All Upcoming Events
Thursday, February 11 12:30 PM

Write@UGA: Igniting Writing

MLC Reading Room

This event will feature UGA writing programs in five-minute ignite sessions. Over lunch, attendees will hear presentations from the various writing initiatives on campus and how they build writing-related knowledge and skills. Students can discover ways to support their writing, and faculty can hear about programs that support teaching writing across the curriculum.

Sponsored by the Writing Intensive Program, CTL Writing Fellows, Grady Sports Media, Grady College Department of Journalism, and First Year Composition.

Register here: https://ugeorgia.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_8wQ0xo0n2p3lG9D

Thursday, February 11 8:00 PM

Dada Centennial: Visiting artist Luciano Chessa

For UGA’s Dada Centennial, a series of events will be held to celebrate Dada, an artistic phenomenon that began in February 1916 at the Cabaret Voltaire in Zurich, Switzerland and spread around the world! On the 11th, the Flicker Theatre & Bar will transform into Cabaret Voltaire 1916 with a performance by visiting artist Luciano Chessa, reenactments by students in music and theatre and film studies, and a presentation by Jed Rasula, Helen S. Lanier Chair of the Department of English and author of “Destruction Was My Beatrice,” the globe-spanning narrative of Dada published in 2015.

Ideas for Creative Exploration (ICE) and the English Department are pleased to present three evenings of performance and scholarship in celebration of the centennial year of Dada and experimental art for all time.  This event is free and open to the public.  For more information, see the ICE website

Friday, February 12 12:15 PM

Graduate Committee Meeting

Graduate Committee Meeting

Monday, February 15 8:00 AM

Write@UGA: Write-ins

CTL North Instructional Plaza

Write-In sessions are regularly scheduled events that offer faculty members, staff, and graduate students the opportunity to focus and work on their writing in a designated space that is not their home or office, away from their other responsibilities and demands on their time.  At each meeting, participants will have access to a quiet place to work, refreshments, and additional writing assistance, if desired. At the end of each session, participants are invited to socialize and build community informally.

No registration required.

Sponsored by the Office of the Vice-President for Research and the UGA Writing Intensive Program.

Tuesday, February 16 4:00 PM

Write@UGA: Write-ins

CTL North Instructional Plaza

Write-In sessions are regularly scheduled events that offer faculty members, staff, and graduate students the opportunity to focus and work on their writing in a designated space that is not their home or office, away from their other responsibilities and demands on their time.  At each meeting, participants will have access to a quiet place to work, refreshments, and additional writing assistance, if desired. At the end of each session, participants are invited to socialize and build community informally.

No registration required.

Sponsored by the Office of the Vice-President for Research and the UGA Writing Intensive Program.

Wednesday, February 17 12:15 PM

Graduate Faculty Meeting

Park 144, Graduate Faculty Meeting

Wednesday, February 17 2:00 PM

Write@UGA: WriteXhibit

MLC Rotunda

This event will offer the entire UGA community the opportunity to learn about journals and magazines published at UGA and edited by UGA faculty, staff, and students. Meet editors, and find out how you can get involved or published.

No registration required.

Sponsored by the UGA Press, the Jellyfish Magazine, and the PreMed Magazine.

Thursday, February 18 8:00 PM

Dada Centennial: The Sun Ra Arkestra

For UGA’s Dada Centennial, a series of events will be held to celebrate Dada, an artistic phenomenon that began in February 1916 at the Cabaret Voltaire in Zurich, Switzerland and spread around the world!  On the 18th, The Sun Ra Arkestra will perform at The Morton Theatre.  Tickets are available online

The spirit of famed jazz musician, composer, poet, and bandleader Sun Ra is alive and well in the present day manifestation of the Sun Ra Arkestra under the direction of Marshall Allen, featuring a mix of classic Sun Ra big-band compositions and arrangements alongside Allen’s own compositions and arrangements that are deeply rooted in the spirit of Sun Ra.

This historic evening at the Morton Theatre will commence with a rare performance by Athens’ own Flicker Orchestra, which provides live music for classic silent films.

Ideas for Creative Exploration (ICE) and the English Department are pleased to present three evenings of performance and scholarship in celebration of the centennial year of Dada and experimental art for all time.  Tickets for the Sun Ra Arkestra are $15.  For more information, see the ICE website

Monday, February 22 8:00 AM

Write@UGA: Write-ins

CTL North Instructional Plaza

Write-In sessions are regularly scheduled events that offer faculty members, staff, and graduate students the opportunity to focus and work on their writing in a designated space that is not their home or office, away from their other responsibilities and demands on their time.  At each meeting, participants will have access to a quiet place to work, refreshments, and additional writing assistance, if desired. At the end of each session, participants are invited to socialize and build community informally.

No registration required.

Sponsored by the Office of the Vice-President for Research and the UGA Writing Intensive Program.

Tuesday, February 23 1:30 PM

Elizabeth Wardle, "Teaching for Transfer: How Can We Help Students Use What They Know About Writing?"

MLC Reading Room

This workshop is designed to help faculty and teaching assistants understand how transfer works or doesn’t work in their classrooms. Teachers are frequently frustrated by the fact that students seem to forget what they've learned, not see it as relevant, or apply it inappropriately when they encounter new writing challenges. The problem is that students don’t know how to productively engage what they have already learned to facilitate learning and performance in new and different contexts. In particular, this workshop will focus on transfer as it pertains to students' ability to use what they already know about writing when completing new and challenging writing tasks. Faculty who teach with writing will learn how to build on students’ prior writing-related knowledge and experiences. Workshop participants will also identify where students struggle to usefully transfer prior knowledge and develop strategies to intervene during moments of struggle. Finally, participants will explore next steps for encouraging transfer across courses and programs.

Co-sponsored by the English Department, Office of the Vice-President for Instruction, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, and the UGA Writing Intensive Program.

Register here: https://ugeorgia.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_6DXi1RQVmg0SRpP

Tuesday, February 23 10:00 AM

Elizabeth Wardle, "Problem-Solving with Prior Knowledge: Influences, Affordances, and Constraints"

271 Russell Special Collections Library

The tendency students have to isolate learning experiences has long been a source of frustration for faculty. Students struggle to use skills and knowledge from one semester to the next, from one course to the next, from one writing task to the next. Researchers refer to the inability to make connections among learning contexts as the problem of “transfer.” A growing body of scholarship attends to this real and felt problem by looking for ways to facilitate transfer in the classroom. More specifically, writing studies scholars are interested in considering how writing skills, concepts, heuristics, and processes translate from course to course and writing assignment to writing assignment.

This talk will draw on two longitudinal studies of student writing to explore variables that impact students’ abilities to transfer and use prior knowledge in new writing tasks, such as engagement, dispositions, and identity. The lecture will conclude with specific suggestions regarding how faculty can assist students in usefully transferring prior knowledge to enhance learning, motivation, and performance.

Elizabeth Wardle is professor and chair of writing and rhetoric at the University of Central Florida. She has directed the writing program there and at the University of Dayton, which contributed to her ongoing interest in how learners use and transfer prior knowledge about writing, and how courses and programs can best help students learn to write more effectively. She regularly gives talks and workshops around the U.S. on how threshold concepts and knowledge about writing and knowledge transfer can be used to strengthen writing courses and programs. Her most recent publication is Naming What We Know: Threshold Concepts of Writing Studies (Utah State University Press 2015), with Linda Adler-Kassner.

Co-sponsored by the English Department, Office of the Vice-President for Instruction, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, and the UGA Writing Intensive Program.

Register here: https://ugeorgia.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_3qGK374o6xmIgMB

 

Tuesday, February 23 4:00 PM

Write@UGA: Write-ins

CTL North Instructional Plaza

Write-In sessions are regularly scheduled events that offer faculty members, staff, and graduate students the opportunity to focus and work on their writing in a designated space that is not their home or office, away from their other responsibilities and demands on their time.  At each meeting, participants will have access to a quiet place to work, refreshments, and additional writing assistance, if desired. At the end of each session, participants are invited to socialize and build community informally.

No registration required.

Sponsored by the Office of the Vice-President for Research and the UGA Writing Intensive Program.

Thursday, February 25 8:00 PM

Dada Centennial: Visiting artist Bruce Andrews

For UGA’s Dada Centennial, a series of events will be held to celebrate Dada, an artistic phenomenon that began in February 1916 at the Cabaret Voltaire in Zurich, Switzerland and spread around the world! On the 25th, we return to Flicker Theatre & Bar for an evening of new works with visiting artist Bruce Andrews, students from art, music, and theatre and film studies, and the extraordinary Mind Brains!

Ideas for Creative Exploration (ICE) and the English Department are pleased to present three evenings of performance and scholarship in celebration of the centennial year of Dada and experimental art for all time.  This event is free and open to the public.  For more information, see the ICE website.

Thursday, February 25 6:30 PM

"I Have a Debt to Be Mindful Of": "Lovable Racists" in the Film "12 Years a Slave"

Professor Ikard’s talk treats the film 12 Years a Slave as a historical corrective text vis-a-vis its 19th century, ghostwritten namesake. Focusing on the variables of authorship which shaped the politics of Solomon Northup’s narrative, including the desire by the white ghostwriter David Wilson to pimp the narrative to acquire fame and fortune, Ikard questions the popular receptivity of the slave narrative as representative of Northup’s perspective. He exposes what he calls “loveable racist” tropes in the form of benevolent white slave masters that pervade the slave narrative and conspicuously undermine Northop’s otherwise bold critique of white supremacist pathology. Ikard then shows how the film version operates at crucial turns as a corrective historical apparatus, literally and figuratively de-romanticizing the “lovable racist” trope and exposing the white supremacist pathological mindset out of which the trope derives. What will become clear are the limits of white anti-racist liberalism in the post-bellum era and why such corrective historical interventions like the film are desperately needed to comprehend the complexity of black humanity (past and present), if not also the tenacity and depth of white supremacist pathology.

The location of the lecture: Zell B. Miller Learning Center, Room 213. This event is part of the English Department's Ballew Lecture Series and is sponsored by the President's Venture Fund. Dr. Ikard's visit to UGA is hosted by the Creative Writing Program and the Institute for African American Studies. The event is free and open to the public. 

Monday, February 29 8:00 AM

Write@UGA: Write-ins

CTL North Instructional Plaza

Write-In sessions are regularly scheduled events that offer faculty members, staff, and graduate students the opportunity to focus and work on their writing in a designated space that is not their home or office, away from their other responsibilities and demands on their time.  At each meeting, participants will have access to a quiet place to work, refreshments, and additional writing assistance, if desired. At the end of each session, participants are invited to socialize and build community informally.

No registration required.

Sponsored by the Office of the Vice-President for Research and the UGA Writing Intensive Program.

Tuesday, March 01 4:00 PM

Write@UGA: Write-ins

CTL North Instructional Plaza

Write-In sessions are regularly scheduled events that offer faculty members, staff, and graduate students the opportunity to focus and work on their writing in a designated space that is not their home or office, away from their other responsibilities and demands on their time.  At each meeting, participants will have access to a quiet place to work, refreshments, and additional writing assistance, if desired. At the end of each session, participants are invited to socialize and build community informally.

No registration required.

Sponsored by the Office of the Vice-President for Research and the UGA Writing Intensive Program.

Park Hall Monitor

Park Hall Monitor

Jed Rasula - Dept HeadThese are said to be daunting times for the humanities. Scarcely a day goes by, it seems, without an article in a major news media outlet tracking the flight of students from liberal arts to business schools and STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering, math). The escalating cost of higher education is just one of many factors pressuring students and their families to regard college education as a job-placement service. Universities are under increasing pressure to make themselves over as vocational schools, something that used to be reserved for those who couldn’t make it into college in the first place. The liberal arts have traditionally been the forum for experiencing the timeless verities on which civilization was founded. So what does it mean when times change, and the humanities are expected to change with the times? Does it mean those putative truths are expendable? That the legacy of the arts was just empty rhetoric? And that the humanities are an unaffordable distraction? Some would have you believe so.

 

But I’ve heard the CEO of a corporation confess that he’d rather hire English majors than students with an M.B.A. Why? Because, he said, English majors know how to communicate effectively, orally and in writing, and they’re capable of critical thinking. An alert, well-rounded mind trumps the dutiful trainee. The wide world of work far exceeds the command-control needs of a combat operation. It turns out that the most needed workers are those who possess the old skills honed by the liberal arts.

 

But what kind of jobs can you get? This question repeats itself in the public sphere with the tenacity of a bulldog. Well, the answer is just about anything under the sun. A degree in English is a roundhouse, propelling career-potential in every direction. It’s thought that in English we read books. True. But what do we read in those books? We read situations, we read human character, we read the sticky complexity of worlds exactly like our world, where solutions never come easily, where desires are only fleetingly gratified, and in which solving problems is necessary.

 

The English department at Harvard University provides a pie chart showing where its graduates have found careers. The profile closely matches UGA’s results, and probably those of most English departments around the country. Here’s the breakdown: education 17%, law 16%, media 11%, arts/entertainment 11%, business 10%, finance 8%, publishing 7%, health services 6%, nonprofit 5%, computer/IT 3%, government 2%, and “other” 4%. It’s edifying, to be sure, when our students follow a similar career path and end up as professors themselves. But few do, so we relish it when someone from long ago pops up with a cherished memory of reading The Sound and the Fury or King Lear, tangling with Beowulf or a poem by Emily Dickinson—and then discloses the unimaginable career tangents that this student has been embarked on through the decades.

 

Now, more than ever, the sense of history and the ethical framework of civic virtues are at risk of becoming an afterthought in a milieu dominated by means-ends calculations. But because the books we read in English are documents of human lives and societies across a range of times and places, these needed components of citizenship are uniquely ours to offer. A degree in English is a genuine education, and a timely reminder that education is more than vocational training.

 

Jed Rasula, Department Head

For more, please read the latest version of the Park Hall Monitor, the department's newsletter.

Write@UGA
Write@UGA

Write@UGA is a month-long celebration of writing during February.  For more information, see the website.

Borrowers and Lenders
Borrowers and Lenders

Borrowers and Lenders, winner of the CELJ Best New Journal Award in 2007, is a peer-reviewed, online, multimedia Shakespeare journal (http://www.borrowers.uga.edu). The journal is indexed in the MLA BibliographyWorld Shakespeare Bibliography, and other databases.

General Editors: Christy Desmet and Sujata Iyengar, University of Georgia
Associate Editor: Robert Sawyer, East Tennessee State University