All Upcoming Events
Tuesday, March 31 4:45 PM

Workshop: ModSquad Works-in-Progress

Alexandra Edwards (PhD student, English) and Laura Lake Smith (PhD student, Art History) will give brief presentations followed by discussion and critical feedback on their PhD research. Papers will be pre-circulated via the Interdisciplinary Modernisms eLC site. To join the eLC list, please contact Erin McClenathan, emcclena@uga.edu. The discussion will take place at the new Willson Center House, 4:45-6:00.

Tuesday, March 31 7:00 PM

Creative Writing Program -- Spring Faculty Reading

 

The faculty of the Creative Writing Program cordially invites you to a reading of new and recent work on Tuesday March 31 at 7pm at Cine in Downtown Athens. Featured Readers: LeAnne Howe, Reginald McKnight, Ed Pavlic, Andrew Zawacki, Magdalena Zurawski

 

 

Thursday, April 02 5:00 PM

The Colloquium in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-century British Literature Presents: A Lecture by Danielle Coriale

Park Hall: Room 144

“Social Zoology, A New Species of Literature”

This talk explores a group of critically neglected Victorian sketches known in the period as “social zoologies.” Published in England during the 1830s and 1840s, these sketches parodied contemporary zoological texts, substituting London social types for animal species. In many cases, these texts included dazzling zoomorphic illustrations that fuse humans and animals into a single, ontologically blurry sign. In this talk, I will analyze these provocative sketches, exploring their rich, semiotic textures and the diverse responses they elicited from Victorian reviewers, publishers, illustrators, and novelists including Charles Dickens and William Makepeace Thackeray. In so doing, I uncover a new vector that divided Victorian literature and science—taste. While thousands of readers relished the nimble parodies and titillating animal play in the sketches, many of London’s rising literary elite considered them vulgar or impolite. The final part of my talk will focus on Dickens, who was troubled by this strange new species of literature—a hybrid form that violated the humanness upon which he staked his claim to literary distinction.

Danielle Coriale is Assistant Professor of English at the University of South Carolina. 

This event is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by the Willson Center and the English Department's Rodney Baine Lecture Fund. A reception will follow in the Park Hall Library.

 

 

Thursday, April 02 12:30 PM

“Modernism After Poststructuralism, or Badiou Saved From Drowning”

We are now at least a generation beyond the poststructuralist revolution that transformed  modernist studies in the 1970s and 1980s.  How has the emergence of a new group of contemporary theorists changed our conception of modernism and the interpretative protocols we use to read it?  Prof. Begam examines the theory of Alain Badiou, which moves away from a deconstructive and immanental approach to modernism and toward one that is aesthetically performative and thematically universalist.  In exploring Badiou’s “evental ontology” and its elaboration through mathematics, Prof. Begam considers two of modernism’s central texts: James Joyce’s Ulysses and Samuel Beckett’s Trilogy.

Richard Begam is Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has been a Visiting Professor at Duke University, the University of Düsseldorf and Stockholm University.  He is the author of Samuel Beckett and the End of Modernity (Stanford UP, 1996), co-author of Platonic Occasions: Dialogues on Literature, Art and Culture (Stockholm UP, 2015) and co-editor of Modernism and Colonialism (Duke UP, 2007), Text and Meaning (Düsseldorf UP, 2011) and Modernism, Postcolonialism and Globalism (Oxford UP, forthcoming 2015).  He is completing a book entitled Beckett’s Philosophical Levity.

This lecture is sponsored by the Willson Center, the British Irish Studies Program, and the Interdisciplinary Modernisms Research Cluster. It is free and open to the public. Location: Miller Learning Center Rm. 269.

Monday, April 06 12:15 PM

Graduate Committee meeting

The Committee will meet to consider applications for 6th-year extensions (faculty only for this portion of the meeting) and other business including this year's admissions.  261 Park Hall.

Thursday, April 09 8:00 AM

29th Annual MELUS Conference

UGA is hosting the 29th Annual MELUS Conference (Society for the Study of the Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States) April 9-12. The conference theme is “Arrivals and Departures in U.S. Multi-Ethnic Literatures.” Most sessions will take place in the Classic Center. Keynote speakers will be Harvard Professor Werner Sollors; the novelist Cristina García; and the former Poet Laureate of the United States and alumna of UGA's English department, Emory Professor Natasha Trethewey (AB '89). You can access the conference webpage at melus2015.wordpress.com. Numerous UGA faculty and graduate students will be presenting papers.

Thursday, April 16 4:45 PM

Stephen Ross, Workshop on Interdisciplinary Modernisms and the Digital Humanities

Stephen Ross, Professor of English at the University of Victoria, Editor of the Routledge Encyclopedia of Modernism Online, and 2016 Modernist Studies Association President, will guide a discussion on Interdisciplinary Modernisms and the Digital Humanities at the Willson Center House from 4:45-6:00 p.m. Two essays by Professor Ross on this topic will be pre-circulated via the Interdisciplinary Modernisms eLC site: to be added to the eLC list, please contact Erin McClenathan, emcclena@uga.edu. 

Friday, April 17 10:00 AM

Exhibit, Reception, Opening: Textual Machines

Beginning on FRIDAY APRIL 17 and continuing through the weekend, there will be an exhibit of historical digital texts and technical books, from cipher wheels to Apple 2 and e-readers in the Main Library, co-curated by Jonathan Baillehache and Miriam Jacobson in conjunction with Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscripts Library. 

Friday April 17

Willson Center Digital Humanities Lab, 3rd floor of the Main Library

10 am – Opening of the Textual Machines Exhibit, with refreshments.


Sponsored by the Willson Center. 

organizers:
Jonathan Baillehache (Romance Languages)
Miriam Jacobson (English)
Anne Meyers DeVine (Hargrett Library)

Friday, April 17 10:30 AM

"The Texture of Erasure in Two Book-Objects: Tree of Codes by Jonathan Safran Foer and The Desert by Jen Bervin" (Gwen Le Cor Plenary)

Willson Center Digital Humanities Lab, 3rd floor of the Main Library

 

"The Texture of Erasure in Two Book-Objects: Tree of Codes by Jonathan Safran Foer and The Desert by Jen Bervin," by Gwen Le Cor (University of Paris 8)

Saturday, April 18 10:00 AM

TEXTUAL MACHINES (Symposium on the Book and Digital Arts Faculty Research Cluster)

Graduate Reading Room, 3rd floor of the Main Library

10 – 10:30 am: Reception with refreshments.

10:30 – 10:45 am: Introduction.

  • Opening words by Jonathan Baillehache (Department of Romance Languages, University of Georgia) and Miriam Jacobson (Department of English, University of Georgia)

10:45 – 12:00 am: Keynote address.

  • The Disappearing Book: Media Innovation and the Future of Shared Attention,Keynote Address by Janet Murray (School of Literature, Media, and Communication, Georgia Institute of Technology)

12:00 – 1:30 pm: lunch break. Participants and attendees will find many restaurants downtown, at a walking distance north of the conference location.

1:30 pm – 2:30 pm: Generative Literature. Chair: Jonathan Baillehache.

  • Pentametron and the Digital Vernacular, Eric Rettberg (School of Literature, Media, and Communication, Georgia Institute of Technology)
  • Cyborgs, Algorithms and Common Archives : Procedural Poetry and Software Art in Latin America, Osvaldo Cleger (School of Modern Languages, Georgia Institute of Technology)

2:30 – 3:45 pm: Plenary Talk.

  • Digital Literature in France, Serge Bouchardon (University of Technology of Compiegne)

4:00 – 5:00 pm: Reading through SpaceChairChris Eaket.

  • Imaginative Effort: reassessing immersion and interactivity in digital fiction, Daniela Côrtes Maduro (Center for Portuguese Literature, University of Coimbra).
  • Locating the Silent History in Theory, Practice, and Media, Richard Gibson (Wheaton College).

5:00 – 6:30 pm: Collaborative texts. Chair: Miriam Jacobson.

  • com: Textual Machine, Ari Lieberman (Department of Comparative Literature, University of Georgia)
  • The Letters to X project, Jessica Barness (School of Visual Communication and Design, Kent State University).
  • E-, Free, and Open: The Future of the Textbook in Not in Your Book bag, Lauren Fancher (GALILEO Support Services and Affordable Learning Georgia)



Sponsored by the Willson Center. 

organizers:
Jonathan Baillehache (Romance Languages)
Miriam Jacobson (English)
Anne Meyers DeVine (Hargrett Library)

Saturday, April 18 10:45 AM

The Disappearing Book: Media Innovation and the Future of Shared Attention (Janet Murray Talk)

Janet Murray (School of Literature, Media, and Communication, Georgia Institute of Technology), "The Disappearing Book: Media Innovation and the Future of Shared Attention."

Graduate Reading Room, 3rd floor of the Main Library

Saturday, April 18 2:30 PM

Digital Literature in France (Serge Bouchardon talk)

"Digital Literature in France," Serge Bouchardon, University of Technology of Compiegne.

Graduate Reading Room, 3rd floor of the Main Library

Park Hall Monitor

Park Hall Monitor

There are many changes in the Department of English, and dramatic changes in Park Hall as well.

First, new faces: When Mike Moran retired in June, I became head of the department—not a new face, really, since I arrived at UGA as the Helen S. Lanier Distinguished Professor in 2001. I’m delighted to welcome the department’s first associate chair, Esra Santesso, who barely had time to savor her promotion to associate professor before being plunged into tackling her new administrative duties. Esra is a native of Turkey and a scholar of postcolonial literature. Finally, Richard Menke succeeded Aidan Wasley as undergraduate coordinator. Richard teaches Victorian literature, with a special focus on the modern communications technologies that arose during the nineteenth century and continue to serve as the broad backdrop of all communications today, literary and otherwise. Accompanying Mike Moran into retirement this year was linguistics professor Don McCreary, whose Dawgspeak provided a savvy summation of this institution’s unique contribution to the English language.

Now, the new place: This summer the original wing of Park Hall was a hardhat zone, swarming with construction workers, engineers, and electricians laboring under a deadline to complete renovations before classes resumed in August. They met the deadline, leaving staff and cleaning crews one long weekend to transform a worksite into some semblance of Park Hall as generations had come to know it. The gains are immediately apparent. Thanks to university-wide green initiatives in infrastructure, we now have motion-sensitive lights in all the classrooms and offices (in the “old” wing), as well as a completely new cooling/heating system. Gone are the days of opening windows in winter to cool off an overheated classroom, and wearing a parka to class in fall term to compensate for the arctic blast from an ancient AC system. (Gone, too, are the days before air conditioning, when faculty competed for 8 a.m. teaching slots in the basement to avoid the standing temperature of 115 degrees on the second floor. This astonishing historical anecdote comes from Mary Hutcherson, an alumna whose generous gift to the department is profiled below.) Please stop by the newly renovated Park Hall if you’re on campus. It’s an iconic landmark of UGA with newly tweaked innards and a configuration of offices that offers, among other bonuses, an undergraduate lounge.

It’s my pleasure now to turn to another topic, one as consequential as Park Hall itself. It is thanks to the vision and generosity of donors that the Department of English encompasses such a wide range of dedicated teachers, sterling scholars, and inspiring students. I want to briefly profile a few of the endowments that continue to contribute so much to Park Hall.

The Martha Munn Bedingfield Teaching Award, established by English alum Laura Bedingfield Herakovich in honor of her grandmother, was presented to Dr. Barbara McCaskill last spring.  The award gave her a vital opportunity to conduct archival research for her latest book. The Bedingfield award, writes Barbara, “is special to me because it recognizes the value of my teaching from my colleagues, whose own excellence in the classroom I have sought to emulate over the years.” Previous recipients of the award are Susan Rosenbaum and Roxanne Eberle.

The Jane McMullan Academic Support Fund was established in 2006 by John and Marilyn McMullan in loving memory of sister Jane (AB ’53; MA ’58); Jane joined the staff of Georgia Senator Richard B. Russell, Jr., who appointed her to the staff of the Senate Appropriations Committee. This endowment has provided critical support to the professional development of both undergraduate and graduate students, including conference travel and funding for innovative projects benefiting the department at large.

I also want to express gratitude for two new funds that greatly enhance our ability to attract, recruit, and support talented, ambitious English students.  

In spring of 2014, the Alice C. Langdale Graduate Award in English was established. Alice received her bachelor’s degree in English in 1940. She and her husband, Dr. Noah N. Langdale, Jr. were lifelong champions of higher education in their roles as the first lady and president, respectively, of Georgia State University from 1957 to 1988. An apt tribute named for a remarkable student and campus leader, the Alice C. Langdale award will recognize outstanding graduate students in the department of English.

In December  of 2013, Mary Denmark Hutcherson (AB ’52 magna cum laude) established the H. Grady Hutcherson Memorial Georgia Access Scholarship in English.  One of the largest endowments to the department, this need-based scholarship opens the door to education at UGA. It also honors Mary’s late husband Grady (BSED ’49, MA ’51) who served the English Department for decades as a dedicated teacher and undergraduate advisor.

The Langdale and the Hutcherson awards will be presented for the first time in 2015, and I look forward to sharing news of the inaugural recipients in the next newsletter. The generous loyalty of alumni like these and other benefactors is essential to the continued excellence of our department and the caliber of our students. We all benefit — teachers and students alike — from such magnanimity. To those of you who are not yet benefactors, let me inspire you in closing with these lines from William Butler Yeats:

 

Look up in the sun’s eye and give

What the exultant heart calls good

That some new day may breed the best

Because you gave ...

… the right twigs for an eagle’s nest!

 

From assorted twigs to a whole trunk, please consider the greater good that a culture of giving can attain. Please come see me in Park 134: I would be glad to welcome anyone who cherishes memories of this “eagle’s nest.”

- Jed Rasula

For more, please read the latest version of the Park Hall Monitor, the department's newsletter.

29th Annual MELUS Conference
29th Annual MELUS Conference

UGA is hosting the 29th Annual MELUS Conference (Society for the Study of the Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States) April 9-12. The conference theme is “Arrivals and Departures in U.S. Multi-Ethnic Literatures.” Most sessions will take place in the Classic Center. Keynote speakers will be Harvard Professor Werner Sollors; the novelist Cristina García; and the former Poet Laureate of the United States and alumna of UGA's English department, Emory Professor Natasha Trethewey (AB '89). You can access the conference webpage at melus2015.wordpress.com. Numerous UGA faculty and graduate students will be presenting papers, and we urge all of you to attend as many sessions as possible. Mark your calendars now!

Ed Pavlić
Ed Pavlić

The National Poetry Series recently announced the five winners of its 2014 Open Competition, which included Let’s Let That Are Not Yet: Inferno by the University of Georgia’s Ed Pavlić, a professor of English and creative writing in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences.

The National Poetry Series arranges publication of the winning books, scheduled to be released in summer 2015. The prize also includes a cash award, which has been raised to $10,000 from $1,000 thanks to a grant from the Lannan Foundation, which has awarded literary prizes since 1989.

About 1,200 manuscripts are entered for the open competition each year.

“Since the late 1970s, arguably more than any other American literary institution, the National Poetry Series has helped produce and publicize a portrait of our culture’s real diversity, which is also its actuality,” Pavlić said. “In a culture in which evidence, everywhere, seems designed, chillingly, to prove that all power is financial power and that all news is, at bottom, financial news, the Lannan Foundation’s generous support of the NPS supports one crucial – at times seemingly powerless – need of the culture: that it be empowered, in ways against itself, for itself.”

Pavlić is the author of six volumes of poetry and criticism, including Visiting Hours at the Color Line (National Poetry Series, Milkweed Editions, 2013), But Here Are Small Clear Refractions (Achebe Center, 2009; Kwani Trust, 2013) and Winners Have Yet to be Announced: A Song for Donny Hathaway (UGA Press, 2008). Among his current projects are two book-length manuscripts concerning the life and work of James Baldwin.

Let’s Let That Are Not Yet: Inferno will be published by Fence Books. Visiting Hours at the Color Line, also a NPS selection in 2012, was published in 2013.

Pavlić said on the award and the new book, “The gift is always that the work finds its way, by whatever unthinkable route, onto the page and then, against even more dubious odds, into the world.”

- by Alan Flurry, Director of Communications, Franklin College, UGA