The Georgia Colloquium in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century British Literature events

Mon, 12/10/2018 - 1:46pm
Donelle Ruwe is the Associate Chair of English at Northern Arizona University and is the author of British Children’s Poetry in the Romantic Era: Verse, Riddle, and Rhyme (Palgrave Macmillan 2014), the editor of Culturing the Child 1660-1830 (2005), and co-editor of the forthcoming Children, Childhood, and Musical Theater. She has published numerous essays on Romantic poetics, women writers, and children’s writing, and she is currently…
Mon, 10/29/2018 - 11:21am
On October 31st UGA will take part in Frankenreads: an international celebration of the 200th anniversary of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein organized by the Keats-Shelley Association of America and the NEH.  The Colloquium in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Literary is sponsoring a nearly-complete reading of the novel in collaboration with the Main Library, The Willson Center for Humanities and Arts, the Theatre and Film Studies Department, and…
Thu, 10/11/2018 - 2:19pm
Jonathan Sachs is Professor of English at Concordia University in Montreal and Principal Investigator of the Montreal-based Interacting with Print Research Group. His work focuses on British literature from 1750-1850, where his research explores the role of literature in constructing historical and temporal experience, including the uses of antiquity, the anticipation of the future, and practices of reading. His research has been supported by…
Mon, 10/01/2018 - 3:12pm
On October 31st UGA will take part in Frankenreads: an international celebration of the 200th anniversary of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein organized by the Keats-Shelley Association of America and the NEH.  The Colloquium in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Literary is sponsoring a nearly-complete reading of the novel in collaboration with the Main Library, The Willson Center for Humanities and Arts, the Theatre and Film Studies Department, and…
Thu, 07/19/2018 - 3:25pm
This talk looks at how handmade artifacts enabled connections with British colonial spaces in imaginative, material, and tactile ways. It examines objects created by women that made use of a mixture of global sources for their material composition and visual inspiration. What kind of alternative stories of empire are told through intercultural crafts? And what tales might unfold around handheld objects in British novels set in the eighteenth-…
Wed, 04/18/2018 - 3:11pm
Nick Groom is professor of English literature at the University of Exeter, an author on subjects ranging from the history of the Union Jack to Thomas Chatterton, has edited several books and regularly appears on television, radio and at literary festivals as an authority on English Literature, seasonal customs, J. R. R. Tolkien, the “Gothic” and “British” and “English” identities. Due to his extensive work on the Gothic, especially on the…
Fri, 10/27/2017 - 10:31am
In a 1780 parliamentary speech, “On Economical Reform,” Edmund Burke asserts that the British royal household “has lost all that was stately and venerable in the antique manners, without retrenching anything of the cumbrous charge of a Gothic establishment” and is populated by “grim spectres of departed tyrants—the Saxon, the Norman, and the Dane; the stern Edwards and fierce Henries—who stalk from desolation to desolation, through the dreary…
Fri, 10/27/2017 - 10:29am
The question of how (or why, or whether) to commingle queer theory and ecocriticism has become an urgent concern for many theorists writing in the wake of Timothy Morton’s 2010 PMLA essay “Queer Ecology.” While Greg Garrard, for example, thinks that queer theory needs ecocriticism in order to avoid theoretical bankruptcy and irrelevance, Jordy Rosenberg argues exactly the opposite, warning that certain versions of eco-theory are guilty of…
Fri, 10/27/2017 - 10:25am
A number of contemporary digital media works, such as Lisa Reihana’s installation “In Pursuit of Venus [infected]/Emissaries” (2015-2017) and Tracy Fullerton’s video game “Walden” (2017), have returned to panoramic strategies of representation to reimagine totalizing and seemingly transcendent concepts like empire and nature. Reihana’s and Fullerton’s approaches are partially archival, drawing directly on printed works produced during the late…