Write/Writing -- All Fields


Last updated: 2006-11-06 11:29:20.867

FullCourseIdCourseTitleDescriptionCourseObjectivesTopicalOutline
AAEC 3020Analysis of Agribusiness and Natural Resource IssuesResearch applications using Microsoft Office suite for real world economic problem solving in agribusiness and natural resource areas. Development of research proposal, hypothesis formation, data collection and analysis, written paper and visual presentation. Emphasis on written, analytical, and presentation skills development by student teams with Word, Excel, Access, and Powerpoint.Course objective is to teach basic methods of economic analysis with topical applications in agribusiness or natural resource management. By the end of the term, you should be able to: 1) develop an economic explanation of some facet of agribusiness or natural resource management, 2) locate and download relevant data from the Internet into a spreadsheet, 3) conduct graphical and statistical analysis of the data, 4) prepare written and oral analysis of the results, and 5) present the results to other researchers.I. Identifying researchable topics II. Drafting a research proposal and testable hypotheses III. Finding and downloading Internet data IV. Analyzing data to answer research questions V. Writing a research report VI. Preparing and giving a research presentation
AAEC 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.
AAEC 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
ACAE(ENGL) 0097Fundamentals of Effective WritingCovers major sentence and syntax errors and basic organization of paragraphs and short narrative and expository papers. Writing topics include personal and expository topics. Emphasis on drafting and revising.The primary objective of the course is to prepare students for ACAE (ENGL) 0099. To that end, students will learn to use pre-writing and invention strategies to generate content appropriate for developing short essays (300-500 words) based on personal experience and observation; learn to integrate information from secondary sources into their own papers; learn to organize coherent, unified paragraphs and essays; and learn to proofread and edit sentences for basic clarity and mechanical and grammatical correctness.-Qualities of effective college-level writing -Invention and pre-writing strategies -Common modes of expository discourse -Achieving clarity: principles of unity and coherence -Achieving clarity: proofreading, mechanics, and grammar -Using secondary sources (paraphrasing and quoting) To practice these principles and skills, students will write a number of short essays (300-500 words) and/or extended paragraphs (125-300 words), some of which will be revised.
ACAE(ENGL) 0098Basic Composition for Multilingual WritersFor multilingual students only. Course covers elements of effective style, careful proofreading, logical organization, and convincing development of expository and persuasive essays. Emphasis on problems multilingual students typically experience with proofreading, revision, and writing for an American academic audience.Students will be able to write American-style thesis-support essays of 500-700 words. They will have mastered English sentence-structure and word-order, verb form, idioms, and grammar to the extent that their writing can be easily understood by American readers. They will have made progress toward achieving a college-level English vocabulary.-Grammar topics: o Verbs: tenses, modals, use of passive o Nouns: singular and plural, count and non-count, possessives o Articles o Pronouns o English sentence structure, sentence order, and sentence boundaries o Connectors, conjunctions, and transitions o Noun clauses and adjective clauses o Gerunds and infinitives o Parallel structures o Conditional sentences -Composing paragraphs (topic sentences, development, unity, coherence) -Composing short expository and argument essays (500-700 words) (approximately four during the semester) -Vocabulary development (approximately ten vocabulary assignments)
ACAE(ENGL) 0099Basic Written CompositionCovers elements of effective style, careful proofreading, logical organization, and convincing development of college-length expository and persuasive essays. Emphasis on proofreading, revision, and analytic and interpretive thinking and writing.Students will be able to compose well-developed essays of 500-600 words; to organize their essays in a logical, coherent arrangement that fits the assignment, intended audience, and the writer's purpose; to select appropriate supportive information from assigned readings and be able to incorporate paraphrased and quoted passages into their own papers without plagiarizing; to edit and proofread their papers to the degree that students are unlikely to earn editing failure grades on ENGL 1101 papers.-Pre-writing strategies -Quoting and paraphrasing -Proofreading, mechanics, and grammar, with a focus on the editorial failure errors of ENGL 1101 -Effective organization of an essay -Effective content (providing evidence, selecting evidence from reading) Students write six to eight essays (including revisions), applying the principles taught in the course.
ACAE(ENGL) 0099LDevelopmental Studies English LaboratoryClassroom and individualized instruction to prepare students for the English Collegiate Placement Exam and Exit Writing Sample; both are required criteria for Basic Written Composition.-To prepare Developmental Studies English students to pass the Collegiate Placement Exam. -To prepare Developmental Studies English students to pass the Exit Writing Sample.-Review of Regents Developmental Studies Requirements -Collegiate Placement Exam instruction -Exit Writing Sample instruction -Testing (Collegiate Placement Exam and Exit Writing Sample)
ACAR(READ) 0099LPreparation for the COMPASSComputer instruction on reading rate and test preparation for COMPASS.· Students will develop strategies for taking the Collegiate Placement Examination (CPE). · Students will develop strategies to identify the main idea of paragraphs and passages. · Students will develop strategies to determine the meaning of words. · Students will develop strategies to answer literal comprehension questions. · Students will develop strategies to answer inferential comprehension questions. · Students will develop strategies to answer questions that require analysis of an author's writing style. · Students will develop strategies to determine facts from opinions. · Students will develop strategies to increase their reading rate.· Type of questions on the Collegiate Placement Examination (CPE) · Developing an approach for taking the Collegiate Placement Examination CPE) · Scanning for information · Analyzing questions and linking the passage to the questions · Main ideas of a paragraph and a passage · Supporting details · Vocabulary · Literal and Inferential Comprehension · Analysis of author's writing style in paragraphs and passages · Increasing reading rate
ACCT 5710Professional Accounting IAreas of accounting emphasis and their pertinence to alternative accounting careers. Written assignments and discussion with speakers used to enhance communication skills.To acquaint students with alternative career paths in accounting, to prepare students for the initial job search, to enhance students' writing skills, and to familiarize students with accounting issues faced by practitioners.1. How to succeed in the accounting program 2. Developing leadership skills 3. Developing professional writing skills (3-4 weeks) 4. Writing a resume 5. Preparing for interviewing 6. Learning about opportunities in accounting (6-7 guest speakers)
ACCT 5720Professional Accounting IIA continuation of Professional Accounting I with increased emphasis on application of business technology.To acquaint students with alternative career paths in accounting, to prepare students for the initial job search, to enhance students' spreadsheet skills, and to familiarize students with accounting issues faced by practitioners.1. How to succeed in the accounting program 2. Developing leadership skills 3. Developing spreadsheet skills (3-4 weeks) 4. Writing a resume 5. Preparing for interviewing 6. Learning about opportunities in accounting (6-7 guest speakers)
ACCT 5800/7800Internship/Cooperative EducationApplied professional experience or experience with the profession in another culture.To provide students with applied professional experience or experience with the profession in another culture, to provide students the opportunity to apply their accounting knowledge to a real-world business problem.1. Developing teamwork and leadership skills 2. Developing professional writing skills 3. Participating in accounting in an actual business setting 4. Identifying accounting-related issues in actual business settings 5. Analyzing and proposing solutions to real-world issues
ACCT 7600Financial Statement AnalysisBasic techniques, research methods, strengths, and limitations of financial statement analysis. Computer analysis of financial data to predict earnings and other financial ratios. Use of these techniques to value equity securities and to predict takeover targets, future debt ratings, and bankruptcies.Students will learn how the measurement and presentation of financial data affect the perceptions of investors, lenders, and other stakeholders concerning firm liquidity, solvency, profitability, and value. To better understand financial performance, students will apply techniques such as ratio analysis, pro forma financial statements, discounted cash flows and accounting-based valuation models to real-world cases selected to illustrate concepts in the course. The course format will be a mixture of lectures and case discussions. Performance on homework, case write-ups, two examinations, class participation and discussion, and a report on the financial analysis and equity valuation of a selected company will be used to measure student achievement in the course.1. Overview of Financial Statement Analysis 2. The Firm's Life Cycle and Income Flows versus Cash Flows 3. Profitability and Risk Analysis 4. Identifying Relevant Financial Data for Analysis 5. Income Recognition and Asset Valuation 6. Liability and Expense Recognition 7. Accounting for Intercorporate Entities 8. Case Studies in Profitability Analysis 9. Risk Analysis 10. Developing Pro Forma Financial Statements 11. Valuation Techniques
ACCT 7651Forensic Accounting and Fraud ExaminationA survey of the rapidly developing and increasingly relevant discipline of forensic accounting. Students will develop increased awareness of fraud in businesses, the circumstances in which it arises, techniques for detecting, measuring and preventing fraud, and skills needed to help in the eventual resolution of discovered frauds.1.To introduce students to forensic accounting. 2.To give students hands-on experience with investigating fraud using auditing, accounting information systems, and web-based investigative exercises. 3.To give students experience in writing investigation reports and presenting oral reports.• Seriousness of Fraud in the Accounting Profession • The Role of Sarbanes Oxley and SAS No. 99 • Elements of Fraud • Fraud Categories, Fraud Definitions, and Schemes • Psychology of Fraud • Understanding a Firm’s Industry • Fraud Symptoms and General Detection • The Role of Internal Controls • The Role of Effective Governance and Oversight • Fraud Investigation: Evidence Collection
ACCT 9030Conducting Empirical Studies in Accounting ResearchDoctoral students learn how to access the primary databases that support capital markets research in accounting, using the SAS programming language. Students apply skills acquired in the course, replicating a published empirical accounting study under the instructor's supervision.·Achieve adequate proficiency using the SAS programming language to replicate an empirical study in accounting research. ·Develop the understanding and skills to manipulate and maintain data and source language files on a UNIX based file server. ·Learn how to access and retrieve data from three major databases (CRSP, COMPUSTAT, and IBES) maintained on the remote Wharton WRDS file server. ·Learn how to merge data from major databases in accounting research, how to select specific records from the data, and how to perform routine statistical analyses on the data. ·Learn how to craft a research working paper, using familiar word processing and spreadsheet software, and the replicated empirical study as the focus for the presenatation.The following list of topics, although not exhaustive, is indicative of ideas that will be covered in this course. ·The basics of the SAS data step. ·Using SAS data steps to read in data, merge data, and subset data. ·Using mainstream SAS procedures to manipulate and analyze data. ·Learning how to de-bug SAS source code. ·An introduction to the UNIX operating system. ·Communicating with UNIX based file servers using the SSH Secure Shell communications program. ·Using the SSH File Transfer program to explore, manipulate, upload and download files and directories on a UNIX file server. ·Installing and using X-Windowing software on a personal computer to communicate with SAS programming software residing on a UNIX based server using a windowing environment. ·Communicating with, and exploiting the resources on, the Wharton WRDS server. ·Selecting and downloading CRSP, COMPUSTAT, and IBES data from the Wharton WRDS server to a local server or PC. ·How to merge data extracted from the CRSP, COMPUSTAT, and IBES databases. ·Learning how to create visually pleasing, and informative, tables in a research study. ·How to organize, write, and present findings in a research report that meets the norms of publication in accounting research. ·Replication of a published empirical study in accounting research under the supervision of the instructor.
ACCT 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.To acquaint students with dissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.Independent research and preparation of the doctoral dissertation.
ADPR 3110Advertising Message StrategyStrategy and execution of advertising copy and layout. Study of solutions of advertising/marketing communication problems through preparation of advertisements for a variety of media. to a more executional emphasis. During the second portion of the semester, you will learn to successfully manipulate the physical building blocks of a clear, concise ad execution: headlines, visuals, copy, design elements, layout formats, as well as writing guidelines for electronic media such as television and radio, direct response, and retail.What Does It Take to Make Good Advertising? Objectives vs Strategy vs Execution What Makes Up a Strategy? Ð Product, Consumer, Marketplace Researching Your Product; Knowing Your Brand Understanding the Consumer; Insight; Needs; Personality Evaluating the Marketplace; Segmentation Writing the Strategy Statement; Creative Briefs Kinds of Strategies, Using Strategies Headlines and Visuals Body Copy Graphic Design Elements; Layout Formats Writing for the Electronic Media-Television and Radio Writing for Direct Response, Outdoor and New Media Developing Successful Advertising Campaigns
ADPR 5710Advertising and Communication ManagementManagerial and decision making processes of advertising and related marketing communication functions. Emphasis on determining opportunities, integrating with other elements of the promotion mix, setting objectives, establishing budgets, and measuring advertising and communication effectiveness.Advertising and Communications Management is designed to enhance your knowledge of advertising strategy and decision making. The course focuses on the role of planning and decision making within the marketing mix and within integrated marketing communication. It views decision making largely from the advertiser's perspective, rather than the perspective of the advertising agency. Thus, it tends to emphasize top marketing management issues, including budgeting decisions. While many class meetings use the lecture/discussion format, others employ comprehensive case discussions. It is assumed that you already have some understanding of advertising planning: objective-setting, message creation, media, and research. However, these topics will be reviewed and thoroughly explored in the context of other marketing communication areas such as sales promotion, public relations, point-of purchase, and branding. Chapter assignments, readings, and specific cases encompass all these broader areas of marketing communication. All cases should be prepared in advance of class discussion, while written cases are typically assigned to planning teams who write a report as well as lead the discussion. Class discussion of course topics is an important element, with the goal of integrating concepts with applications.Corporate and integrated marketing concepts Evaluating advertising opportunity Objective setting Budgeting methods/advertising response functions Creative decisions and management Media planning and decision-making Research decisions/evaluating advertising effectiveness Agency-client relations Social responsibility/ethics/regulation
ADPR 5740/7740Advertising and Communication CampaignsManagerial and decision making processes in simulated situations with student groups functioning as advertising agencies to plan, implement, and manage advertising and communication campaigns for assigned clients.This course is designed to give students an integrated and comprehensive learning experience in advertising and promotion decision making. Working in teams, students will approach the problem as an advertising agency would work for a client. By the end of the course, each team will: l.Analyze marketing/advertising problems accurately, based on a thorough situation analysis. 2.Determine a realistic marketing, advertising, and promotion strategy. 3.Set realistic advertising and promotion objectives and budgets. 4.Plan effective communication message/media/budgeting strategies and tactics that solve well-defined problems. 5.Develop and test message executions to determine if they communicate effectively with target markets. 6.Plan and prepare media programs to reach target audiences efficiently and effectively. 7.Determine optimum advertising and promotion budgets. 8.Specify appropriate means to evaluate and control advertising/marketing programs. 9.Write a comprehensive report and make a formal oral presentation.Week 1 Introduction Problem Assignment Week 2 Group Assignment Situation Analysis Week 3 Situation Analysis Business Plan Week 4 Marketing Strategy Objective Setting Week 5 Advertising Strategy Objective Setting Week 6 Creative Strategy Promotion Strategy Thinking out of the box Week 7 Creative Strategy Promotion Considerations Creative Development Media Plan Development Week 8 Creative Development Media and Promotion Planning Week 9 Finalize Media Plan Evaluation Plan Finalize Creative Week 10 Finalize Plans Book Week 11 Plans Book Due by 12:00 noon Week 12 Final Presentations, will begin between 5:00-6:00 p.m. depending on room availability and will run up until 10:30- 11:00p.m. that evening. Week 13 Critique of Presentation and Plans Books Week 14 All teams working to revise winning Plans Book Week 15 Two copies of all revised Plans Books are due at 12:00 noon Week 11 Creative Development Media and Promotion Planning
ADPR 5790Advertising Portfolio SeminarStudent production and development of an advertising portfolio of their best creative work with emphasis on both verbal and visual skills.Advertising Portfolio Seminar is an advanced course structured as an intensive creative class with a concentration on combining both verbal and visual aspects of advertising communication. Strong emphasis is placed on individual student projects. These projects are in the form of a professional portfolio of the students very best creative efforts. The course objective is to help the student strengthen their talents to think, see, and express themselves more effectively as a writer, designer, and communicator. The course allows the student to expand their overall verbal and visual awareness, and enhance their creative talents by exploring and developing cohesive dynamic advertising communication. These professional portfolios are a vital and necessary tool for advertising students desiring to enter the creative side of the advertising business.Emphasis placed on individual student portfolios. Class format: Primary independent student work, with individual conferences with each student weekly. Class also structured as an intensive hands on lab, with concentration on the high-end capabilities of the computer as a tool for writing, design, and image manipulation. Portfolio proposal plans: Students must submit and get approved portfolio proposal plans. This proposal must include a complete advertising platform for each project the student works on. Criteria for judgement: Student portfolios are judged by instructor for problem- solving and creative ability, professionalism, communication, and creative design execution and presentation of materials.
ADPR 5920Public Relations CommunicationsWriting course designed to help the student understand news releases, feature stories, speeches, letters, scripts, cutlines, memoranda, and other tools basic to the practice of public relations. Emphasis will be placed on the strategies and techniques behind public relations writing.To develop professional writing skills required in the practice of public relations within the context of planned campaigns and to become familiar with communication theories and practices governing the techniques. The course will emphasize effective writing as it is applied in programmed communications for organizations in the private and public sectors as part of an overall public relations plan involving objectives, research, sound implementation and evaluation strategies. It will cover writing for print and electronic media as well as direct (unmediated) communications. The course requires numerous writing assignments, in-lab and out-of-class, including a final project involving working with a client.Lecture with mandatory laboratories. Theory/fundamentals/principles of effective public relations communication Effective writing for plans and proposals, including preparing situation analyses, goal-and objective-setting Writing for research: Moderator's guides and Questionnaires Interview techniques Writing for news media: Press kits and fact sheets News announcements, media advisories for print media Feature pitches, feature articles Video news releases, Public service announcements Memo and report writing Writing for special events-- planning and sponsorships Writing direct communications: brochures and newsletters Writing other controlled communications: speeches New Technologies: writing for the World Wide Web Written evaluations Crisis response strategies
ADSC 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.
ADSC 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
ADSC(FDST) 6170-6170LExperimental Techniques in Meat Science and Muscle BiologyBasic methods in laboratory techniques in meat science. Experiments will familiarize students from a wide variety of backgrounds with a number of laboratory techniques, including lipogenesis, muscle histology, enzyme kinetics, and muscle metabolism.The objective of this course is to introduce graduate students to current research techniques utilized to understand quality, quantity, and functional properties of muscle as food; to provide hands-on experience in a supervised laboratory setting; and to improve student's creative and scientific thinking through development, writing, and presentation of research proposals and papers.• General Laboratory Methods and Safety Issues • Changes in metabolic activity during rigor formation - pH and R-values • Determination of carcass composition by dissection and specific gravity • Determination of proximate composition in meat - chemical and NIR analysis • Separation of proteins using ion-exchange chromatography • Assay of proteolytic enzyme activity • Measuring enzyme kinetics and developing an enzyme assay procedure • Separation of soluble and insoluble collagen • Colorimetric determination of hydroxyproline concentrations • Measurement of sarcomere lengths by laser diffraction • Determination of the myofibrillar fragmentation index • Measuring indicators of muscle growth - RNA, DNA, and protein concentrations • Differential staining of muscle fibers - determining fiber types and diameter • Instrumental assessment of meat color • Separation of proteins using electrophoresis • Western blots for identification of specific proteins • Textural and sensorial analysis of meat products • The biochemistry of meat flavor • Introduction to SAS and statistical analysis of data collected
AESC 3910International Agriculture InternshipPlacement with an international public or private organization in a foreign country. If located near a university, student may also enroll in a course.Enhance the student's foreign language proficiency and expand the student's cultural awareness.The student will be placed with an international university or company for 2-3 months. The student will work on a project and/or take a class with the host. At the end of the visit, the student will write a report of his/her experiences and share it with the host and the Office of International Agriculture.
AFAM 2000Introduction to African American StudiesCultural, social, and historical movements among Americans of African descent.This course requires students 1. to recognize important cultural influences that both formed and informed Africans and Europeans prior to their interactions in the New World. 2. to understand the historically dialectical relationship between black and white people in American society and to recognize the agency of black people in forming their experiences within the United States. 3. to comprehend, analyze, and synthesize a significant amount of reading material from a variety of sources with complementary, but not duplicate lecture materials. 4. to participate knowledgeably in class discussions, informed by mastery of the course materials. 5. to demonstrate critical and analytical skills in writing papers and answering comprehensive essay questions on written examinations.Utilizing lectures, assigned readings, and class discussions, students will examine selected critical issues in the African American experience. Topics may include the traditional West African cultural backgrounds of the peoples Europeans enslaved in the New World; the institution of slavery; the slave community; antebellum free black people; black participation in the Civil War and Reconstruction; different schools of thought on black education; the first fifty years of the twentieth century; and the Civil Rights Movement. In addition to written papers and examinations, the instructor may assign oral presentations and/or group projects as course requirements.
AFAM 2000HIntroduction to African American Studies (Honors)Cultural, social, and historical movements among Americans of African descent.This course requires students 1. to recognize important cultural influences that both formed and informed Africans and Europeans prior to their interactions in the New World. 2. to understand the historically dialectical relationship between black and white people in American society and to recognize the agency of black people in forming their experiences within the United States. 3. to comprehend, analyze, and synthesize a significant amount of reading material from a variety of sources with complementary, but nor duplicate lecture materials. 4. to participate knowledgeably in class discussions, informed by mastery of the course materials. 5. to demonstrate critical and analytical skills in writing papers and answering comprehensive essay questions on written examinations.The Traditional West African Cultural Backgrounds of the Peoples Europeans Enslaved in the New World The Institution of Slavery The Slave Community Antebellum Free Black People Black Participation in the Civil War and Reconstruction Different Schools of Thought on Black Education The Twentieth Century: The First Fifty Years The Civil Rights Movement In addition to written papers and examinations, the instructor may assign oral presentations and/or group projects as course requirements. The small class size of Honors sections allows for greater student participation in class discussion than possible in standard sections. Furthermore, Honors students will write longer papers requiring more analysis, synthesis, and evaluation than students in the standard course. Finally, at the discretion of the instructor, the course may deviate from a general survey format to focus more narrowly on particular time periods or selected historical issues.
AFAM 4970HDirected Reading and/or Project (Honors)Individual study, reading, or projects under the direction of a project leader.Development of research and writing a substantial paper of highest undergraduate quality; implementation of skills in professional documentation and form.Directed study.
AFAM 4980HDirected Reading and/or Projects (Honors)Individual study, reading, or projects under a director.Completion of a susbstantial and original paper reflecting the highest quality of undergraduate research and writing; professional documentation and form.Directed study.
AFAM(ROML) 4860/6860Topics in Afro-Hispanic IdentityRepresentations of Africa and African American culture in Hispanic Literature by writers of African descent. By covering a variety of genres, the course will provide discussion about a cultural identity that is constantly in dialogue with dominant discourses. The course will incorporate critical texts.1) Study in fiction, autobiography, various prose, drama, and poetry in Afro-Hispanic literarture, particularly of the Carribean and South America. 2) Inquiry into the literary shapes of cultural identity. 3) Examination of the historical context and intellectual traditions. 4) Inquiry into international sources for Afro-Hispanic texts in the United States. 5) Placement of the inquiry within the major literary movements (Harlem Renaissance, N‚gritude, and Latino) in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. See 20 above.Texts Used: Cabrera, Lydia. "Cuentos negros de Cuba"; Cunha, Helena Parente. A mulher no espelho. The woman in the mirror. Fred P. Ellison and Naomi Lindstrom, transl.; Do Nascimento, Abdias. "Sortilegio"; Duncan, Quince. "Dawn Song", "The Pocomia Rebellion" in The Best Short Stories of Quince Duncan. Dellita Martin-Ogunsola, ed.; Guillen, Nicolas. "Songoro Cosongo" or "Motivos de Son"; Zapata Olivella, Manuel. Chambacu: A Black Slum. Jonathan Tittler, transl. Critical Texts for this course will include some of the ones listed for the first one proposed, such as those by Jackson, Moore, and Sollors. See texts above.
AGCM 1200Introduction to Communication in Agricultural and Environmental SciencesStrategies and techniques for effective communication, both oral and written, associated with agricultural and environmental sciences. Emphasis is on oral, written, and visual techniques for formal and informal situations, including non-verbal and cross-cultural communication, interviewing, and group communication. The focus is on communication as it relates to agricultural and environmental sciences.Upon the conclusion of the course, students will be able to do the following: - Apply the basic concepts of written communication; - Prepare and make oral presentations; - Identify and describe the various media forms used in agricultural communications; - Identify and describe components in the communication process; - Plan and deliver the following, all related to agricultural and environmental sciences:: - A persuasive speech - An informative speech - A written memo for purposes associated with being in an organization - Develop quality visual aids for oral presentations, including various computer graphics packages, such as power point - Describe the preparation for and techniques to be used in interviewing for professional positions in the area of agricultural and environmental sciences - Facilitate both small and large group communication and subsequent follow up for action - Identify and describe strategies and techniques for conducting effective business meetings, using group communication skills and parliamentary procedure(Note: The following topics will be related to agricultural and environmental sciences) - Introduction to the course - Concepts of logical and critical thinking in relation to clear writing and speaking (organization, types of delivery, adapting to one's audience) - Preparing to write, synthesizing topics, then writing - Writing projects - Memos - Reports - News stories - Persuasive written papers - Oral communication process - Organizing speeches, other oral presentations, and general communication - Evaluating speeches - Speech project: informative speech - Speech project: persuasive speech - Group communication and process - Small group communication - Large group communication - Functioning in an organization with effective communication skills and techniques - Effective business meetings - Parliamentary procedure in relation to group meetings - Preparing for interviews for professional positions - Interview projects - Making positive impressions via both written and oral communication techniques (including non-verbal communication)
AGED 4350/6350Curriculum Planning in Agricultural EducationContent identification, program organization, preparation of instructional objectives, and guidelines for selection and development of instructional materials for agricultural education.1. Define contextual teaching and learning as a basis for curriculum planning. 2. Define curriculum and discuss the levels, approaches, and types of curriculum. 3. Describe the role and interaction of content, context, and learner in delivering curriculum. 4. Examine curriculum guides and curriculum frameworks for organization and content. 5. Become familiar with state (QCC) and national standards. 6. Determine how state and national standards apply to planning. 7. Develop a unit plan and describe its purpose in planning to teach. 8. Prepare appropriate goals, generalizations, and concepts. 9. Write instructional objectives for a unit of instruction and a daily lesson using Bloom's taxonomy as a guide. 10. Compare and contrast models of instructional design (lesson plan formats or models). 11. Discuss and use the elements of instructional design. 12. Describe the functions and stages of planning. 13. Identify designs/plans (yearly, unit, weekly, daily) for various time periods. 14. Identify and analyze different learning styles. 15. Explain and illustrate the relationship between Bloom's taxonomy, and instruction and assessment. 16. Recognize advantages, disadvantages, strengths, and weaknesses of selected kinds of tests. 17. Develop a table of specification based on a unit of instruction. 18. Construct kinds of tests using appropriate guidelines. 19. Discuss alternative methods of assessment. 20. Find and evaluate an alternative assessment approach (form). 21. Distinguish between classroom management and discipline. 22. Discover and analyze the dimensions of classroom management. 23. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of various classroom management models. 24. Evaluate the effectiveness of classroom management models. 25. Show how technology is used to enhance curriculum.The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary. 1. Orientation to course (Theory to Practice, Model of Teacher Development, Research Process, Curriculum Development Process, Interaction of content/context/learner) 2. Aspects of Curriculum (Definition, Approach, Levels, Kinds, Products) 3. Content Selection (curriculum guides, quality core curriculum, standards [national, state], textbooks, supplementary materials) 4. Planning (Defined, Functions, Planning Phases) 5. Curriculum Components (Yearly Plan, Scope and Sequence, Block Plan) 6. Elements of Instructional Design/unit plan or unit of instruction (goals, terms, objectives, teaching and learning activities) 7. Designs for Varied Time Periods (Weekly Plan, Models of Instructional Design [Daily Plan]) 8. Student assessment (traditional assessment and construction, authentic assessment, grading criteria) 9. Classroom management (models, strategies, approaches, dimensions) 10. Learning Styles (4Mat, Gardner) 11. Professional Ethics 12. Initiatives and Mandates in Career and Technical Education 13. Certification (industry and programs) 14. Funding (vocational) 15. Modular Materials and Thematic Units 16. Professional Organizations/Learned Societies
AIRS 2001Air Power History ISecond-year survey course covering a time period from the first balloons and dirigibles to the space-age global positioning systems of the Persian Gulf War. Historical examples are provided to extrapolate the development of Air Force capabilities and missions and to determine the evolution of what has become today's United States Air Force air/space power. Examination of several fundamental truths associated with war from doctrinal/historical perspectives, incorporation of operational examples of Air Force core values, and development of writing/briefing style to meet Air Force communication skills requirements.Know the key terms and definitions used to describe air and space power. Know the milestones or historical events, leaders, and technological advancements that surround the evolution and employment of USAF air and space power. Demonstrate basic verbal/written comm skills. Demonstrate an operational understanding of the AF core values and recognize examples of their use throughout the evolution of US air and space power.COURSE PLAN/SCHEDULE AIRS 2001 - FALL SEMESTER HOUR SUBJECT ASSIGNMENT 1 Introduction and Overview None 2 Air and Space Power Defined None 3 Early Flight to World War I AMA, pp. 11-29, Review CFD Model 4 Advent of the Air Age: WWI AMA, pp. 29-47 Review CFD Model T-211, pp. 5-8 5 Interwar Years AMA, pp. 48-67; 72-84 6 Airpower in WWII AMA, pp. 84-108 T-211, pp. 21-47 7 European Theater, WWII AMA, pp. 108-119 8 Pacific Theater, WWII AMA, pp. 119-141 Review CFD Model T-211, pp. 21-47 9 Mid-Term Exam (covers hours 2-8) 10 Independent AF/Cold War AMA, pp. 142-147 T-211, pp 49-59 11 The Berlin Airlift AMA, pp. 147-149 “Operations Vittles” (paper due 5 Nov) 12 LeMay, Korean, Nuclear AMA, pp. 149-194 Deterrence 13 LeMay, Korea, Nuclear AMA, pp. 149-194 Deterrence 14 Air and Space Power AMA, pp.11-194 Revisited Review CFD Model 15 Review/Semester Closure--Review AMA, pp. 11-194 Review T-211,pp. 1-53 16 Final Exam (covers hours 10-15)
AIRS 2002Air Power History IIBeginning with the Vietnam War, historical examples are provided to extrapolate the development of Air Force capabilities/missions to determine the evolution of what has become today's United States Air Force air/space power. Examination of fundamental truths associated with war, from doctrinal/historical perspectives; incorporation of operational examples of Air Force core values; and development of writing/briefing styles to meet Air Force communication skills requirements.Know the key terms and definitions used to describe air and space power. Know the milestones or historical events, leaders, and technological advancements that surround the evolution and employment of United States Air Force air and space power. Demonstrate basic verbal/written comm skills. Demonstrate an operational understanding of the Air Force core values and recognize examples of their use throughout the evolution of US air and space power.HOUR SUBJECT ASSIGNMENT 1 Introduction and Overview None 2 Vietnam: Part 1 T-208, pp. 57- 69; T-211, pp. 69-86 3 Vietnam: Part 2 T-208, pp. 57- 69; T-211, pp. 69-86 4 End of Vietnam: Part 3 T-208, pp. 57- 69; T-211, pp. 69-86 5 Cold War and Rebuilding the T-208, pp. 69- 74; T-211, pp. 87-90 Air Force: Part I & Part II 6 The Persian Gulf War T-208, pp. 75- 82; T-211, pp. 91-95 7 Post-Cold War USAF Operations None 8 Conflict in the Former Republic of T-211, pp. 92- Yugoslavia 108 9 Air and Space Power Review T-208, pp. 1-82 10 Exam (covers hours 2-9) 11 Oral Communications Tongue & Quill, pp. 93 –104 12 Class Briefings Tongue & Quill, pp. 93-104 13 Class Briefings Tongue & Quill, pp. 93-104 14 Class Briefings Tongue & Quill, pp. 93-104 15 Class Briefings Tongue & Quill, pp. 93-104
AIRS 3001Air Force Leadership Studies IEmphasizes the individual as a manager in an Air Force environment. Individual motivation/behavioral process, leadership, communication, and group dynamics provide a foundation for the development of the junior officer's professional skills as an Air Force officer. Basic managerial processes involving decision making, utilization of analytic aids in planning, organizing, and controlling in a changing environment.Apply listening, speaking, and writing skills in Air Force-peculiar formats and situations with accuracy, clarity, and appropriate style. Comprehend selected concepts, principles, and theories of quality Air Force leadership and management. Comprehend selected individual leadership skills and personal strengths and weaknesses as applied in an Air Force environment. Comprehend and appreciate selected Air Force officers' duties and responsibilities as a subordinate leader. Comprehend the responsibility and authority of an Air Force officer. Comprehend the Air Force officer's responsibilities in the counseling and feedback process. Comprehend and apply concepts of ethical behavior.Day Lesson Topic 1 1 Introduction/AFOATS Training Guide 2 2 Assessing Leaders 3 3,4 Critical Thinking/AF Effective Writing 4 5,6 Writing Strategies/Editing 5 Labor Day Holiday 6 7A Basics of Briefing 7 7B Informative Briefing 8 8A,8B Problem Solving/Exercise 9 9 Management Functions and Principles 10 10 Power and Influence 11 11 Leadership Authority and Responsibility 12 Briefings 13 Briefings 14 12 Group Conflict Management 15 13 Counseling and Practicum 16 13 “ “ “ “ 17 Mid-term TEST 1 18 14 Corrective Supervision and Counseling 19 15 Situational Leadership 20 16 “12 O’Clock High”: Situational Ldrshp 21 16 “12 O’Clock High”: Situational Ldrshp 22 16 “12 O’Clock High”: Situational Ldrshp 23 Fall Break 24 17 Motivation 25 18 Effective Supervision 26 18 Effective Supervision 27 19 Profession of Arms 28 20 Team Building 29 20 Team Building 30 21 Civilian Personnel 31 Thanksgiving Break 32 Course Review 33 Final TEST 2 34 Finals Week
AIRS 3002Air Force Leadership Studies IIManagerial and leadership problems found in industry and government. Actual Air Force cases are used to enhance the learning and communication process. Organizational and personal values, management of forces in change, managerial strategy and tactics. Application of learned theories to potential problems the new officer may encounter.Apply listening, speaking, and writing skills in Air Force-peculiar formats and situations with accuracy, clarity, and appropriate style. Comprehend selected concepts, principles, and theories of quality Air Force leadership and management. Comprehend selected individual leadership skills and personal strengths and weaknesses as applied in an Air Force environment. Comprehend and appreciate selected Air Force officers' duties and responsibilities as a subordinate leader. Comprehend the responsibility and authority of an Air Force officer. Comprehend the Air Force officer's responsibility in the counseling and feedback process. Comprehend and apply concepts of ethical behavior.Day Lesson Topic 1 -- Introduction 2 20 Effective Supervision 3 21 Profession of Arms 4 23 Leadership Accountability 5 23 Leadership Accountability 6 24 Leadership Accountability Case Study 7 25 Team Building 8 25 Team Building Exercises 9 26 Military Ethics 10 26 Military Ethics 11 27 Joint Ethics 12 28 Advanced Topics on Military Ethics 13 28 Advanced Topics on Military Ethics 14 28 Advanced Topics on Military Ethics 15 Midterm Exam 16 32 Professional Relations 17 Briefing 18 Briefing 19 Briefing 20 Spring Break 21 29 AF Effective Writing 22 30 Writing Strategies 23 31 Editing: An Essential Endeavor 24 22 Enlisted Evaluation System 25 22B EPR Assessment 26 33 Officer Evaluation System 27 34 Officer Professional Development 28 35 Caine Mutiny 29 35 Caine Mutiny 30 35 Caine Mutiny 31 36 Commander's In-Basket 32 Final Exam
AIRS 4001National Security Affairs IExamination of the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of interest focus on the military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military professionalism. Continued emphasis is given to refining communication skills.Students should comprehend the basic elements of national security policy and process. Also should know selected roles of the military in society and the current issues affecting the military profession, as well as, selected provisions of the military justice system. Students should comprehend the responsibility, authority, and functions of an Air Force commander. The cadet should apply listening, speaking, and writing skills in Air Force-peculiar formats/situations with accuracy, clarity, and appropriate style. The cadet should comprehend the factors which facilitate a smooth transition from civilian to military life.DAY LESSON TOPIC 1 1 Introduction 2 2, 3 U.S. Constitution; Constitution Bowl 3 4 Role of the President 4 5 Role of the Congress 5 6, 10 Civilian Control of the Military; DoD 6 7 The Evolution of U.S. Policy 7 8 Making Strategy 8 9 Principles of War 9 11 Essence of Air and Space Power 10 12 Global Vigilance 11 13 Air and Space I 12 14 Air and Space II 13 15 MAJCOMs I 14 16 MAJCOMs II 15 17 Total Force 16 18 Joint Force 2020 17 19 EAF 18 20 Dept of Navy; Marine Corps 19 22 Department of Army 20 21 Joint Operations 21 MOOTW 22 Fall Break 23 Briefing 1 24 23 Briefing 1 25 24 Briefing 1 26 25 Setting the World Stage 27 25a Terrorism/Force Protection 28 26 Africa in Transition 29 Briefing 2 30 Thanksgiving Day 31 Briefing 2 32 Briefing 2 33 Final Exams
AIRS 4002National Security Affairs IIContinues focus on the military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military professionalism. Continued emphasis is given to refining communication skills.Students should comprehend the basic elements of national security policy and process. Students also should know selected roles of the military in society and the current issues affecting the military profession, as well as, selected provisions of the military justice system. The cadet should comprehend the responsibility, authority, and functions of an Air Force commander. The cadet should apply listening, speaking, and writing skills in Air Force-peculiar formats and situations with accuracy, clarity, and appropriate style. The cadet should comprehend the factors which facilitare a smooth transition from civilian to military life.DAY LESSON TOPIC 1 Introduction 2 32 Information Warfare 3 34 Evoluation of Military Law 4 35, 36 Military Justice System; Prev, Corr, Non-Judicial Punishment 5 33 Law of Armed Conflict 6 37 AF Homosexual Policy 7 38 Unprofessional Relationships (UPR) 8 39 UPR Case Studies 9 40 Fraud, Waste, and Abuse 10 Briefing 1 11 Briefing 1 12 Briefing 1 13 41 Security Education 14 42 Sexual Harassment Awareness 15 43,44 Substance Abuse Control Program; Suicide Awareness 16 46 Personal Finance 17 45 Operational Risk Management 18 49 Senior NCO Perspective 19 50 Leadership Case Studies 20 51 Core Values Case Studies 21 Spring Break 22 Spring Break 23 27 East Asia in Transition 24 28 Europe after the Cold War 25 29 Latin America in Transition 26 30 Middle East in Transition 27 31 Russia and Other Former Soviet Republics in Transition 28 Briefing 2 29 Briefing 2 30 Briefing 2 31 Exam 32 47 Your First Assignment 33 48 Oath of Office
ANNU 8340Proteins and Amino Acids in Animal NutritionMetabolism and utilization of dietary proteins and amino acids; methods of supplying amino acids for efficient utilization for maintenance, growth and the production products; evaluation of the quality of proteins to meet requirements; methods for separation of proteins, amino acid analysis and determination of protein quality will be studied.This course provides a broad in-depth study of factors that influence the utilization of amino acids by animals.Lectures Analysis for proteins and amino acids Effects of processing on proteins and amino acids Protein and amino acid digestion Protein and amino acid absorption Protein and amino acid digestion and absorption: a comparison of species Lysine availability: a comparison of methods Amino acid deficiency Amino acid imbalance Amino acid excesses Dispensable and indispensable amino acids D amino acid utilization Braced chain amino acid interrelationships Methionine metabolism Use of methionine derivatives such as methionine hydroxy analog Protein and amino acid nutrition and its effect on body composition Methodology of amino acid availability studies Availability of amino acids-poultry Availability of amino acids-swine Availability of amino acids-numerous Feed efficiency and interpretation of amino acid requirement studies Literature Reviews Each student will write 2 literature reviews on current topics and give oral class reports on these assigned topics.
ANNU 8380Experimental Methods in Animal NutritionBiochemical nutrition methodology and its utilization in performing experiments, recording and interpreting data, and writing scientific reports.To familiarize the student with laboratory techniques and procedures that are used in carrying out experimental work in animal nutrition.Laboratory Exercises Freeze drying of samples Extraction of lipids Spectrophotometry Gas liquid chromatography High pressure liquid chromatography Thin layer chromatography Column chromatography (ion exchange, Sephadex, etc.) Centrifugation Atomic absorption Enzyme assays Electrophoresis Dumas N Bomb calorimeter
ANNU 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
ANTH 2070H-2070LCulture and Human Biology (Honors)The biological bases of human social and cultural behavior from the perspective of biological anthropology. Includes instruction in laboratory methods. Evolutionary history, primate behavior, and human biological diversity will be applied to understanding the interrelationship of biology, culture, and society.I. Attainment of knowledge about the major research areas within biological anthropology, as demonstrated through class discussion and examination. II. Hands-on experience with laboratory materials from the departmental collections, including completion of structured lab exercises and write-up of results. This includes study of skeletal material, fossil hominid casts, and techniques of anthropometry. III. Understanding of basic evolutionary and biological principles/concepts as they relate to human and nonhuman primates.1. The scope of anthropology and the role of biological anthropology 2. Evolution and its bases: Molecules and populations 3. Nonhuman primates: their biology and evolutionary history 4. Nonhuman primates: their ecology, behavior, and social organization 5. Human evolution: the earliest hominids 6. Human evolution: "our kind" in the making 7. Human variation in modern Homo sapiens 8. Human adaptability and environmental stress: climatic stress 9. Adaptability and stress: infectious disease 10. Adaptability and stress: nutrition, over- population, modernization 11. Contemporary & applied issues in biological anthropology
ANTH 3550Introduction to Forensic AnthropologyAn introduction to forensic anthropology, focusing on human identification through analysis of bone and teeth. Students learn the basic information used by forensic anthropologists to recognize and evaluate sex, age, stature, genetic origin, disease, and trauma. Human skeletal anatomy, forensic case studies, relevant research, and report writing are included.To introduce students to the field of forensic anthropology in the overall context of the forensic sciences. Also to teach basic human osteology, the knowledge of which is prerequisite to the practice of forensic anthropology. Students who want more in depth knowledge would continue with ANTH 4720/4720L which provides a lab section for hands on training.1. definition and history of forensic anthropology. 2. the basics of bone biology. 3. skull anatomy, sex and race assessment from the skull 4. thoracic osteoanatomy and aging 5. upper limb osteoanatomy,muscularity and handedness. 6. vertebral osteoanatomy and aging. 7. pelvic osteoanatomy and sex assessment. 8. lower limb osteoanatomy and stature assessment. 9. dental anatomy, age and race assessment. 10. evidence of disease and trama. 11. field methods in forensic anthropology. 12. evidence, custody, report writing and expert witness testimony. 13. expert witness testimony. 14. disaster applications. 15. historic applications. 16. human rights applications.
ANTH 4010/6010Historical EcologyPrinciples of human impact through time on ecological landscapes and how these principles can guide contemporary communities in the design of future sustainable land and water use. Special focus on the American southern piedmont covering a ten thousand year period from pre-agriculture to post-industrial societies.1. Ground the student in social science and ecological theories, principles, and methods on long-term human impact on local environments. 2. Review a series of case studies around the world on how human populations have adapted to, modified, and created new ecological systems. 3. Master methods and data interpretation related to the archaeological record, historical documents and maps, oral histories, natural resource sampling, ethnobotany and aerial photography through direct research experience with a watershed in the piedmont of Georgia. 4. Learn writing and presentation skills by researching, composing, and presenting to the class a research paper on an aspect of Georgia piedmont's historical ecology. 5. Learn to extrapolate the findings from another time period to the present and into the future as a way to demonstrate historical ecology's potential as a societal planning tool. 6. Relate class readings, findings, and experience to the issue of policy for communities and watersheds.1. People, Land and Time: A Review of the Literature. 2. Human as Creators or Destroyers of Ecosystems: Case Studies 3. Methods for Historical Ecology Research: Secondary Data 4. Methods for Historical Ecology Research: Primary Data 5. Case Study I: Indian Agriculture (4000 BP-1800) 6. Case Study II: Pioneer Farming (1800-1850s) 7. Case Study III: Yeoman Farming (1875-1950s) 8. Case Study IV: Present and Future (2000-2050) 9. Student individual or team projects on reconstruction of some aspect of piedmont life. 10. Guest speakers, films, and visits to historical sites.
ANTH 4720/6720-4720L/6720LForensic AnthropologyIntroduction to an application of physical anthropology focusing on human identification through analysis of bone. Students recognize and identify whole and fragmentary bones and teeth, and determine age, sex, stature, racial traits, disease, and trauma from the skeleton. Case studies, hands-on experience, and report writing are included.To introduce the students to the field of forensic anthropology in the overall context of the forensic sciences. Also to teach human osteology, the knowledge of which is prerequisite to the practice of forensic anthropology.1. Definition and history of forensic anthropology 2. Osteologial basis for forensic anthropology 3. Skull anatomy 4. Thorax osteoanatomy 5. Vertebral column 6. Arm and hand osteoanatomy 7. Innominate anatomy 8. Leg and foot osteoanatomy 9. Odontology 10. Field recovery of human remains 11. Laboratory analysis of skeletal remains 12. Maintenance of evidence and chain of custody 13. Forensic report writing and courtroom testimony 14. Applications in criminal investigation, disasters and human rights 15. Appliations in historical and prehistorical archaeology
ANTH 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.
ANTH 8630Anthropological Research Design and Proposal DevelopmentFinding and formulating an anthropological research idea and translating it into a convincing plan for research. Students will develop their own research ideas, discuss evolving research designs in class each week, and prepare an effective proposal.1. To understand the basic principles in preparing a proposal for funded research, including explanation of theory, writing a research question and hypotheses, selection of methods, study sample, and study location. 2. To develop an effective research design for independent Anthropological research and present this in a format appropriate for a funding agency.1. Thinking about the Research Problem Choosing a topic Effective reviews of the literature Formulating a preliminary research question 2. Developing the Research Question Stating the problem Justifying the study Making predictive statements Understanding causation Qualitative and quantitative epistemologies, approaches, distinctions, and mixes 3. Developing the Research Design How to select a study population or location How to select and justify the right methods Sampling How to select and justify the right method of analysis Common but deadly mistakes to avoid Important practicalities: ethics, documenting arrangements, budgeting and time management 4. Proposing the Research to Others The function of the proposal Layout, presentation, and writing clarity How proposals are reviewed and why they are funded (or not) The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary.
ANTH 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
ANTH(AFST) 3460Africa: Peoples and InstitutionsPeoples and institutions of Africa, south of the Sahara, starting with earliest evidence of indigenous peoples, with special emphasis on current changes.During this course, students will encounter the variety of people, past and present, that have inhabited the African Continent. Students will gain a familiarity with great variety of cultures that are a part of Africa, and with the many different ways they have organized their societies. The students will gain an appreciation for the rich depth and breadth of the human experience in Africa. Africa: Images and Inventions Africa and Us Africa in Contemporary Cultural Discourse Ethnographic Encounters with Africa Enduring Legacies of Colonial Domination Panafrican Identities and Nation States Africa Remembered: Narratives of the Slave Trade Writing Africa in Black and White Territories in Trouble and Transition Principles and Paradoxes of Social Organization Becoming Person and Belonging to Society (Naming) African Ways of Thinking and Knowing African Revelations: Cosmologies of a Continent Performance, Play, and Agency African Landscapes and Livelihoods Myths and Realities of African Lifeways Ecologies of Space in African Daily Life Anthropology in Action in Africa Eros Ethnography: Sexuality Research in Africa AIDS in Africa: Political Economy of an Epidemic Ethics and Enigmas of Eidlwork in Africa Trials and Tensions of Urban Life
ANTH(AFST) 4461/6461African EthnographyThe peoples of Africa and the process of researching and writing ethnography. Part one reviews classic/canonical ethnographic readings and concepts from the colonial period. Part two involves ethnography of colonialism. Part three details the post-colonial experience.By the end of this course students should have the following: * Working knowledge of the canonical anthropological literature from Africa * Understanding of the biases present in the canonical literature, particularly related to colonial ideology * Understanding of the complexities of African history and social life that underlie recent & current politics * Familiarity with a diversity of cultures within Africa * Familiarity with methods of researching, writing, and reading ethnography * Ability to critically evaluate current news coverage, popular media, and scientific research regarding Africa and African peoplesIntroduction Limitations of the Categorical approaches to African geography, language, and history Pastoral life among the Nuer Unilineal descent and segmentary societies, the Nuer Comparative social organization part 1: Bemba, Tiv, Swazi Comparative social organization part 2: Afikpo-Igbo, Juhoansi San Social organization of the dead: ancestors as elders Social Identity: Examples from Madagascar Witchcraft and Magic French structural-functionalism: Marcel Griauleï's conversations with Ogotemmeli European Colonialism of Africa Social Discourses of power and control Psychology of colonialism Colonialism and history in Madagascar The Betsimisaraka: Horticulturalists turned peasants History, memory, and the Betsimisaraka colonial experience Women and colonialism Market integration in Africa: Tiv markets and bitter money From colonialism to nationalism Africans on Africanist research Gender in Urban Botswana The Kalahari San debate The Kalahari San today The Nuer today Intensive agriculture among the Kofyar, Nigeria Indigenous development: Kofyar Neocolonialism and development: rights and wrongs
ARAB(LING) 3005Advanced Standard Arabic IAdvanced grammar, reading, conversation, and composition in standard (including classical) Arabic. Particular attention will be given to readings in Islamic literature.A high degree of proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, listening comprehension, and textual analysis of standard Arabic.I. Programmed Arabic - Islamic Reader II Lessons 1 - 30. II. Selected readings from contemporary and classical texts. III. Selected articles from contemporary media. IV. Selected Arabic films and music.
ARAB(LING) 3006Advanced Standard Arabic IIA continuation of Advanced Standard Arabic I.The main purposes of the class is to gain competency in reading a variety of genres of Arabic, to master its grammatical principles, and to increase the student's Arabic vocabulary and capability in speaking, orally comprehending, and writing Arabic.Completion of Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, and readings in Qur'an, tafsir, hadith, hadith criticism, Arabic New Testament, Arabic Infancy Gospel, Arabic biographical literature and criticism, sufi poetry and prose, narrative literature, modern arabic journalism and literature.
ARED 3050Art and the ChildChild creative development including experiences in drawing, painting, graphics, sculpture, and crafts appropriate to children. (May not be used for credit by art education majors.)To prepare students to develop and implement strategies and procedures for extending learning through art at the elementary school level. Teaching methodologies, instructional strategies, materials, equipment, techniques and subject matter appropriate to these age groups for teaching both in and through visual art will be investigated through reading, discussion, responsive writing and application.The course is taught in both a seminar and studio format. Students will read, discuss and write about art education theory as it pertains to extending learning across the curriculum. They will practice art instruction and application through model lessons. Working in project teams with students from ARED 3350, they will develop and critique arts-based lessons that draw on knowledge and skill in art history, criticism, aesthetics and art making as well as connect to learning objectives from other subject areas as established by the Georgia Qaulity Core Curriculum. Students will develop their own teaching philosophy for incorporating the arts into their personal instruction, the creation and presentation of lessons of instruction, the development of a professional portfolio and the transfer and application of theoretical issues in art education to practical applications within the elementary classroom.
ARED 3350Basic Curriculum in Art EducationPlanning and developing procedures for implementing curriculum at the elementary level. An investigation into the literature, materials, and procedures appropriate to children of different ages, including studio experiences.To prepare students to develop and implement strategies and procedures for teaching art at the elementary school level. Art teaching methodologies, instructional strategies, materials, equipment, techniques and subject matter appropriate to these age groups are investigated through reading, discussion, responsive writing and application.The course is taught in both a seminar and studio format. Students will read, discuss and write about art education theory. They will observe art instruction in elementary classrooms. They will practice art instruction and application through model lessons. As an upper level course in the School of Art, students will apply their knowledge and skill of art history, criticism, aesthetics and art making, obtained through their undergraduate sequence of study, in the development of a teaching philosophy for art education, the creation and presentation of lessons of instruction, the development of a professional portfolio and the transfer and application of theoretical issues in art education to practical applications. Working in teams with students from ARED3050, possibilities for extending learning through art education across the entire elementary curriculum are explored.
ARED 3360Teaching Procedures in Art EducationPlanning and implementing art instruction for middle and secondary students. Specific teaching procedures, materials, and techniques developed from Art Education philosophy, research, and studio practices.To prepare students to develop and implement strategies and procedures for teaching art at the upper middle and secondary school levels. Art teaching methodologies, instructional strategies, materials, equipment, techniques and subject matter appropriate to these age groups are investigated through reading, discussion, responsive writing and application.The course is taught in both a seminar and studio format. Students will read, discuss and write about art education theory. They will practice art instruction and application through a model unit of instruction. The student will apply their knowledge and skill of art history, criticism, aesthetics and art making in the development of a teaching philosophy for art education, the creation and presentation of units of instruction using computer and technology expertise, the development of a professional portfolio and the transfer and application of theoretical issues in art education to practical applications. The student will be expected to take their in-depth knowledge of art appreciation, history, criticism and art production and organize it into sequential learning experiences appropriate to students of middle and high school developmental levels.
ARED 5350/7350Teaching of Art in the Elementary SchoolRecommended practices in qualitative curriculum planning; laboratory experiments that identify philosophical, motivational, and evaluative problems in elementary school art. To prepare students to develop and implement strategies and procedures for teaching art at the elementary school level. Art teaching methodologies, instructional strategies, materials, equipment, techniques, and subject matter appropriate to these age groups are investigated through reading, discussion, responsive writing, and application.Course is the same as ARED3350. Graduate students should enroll under ARED7350. Students from the College of Education should enroll in ARED5350 with permission of the instructor. Expectations for graduate work are based on quality, not quantity. The course is taught in both a seminar and studio format. Students will read, discuss, and write about art education theory. They will observe art instruction in elementary classrooms. They will practice art instruction and application through model lessons. As an upper level course in the School of Art, students will apply their knowledge and skill of art history, criticism, aesthetics and art making, obtained through their undergraduate sequence of study, in the development of a teaching philosophy for art education, the creation and presentation of lessons of instruction, the development of a professional portfolio and the transfer and application of theoretical issues in art education to practical applications. Working in teams with students from ARED3050, possibilities for extending learning through art education across the entire elementary curriculum are explored.
ARED 5360/7360Teaching of Art in the Secondary SchoolRecommended practice in qualitative curriculum planning, together with laboratory projects that identify philosophical, motivational, and evaluative problems in secondary school art. To prepare students to develop and implement strategies and procedures for teaching art at the upper middle and secondary school levels. Art teaching methodologies, instructional strategies, materials, equipment, techniques and subject matter appropriate to these age groups are investigated through reading, discussion, responsive writing and application.The course is taught in both a seminar and studio format. Students will read, discuss and write about art education theory. They will practice art instruction and application through a model unit of instruction. The student will apply their knowledge and skill of art history, criticism, aesthetics and art making in the development of a teaching philosophy for art education, the creation and presentation of units of instruction using computer and technology expertise, the development of a professional portfolio and the transfer and application of theoretical issues in art education to practical applications. The student will be expected to take their in-depth knowledge of art appreciation, history, criticism and art production and organize it into sequential learning experiences appropriate to students of middle and high school developmental levels.
ARED 7370Curriculum Development in Art EducationCurriculum improvement, guidelines for curriculum improvement, curriculum decision making, testing and evaluating operational curriculum innovations.The course will investigate curricular aims, goals, and forms of student assessment within art education through a variety of theoretical lenses. Students will identify issues in curriculum of personal interest and explore these through research, class discussion, and reflective writing. Students are expected to regularly extend seminar discussions via postings on Web CT.The course is taught in a seminar format. Students will read, discuss, and write broadly across education theory as it pertains to curriculum and pedagogy. Through class presentations and peer discussion, students will develop skills in connecting theory to practice.
ARED 8430Readings in Art EducationSignificant writings ranging from classical foundations to contemporary viewpoints in art education with emphasis upon issues relevant to current art education practice.This course is designed to provide students with a knowledge of significant writings in the field of art education that have shaped its practice. They use this knowledge to further explore an area relative to their interests.Through readings and class discussions, students gain understanding of the literature of art education in relation to its practice. Emphasis is placed on issues that are relative to current art education practice. A scholarly paper allows students the opportunity to relate selected readings to an area of personal interest.
ARED 8990Research Seminar in Art EducationResearch methodology, critiques of art education research and proposed research projects.The course will investigate how the discipline of visual art creates a lens for the conduct of qualitative inquiry in education. Arts-based methodologies will be compared with other approaches to qualitative research. The perceived dichotomy between quantitative and qualitative methods will be examined. Students will engage in small pilot research projects and present this research at the end of the course. Although students may choose a variety of research methods as a primary means of gathering data, it is assumed that qualitative skills in interviewing are useful even if employed as secondary data gathering methods. Consequently, skills in interviewing, transcribing, and coding will also be addressed.The course is taught in a seminar format. Students will read, discuss, and write broadly across educational research theory. Through class presentations and peer discussion, students will develop their own research topics, selection of research methods, and skills in connecting theory to the conduct of research.
ARED 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.Students conduct research necessary to dissertation and defend the dissertation.Students work independently on dissertation under the direction of major professor.
ARED 9630Critique of Educational Literature in Art EducationResearch and theoretical writing in the field of education.Students will demonstrate ability to engage in research in art education in area of primary interest.Students will review the literature of art education pertinent to an area of primary interest and develop a research paper relevant to this review.
ARGD 3050IllustrationStresses the importance of technique in a variety of media as the basis for solving design problems.To give students the opportunity to select and experiment with a variety of media while solving illustrative problems.Illustration is not rendering, making facsimiles of people or objects. Illustration should help you learn to express your individual point of view with a variety of media. Illustrators, like writers, musicians or dancers interpret. To do that your tools need to be an expressive extension of your mind, eyes and hand. Mastering your craft is a necessary step towards achieving artistry.
ARGD 3320Intermediate Scientific IllustrationA continuation of Fundamentals of Scientific Illustration but introducing plate layout and design, working from a publisher's specifications, the production of illustrations for portfolio, and contract negotiations.This course is a continuation of the fundamentals of Scientific Illustration course while introducing page layout and design and working from strict guidelines of publisher specifications. Observing business ethics and practices of self promotion, proposal and bidding of project style and cost will be covered in each assignment. The preparation of portfolio ready illustrations and presentation will also be practiced.Scratch board a. animal and habit b. environmental landscape Watercolor a. sepia still-life with focal point b. herbarium sheet Business a. business card b. letterhead c. portfolio preparation d. letter writing e. project bid and proposal
ARGD 4050CalligraphyUse of the fifteenth-century Humanist Hand and its italic variant, the Chancery Hand, and the familiarity with other historical calligraphic hands.The course in calligraphy is an elective course primarily for graphic design majors but is open to art majors in other fields and to students in the School of Environmental Design. Students are expected to possess excellent visual design skills, creative interest and hand dexterity. The primary objective is to develop facility in calligraphically forming letters in the tradition of the major European medieval and renaissance hands. Once learned, these hands are used in various projects which stress creative and unique use of letterforms and literary content as well as color, texture, paper, etc. As graphic design majors must design with typographic letterforms, this course introduces them to the pre-typographic alphabets from which typographic alphabets evolved.Using traditional steel, quill and reed square-nib pens students will become proficient in the 14th century Italian Humanist Hand, the 15th century Italian Chancery Hand as well as chosen hands from the rich tradition of Roman and northern-European uncials and northern-European gothic hands and scripts. Expressive use of these calligraphic styles result in 3-4 finished projects using literary material of all types, from folk wit to sacred texts. Students are expected to formulate these designs in personal and unique ways. Traditional marking tools, inks, paints and metallic leaf, paper, parchment and vellum are introduced and used. Experimentation is encouraged with more contemporary tools, mediums and supports including graphic computer programs. There are lectures on the evolvement of the letter form from pre-writing through modern typography. There are also lectures on the important figures in calligraphy.
ARHI 2110HMonuments of World Art (Honors)A chronological survey of major monuments of world art.This course introduces students to a selection of the major monuments spanning the last 15,000 years of art history. In this course, students will have the opportunity to study a diverse range of people, places, events, and periods by looking at visual records. Through studying the art of other cultures, students will be issues related to the emotional, spiritual, sociological, and political concerns of people throughout history. This class also offers an opportunity to discover our visual heritage and to enrich the students' perceptions and responses to visual culture. Throughout the semester students will be asked to actively look at and think about art, as well as to discuss and analyze art and architecture as aesthetic objects and as products of particular historical and cultural periods. Students will be asked to take a series of quizzes and exams to test their developing knowledge of the monuments and their ability to discuss the issues related to the monuments. Because it is an honors course, the class size will be drastically reduced, thus allowing greater daily contact between students and faculty. Students will also be asked to write papers on particular monuments, stylistic developments, or methodological issues.I. Introduction, Paleolithic Era, Egyptian Sculpture and Architecture, Buddhist Architecture. II. Green Sculpture and Architecture, Roman Sculpture and Architecture. III. Early Christian and Byzantine Architecture, Hiberno-Saxon and Carolingian Manuscript Illuminations. IV. Ottonian Sculpture, Romanesque Architecture and Sculpture, Gothic Architecture, Sculpture, and Stained Glass. V. Hindu Architecture, Chinese Landscape Painting. VI. Italian Renaissance Sculpture, Painting, and Architecture, Flemish Renaissance Painting. VII. Northern Renaissance Painting, Italian High Renaissance Art and Architecture. VIII. High Renaissance Art and Architecture in Rome, Venetian High Renaissance Painting, Mannerism. IX. Italian Baroque Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture. X. Dutch, Flemish, Spanish, and French Baroque Painting. XI. Rococo Painting, Neo-Classical Painting and Architecture. XII. Romanticism (Spanish, French), Neo-Classical Romanticism, English Romanticism, Realism. XIII. Impressionism, Japanese Prints, Post-Impressionism. XIV. Post-Impressionism, Expressionism and Fauvism, Post-Cubism. XV. Analytical Cubism, Abstraction, Dada, Early Modern Architecture. XVI. Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Post-Modernism.
ARHI 3000Ancient ArtMajor monuments of art from the ancient world from the Paleolithic era through the Roman Empire.This course is intended to introduce students to the major periods, styles and themes of the art of antiquity. Through class lectures, in which student questions and discussion are encouraged, a sequence of eras of ancient art is presented. A reliable survey text and a class web site reinforce the material from class lectures. In a final paper, each student chooses an artwork covered in class or a related work that is at the Michael C. Carlos Museum at Emory University, and writes out the text of a 20-minute presentation that he/she would give to undergraduate students, while standing in front of the structure at its archaeological site, or the work in a museum. An additional extra- credit paper involves the selection, illustration and discussion of buildings in Athens (in Georgia) or elsewhere that have columns in the Green and Roman architectural orders. The purpose of the class is to insure that students can recognize major monumental and artistic forms of antiquity, when encountering new examples. A knowledge of the stylistic traits that are distinctive to each ancient period and of the attributes of important mythological characters should also allow students to roughly date unfamiliar antiquities and guess at their thematic content. In addition, students should be able to recognize ancient styles, themes and architectural forms when they are utilized by artists after antiquity, and they should be aware of the richness of antiquity as a source for motifs that can be mined by contemporary artists.This course introduces the student to major monuments and art forms from the ancient era. The required materials begin with European and Near Eastern art of the Paleolithic, Mesolithic, Neolithic and Chalcolithic periods; then Egypt and the Greek world during the Bronze Age are examined. Next, Greece in the Iron Age, Etruscan art, and Roman art of the Late Republic and Empire are surveyed. Students must pass two non-cumulative midterms and one non-cumulative final, as well as writing a short descriptive paper on a monument of their choice. The midterms and final exam have both factual parts and an analytical essay.Myrt
ARHI 3010Medieval ArtEuropean art from the fourth century through the fourteenth century with an emphasis on the impact of Christianity on Europe's classical Roman and non-classical heritage.European art from the Fourth through the Fifteenth Century with an emphasis on the impact of Christianity on Europe's classical Roman and non-classical heritage. The end of the course successful students will have demonstrated that they can write convincing and factually correct essays about works of European art originating in all phases of the 1,000 years of the Medieval era.I. Methodological approaches to medieval architecture and art. A. State of preservation. B. Descriptive analysis. C. State of research. D. Evaluation of object and state of research. II. Architecture and its elaboration through sculpture, mosaics, paintings and stained glass. III. Portable Art, e.g., Manuscripts, ivories, and metalwork. IV. Textual Bases for Medieval Art. A. Biblical: l. Old Testament: Selected passages from Genesis, Exodus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, I & II Samuel, I & II Kings, Psalms, Isaiah and Jeremiah. 2. New Testament: Selected passages from Romans, Colossians, I & II Thessalonians, the Gospels, Acts, Revelations. B. Selected readings in medieval history. 1. From Constantine to Islam, c. 300--650. 2. The Heyday of the Merovingians to the Norman Conquest of England, c. 500--1066. 3. The Advent of the modern European nation state.
ARHI 3030Baroque Art I: Southern EuropeA survey of Baroque art and architecture in Italy, Spain, and France from ca. 1590 through 1675. Major artists to be considered include Caravaggio, Bernini, Velasquez, and Poussin.The subject of this course is the history of art in Europe during the period known as the Baroque. Although exact dates vary according to location, by general agreement the Baroque is associated with the seventeenth century. In this class students will consider the arts of painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy, Spain and France. Beginning in Italy the class will commence with a review--both formally and contextually--of the Counter Reformation and the art it produced. Moving from Italy to Spain and France--essentially tracing the spread of the Catholic Roman Baroque-the class will end with a consideration of imperial or monarchical art and architecture at the great courts. The purpose of this class is to expose students to the important stylistic developments associated with the Baroque; it is also, however, to consider the role of societal changes (the seventeenth century being, in essence, the beginning of modern Europe) in the creation of art and the self-fashioning of artists. Students will be asked to take two exams, and occasional midterm, and write two brief papers.I. Introduction - The Baroque II. The Counter Reformation III. The Carracci in Bologna IV. The Carracci in Rome V. Caravaggio VI. Caravaggio after 1600 VII. The Second Generation in Rome: The Followers of Annibale Carracci VIII. The Caravaggisti IX. Bernini and Baroque Sculpture X. Baroque Architecture in Rome XI. Poussin XII. French Baroque Painting XIII. Baroque Painting in Spain XIV. Velazquez XV. Royal Patronage in Spain XVI. Royal Patronage in France
ARHI 3040Asian ArtThe arts of India, central and southeast Asia, China, and Japan with emphasis on religions and cultural interchanges in Asian history.This course is designed to acquaint students with traditional arts in Asia prior to the twentieth century. The course focuses on four countries in Asia, India, China, Korea, and Japan. Each class is organized as slide presentations of the instructor, through which students will learn and observe major works of art in this region. Readings are assigned each week to provide students with cultural and religious backgrounds. Evaluation is based on a writing assignment and two exams, and students will be expected to demonstrate their visual analysis skill and ability to characterize artistic achievement of each country.This course explores traditional arts of Asia, including India, China, Korea, and Japan. Topics included are Buddhist and Hindu art and architecture in India, introduction of Buddhist art in East Asia, scroll paintings, calligraphy, ceramics, timber-frame architecture in China, Korea, and Japan. Through frequent comparisons between arts of different regions, the course aims to understand common and characteristic features of major artistic traditions in Asia.
ARHI 3070American ArchitectureAmerican buildings, their architects, and architectural theory in the continental United States from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries.Architecture in the continental United States from the era of European colonization through the Twentieth Century. At the end of the course successful students will have demonstrated that they can research and write factually correct and compelling essays on topics in American architecture, and that they understand some of the methods, values, and procedures that shape the history of American architecture.I. Methodological approaches to individual buildings and architectural complexes. A. Descriptive analysis 1. State of preservation 2. Ground plans, sections, elevations 3. Principal spaces, ancillary spaces, and the articulation of their boundaries 4. Differentiation of spaces in relation to their functions 5. Facades 6. Luminal spaces and traffic patterns 7. Materials and structure 8. State of research 9. Evaluation of the work and the state of research B. Historical contexts, chronologies and conflicts 1. Primary sources 2. Secondary sources II. Aspects of architecture in American history A. The American home and the family B. Community and communities C. Nature D. Technology E. Money F. Art
ARHI 4050/6050Icons in Byzantium: Theory and PracticeVarious issues of panel painting in the Byzantine Empire. The Byzantines not only mastered the production of such pieces of art but additionally they developed a highly sophisticated theory of images that was unique in the medieval world. This course explores the dynamics between the theory and the practice of creating, displaying, and venerating icons.Students will be expected to learn to analyze works of art and architecture and to interpret their meaning by taking into account the original cultural context in which these monuments were created. Since this is a writing-intensive course students will be expected to conduct research and compose a short term paper.Week 1: Introduction Week 2: Late Antique Portraiture Week 3: Late Antique Funerary Art Week 4: Miraculous Images "Not-Made-By-Human-Hand" Week 5: Icons and Relics Week 6: Icons in Everyday Life: Magical Practices Week 7: The Rejection of the Icons Week 8: New Theory of the Holy Images Week 9: New Theory of the Holy Images Week 10: Icons and Ascetics Week 11: Icons and Emperors Week 12: The Technique of Painting Icons Week 13: Icons and Rituals Week 14: Icons and the Cults of Local Saints Week 15: Icons with Narrative Cycles: Hagiographic Icons Week 16: Images on the Backs of Byzantine Icons
ARHI 4100/6100Early Medieval ArtArchitecture, sculpture, and painting in Western Europe from the seventh through the eleventh centuries.The dominant architecture and art of Western Europe during its Christian colonization, the decline and fall of the Western Roman Empire and its aftermath. Particular emphasis on the Christian reinterpretation, transformation and integration of both classical and non-classical traditions. At the end of the course successful students will have demonstrated that they can research and write convincingly about topics in Early Medieval Art that are covered in the course, and that they understand some of the methods, values, and procedures that shape the history of medieval art in America.I. Methodological approaches to Early Medieval Architecture and Art. A. A familiarity with the textual bases for Christian doctrine. B. State of preservation at the work of art or architecture. C. Descriptive analysis of the work. D. State of research on the work. E. Evaluation of the work and the state of research. II. The Legacy of Imperial Rome. A. The requirements of Roman Imperial Christianity. B. Selected works of Early Christian and Early Medieval architecture and art as they relate to non-Christian Roman Imperial architecture and art. III. The legacy of barbarian Europe. A. Monumental architecture and sculpture. B. Portable art.
ARHI 4110/6110Romanesque ArtArchitecture, sculpture, and painting in Western Europe of the eleventh and twelfth centuries with particular emphasis on France.The architecture and art produced in Christian Europe in a variety of styles and generally ascribed to the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries. Particular emphasis on the reinterpretation, transformation and integration of inherited traditions, both formal and iconographic. At the end of the course successful students will have demonstrated that they can research and write convincing, factually accurate essays on topics in Romanesque architecture and art, and that they understand some of the methods, values, and procedures that shape the study of Romanesque art in America.I. Methodological approaches to Romanesque architecture and art. A. The textual bases for Christian doctrine. B. State of preservation of the work of art or architecture. C. Descriptive analysis. D. State of research. E. Evaluation of the work and the state of research. II. The Romanesque basilican church, its constituent parts, and the theoretical genesis of their forms from their antecedents. III. Romanesque Sculpture. A. Architectural sculpture. B. Reliquaries, book covers, altars, liturgical instruments. IV. Romanesque Painting, e.g., manuscript illumination and murals. V. Pertinent historical events. e.g., ecclesiastical reform, crusades, pilgrimages, heresies, new monastic orders and cathedral schools.
ARHI 4120/6120Gothic ArtArchitecture, sculpture, and painting of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries in Europe with special emphasis on France.The dominant style of architecture and art produced in Western and Northern Europe from the Twelfth through the Fifteenth Centuries. Particular emphasis on the reinterpretation, transformation and integration of inherited traditions, both formal and iconographic. At the end of the course successful students will have demonstrated that they can research and write factually correct and convincing essays on the topics in Gothic art that are covered in the course.I. Methodological approaches to Gothic architecture and art. A. The textual bases for Christian doctrine. B. State of preservation of the work of art or architecture. C. Descriptive analysis of the work. D. State of research on the work. E. Evaluation of the work and the state of research. II. The Gothic Cathedral, its constituent parts, and the theoretical genesis of their forms from their antecedents: The Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Chartres. III. Gothic Sculpture. A. Architectural sculpture at Chartres. B. Reliquaries, book covers, altars, liturgical instruments. IV. Gothic Painting. A. Stained Glass. B. Manuscript illumination. V. Historical events, e.g., ecclesiastical reform, crusades, pilgrimages, heresies, nation states and their conflicts with the papal states, technology, cities, commerce, universities, and administrative bureaucracies.
ARHI 4290/6290Renaissance and Baroque SculptureThe development of period styles and an analysis of the role of function and tradition in European sculpture for ca. 1260-1700, with special attention to the work of Donatello, Michelangelo, and Bernini.The subject of this course is the history of sculpture in the period between 1250 and 1700. Although numerous justifications might be proposed for such a course, mine is quite simple - sculpture was arguably the pre-eminent medium in the Renaissance and continued to be so in Rome during the Baroque. Linked both to ancient traditions and to the Christian religious object. Sculpture reveals most clearly the dual demands made on art in the Renaissance and Baroque. It reflects the collaboration between individual artists and the traditions and expectations of the patron and/or the project. Especially today, when sculpture has become the step-child of the more powerful arts of painting and architecture, it is even more important that one learns to appreciate sculpture, in all its diversity, as a medium with a glorious history. Students will be expected to learn a greater appreciation for, sensitivity to, and understanding of sculpture as a artistic option, as material, and as an expressive form. Classroom discussions, augmented by readings, will focus on the history of sculpture; students will write papers on sculptural objects that are accessible in Athens as well as on important examples of Renaissance or Baroque sculpture.I. Introduction--Looking at Sculpture II. Nicolo Pisano and Giovanni Pisano - The Pulpits at Pisa and Siena III. Arnolfo di Cambio: Sculpture and Architecture; Lorenzo Maitani at Orvieto IV. Orcagna's Tabernacle in OrSanMichele; Claus Sluter and The Well of Moses in Dijon V. Andrea Pisano and Ghiberti - The Bronze Doors for the Florentine Baptistery; Jacopo della Quercia and the Portal of S. Petronio VI. The Cantorie and Donatello's Paduan Altar; Portraits
ARHI 4300/6300Italian Baroque Art and ArchitectureBaroque art and architecture in Italy, with special emphasis on Rome, and such important figures as the Carracci, Caravaggio, Bernini, and Borromini.This course is focused on the art produced in Italy during the seventeenth century, the period commonly known as the Baroque. Although the majority of the classroom lectures will focus on the arts in Rome, consideration will also be given to other Italian centers including Naples, Bologna, Florence, and Venice. Works of painting, sculpture, and architecture will be studied for what they reveal, not only about the careers of the individual artists who made them, but also in terms of the external forces that shaped their creation. By beginning with an intensive study of St. Peter's, the most important artistic center in Baroque Rome, students will begin to understand Baroque art as a series of ever-expanding ideas about art, not merely as a specific style. Students will be asked to do a considerable amount of reading and writing in conjunction with the lectures.I. Introduction: Michelangelo and St. Peter's in the 16th Century II. Clement VIII, Paul V. Maderno, and St. Peter's III. Urban VIII, Bernini and St. Peter's IV. Alexander VII and the Completion of St. Peter's V. Annibale Carracci and the Reform of Painting VI. Caravaggio VII. Caravaggisti and Classicism in Rome VIII.Guericino and Reni IX. Bernini and Algardi X. Bernini and Borromini XI. Pietro da Cortona and Andrea Sacchi XII. Naples and Florence XIV. Venice and the North XV. Foreigners in Rome
ARHI 4310/6310Northern Baroque ArtFrench and Dutch art of the seventeenth century with emphasis on such key figures as Rubens, Velasquez, Rembrandt, and Poussin.The subject of this course is the history of art in 17th-century Holland, more specifically the history of painting, drawing, and graphic arts in the time of Rembrandt. The course will focus on the career of Rembrandt and, through him, consider comparable work by other Dutch, Flemish, and Italian masters. Besides considering the careers of a series of important artists, attention will be focused on the development of specific genres of painting, including portraits, still-life painting, landscapes, and genre painting. Consideration will also be given to the expanding role of prints and printmaking in 17th-century Holland as well as the interaction between painters and their society. This class should develop both intensive knowledge of a specific art historical period and also a growing awareness of the role of material and culture in the creation of artistic careers. Students will be expected to write papers on both a 17th-century print and on a painting by one of the artists under consideration in this class or on a theme of particular relevance to the class.I. Introduction to Holland in the 17th century II. International Artists in the North: Durer, Colzius, and Rubens III. The Utrecht School IV. Dutch Painting in the Sixteenth Century-Lucas van Leyden to Pieter Aertsen V. Peter Lastman VI. Rembrandt and Jan Lievens VII. Portraiture-Frans Hals and Thomas de Keyser VIII.Rembrandts Portraits IX. Classical Themes in Rembrandt X. The Nightwatch and Group Portraiture in Holland XI. Rembrandt the Printmaker XII. Rembrandt and His Followers XIII.Genre Painting XIV. Landscape Painting XV. Still Life Painting XVI. Vermeer
ARHI 4400/6400Romanticism and NeoclassicismEuropean art and architecture from ca. 1760 through 1865 including the sublime, the beautiful, the picturesque, historical revivalism, exoticism, rationalism, and eclecticism.In this course, students will examine styles, themes, aesthetic theories and principles, and institutional structures of European painting and sculpture between 1760-1830. The artistic categories of Romanticism and Neoclassicism were once presented as polarized camps of opposing interests, but more recent studies have demonstrated that their relationship is vastly more complicated. Some of the principal artists to be examined are Reynolds, Kauffmann, David, Houdon, Gericault, Friedrich, Ingres, and Preault. The overarching goal of the course is to stimulate students to look, think, read, and write in a critical manner about visual art and its ideas. Students will be asked to do so in class discussions, exams, and papers.The course will begin by introducing how these styles and movements have traditionally been formulated, and then propose alternative definitions. These definitions will then be applied to various works of art and artists. The course outline is organized around genres of art or themes that were critical to the transformations then occurring, e.g., the Sublime and Sensibility, History and Historicism.
ARHI 4420/6420American Art of the Fin de Sie`cle 1876-1913The transition in American art from Victorianism to early Modernism in an age of science, progress and decay, tradition and ethnicity, motherhood and the "new woman." A key cultural referent will be the World's Columbian Exposition of 1893.This course examines with a thematic organization the period of transition in American art from Victorianism to early Modernism. Looking at the various contradictions and oppositions that made up American life and culture from the Centennial to the eve of World War I, this course seeks to investigate the complex artistic expressions of America's most significant artists of this period as part of a broad era of such sweeping polarities as individualism and incorporation, expatriatism and nationalism, the modern and the primitive. With research projects requiring examination of the period's illustrated periodicals, the course aims to explore individual artistic production within the broader framework of cultural artifacts such as photographs, decorative objects, advertisements, exhibition displays, illustrations, cartoons, and period writings.I. The Promise of 1893: The World's Columbian Exposition As Mirror To The American Soul II. Memory & Nostalgia For A Utopian American Past III. The Heroic Present: Science, Professionalism & Individual Achievement IV. The American West Conquered V. Being Big: Fighting Neurasthenia & The Crisis of Masculinity VI. Aestheticism & the Pursuit of Cosmopolitan Beauty VII. Orientalism, The Sacred Goddess & The New Woman VIII. Mind Cure: The Spirit Seekers IX. Illusion and Authenticity in The Age of Urban Spectacle
ARHI 4500/6500Realism and ImpressionismThe rise and development of naturalism in mid-nineteenth-century art in Europe.This course introduces and explores the principal artistic movements and stylistic trends in Europe from 1830 to 1880, with an emphasis on French Realism and Impressionism. Works of art are examined through their forms and techniques, historical circumstances, and critical reception. Although the name Realism suggests that this artistic movement or style had a close relationship to the "real," students will analyze its images as representations, not as equivalents for "reality." In similar manner, the old myth that the Impressionists painted only what they saw in front of them will be challenged, and the broader historical and cultural context will be brought to bear to illuminate their aesthetic decisions and innovations. The goal is to develop critical skills in looking at and reading, thinking, and writing about paintings, sculptures, and prints as visual images and cultural products. Students will be asked to apply factual information and interpretive skills to works, concepts, and texts on exams and papers.The course begins with an overview of the institutional structure and training that young artists encountered as they worked to become professionals, and addresses the aesthetic, economic, and cultural forces behind the development of plein-air painting (painting out of doors) that culminated in the Impressionist technique. Special emphasis will be given to Paris as the art capital of the West as well as a principal subject of modern art. Other issues include the situation of women artists, the development of artists' organizations and societies, and the various strategies of the art market to promote contemporary art. Visits to area art collections or temporary exhibitions will be made whenever possible so that students may study original works of art.
ARHI 4650/6650Voyages and Visionaries: From Columbus to PicardThe visual history of travel related to the building of empires from 1400 until today. Historical and fictitious travelers will be explored with reference to maps, travelogues, paintings, sculpture, photographs, and cinema. Field trips to the Hargrett Map Collection and the Georgia Museum of Art.Students will learn to analyze visually, think and write critically, and to make cross-cultural references among Spain, France, England, North America, the Caribbean, North Africa, South Asia and China.Week 1: Introduction Week 2: Early Voyagers Week 3: Mapping the World Week 4: Visit to the Hargrett Map Collection Week 5: Borders and Boundaries Week 6: The Scientific voyage Week 7: The Empire of Nature Week 8: Cabinets of Curiosities Week 9: Visit to the Georgia Museum of Art Week 10: Mapping the Landscape in painting and sculpture Week 11: Constructions of Geography and Empire Week 12: Traveller's Myths Week 13: Hollywood and Notions of Travel Week 14: Movie: Star-Wars Week 15: Movie: Star-Wars Week 16: Re-assessing Ideas about Empire
ARHI 4800Senior Seminar: Methods of Art HistoryThis topic-centered course provides a foundation for understanding various methods of interpreting art ranging from connoisseurship to iconography, Marxism, and feminism. It addresses the theory, contributions, and oversights of each method as well as how research is accomplished, what sources are used, and how they are interpreted and applied.This course is open to junior and senior art history majors and will serve as an alternative to the exit exam. It provides an introduction to the literature and methods of art history, organized around a topic in the area of specialization of the instructor. Students will learn how to read in a critical fashion by identifying an argument, the sources upon which it is based, and the contribution it proposes to make to the field in general. They will also explore various methods of building arguments in the interpretation of works of art, and to apply them to specific works. They will work on specific objects, conduct research, and apply at least some of these methods in the preparation of a research paper. Ideally, these papers may provide those majors interested in applying to graduate school a writing sample that reflects their competency and knowledge inthe field.The following course outline will be adjusted by the individual instructors: Week One: Introduction to Course and Topic Week Two: Formal analysis and Connisseurship Week Three: Materials and Conservation Issues Week Four: Museum and/or Library Visit Week Five: Iconography Week Six: Historical Context Week Seven: Reception History Week Eight: Sociology and Marxism Week Nine: Biography Week Ten: Individual Meetings on Research Week Eleven: Feminism Week Twelve - Fourteen: Student Presentations
ARHI 4910/6910Topics in Renaissance and Baroque ArtParticular topics in Renaissance and Baroque art and architecture treated in depth. This course explores specific aspects of the art and architecture created during the Renaissance and Baroque periods. For instance the course might focus on the patronage of Empress Catherine II (1764-1796). The empress commissioned numerous works of art and architecture, which she regarded as manifestations of her own enlightened rule. These monuments expressed the spirit of the era since their design and visual programs were informed by the ideas of some of the most prominent intellectuals of Europe who regarded Catherine the Great as their patroness and friend. In addition, the empress's creations reflected her own intellectual pursuits as a scholar, a writer, as well as an art collector and connoisseur. Asserting the place of her people on the map of what she viewed as the World of the Enlightenment, Catherine the great created a unique vision of the past merging the history and culture of the medieval Russian state with classical antiquity and Byzantium. Students will be tested two times in the course of the semester and submit a research paper. Shorter assignments might be required such as a critical analysis of a scholarly work.I. Introduction: Russia and the Russians. II. Slavic Language Culture Between Byzantium, Asia and the West. III. Holy Moscow: The Orthodox Empire of the Third Rome. IV. The Petrine Revolution in Russian Imagery. V. Catherine the Great's Triumphs Played out in Sculpture, Architecture and Words. VI. Politics and Pleasure: Tsarskoe Selo. VII. Between Versailles and Constantinople: The Kekereksenskii Palace. VIII. Collecting Art and Antiquities: Catherine the Great and Count Aleksander Sergeevich Stroganoff. IX. Imperial Portraits, Icon and Caricature. X. Architecture: Neoclassical Style, Neo-Gothic Buildings, Landscape Design. XI. Monuments: The Brazen Horseman of St. Peterburg. XII. Dining with the Empress: The Orlov Tea Service, The Cameo Service, Services for the Orders of St. George, St. Andrew, and St. Vladimir. XIII. England Seen Through the Eyes of the Empress: The Green Frog Service. XIV. Russia Seen Through the Eyes of the French: The Drawings of Jean- Baptist Le Prince and the response of Catherine the Great. XV. Catherine the Great and Voltaire.
ARHI 4950/6950Independent StudySpecial projects in fields in which the student has demonstrated the ability to conduct research and write a fully and correctly annotated paper.Independent study requires the permission of the department and of an individual faculty member willing to work with a student on a particular project or research program. Among other issues, the student must be able to demonstrate that an independent research project would be more beneficial than a more traditional course. The student would be expected to develop a plan and schedule for their research and to submit progress reports as well as to meet on regular basis with their faculty advisor. The expected learning outcome for such an independent study project would be to allow a student to conduct research on a level equal to that of graduate art history students and to produce a rigorously researched and correctly annotated paper.Independent Study course.
ARHI 4960HDirected Reading and/or Projects (Honors)Special projects under the direction of an approved advisor for Honors students of senior division standing.As part of the honors program, art history majors can decide to take 6 hours of credit toward the research and writing of a research project. This course serves as the first part of that program-it is a three-hour directed study. The student, in consultation with a faculty advisor, will determine a topic, set a schedule, and undertake the appropriate research. Regular meetings will be held with the faculty advisor. Success in the course will be based on the research completed. This semester is understood as the first half of a two semester program. The second portion is ARHI 4990H where the writing will be completed. The goal of this doubled, honors program course is to introduce students to the rigorous discipline of art historical scholarship.Directed study.
ARHI 4990HHonors ThesisIndividual research in the major field or in a closely related field.As part of the honors program, art history majors can decide to take 6 hours of credit toward the research and writing of a research project. This course serves as the second part of that program-it is a three-hour directed study intended to allow the student to write the research paper/project begun during the previous semester. In consultation with a faculty advisor, the student will set a schedule for the semester and undertake the writing of a research paper. This paper should represent serious research and analysis. Throughout the semester regular meetings will be held with the faculty advisor. Success in the course will be based on the completed paper. This semester is understood as the first half of a two semester program. The first portion is ARHI 4960H when the research will be completed. The goal of this doubled, honors program course is to introduce students to the rigorous discipline of art historical scholarship.Honors thesis.
ARHI 7040Art History MethodologyArt historical methodologies as they developed from the Renaissance to the present and as they are currently employed in the diverse fields and periods of art history. Students will work with the entire art history faculty in the presentation of different methodologies.This course is intended to introduce students to the range of art historical methodologies, both inside and beyond their chosen field of concentration. The format is further intended to introduce them to ways of teaching such a course themselves, increasingly a staple of every art history program. This course will expose our graduate students to the wide diversity of means and methods available to them in the study of art history. It will, therefore, enhance both their appreciation of the work of other scholars and the sophistication of their own research.This course covers the history of art history from its birth in the sixteenth century through the modern period. Over the course of eight focused discussions students will be exposed to a variety of different methodologies ranging from Vasari's biographies to the newest theories of contemporary art. Each professor will work with one or two students to prepare the discussion that will be led by the students and will be based on readings taken from Art History and Its Methods: a critical anthology,ed. Eric Fernie (Phaidon, 1995) as well as articles chosen by the professor in consultation with the students working with him/her. 1. Introduction 2. Winckelmann and Ancient Art/Research Techniques 3. Iconography of Medieval Art 4. Renaissance and Connoisseurship 5. Wofflin. The Baroque and Periodization in Art History 6. Asian Art Historiography 7. Writers of/on Art 8. American Art and cultural History 9. Modernity and Modernism 10. Conclusion
ARHI 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.Art history and graduate students who enroll in this course are expected to complete the research and write their M.A. thesis in art history. Working under the supervision of their major professor, students should use this semester to complete all work for the M.A. thesis, including the defense of the thesis.Master's thesis.
ARHI 8580Seminar in Renaissance ArtProblems in European art during the Renaissance. May include topics oriented toward a single major figure, a genre, or a school. Problems concern a major branch of art history, e.g., connoisseurship or iconography.This course undertakes in-depth examination of specific problems, monuments, or periods in Italian art from the thirteenth through the sixteenth centuries. Previous seminars have considered such topics as the Arena Chapel and Giorgio Vasari's Lives. The seminar on the Arena Chapel introduced students to problems in pictorial narration; that on Vasari's Lives dealt with one of the key texts in the history of western art and questions of historical writing. In each instance students are required to give at least one presentation and to produce a major research paper, which will constitute the better part of their final grade.Seminar.
ARHI 8870Seminar in Asian ArtResearch topics may include Hindu iconography, Chinese painting, pan-Asian Buddhist iconography, the Hindu temple, and others.This course is a seminar on various topics in Chinese art. The main purpose is to enable students to expand their understanding in non- Western tradition of art and question conceptual models based on European artistic traditions. The first third of the semester will be devoted to reading and discussing theoretical writings. The second third will be devoted to careful observation of related works of art or objects in Asian context. The last third will consist of student presentations and a term paper, through which students will show their ability to combine conceptual models and careful observations of objects or works of art.This course explores Asian art in relation to important conceptual models in art history. We will start from reading theoretical discussions on a certain conceptual model (i.e. word and image, representation, landscape, and icons and rituals). Then by observing examples in Chinese art, we will discuss how the conceptual model could enhance our understanding of Chinese art and also how the case in Chinese art could modify or change certain models. In the latter part of the course, students will make presentations and write an extensive research paper that combine their critical reading of theories and their ability to relate them with objects or works of art.
ARHI 8910Seminar in Nineteenth-Century European Art HistoryIssues relating to the visual arts. Studies of major artists or movements, and thematically directed projects.This seminar typically focuses on an important artist, movement, theme, or problem in 19th-century European art, more often in France, England, and/or Spain. The class together reads and discusses important texts and theories, looking closely at images, the way that the argument has been constructed and "proven," and the resources and research of the authors. In their research papers and presentations, graduate students are introduced to and asked to apply the different methodologies available to art historical research and interpretation.Course outlines vary considerably depending on the topic chosen for the class. Generally, the professor presents an overview to the subject, related images, and the scholarly literature. The following six to eight sessions typically involve reading a text or texts, and discussing them in class in relation to images in slides that the professor has selected. After this material has helped to solidify the students' knowledge of the topic, its historical context, and its scholars, students then present their topics in one to one and one-half hour presentations with slides, followed by discussion of further avenues of inquiry and research. These presentations allow students to try out their ideas and to prepare for the writing of their seminar papers.
ARHI 8920Seminar in Twentieth-Century Art HistoryIssues relating to the visual arts. Topical studies of major artists or movements, and thematically directed projects.This course number allows for a variety of topics according to the specialized interests of the art history faculty who teach in the area of twentieth-century art. It is intended primarily for art history graduate students in the M.A. and Ph.D. programs. Recent topics have included Abstract Expressionism: The First Generation and Mythology in Twentieth-Century Art. Students devote three-quarters of the semester to reading and discussing the recent scholarship on the topic under consideration and presenting short reports. Upon completion of the assigned readings students will make forty-minute oral presentations and submit a research paper at the conclusion of the semester based on these presentations. Students will become acquainted with the best and latest scholarship on the topic covered, develop an in-depth understanding of it, and write a paper aimed at original thinking on the subject.I. From Regionalism to Abstract Expressionism II. The Intellectual Roots of Abstract Expressionism III. The Formation of the Avant-Garde in New York IV. Automatism and Primitivism 1940-1950 V. The Subjects of the Artist VI. The Abstract-Expressionist
ARHI 8950Seminar in Post-Modern Theories and Art HistoryWriting-intensive course focusing on film painting and related post-modern theories drawn from semiotics, gender studies, cultural studies, and post-colonial studies.The content of this course will change from professor to professor and semester to semester. Students will learn to grasp and critique major theoretical readings drawn from a variety of fields, in relation to the film, photography and painting. In addition, they will engage in a series of intensive writing exercises and seminar presentations that will help them learn how to articulate certain key concepts and raise further questions in a clear, concise manner.A sample course: Week 1: Introduction: Masks of the "Orient" Week 2: Advertising the "Orient" Week 3: Reading Edward Said and Griselda Pollock Week 4: Stereotypes Week 5: Picturing the Body Week 6: Dance and Constructions of Identity Week 7: Cultural Signs and Signifiers: Introduction to Semiotics Week 8: Writing and Travel Theory Week 9: Greta Garbo in Mata Hari Week 10: Role Reversals: How does the "Orient" re-colonize? Week 11: Anna and the King of Siam Week 12: Mapping Landscape Week 13: Mapping Identity Week 14: Nationalism and Identity Week 15: The Mummy Week 16: Hollywood's constructions of the "Other"
ARID 3110Studio II: Documenting Interior Design ProjectsAll design phases in the development of a comprehensive interior design project from programming through contract documents. Development of skills in creating working drawings and oral presentations.To examine residential interiors, furnishings, space planning, principles and elements of design, materials, and components. To understand the applications of design principles and elements to residential interior design through the design of one or more projects. To expand understanding of graphic presentation, drawings and drafting skills. To explore multiple dwelling spaces that increase involvement with problems of modern environmental considerations, i.e. basic building and barrier-free codes. To understand specialized fields and how they serve residential interior design, i.e., lighting, acoustical, furniture design, graphic elements and selection of art work. To demonstrate residential interior design vocabulary and comprehension. To understand the role of the interior designer in residential design.I. Defining design: The development and practice of residential interior design. II. The design process a. Design statement b. Research and programming c. Writing a program d. Design development: Solving the problem Space planning Furniture arrangement and specification Materials and finishes specifications III. Design presentation a. Orthographic b. Scale drawing c. Perspective d. 3-dimensional e. Boards IV. The Building a. Systems b. Structural components c. Human factors
ARID 3420Computer-Based Business/Professional ApplicationComputer-based design project management utilizing appropriate software for CAD, desktop publishing, spread sheets, databases, and presentations.To understand interior design business organizations and staff structures. To understand basic interior design business procedures beginning with design contracts and moving through all project design phases. To demonstrate the use of basic software applications to create, present, store, manage and recall interior design project information and to conduct routine business procedures. To demonstrate proficiencies in writing and interpreting design contracts and letter of agreement, including goods and services to be provided and design fee structures. To demonstrate an awareness of professionalism and professional ethics through role-playing and similar oral or written exercises. To synthesize and extend information learned in previous interior design courses. To project the use of information learned in this course to the experiences that may be anticipated in future ID courses and in professional practice. To demonstrate proficiency in interior design project and information management by utilizing appropriate CAD, desktop publishing, spreadsheet, database, presentation, and project management software on a studio design project.Introduction to business procedures, e.g. contracts and letters of agreement, project time management, human and financial resource management, and information management throughout all interior design project phases. Introduction to, demonstration of and exercises using basic software applications, including desktop publishing, spreadsheets, databases, CAD, presentation graphics, and project management software. Use of software to create, present, store, manage and recall project information. Creating computer-based design documentation appropriate to each design phase, e.g. graphic presentations, two-and three-dimensional working drawings, schedules and written specifications, and furniture, fixtures and equipment (FF7E) budgeted documents. Professional procedures document production. a. design contracts b. 2- and 3-D plans, elevations, sections and details. c. written product and/or performance specifications for FF7E items d. FF&E budget documents Verbal and graphic presentation of design documents both on-and off-screen.
ARID 4350/6350Interior Design PracticumIndividualized projects arranged with clients to explore various aspects of the interior design profession.To extend learning experiences into various aspects of the profession. To develop an individualized program of learning based on interest and need. To document the practicum experience in written or graphic form.A practicum experience might include, but would not be limited to, interior design services rendered to a client: 1. Meet with client to determine project goals and objectives. 2. Write letter of agreement for client and obtain client's signature. 3. Produce design documents as needed. 4. Produce construction documents as needed. 5. Conduct client follow-up evaluations.
ARID 7890Interior Design ISpecial problems in the planning of architectural spaces for public and residential uses.Advanced considerations for interiors, furnishings, space planning, principles and elements of design, materials, and architectural components for public and private places. Applications of design principles and elements to residential interior design through the design of one or more projects. To expand understanding of graphic presentation, drawings and drafting skills. To explore multiple dwelling spaces that increase involvement with problems of modern environmental considerations, i.e. basic building and barrier-free codes. To understand specialized fields and how they serve interior design, i.e., lighting, acoustical, furniture design, graphic elements and selection of art work. To demonstrate interior design vocabulary and comprehension.I. Defining design: The development and practice of residential interior design. II. The design process: A. Design statement B. Research and programming C. Writing a program D. Design development: Solving the problem Space planning Furniture arrangement and specification Materials and finishes specifications. III. Design presentation A. Orthographic B. Scale drawing C. Perspective D. 3-dimensional E. Boards IV. The Building A. Systems B. Structural components C. Human factors
ARST 3210Color PhotographyColor photography including color theory, color temperature, lighting, and color printing. Concepts are presented in the context of contemporary trends and practices.This course is designed to introduce the students to both the technical and conceptual use of color photography. Through technical exercises in shooting color film and working in the darkroom students will learn the techniques of working with color materials including color theory, color temperature, lighting, and color printing. Classroom discussions, slide lectures, gallery visits, research projects and critiques will expose the students to the conceptual components and contemporary trends in color photography.Color theory, color temperature and lighting lectures. Color films: lighting and shooting exercises. Color darkroom work in printing and color balancing. Regular in class assisted lab work time. Slide lectures, gallery visits and conceptual reading/writing on historical and contemporary trends in color photography. Portfolio development with regular critiques.
ARST 3220Medium and Large FormatMedium and large format cameras using roll, pack, and sheet films. Techniques of advanced camera handling, lighting, film processing, and refined printing. Historical and contemporary practices considered.This course is designed to introduce the students to both the technical and conceptual use of medium and large format photography. Through technical exercise in shooting film and printing in the darkroom students will learn the techniques of working with medium and large format cameras including using roll, pack and sheet films, advanced camera handling, lighting, film processing and refined printing. Classroom discussions, slide lectures, gallery visits, research projects and critiques will expose the students to the conceptual components and historical and contemporary practices in medium and large format photography.Handling the large format camera: working with sheet film, loading film holders, setting up the view camera (zero position), lens plane tilts and swings shifting plane of focus, film plane tilts and swings shifting perspective, bellows extension principle, scheimpflug principle, processing sheet film in trays and using the Jobo film processor. Printing large format negatives. Advanced exposure and development controls - the zone system. Medium format cameras, roll film, processing roll film. Regular in class assisted lab work time. Slide lectures, gallery visits and conceptual reading/writing on historical and contemporary trends in medium and large format photography. Portfolio development with regular critiques.
ARST 3240Digital PhotographyApplication of digital photography emphasizing conceptual approaches and contemporary practices. Fine printing through computer based output.The intention of the course is to utilize the tools of digital photography for personal expression. The class will emphasize using the tools of the computer to explore conceptual ideas. In addition students will learn fine printing through computer based output.Contemporary practices. Conceptual readings and writing. Image capture: digital camera, digital video, flatbed scanner, drum scanner. Scanner as camera. Color calibration, profiles. Digital darkroom output, fine printing, black and white, color, papers and media. Straight image. Digital collage.
ARST 3850Interactive Art IExploration of realtime interactive audio-visual/mechanical systems in the service of art. Students create, control, effect, and transform digital media in realtime using custom hardware and software.Students learn software for programing 10 devices, with an emphasis on techniques and approaches for sound and spatial art. By conceiving and designing digital abstractions of the physical world, students learn to write computer programs which manipulate internal representations of physical time and space as a means of controlling events in real physical time and space.1) Introduction to the history of interactive art. 2) Introduction to visual programming. 3) Introduction to hardware controllers and sensors. 4) Sound synthesis. 5) Switching devices. 6) Motor control. 7) Video control. 8) Final project
ARST 4200Advanced PhotographyAdvanced applications of the medium. Experimental camera handling and laboratory work is emphasized. Intensive practice of traditional and new technologies from the photogram to the electronic image.This course is designed for advanced photography students to explore in-depth applications of medium. Experimental camera handling and laboratory work is emphasized. Students are encouraged to pursue their own direction for their work while completing technical exercise on new advanced techniques. Classroom discussions, slide lectures, gallery visits and critiques are significant components of this class as students come to terms with their own use of the medium and enter a dialogue with contemporary practice.Personal portfolio development throughout the course. Special techniques including advanced lighting, non-traditional printing techniques, mixed media applications incorporating photography, shooting copy slides, print finishing and presentation, and writing an artist statement. Regular critiques on developing work. Regular in class assisted lab work. Slide lectures, gallery visits and conceptual reading/writing on contemporary practice.
ARST 4800/6800Special Topics in Art and TechnologyFor upper-level undergraduate and graduate students who are working within expanded forms of installation, video, sound, performance, and interactive electronic arts. Students are expected to work independently setting their own projects and goals. The class combines theory, studio, critique, and discussion.Students will expand their time based media techniques to arrange complex installations, video and sound art. Using current technology, students will explore areas of performance and electronic interactive arts. The course encourages experimentation in pushing the recognized boundaries of the Art & Technology. They will learn how technology can improve ones art making vocabulary.The course will begin with a brief two-week historical overview of this hybrid area. The next three weeks will be devoted to bringing everyone up to speed on the current technology in art. Students will then write proposals for three projects that they wish to carry out through out the semester. Group critiques will take place every other week. The final grade will be based on three completed works of art. A grading emphasis will be placed on effort.
ARST 4830Digital Video IIIntroduction to more sophisticated processes in video production and post production. Further refinement of digital editing techniques and visual effects are covered. Storyboards, scripting, and content are emphasized. The class views, reads, and discusses significant contemporary works and related critical writings.Students are expected to achieve a level of technical competence and confidence necessary to undertake more ambitious independent work. By the end of the course the student will be able to: 1) Describe their ideas through storyboards, scripting and sketches. 2) Fluently interact with non-linear editing software and hardware. 3) Apply the skills toward a completed project within an art context. 4) Understand concepts and methods used in digital video art making.1) Survey of video techniques. 2) Review of contemporary art videos. 3) Scriptwriting 4) Storyboarding 5) Software tutorials a. Special effects b. Transitions c. Timing d. Projections and installations e. Interactivity 6) Final project
ARST 4850Interactive Art IIAn advanced course in realtime interactive audio-visual/mechanical systems.Students learn advanced software for programing 10 devices, with an emphasis on techniques and approaches for sound and spatial art. By conceiving and designing virtual abstractions of the physical world, students learn to write computer programs which manipulate events in real physical time and space. In this advanced course the students will also design and build their own sensors and interactive electronics.1) Historical view into the making of interactive art. 2) Mutiple language visual programming. 3) Hardware controllers and sensor building. 4) Sound synthesis programming. 5) Switching sevice applications. 6) Rmote motor control techniques. 7) Remote video control techniques. 8) Final Project.
ARST 6210Color PhotographyFundamentals of color photography, including color theory, color temperature, lighting, and color printing. Concepts are presented in the context of contemporary trends and practices.This course is designed to introduce the students to both the technical and conceptual use of color photography. Through technical exercises in shooting color film and working in the darkroom students will learn the techniques of working with color materials including color theory, color temperature, lighting, and color printing. Classroom discussions, slide lectures, gallery visits, research projects and critiques will expose the students to the conceptual components and contemporary trends in color photography. This course accompanies ARST3210 with additional research expectations for the graduate level.Color theory, color temperature and lighting lectures. Color films: lighting and shooting exercises. Color darkroom work in printing and color balancing. Regular in class assisted lab work time. Slide lectures, gallery visits and conceptual reading/writing on historical and contemporary trends in color photography. Portfolio development with regular critiques.
ARST 6220Medium and Large FormatMedium and large format cameras using roll, pack, and sheet films. Techniques of advanced camera handling, lighting, film processing, and refined printing. Historical and contemporary practices considered.This course is designed to introduce the students to both the technical and conceptual use of medium and large format photography. Through technical exercise in shooting film and printing in the darkroom students will learn the techniques of working with medium and large format cameras including using roll, pack and sheet films, advanced camera handling, lighting, film processing and refined printing. Classroom discussions, slide lectures, gallery visits, research projects and critiques will expose the students to the conceptual components and historical and contemporary practices in medium and large format photography. This course accompanies ARST3220 with additional research expectations for the graduate level.Handling the large format camera: working with sheet film, loading film holders, setting up the view camera (zero position), lens plane tilts and swings shifting plane of focus, film plane tilts and swings shifting perspective, bellows extension principle, scheimflug principle, processing sheet film in trays and using the Jobo film processor. Printing large format negatives. Advanced exposure and development controls - the zone system. Medium format cameras, roll film, processing roll film. Regular in class assisted lab work time. Slide lectures, gallery visits and conceptual reading/writing on historical and contemporary trends in medium and large format photography. Portfolio development with regular critiques.
ARST 6240Digital PhotographyApplication of digital photography emphasizing conceptual approaches and contemporary practices. Fine printing through computer-based output.The intention of the course is to utilize the tools of digital photography for personal expression. The class will emphasize using the tools of the computer to explore conceptual ideas. In addition students will learn fine printing through computer based output.Contemporary practices Conceptual readings and writing Image capture: digital camera, digital video, flatbead scanner, drum scanner Scanner as camera Color calibration, profiles Digital darkroom output, fine printing, black and white color, papers and media Straight image Digital collage
ARST 7200PhotographyAdvanced applications of the medium. Experimental camera handling and laboratory work is emphasized. Intensive practice of traditional and new technologies from the phoram to the electronic image.This course is designed to explore in-depth applications of the medium of photography. Experimental camera handling and laboratory work is emphasized. Students are encouraged to pursue their own direction for their work while completing technical exercise on new advanced techniques. Classroom discussions, slide lectures, gallery visits and critiques are significant components of this class as students come to terms with their own use of the medium and enter a dialogue with contemporary practice. This course accompanies ARST4200 with additional research expectations for the graduate level.Personal portfolio development throughout the course. Special techniques including advanced lighting, non-traditional printing techniques, mixed media applications incorporating photography, shooting copy slides, print finishing and presentation, and writing an artist statement. Regular critiques on developing work. Regular in class assisted lab work. Slide lectures, gallery visits and conceptual reading/writing on contemporary practice.
ARTI 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.This course will allow students to meet the thesis requirement for the M.S. in artificial intelligence.Master's thesis.
ARTS 4900/6900Professional Practices: The Business Side of ArtThe business practices necessary for an exhibiting and practicing artist to survive in the contemporary art market. Assignments will focus on professional development. Each student will leave the class with a packet of material to approach galleries, museums, and other art centers for exhibitions.Students will leave the course prepared to face the realities of a practicing artist in today's art market. Each student will develop a packet of materials which will include an artist C.V. and resume, artist bio, artist statement, and slide sheet. These will enable the student to pursue venues offered by museum directors, gallery directors, artist residency opportunities, and grant opportunities. Each student will also do a public slide presentation often required in association with such venues. Outside speakers such as accountants, lawyers, artist representatives, professional photographers, gallery owners,etc. will lead discussions on taxes, contracts, insurance, slide preparation, and copyright law to inform each student on logistical matters crucial to professional artists. The student will leave the class feeling that they have the knowledge and skills to meet the challenges one encounters upon graduation from art school.Books Required - "How to Survive and Prosper as an Artist: Selling Yourself Without Selling Your Soul", by Caroll Michels "Art and Fear," by David Bayles & Ted Orland Week One - Introduction: "How I have survived and prospered as an artist" Overcoming Myths. Are you ready to market your work? Tools of communication - business cards, resume, cover letter. Assignment #1 - pg. 1-15 Michels. Prepare an up to date, professional resume. Week Two - Photographing Your Artwork, Guest speaker to be announced. Resume due. Assignment #2 - Prepare a slide portfolio of 10 slides, one (5"x7" or 8"x10")black and white photo of work and black and white photo of self. Week Three - Tools of Communication - Biographical Statement, Personal Statement. Press Reviews. Presentation Packages - Brochures, Videos, Press Releases, Invitations, Review of Resumes. Assignment #3 - Write Biographical Statement and Personl Statement. Week Four - Sources of Funding - Artist-In-Residence Programs, Grant writing in course objectives. Writing a Proposal Slides and Photos due. Assignment #4 - Write for application forms for residency programs or available grants, prepare a grant or residency proposal. Week Five - State Grants and Percent for Arts Programs, Guest Speaker to be announced. Biographical Statement and Personal Statement due. Week Six - Review of Bio's and Personal Statement Review of Slides. 2nd Draft of resume due. Open discussion. Assignment #5 - Write a press release. Week Seven - Artists and the Law. Guest Speaker to be announced. Record Keeping, Legal Guidelines, Obscenity laws, taxes. Residency or Grant Proposal due. Assignment #6 - Read Federal Tax Forms, set up system for all business records, send away for copyright forms. Week Eight - Exhibition Opportunities - Commercial Galleries, Museums, Art Centers, University Galleries, Co-operatives, Juried Exhibitions Non-profits, Alernative Spaces. Questions to ask your gallery. Assignment #7 - Written evaluation of 5 galleries or alternative spaces for potential exhibition of your work. Week Nine - Preparing Work for Exhibition - Pricing Work, Insurance, Contracts, Crating and Shipping. Guest Speakers to be announced. Assignment #8 - Contact insurance companies for an estimate on insuring your studio, exhibition, and fine art shipment. Week Ten - Guest Speaker to be announced. Written evaluation of potential exhibition spaces due. Open Discussion. Week Eleven - Taxes Guest Speaker to be announced. Assignment #9 - Prepare records for tax keeping. Week Twelve - Exhibiting in Museums and Art Centers. Guest Speaker to be announced. Tax preparation system due. Week Thirteen - How to Sell Artwork. Guest Speaker to be announced. Assignment #10 - Prepare for class slide presentations Week Fourteen - Public Relations. Class slide presentations. Peer Evaluation. Week Fifteen - Public Relations. Class slide presentations. Peer Evaluation. Assignments due for grading: Final slide portfolio (20 slides), slide list, resume, personal statement, press release, 5"x7" or 8" x10" black and white photo of work and photo of self. Week Sixteen - Final Grading. Presentation Packets returned.
ARTS 4920/6920Seminar in Contemporary ArtContemporary art from the point of view of studio artists.This course introduces students to contemporary concepts and theories developed by artists of different disciplines working form 1970 to the present. Through lecture and discussion, this course strengthens the student's abilities to talk and write about contemporary art in a sophisticated and skilled manner. Emphasized in this class are ideas and language related to the making and meaning at conceptual art, performance art, video and digital media work, painting and sculpture. The knowledge acquired through this investigation will provide the student with the necessary discourse to enter the current world of art.This course is designed for upper level under-graduates and for graduate students in all departments of the Art School. Classroom activities include slide lectures, video viewing, critique and discussion. Each student is required to write six art reviews of six different artist projects on the World Wide Web, thus engaging the student in a relationship with the current technology being used by visual artists today. Each student is required to create three or more studio assignments based on the topics currently being discussed in the classroom. These projects help students expand their understanding of traditional object making. Lastly, each student is required to complete a final term project using research, development and writing, designing and planning, based on creating a group show of contemporary artists and contemporary thinking. Students are evaluated on the innovative interpretation and quality research of their projects, and the strength of their improvement in their ability to engage in meaningful contemporary art discourse. All of which develops a vocabulary essential to their development of professional artists.
ARTS 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.Art History and Art Education graduate students who enroll in this course are expected to complete the research and write their Ph.D. dissertation. Working under the supervision of their major professor, students should use this semester to complete all work for the doctoral dissertation, including the defense.Doctoral dissertation.
ASTR 8110Graduate Astronomy SeminarProfessional skills such as writing and reviewing research and observing proposals, writing and refereeing research papers, making oral presentations of research and of journal articles, and writing brief newspaper and magazine summaries. To provide graduate students with the general writing, reading, presentation, and argumentative skills necessary for success as professional scientists in academia, government, and industry. Writing and reviewing research and observing proposals; writing and refereeing research papers; making oral presentations of their research and of journal articles; and writing brief newspaper and magazine summaries.
BCHE 7300Master’s ThesisThesis writing under the direction of a major professor.Preparation of a master of science thesis.Master’s Thesis.
BCHE 8210Fermentation Engineering LaboratoryAdvanced fermentation principles through the development of mathematical models, design of experiments, and interpretation of results.Students will enhance their skills at technical report writing. Students will work in multidisciplinary teams to work on problems in microbial and enzymatic systems. Student will develop skills modeling microbial and enzymatic systems. Students will learn design of fermentation/enzyme experiments and interpretation of results.Students will work in multidisciplinary teams on five laboratory modules during the semester. Lectures will directly complement the experiments and lead to an advanced understanding of microbial and enzymatic systems, modeling such systems and interpretation of associated experiments. Students will be expected to 1) investigate the literature, 2) schedule experiment and modify experimental protocol, 3) present their experimental design to instructor(s), 4) conduct experiment, 5) complete written laboratory reports. Students will conduct the following three experiments: 1) batch anaerobic bacterial fermentation 2) genetic transformation of bacteria and batch anaerobic fermentation of transformed microorganism 3) measurement of mass transfer coefficients Students will conduct two of the following experiments: 1) continuous yeast fermentation 2) solid matrix fermentation 3) biodegradation 4) enzyme transformation 5) substrate-limited fed-batch fermentation Additional lecture topics will include: 1) material balances on microbial processes 2) enzyme kinetics 3) microbial growth kinetics 4) mass transport phenomena 5) statistics and cost considerations in medium selection 6) overflow metabolism and fluxes
BCMB 3150Special Topics in Biochemistry and Molecular BiologySeminars, readings, and discussions of topics related to biochemistry, biotechnology, and molecular biology. Scientific writing will be emphasized, and visits to laboratories may be scheduled.The objective of this course is to provide students extended readings and discussions beyond topics generally covered in the didactic lecture courses. The students will learn critical analysis of scientific papers, oral presentation of concepts, and rudimentary scientific writing. Trips to laboratories at UGA and off-campus may be included depending upon student interests.Since the intent of this new offering is to provide a flexible course to accommodate diverse student and faculty interests and provide instruction in critical reading and analysis, oral communication, and scientific writing, where laboratory visits and off-campus field trips may also be included to view specialized instrumentation and experimental procedures, it is not possible to provide a fixed outline of the topics to be covered. One possible offering could, for example, focus on biotechnology and society. For such an offering students would have assigned readings in the basic scientific methodologies underlying biotechnology, e.g. cloning (gene, reproductive, and therapeutic), biomanufacturing (microbial and animal cell production), and current and potential applications in health and agriculture, as well as the moral and ethical concerns. Students would be asked to present the papers and defend or criticize the content; they would also have written assignments involving literature research. Visits to laboratories and facilities at UGA, as well as off-campus, will be scheduled as appropriate.
BCMB 3150HSpecial Topics in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Honors)Seminars, readings, and discussions of topics related to biochemistry, biotechnology, and molecular biology. Scientific writing will be emphasized, and visits to laboratories may be scheduled.The objective of this course is to provide Honors students extended readings and discussions beyond topics generally covered in the didactic lecture courses. The Honors students will learn critical analysis of scientific papers, oral presentation of concepts, and rudimentary scientific writing. Trips to laboratories at UGA and off-campus may be included depending upon student interests.Since the intent of this new offering is to provide a flexible course to accommodate diverse Honors student and faculty interests and provide instruction in critical reading and analysis, oral communication, and scientific writing, where laboratory visits and off-campus field trips may also be included to view specialized instrumentation and experimental procedures, it is not possible to provide a fixed outline of the topics to be covered. One possible offering could, for example, focus on biotechnology and society. For such an offering Honors students would have assigned readings in the basic scientific methodologies underlying biotechnology, e.g. cloning (gene, reproductive, and therapeutic), biomanufacturing (microbial and animal cell production), and current and potential applications in health and agriculture, as well as the moral and ethical concerns. Students would be asked to present the papers and defend or criticize the content; they would also have written assignments involving literature research. Visits to laboratories and facilities at UGA, as well as off-campus, will be scheduled as appropriate.
BCMB 4121HHuman Biochemistry (Honors)Various topics in human biochemistry and pathophysiology.The major objective of this course is to provide students an opportunity to hear various faculty members from MCG speak of their basic biomedical or clinical research. Students completing this course will have a better understanding and appreciation of biomedical research.This course features lectures by a variety of MCG faculty speaking on contemporary research, basic and clinical, in the biomedical field. These lectures will extend and augment the parent course, Human Biochemistry and Disease. Students are expected to engage in discussion with the instructors and will write a paper each week.
BCMB 4960HLaboratory Research in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I (Honors)Basic techniques in biochemistry and molecular biology, application of the scientific method, and preparation of a written scientific report. For Honors students with little or no laboratory experience.The objective of this first-semester research laboratory is to teach research methodology to Honors students who have had little or no training in laboratory-based research. By studying with a faculty mentor in his/her laboratory each student is expected to identify a research project, read the pertinent literature, develop a hypothesis to be tested, learn the necessary research protocol(s), conduct experiments, interpret the results, and prepare a scientific paper at the end of the semester. Students will gain skills in laboratory research and scientific writing.Students will perform laboratory-based research with a faculty mentor and receive training in critical analysis of the literature, applications of the scientific method, and scientific writing.
BCMB 4960LLaboratory Research in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology IBasic techniques in biochemistry and molecular biology, application of the scientific method, and preparation of a written scientific report. For students with little or no laboratory experience. This, the first laboratory of a 2-semester sequence, has as its objective the introduction to students with little or no laboratory experience many of the basic techniques of biochemistry and molecular biology in a research laboratory, application of the scientific method, data analysis, and preparation of a written scientific report. Students completing this laboratory should have familiarity with standard techniques and instrumentation in biochemistry & molecular biology research and rudimentary skills in critical data analysis and writing.This course currently consists of 9-15 laboratory hours per week (3-5 hours credit). There is need for a discussion hour to review experimental results, analyze data, and plan new experiments. The change from variable credit to a fixed credit (4 hours) will enable all faculty instructors to adhere to 1 hour for discussion and 11 hours of planned laboratory research.
BCMB 4970HLaboratory Research in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II (Honors)Advanced techniques in biochemistry and molecular biology, application of the scientific method, and preparation of a written scientific report. For Honors students with some laboratory experience.The objective of this second-semester research laboratory is to continue training of Honors students who have satisfactorily completed at least one semester of research. The student is expected to perform research with more independence, although he/she is under the constant supervision of a faculty mentor. Students completing 4970H are expected to have familiarity with critical reading of the scientific literature and development of a hypothesis, to have exhibited facility in certain experimental techniques and interpretation of the results, and to exhibit writing skills. Lastly, students will be encouraged to present and defend their study at the Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunity Annual Symposium and to publish a paper in The Undergraduate Science Bulletin.Students will, with only rare exceptions, complete 4970H with the same faculty mentor they had in 4960H. This provides continuity and gives the students two semesters of concentrated research on a single project.
BCMB 4970LLaboratory Research in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology IIAdvanced techniques in biochemistry and molecular biology, application of the scientific method, and preparation of a written scientific report. For students with some laboratory experience.The objective of this second-semester research laboratory is to continue training of students who have satisfactorily completed at least one semester of research. The student is expected to perform research with more independence, although he/she is under the constant supervision of a faculty mentor. Students completing 4970H are expected to have familiarity with critical reading of the scientific literature and development of a hypothesis, to have exhibited facility in certain experimental techniques and interpretation of the results, and to exhibit writing skills. Lastly, students will be encouraged to present and defend their study at the Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunity Annual Symposium and to publish a paper in The Undergraduate Science Bulletin.Students will, with only rare exceptions, complete 4970L with the same faculty mentor they had in 4960L. This provides continuity and gives the students two semesters of concentrated research on a single project.
BCMB 4990HHonors Thesis in Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyLaboratory research in biochemistry and molecular biology under the supervision of a faculty member. A thesis summarizing the literature in the field and the student's research findings is required.Students are expected to exhibit some degree of independence in development of a research project, application of the scientific method to address hypotheses, mastering relevant experimental approaches, interpretation and presentation of the data, and rigorous scientific writing that places the project within the context of the field.Students will study with faculty mentors to develop their skills in laboratory research and scientific writing. They are also encouraged to present and defend their data at the Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunity Annual Symposium and/or publish their work in The Undergraduate Science Bulletin.
BCMB 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.
BCMB 8005Graduate Professional DevelopmentA discussion of topics that are fundamental to modern graduate research, including safe laboratory practices, scientific ethics, the scientific method, and scientific resource awareness. Student assignments will explore approaches for identifying and securing independent research funding.This lecture and discussion-based course is designed to provide new graduate students with a practical introduction to modern graduate research and career development. Students will be expected to acquire a basic understanding of the following subject areas: 1) university structure and organization, 2) scientific ethics and ethical research practices, 3) the basics of laboratory safety, 4) project management skills, 5) effective use of scientific research resources, 6) extramural funding mechanisms, and 7) grant proposal writing. Students who successfully complete the course should be equipped to define and execute a research project in the context of a formal Ph.D. training program. The instructor will judge student performance primarily by the student's participation in class discussions. There will be no formal exam and attendance will be mandatory. Student evaluations will be obtained at the end of the semester in accordance with university and department policies. Student recommendations for improvements to the course will be implemented as needed for future offerings of the course.An outline of the syllabus follows. Typically, this course will be taken concurrently with either BCMB 7000 (Master's Research), BCMB 8035 (Laboratory Rotations), or BCMB 9000 (Doctoral Research). Two hours of discussion will minimally be devoted to each topic, with certain topics being discussed over three hours. 1. Overview of the BCMB Graduate Program a) Outline of program expectations b) Introduction to University culture and organization c) Discussion of keys to success 2. Safe Laboratory Practices a) Official UGA Safety policy and training b) Right-to-Know, chemical, hazardous waste, training c) Discussion of improper safety practices and assigned readings 3. Ethics Training a) Official UGA Responsible Conduct and Computer Use policies b) Scientific Integrity and examples of Scientific Misconduct c) Grievance Procedures d) Discussion of assigned readings 4. Development of Research Skills a) The Scientific method and hypothesis driven research b) Scientific research resources c) Data recording practices, notebook organization, and duplicating results d) Discussion of assigned readings 5. Career exploration a) Discussion of career opportunities b) Grant writing basics c) Identification of funding sources d) Discussion of assigned readings 6. Career development - student project a) Description of hypotheses b) Outline of research project/idea c) Identification of suitable extramural funding process d) Knowledge of administrative details 7. Scientific communication and networking a) Review of ongoing departmental research b) Importance of networking c) Discussion of assigned readings
BCMB 8030Introduction to Research in Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyOverview of current departmental research and introduction to research facilities. Training and practical experience in oral presentation, scientific writing, and grant preparation.
BCMB 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
BCMB(GENE) 3433Biology of MedicineSelected topics in biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics, and biotechnology involved in modern medicine. Includes cloning, stem cells, endocrinology, human genetics, gene testing, and human population genetics. Bioethical issues will also be discussed. Both formal lectures and discussion sessions will be utilized and students will write short essays on selected topics.Students completing this course will have an understanding and appreciation of the molecular basis of health and disease as viewed from the perspective of genetics, biochemistry, molecular and cell biology, and physiology. The role of biotechnology in medicine will be discussed from the standpoint of moral and ethical issues.This course, designed for a May Session offering along with History of Medicine, will first be taught in Cortona, Italy and is aimed at attracting students who are pre-med, pre-dental, or pre-vet. Each day will feature lectures and discussions with groups of 15-20 students each. Field trips to sites with a history of medical teaching, research and practice will augment the lectures and discussions.
BHSI 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.The student is expected to report the results of their research project in a written format that meets the guidelines of the University of Georgia Graduate School for publication of a dissertation. Expected Learning Outcome: It is expected the student will successfully complete their dissertation.Students will be exptected to write original ideas, problems addressed, and answers found to specific questions through research conducted with guidance of the instructor and assistance of a graduate committee. Students are expected to properly organize and present thoughts including proper references to germane literature, methods, data obtained, appropriate statistical analyses, and conclusions. All or part of the dissertation may be completed within the semester. Writings may consist of manuscripts for publication or drafts of material to be incorporated in the dissertation. Frequent communication with the major professor, drafts, manuscripts, and/or the complete dissertation will provide the basis for evaluating student performance by the major professor.
BIOL 1103LConcepts in Biology LaboratoryIntroduction to cellular structure and function, Mendelian and population genetics, and environmental concepts. Observation and experimental exercises are combined with written assignments to reinforce content.The students enrolled in the laboratory course will gain a basic understanding of cellular structure and function as it relates to the world around them. Particular emphasis is given to content which directly impacts everyday life. Effort has been made to include laboratory exercises which relate to human and public health issues and current enviromental problems. Traditional observation and experimental exercises, with written assignments, will extend the student's knowledge beyond the scope of the laboratory. Many of the lab exercises will require access to the World-Wide Web or web-CT, and some assignments are designed to improve writing skills.The Scientific Method Organic Macromolecules Measurement of Enzyme Activities Use of the Compound Microscope/ Cells, Diversity in Structure and Function Cellular Metabolism Mitosis Meiosis, Gametogenesis, and Early Embryonic Development Vertebrate Develoment and Differentiation Genes - Patterns of Inheritance Prokaryotes Prokaryotes: DNA: From Lab to Courtroom. Chemicals, Mutagens, and Cancer. Population Genetics Environmental Issues: Biodiversity
BIOL 1104LOrganismal Biology LaboratoryIntroduction to diversity of bacteria; protists, fungi, plants, invertebrates; observational and experimental study of aquatic ecosystems; vertebrate physiology.Inquiry-based lab exercises and guided observations use a cooperative-learning format to study representatives of all major groups of organisms. Field trip observations of an aquatic ecosystem(Lake Herrick). Establish and study a microcosm aquatic ecosystem. Design and carry out an experiment to answer a question about aquatic ecosystems. Learn to observe carefully, ask questions, make measurements, collect data, and interpret results. Practice writing skills.Some of Lake Herrick's critters Bacteria and use of microscopes Establish aquarium jar ecosystem during field trip to Lake Herrick Predictions and measurements on aquarium jar ecosystems Protists(protozoa and algae) Fungi and fungus-like protists Design and start aquatic experiment Plant diversity Reproduction in flowering plants Plant structure Invertebrate diversity Human cardiovascular system Renal function: What's wrong with this patient Sensory system
BIOL 2107H-2107LPrinciples of Biology I (Honors)Biological chemistry, metabolism, cell and membrane structure and function, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, cell cycle, meiosis, classical and molecular genetics, DNA technology, evolutionary theory, natural selection, population genetics, speciation.Students completing this course will have been exposed to lectures and lab experiences related to the chemistry of life, cell structure and function, cellular energetics, classical and molecular genetics and the mechanism of evolution. The course will consist of lectures and a two-hour laboratory per week. Writing will be stressed in both lecture and laboratory. Students will be graded on the standard A to F grading scale. This course is designed specifically for honors students.THE CHEMISTRY OF LIFE Carbon and Molecular Diversity Structure and Function of Macromolecules An Introduction to Metabolism THE CELL Cell Structure Membrane Structure and Function Cellular Respiration Photosynthesis Cell Communication The Cell Cycle GENETICS Meiosis and sexual Life Cycles Mendelian Genetics Chromosomal Basis of Inheritance Molecular Basis of Inheritance Genes and Protein Synthesis Genetics of Viruses and Bacteria Control of the Eukaryotic Genome DNA Technology and Genomics Genetic Basis of Development EVOLUTION Darwin and Natural Selection Evolution of Populations Origin of Species Phylogeny and Systematics
BIOL 2108H-2108LPrinciples of Biology II (Honors)Organismal biology. Bacteria, archeae, protista, plantae, fungi and animalia evolution, diversity, growth, reproduction, physiology and ecology.Students completing this course will have been exposed to lectures and lab experiences related to the evolution, diversity, physiology and ecology of representative organisms from bacteria and archaea, protists, plants, fungi and animals. The learning outcomes for the lecture: Students should be able to think critically about 1) the evolutionary history of biological diversity, 2) plant form and function, 3) animal form and function, and 4) ecology. The learning outcomes for the lab: At the end of the course, the students will be able to observe, classify, and conduct experiments using representative prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. The course will consist of lectures and a two-hour lab per week. Writing will be stressed in both lecture and laboratory. Students will be graded on the standard A to F grading scale. This course is designed specifically for honors students.Evolution and natural selection Origin of life Archaea Bacteria Protists Fungi Plant evolution Angiosperm reproduction Plant structure and growth Plant Physiology Biological history and geological time Evolution of invertebrates Evolution of chordates The animal body Animal reproduction and development Circulation snd gas exchange Urinary systems Digestion and nutrition Nervous system Sensory and motor mechanisms Endocrine system The immune system Introduction to ecology Population ecology Community ecology Food Chains Nutrient cycles Conservation ecology
BIOS 7020Introductory Biostatistics IIIntroduction to a variety of statistical tools with applications in public health and the biological sciences, including survey sampling, multiple regression, experimental design, categorical data analysis, logistic regression, and survival analysis. Motivating examples will be drawn directly from the literature in the health, biological, medical, and behavioral sciences.This survey course is intended to introduce students in health related fields to the diverse variety of statistical tools with applications in the biological, medical and behavioral sciences. Students completing this course should be able to select what tools are appropriate to answer specific scientific questions, implement their use using statistical software, and communicate in writing the methods, results, and conclusions of statistical analyses.1. Design-based vs. model-based statistical inference 2. Public health survey design and analysis 3. Multiple regression model building and diagnostics 4. Experimental design 5. Categorical data analysis 6. Logistic regression 7. Survival analysis
BUSN 4990HHonors ThesisThis course provides opportunity for an honors student to undertake individual research in the field of his or her major.The main objective of this course is to provide upper division Honors students in good standing with the opportunity to do independent research and write an Honors thesis under the supervision of a faculty member.Topics will vary, but will be selected according to the needs and interests of the student.
CBIO 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.
CBIO 8080Scientific Communication Skills in Cellular BiologyAn overview of the principles of effective communication in the format of a research grant, manuscript, thesis/dissertation, abstract, short talk, research lecture, and class lecture. Opportunities for students to practice communication skills are provided in the weekly writing, speaking, and discussion section.Upon successful completion of this course, the student will have: - effective communication skills - effective scientific writing and speaking skills - expertise in written and oral scientific communicationThe weekly schedule of activities is outlined below in the following format: Week # (#.1) Didactic Material (#.2) Writing/Speaking/Discussion Session Week 1. (1.1) Introduction to Scientific Communication Skills: Organizational Meeting. (1.2) Guided discussion of the ethics of scientific writing and speaking Week 2. (2.1) Major Writing Assignments: Steady Progress with Organization and Technical Skill. (2.2) Using outlines as tools to organize and integrate ideas. Write an outline for an autobiography. Week 3. (3.1) Reference Management Programs: EndNote and Reference Manager. (3.2) Use the Reference Manager Program to begin to catalog, organize, and file your papers. Week 4. (4.1) Preparation of Figures and Tables: Describing an experiment in the terms of the “Scientific Method”. (4.2) Write a description of a figure or table using the terms “hypothesis”, “approach”, “result”, and “conclusion”. What are the implications or significance of the results? Week 5. (5.1) Writing Peer Reviewed Manuscripts. (5.2) Read a Published Paper: Work backwards to write an outline of the manuscript. Week 6. (6.1) Manuscript Reviews: Giving and Receiving. (6.2) Read a Published Paper: Write a review of the work as if you were assigned the work as a submitted manuscript. Week 7. (7.1) Departmental Policy for Written/Oral Admission to Candidacy. (7.2) NIH Grant Format, NIH Review Criteria, and NIH Tips for Grant Preparation. Week 8. (8.1) Annotated NIH Sample Grant. (8.2) Discussion of Grant Preparation with Invited Guest Faculty Week 9. (9.1). Writing Thesis/Dissertation. (9.2) Discussion of Written and Oral Admission to Candidacy and Writing Dissertation with Invited Senior Graduate Students Week 10. (10.1). Scientific Meeting Presentations, Published Abstracts. (10.2) Methods for preparation of an effective poster presentation Week 11. (11.1) Elements of Effective Public Speaking. (11.2) All Students Give 5 minute Talk on an effective tip for use of Power Point Week 12. (12.1) Short (20 minute) Research Talk. (12.2) Assigned Student Talks: “20 minute Journal Club” Week 13 (13.1) Research Lecture/Job Talk/Dissertation Defense. (13.2) Assigned Student Talks: “20 minute Journal Club” Week 14. (14.1) Preparing a 50 minute talk to a class. (14.2) Assigned Student Talks: “20 minute Journal Club” Week 15 (15.1) CV Formats; Job Search; Professional Correspondence. (15.2) Assigned Student Talks: “20 minute Journal Club
CBIO 8100Advanced ImmunologyImmunology with emphasis on underlying mechanisms of development and function of the immune system. Students will critically evaluate current literature and design experiments to test hypotheses. Current literature in immunology will be presented by the students and discussed. About 7 current themes in immunology will be selected for discussion. Each topic will start with an introduction (1 hr lecture) and paper presentation (1 hr) by the instructor. Five students (1/2 hr each) will present 5 different preselected papers from current liteature on the same topic, followed by 1/2 to 1 hr of discussion. The students will be graded for their comprehension of the literature on the topic, presentation and writing a grant proposal (4 pages).
CBIO 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
CBIO(BIOL) 3410LLaboratory in Cellular and Developmental BiologyCell biology research techniques in cell cycle and cell differentiation, cell adhesion, motility, molecular transport, and cell metabolism. Cell culture, cell fractionation, fluorescence and laser-confocal microscopy, electron microscopy, immunocytochemistry, DNA isolation, polymerase chain reaction, and DNA sequencing.Students are expected to gain experience with modern techniques employed to address research in cell, developmental, and molecular biology. Current techniques that are taught include: DNA sequencing and bioinformatic analysis; in situ hybridization; in vitro reconstitution of cilia movement; tissue culture; immunofluorescence; western blot analysis; and solution calculation/preparation;. In addition to exposure to these methods, students will learn how to collect scientific data, critically analyze the data, and write scientific reports. Basic information about each area of inquiry is provided and students are expected to obtain a mechanistic understanding of the technical approaches used and a basic understanding of the biological systems studied.The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary. 1. Introduction, microscopy, cell counting (5) 2. Preparation of solutions, sterile techniques of cell culture (5) 3. Observation of mitosis using phase contrast microscopy 4. Observation of mitotic spindles using immunofluorescent microscopy (10) 5. Morphological assessment of cellular differentiation 6. Biochemical analysis of cell differentiation: SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis 7. Detection of proteins using Western Blotting 8. Detection of proteins using Western Blotting -II (20) Quiz 1 (20) 9. Biogenesis and function of organelles 10. Cell fractionation - isolation of nuclei-I 11. Cell fractionation- isolation of nuclei II (10) 12. Organelle assembly - cilia regeneration I 13. Organelle assembly - cilia regeneration II (10) 14. Reactivation of cell motility in vitro. Isolation of cilia 15. Reactivation of cell motility in vitro. Electron Microscopy (10) Quiz 2 (20) 16. Genome organization M-13 phage titration 17. Isolation of single stranded DNA 18. DNA sequencing 19. DNA sequencing II 20. Sequence analysis-I 21. Sequence analysis II (30) Quiz 3 (20) 22. Tissue-specific gene expression Collection and fixation of Drosophila embryos 23. Whole mount embryo in situ hybridization 24. Immunohistochemistry-I 25. Immunohistochemistry-II deadline for submission of proposals for independent projects 26. Preparation and mounting of slides 27. Microscopic analysis of slides (30) Quiz 4 (20) 28. Independent projects Final Presentation (20)
CBIO(MIBO) 4100/6100ImmunologyImmunology from an experimental perspective. Anatomy, development, and function of the immune system. Immune system in infectious diseases. Mechanisms and pathogenesis of immunological disorders. Evolution of immunological concepts.Students will be challenged to develop an understanding of: 1) The components of the immune system, including the terminology associated therewith; 2) The complex interactions between these components in initiating and regulating immune responses; 3) immune defense mechanisms against infectious diseases and cancers; 4) the consequences of malfunctioning immune response; 5) experimental approaches that have led to our current understanding of immunology; 6) modern applications of immunology. Progress toward meeting these course objectives will be evaluated with a series of written examinations which will measure knowledge of the "facts" of immunology and integration of these facts in response to short answer and discussion questions. Through researching and writing an original research proposal on a topic in immunology, students will have the opportunity to consider this discipline in practical terms, apply some of what has been learned to a specific problem, and become exposed to the primary literature in the field.Introduction and General Properties of the Immune System Cells and Tissues of the Immune System Antigens and Antibodies Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigen Processing and Presentation Antigen Receptors and Accessory Molecules Lymphocyte Maturation and Expression of Antigen Receptor Genes Activation of T Lymphocytes B cell maturation and Ig Production Immunological Tolerance Cytokines Innate Immunity Effector Mechanisms: Cell Mediated Immunity Allergies/Hypersensitivities Effector Mechanisms: Humoral Immunity Immunity to Microbes Transplant Immunology Tumor Immunology Immunological Diseases Immunodeficiencies, AIDS and Vaccines
CBIO(PBIO) 4600/6600-4600L/6600LBiology of ProtistsProtists (algae, protozoa, and zoosporic fungi) with an emphasis on cell structure, evolution, and life histories. Laboratories will concentrate on examination of living and fixed materials and will include methods of isolation and culturing of protists.By the end of this course, students will have developed a knowledge base to support lifelong interest and learning in protistan biology and should be able to: 1) identify protists belonging to the major protistan evolutionary lineages; 2) describe the principal structural, biochemical and developmental characteristics, life history, and phylogenetic relationships of the major groups of protists; 3) collect, draw, isolate and culture protists; 4) research and write a term paper on an instructor-approved topic of interest in protistan biology. Students enrolled in CBIO(BTNY) 6600-6600L will give a 30 minute presentation on the term paper.Introduction and major protist groups Origin of life Evolution of eukaryotic cells Cellular characteristics of protists Archezoa Euglenozoa Introduction to algae Chlorophyta Glaucocystophytes Rhodophyta Alveolata Actinopods Rhizopods Choanoflagellates Chytrids Slime molds Microsporidians Heterokonts (Straminopiles) Prymnesiophytes Cryptomonads Chlorarachniophytes Ecology of Protists Protistan symbiosis The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary.
CHEM 1311LAdvanced Principles of Chemistry Laboratory I (Honors)Students learn laboratory skills and instrumental techniques that allow them to perform inquiry-based experimental studies of chemical systems.Laboratory course that accompanies CHEM 1311 or CHEM 1411, designed to reinforce concepts presented in CHEM 1311 or CHEM 1411. Students learn basic laboratory skills and techniques, and skills necessary to design and conduct guided-inquiry (self directed – skills analysis) experiments. Students perform experiments designed to illustrate basic chemical principles and chemical reactions.1. Separation of Components of Mixtures 2. Identifying metals by determining their specific heat. 3. Indirect gravimetric determination of the composition of a mixture. 4. Determining the formula weight of a compound. 5. Application of Hess’s Law 6. Identifying Inorganic Compounds by their inter-chemical reactions. 7. Identifying metals via flame emission analysis. 8. Acid-base titrations. 9. Self Directed-Skills Analysis Experiments (Student write procedures to solve a complex problem).
CHEM 1411LAdvanced Modern Chemistry Laboratory IStudents learn laboratory skills and instrumental techniques that allow them to perform inquiry-based experimental studies of chemical systems.Laboratory course that accompanies CHEM 1311 or CHEM 1411, designed to reinforce concepts presented in CHEM 1311 or CHEM 1411. Students learn basic laboratory skills and techniques, and skills necessary to design and conduct guided-inquiry (self directed – skills analysis) experiments. Students perform experiments designed to illustrate basic chemical principles and chemical reactions.1. Separation of Components of Mixtures 2. Identifying metals by determining their specific heat. 3. Indirect gravimetric determination of the composition of a mixture. 4. Determining the formula weight of a compound. 5. Application of Hess’s Law 6. Identifying Inorganic Compounds by their inter-chemical reactions. 7. Identifying metals via flame emission analysis. 8. Acid-base titrations. 9. Self Directed-Skills Analysis Experiments (Student write procedures to solve a complex problem).
CHEM 2600Introduction to Research IStudents will pursue directed research with a chosen faculty member, and will prepare a written report of their research progress for credit.The course objective is to give the student hands-on experience in a research laboratory. The student will participate in state-of-the-art research under the supervision of a Chemistry faculty mentor.The specifics of the research experience will vary depending upon the nature of the research project and the erequirements of the faculty mentor. Each student is required to write a comprehensive research report at the end of the semester in which research is performed.
CHEM 3600Introduction to Research IIStudents will pursue directed research with a chosen faculty member, and will prepare a written report of their research progress for credit.Students will learn how to conduct guided research under the close supervision of a faculty member. They will learn advanced laboratory skills that will vary according to the faculty member under whom they work and the project to which they are assigned. They will learn to conduct literature searches on a research topic. They will learn to write a scientific research report.This is a nontraditional course in which students engage in research in the laboratory of a Chemistry faculty member. The specific topics to which the student will be exposed will vary according to the faculty member with which they are working as well as to the project to which they are assigned.
CHEM 4000LChemistry InternshipStudents work off-campus, usually at industrial or government laboratories, to obtain practical experience with chemical techniques, skills, and tools, applying them to real-world problems. This is meant to be a full-time experience, lasting one semester.The student is expected to gain experience in the practical application of knowledge and skills in the chemistry field. In particular, experience with being a chemist in an industrial or government laboratory setting will provide the student with familiarity with protocols, teamwork, communication skills, and laboratory safety procedures, that are difficult to teach in a standard classroom. The student will write a report on the research project carried out and this will be evaluated for grade assignment.1. Industrial laboratory chemical practices 2. Problem-solving and analytical laboratory skills 3. Teamwork in problem-solving 4. Following protocols in GMP settings 5. Written and verbal communication of progress and results of laboratory experiments
CHEM 4500Scientific Information Acquisition and DisseminationModern information technology and its uses in accessing the chemical scientific literature. Computer- and web-based databases and search engines will be demonstrated. Students will receive hands-on training in presentation skills. The final project involves a written report, oral presentation, and web-page development.This course was developed to train upper-level undergraduate students and first-year graduate students in information technology and to advise them on the use of this technology for acquiring and disseminating scientific information. In this Information Age, is is essential for every career path to be able to communicate effectively, in both written and oral form. The course will provide training in the modern computer- and web-based information technology tools needed to acquire, assimilate, filter, organize, and disseminate information.1. Introduction 1.1. Information acquisition, organization, and dissemination 1.2. Information is the most important currency of the 21st century 1.3. Communication skills are important for every professional career 2. Information Technology, the tools of the information age 2.1. The information superhighway (infrastructure) 2.2. The internet; information transfer protocols, TCP/IP, domains 2.3. The World Wide Web; hyperlinked information, HTML, URLs 3. Information formats 3.1. Textual; ASCII, RTF, font size/style, markup languages 3.2. Tabular; spreadsheet, database 3.3. 2d Graphical; Bitmap (TIFF, bmp), vector (PICT, .), page description languages (pdf, PostScript) 3.4. 3d Graphical; QuickDraw 3d, vrml 3.5. Animation 3.6. Sound 4. Information acquisition 4.1. Searching the scientific literature 4.2. Electronic publishing, BioMedNet, MedLine, Galileo, . 4.3. Searching chemical databases, ChemWeb, . 4.4. Searching sequence databases, nucleotide, peptide 4.5. Searching structural databases, CSD, PDB 5. Information transduction 5.1. Data analysis; plotting, digitizing, charts, histograms 5.2. Translating and converting graphics formats 5.3. Scanning; bitmaps, bit depth 6. Information dissemination 6.1. Word processors; Typefaces, fonts, styles, formatting, spell-checking 6.2. Citation/reference/bibliography databases 6.3. Chemical structure drawing programs (2d/3d) 6.4. Graphics programs (painting vs. drawing) 6.5. Spreadsheets; charts, graphs 6.6. Database programs; flat file, relational 6.7. Presentation programs; PowerPoint, Persuasion, etc. 6.8. Presentation hardware; slidemakers (instrument cameras), LCD panels, projectors 6.9. E-mail; servers/clients, protocols, attachment formats 6.10. Webservers, homepages 7. Communication skills, written and verbal 7.1. How to write a scientific/technical paper 7.2. Case study (bad vs. good writing) 7.3. How to organize an oral presentation 7.4. Organization of information 7.5. Information vs. decoration 7.6. Slide/transparency design 7.7. Case study (bad vs. good presentation) 8. Class writing projects 9. Class presentations 10. Class homepages
CHEM 4600Independent ResearchStudents will pursue directed research with a chosen faculty member, and will prepare a written report of their research progress for credit.The course objective is to give the student hands-on experience in a research laboratory. The student will participate in state-of-the-art research under the supervision of a Chemistry faculty mentor.The specifics of the research experience will vary depending upon the nature of the research project and the erequirements of the faculty mentor. Each student is required to write a comprehensive research report at the end of the semester in which research is performed.
CHEM 4960HDirected Reading and/or Projects (Honors)This course affords Honors students of senior division standing the opportunity to engage in individual study, reading, or projects under the direction of a project director.The course objective is to give the student hands-on experience in a research laboratory. The student will participate in state-of-the-art research under the supervision of a Chemistry faculty mentor.The specifics of the research experience will vary depending upon the nature of the research project and the erequirements of the faculty mentor. Each student is required to write a comprehensive research report at the end of the semester in which research is performed.
CHEM 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.
CHEM 8340Organic Spectroscopic AnalysisMass spectrometry, 1- and 2-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and ultraviolet spectroscopy as tools for determining the molecular structure of organic compounds. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation of spectral data.Students completing this course will have a basic understanding of the theory and instrumentation for mass spectrometry, 1- and 2-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and ultraviolet spectroscopy. They will be able to interpret spectral data obtained by these techniques to determine molecular structure. Students will be evaluated though problem sets, writing assignments, and examinations, including a comprehensive final exam.Mass Spectrometry-Theory and Instrumentation Mass Spectrometry-Spectral Interpretation IR Spectroscopy-Theory and Instrumentation IR Spectroscopy-Spectral Interpretation UV-Vis Spectroscopy-Theory and Instrumentation UV-Vis Spectroscopy-Applications NMR Spectroscopy-Theory and Instrumentation NMR Spectroscopy-Interpretation of 1-Dimensional Spectra NMR Spectroscopy-Interpretation of 2-Dimensional Spectra Solving Integrated Spectral Problems
CHEM 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
CHFD 3900Prenatal and Infant DevelopmentGrowth and development from conception to second year of life. Guidance of infants and toddlers within family and group care settings.1. Acquire basic knowledge about the development and growth of infants from conception to three-years of age through careful study of current research and theory. 2. Develop abilities in critical thinking through reading and group discussions in class. 3. Develop writing skills through class assignments and projects. 4. Develop oral presentation skills through class participation and leading class discussion. 5. Become familiar with guidance of infants and toddlers within family and group settings.1. Theory of Development 2. Prenatal Development and the Birth Process 3. The Newborn Child 4. Physical Growth 5. Health and Safety of the Young Child 6. Nutrition and Feeding 7. Motor Development 8. Personality Development 9. Language Development 10. Intellectual Development (Brain Development) 11. Social Development 12. Emotional Development 13. Infants with Special Needs 14. Caring for Infants
CHFD 4090/6090Advanced Infant DevelopmentEmotional, social, cognitive, and physical development in infancy. Supervised observation in Infant Center and in selected homes.1. Acquire the basic knowledge about the development and growth of infants through careful study of current research and theory. 2. Develop abilities in critical thinking through reading and group discussions in class. 3. Develop writing skills through research activities and projects. 4. Develop oral presentation skills through class participation and leading class discussion. 5. Acquire skills to become an educated consumer of scientific information through class activities.1. Introduction 2. Theory and Methodology 3. Conception Through Birth 4. Prenatal Development 5. Transition to Parenthood 6. Basic Characteristics 7. Temperament 8. Basic Mechanisms 9. Sensory Development 10. Perceptual Development 11. Physical & Motor Development 12. Cognitive Development: Attention, Memory 13. Cognitive Development: Piaget's Theory 14. Bonding & Attachment 15. Mother-Infant Interaction 16. Father, Siblings, Peers 17. Parenting Infants 18. Emotional Development 19. Communicative Development 20. Language Development 21. Sense of Self 22. Maternal Deprivation 23. Daycare 24. Atypical Infants
CHFD 5110Research Methods in Child and Family DevelopmentThe evaluation of research in the field of Child and Family Development and common problems incurred in applied research which affect the interpretation of data.1. Develop a basic understanding of research methods. 2. Develop a basic understanding of the importance of research participant selection. 3. Develop a basic understanding of measurement. 4. Develop a basic understanding of data analysis. 5. Be able to understand ethical research and the purpose of human subjects review boards. 6. Develop skills necessary to be a good consumer of research.Discussion of syllabus and class assignments, Introductions Introduction to WebCT, PsycINFO, Why take a research methods course Foundations of Research Institutional Review Boards and Human Subjects Sampling: The importance of Participants Sampling Examples Theory of Measurement: Reliability and Validity Reliability and Validity Survey Research and Scaling: How You Measure What You Are Studying Measuring Variables Qualitative and Unobtrusive Measures: Other Methods of Measurement Measurement Examples Design: Internal Validity Experimental Design Quasi-Experimental Design Advanced Design Topics Design Examples Analysis: Conclusion Validity Analysis: Data Preparation and Descriptive Statistics Analysis for Research Design: Basic Statistics Analysis for Research Design: More on Statistics Writing Up Research Analysis Examples
CHFD 5901Policy Internship OrientationIntroduction to family and consumer policy concepts, models, and professional skills associated with the legislative aide experience. Students will complete applied projects.a. to learn a media scan of policy issues related to a student's field of study. b. to gain the skills necessary to work as a legislative aide. c. to complete projects and activities designed to prepare and/or enrich the legialative aide experience. - conducting a media scan - using the internet to track the history of a bill or law - writing a letter of introduction to assigned legislator - making a skills presentation related to the legislative experience - writing a policy briefing paper - outlining a project that the student will complete during the legislative internship - attending the FACS Leadership Retreat - visiting the State Capitol - meeting with the assigned legislator to learn about his/her interests and expectationsI. Introduction to Legislative Aide Expectations and Duties - Project 1: Conduct a Policy Scan II. Overview of the Legislative Aide Experience III. Using the Internet to Search Bills and Laws - Project 2 Select a Bill to Summarize IV. Policy Concepts and Principles V. The Policy-Making Cycle VI. Writing a Policy Briefing Paper - Project 3: Write a Policy Briefing Paper Based on Georgia Bill VII. Relating FACS Research to Policy Issues - Project 4: Summarize Implications of a FACS Faculty Research Paper for Policy Makers VIII. Georgia Government - Project 5: Profile a Senate or House Committee IX. The Legislative Culture and Legislative Etiquette - Project 6. Write a Letter of Introduction to Assigned Legislator - Project 7 Plan a Class Skills Presentation Related to the Legislative Culture X The Legislative Field Project (to be determined by student and his/her department advisor) XI. FACS Leadership Retreat XII. Visit to State Capitol XIII. Class Presentations: Project 3 XIV. Class Presentations: Project 6 XV. Guest Speaker(s)
CHFD 6800Research MethodsResearch design in selected areas of family and consumer sciences. Emphasis on common problems incurred in measurement and data analysis.1. Gain or increase understanding of the foundations of research (e.g., ethics, formulation of research questions, development of measurement strategies and the internal validity of research). 2. Gain or increase understanding of research strategies (e.g., experimental, correlational, survey research, single-case, natural, and quasi-experimental designs). 3. Gain or increase understanding of the data collection and interpretation processes. 4. Gain or increase understanding of the processes involved in writing research papers and proposals. 5. Completion of a research proposal.1. Introduction to Class 2. The Conceptualization to Operalization to Data Analysis Model 3. Research Strategies and Problem Identification 4. The Literature and Problem Identification 5. The Hourglass Model 6. Turning Hypotheses Into A Study 7. Validity 8. Experimental Designs 9. Quasi-Experimental and Single-Participant Designs 10. Correlational Approaches 11. Survey Research 12. Sampling and Research Procedures 13. Interpretation and Dissemination of Research Results
CHFD 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.
CHFD 8710Principles of Life-Span Human DevelopmentIntegration of theoretical and research literature as it pertains to study of human development over the life span with an emphasis on contextual-systemic approaches to family and individual development.This course is the core seminar and is an intensive analysis of the foundations of Child and Family Development. The course covers a variety of different theoretical approaches to the study of Human Development over the life-span, with an emphasis on the systemic-contextual metaphor for individual and family development. The overall objective of the course is to challenge the student's thinking, reading and writing about the subject matter of child and family development.1. A general orientation to models of development including the mechanistic and organismic world views of science and the logic of studying lives over time. 2. An in-depth examination of the Ecological Model of Human Development with a special emphasis on the theorizing of Bronfenbrenner and his students. 3. An examination of the biological and genetic bases of development 4. An in-depth examination of the Life Span and Life Course Principles with a special focus on both the psychological and sociological perspectives on development. 5. An examination of the research literature that illustrates the life span and/or ecological approach to development with a discussion of their relevance to a science that integrates both individual and contextual approaches to change over the life course. Special focus on the family will be emphasized in both theory and method.
CHFD 8800Quantitative Methods in Child and Family DevelopmentQuantitative research processes, conceptualization of research problems, research designs, selection of appropriate methods of data collection, consideration of alternative data analysis strategies, interpretation of findings, and research writing. Research on marital and family therapy included.1. Learn state of the are concepts of developmental and family research methods. 2. Gain awareness of additional and emergent methods. 3. Gain an intermediate-level command of LISREL and exposure to other statistical packages suitable for analysis of non- independent data (this is NOT a course in structural equation modeling, so you should plan on taking one prior to sitting for your comprehensive examinations). 4. Gain experience applying concepts and techniques of developmental and family analysis. 5. Learn how to read and approach the methodological literature. 6. Learn how to replicate and re-analyze results based on published data. 7. Begin building a bibliography of developmental and family methodological and application readings. 8. Begin developing a sophisticated methodological tool kit. 9. Write a research proposal consistent with the format required by an external funding body (think of it as an opportunity to develop your dissertation prospectus).1. Introduction/Orientation to Course/Models/Theories 2. Matrix Algebra and LISREL Basics 3. LISREL--Elementary Models I 4. LISREL--Elementary Models II 5. Basic Designs 6. Missing Data 7. Advanced Designs 8. Measurement I and II 9. Growth Curve Modeling I and II 10. Latent Trait-State Models 11. Analysis of Family Data
CHFD 8810Qualitative Methods in Child and Family DevelopmentQualitative research processes, conceptualization of research problems, research design, selection of appropriate methods of data collection, consideration of alternative data analysis strategies, interpretation of findings, and research writing. Research in marital and family therapy included.1. Students can identify and explain the range of issues, questions, and diverse orientations addressed by qualitative inquiry, particularly directed towards clinical issues. 2. Consider and appreciate epistemological issues of carrying out qualitative research, and the various assumptions underlying different approaches. 3. Develop knowledge and skills regarding: how to conceptualize a study; select a method or methods appropriate to the research questions; collect data; interviewing strategies; researcher's relationship to participants; transcribing strategies; analytical strategies; interpretation of findings; quality control; and presentation of study. 4. Reflect on your own assumptions and subjectivities in regard to qualitative inquiry. 5. Develop critical thinking skills necessary to conduct and evaluate qualitative inquiry. 6. Increase awareness of opportunities to carry out research and publish qualitative research in the social sciences. 7. Increase understanding towards ethical concerns of conducting and re-presenting qualitative studies. 8. Increase understanding of Institutional Review Board (IRB) policies in regards to Human Subjects.1. Introduction 2. Epistemological and Paradigmatic Foundations and Ethical Issues 3. Forms of Data, Topics and Designs 4. Developing Research Questions 5. Data Collection 6. Methods 7. Participants (who, why, how, when?) 8. Improvisation 9. Organizing Data 10. Interpretation and Analysis 11. Quality Control: Evaluation, Trustworthiness, and Ethics 12. Writing up Research 13. Feminism, Gender Studies and Postmodernism
CHFD 8820Evaluation Methods in Child and Family DevelopmentEvaluation research processes; prevention/intervention settings; research problems; research designs; selection of appropriate methods of data collection; alternative data analysis strategies, including measurement of change; interpretation of findings; and research/evaluation report writing. Research in marital and family therapy included.1. Demonstrate competence in program evaluation theory, ethics, methods and practice and be able to apply these concepts to evaluation of human and family development; family and marital therapy; and prevention/intervention programs. 2. Be able to successfully implement at lease one component of program evaluation and be able to articulate specific evaluation issues that arise, through participation in an active evaluation project. 3. Gain oral and written presentation skills, library search skills, negotiation and conflict management skills and other skills needed for working in teams.1. What is evaluation? 2. Components of Evaluation, Focus of Evaluation, Evaluator and Methodological Issues 3. History of Evaluation, Comparing Research and Evaluation, Approaches to Evaluation 4. Evaluation Standards and Ethics 5. Developing Evaluations: Contracts & Stakeholders; Conducting Needs Assessment 6. Feasability Studies and Program Theory 7. Program Monitoring 8. Short-term Outcomes 9. Evaluation Design: Randomized, Quasi-experimental Designs, & Full Coverage Designs 10. Qualitative Methods 11. Validity, Reliability, Sampling, & Measurement 12. Type I and II Errors, Effect and Sample Sizes, Power 13. Practical and Clinical Significance 14. Efficiency, Meta-analysis & Policy Analysis
CHFD 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
CHNS 1001Elementary Chinese IFundamentals of grammar, pronunciation, composition, and conversation.This course begins the development of oral and written skills in Mandarin Chinese. Primary emphasis is placed on gaining competence in conversational Chinese. Students also begin to practice writing and reading informal Chinese.Week 1: Introduction to Chinese Pronunciation and the Chinese Writing System Classroom Expressions and Other Simple Useful Expressions Week 2: Meeting People simple verbs for being and naming Week 3: Greetings and Introductions simple negatives and simple questions Week 4: Introducing Family measure words, question pronouns, verb “to have” Week 5: Dates and Times numbers, modification of nouns Week 6: Talking About Hobbies alternative and affirmative/negative questions Week 7: Visiting Friends predicate adjectives, moderating tone in speech Week 8: Making Appointments complex sentence connectives Week 9: Waiting for a Telephone Call auxiliary verbs, directional complements Week 10:Studying Chinese descriptive complements, ordinal numbers Week 11:Life at School word order, serial verbs, double objects Week 12:Going Shopping amounts of money, more measure words Week 13:Talking About the Weather comparative sentences, sentence final particle “le” Week 14:Going Places topic-comments sentences, sequence in time Week 15:Review
CHNS 1002Elementary Chinese IIA continuation of Elementary Chinese I.This course continues the development of oral and written skills in Mandarin Chinese and emphasizes conversational competence in common practical situations. Students also continue to develop skills in writing and reading informal Chinese.Week 1: Dining emphatic negation, reduplication of adjectives Week 2: Ordering Food at a Restaurant resultative complements Week 3: At the Library proposed object structure, time when and time duration expressions Week 4: Asking Directions direction and location words, indicating degree Week 5: Birthday Party indicating action in progress, verbal attributives Week 6: Seeing a Doctor measurement of action, prepositions, confirmation questions Week 7: Dating potential complements, reduplication of verbs Week 8: Renting an Apartment continuing action, interrogative pronouns Week 9: Post Office numerical approximation, inclusion and exclusion Week 10: Sports expressions of time duration Week 11: Athletic Competitions abstract uses of directional complements, passive voice Week 12: Travel numbers over one thousand, more comparatives Week 13: Hometown terms of address for relatives, existential sentences Week 14: At the Airport modification of verbs, expectation in action phrases Week 15: Review
CHNS 2001Intermediate Chinese IIntermediate grammar, reading, conversation, and composition.This course is designed to continue to develop listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing skills in Modern Chinese, and to prepare students for more advanced studies at the university and in China. Emphasis is placed on honing oral skills, expansion of vocabulary, thorough understanding of grammar, and creative use of language in specific contexts.Week 1: Beginning the Semester, Meeting People verb aspect including completed action, new situation, specific information about past events Week 2: Registering for Classes, Moving In complex sentence connectives Week 3: Life in the Dorm word order, comparisons Week 4: Describing a Room existential sentences Week 5: Meeting Friends to Go Out topics and topicalization Week 6: Ordering a Meal formation of adverbs, other ways to describe and action Week 7: Talking About Food combining verb phrases Week 8: Shopping position of time phrases, complex sentence connectives Week 9: At the Mall reduplication of verbs, modifying the tone of sentences Week 10: Choosing Classes, Choosing a Major suggestions, softening the tone of a sentence Week 11: Looking for Jobs and Internships resultative complements Week 12: Finding a Job, Discussing Careers patterns for inclusion Week 13: Searching for a Place to Live descriptive complements Week 14: Renting an Apartment directional complements, numeric series Week 15: Review
CHNS 2002Intermediate Chinese IIA continuation of Intermediate Chinese I.This course is designed to continue to develop listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing skills in Modern Chinese, and to prepare students for more advanced studies at the university and in China. Emphasis is placed on oral skills, expansion of vocabulary, thorough understanding of grammar, and creative use of language in specific contexts. Outside materials, including introduction to idiomatic expressions, short stories, and brief film selections are also included in the course.Week 1: Boyfriends and Girlfriends directional complements indicating result Week 2: Meeting the Family comparison of time phrases Week 3: Going to the Movies simultaneous actions, conditional forms Week 4: Discussing the News rhetorical phrases, expressions of inevitability Week 5: Debating the Social Effects of Movies and Television Grammar: contrastive forms Week 6: Planning a Trip to China verb aspects indicating experience and completion Week 7: Passports and Plane Tickets review of word order Week 8: At the Post Office proposed object structure, continuation of an actions Week 9: Mailing a Package verb aspect, describing the repetition of an action Week 10: Writing a Letter complex sentence connectives Week 11: Visiting Scenic and Historic Sites describing the difficulty or ease of an action Week 12: Chinese Dragon Boat Festival prepositions Week 13: Qu Yuan Banished to Chu potential complements, optatives Week 14: Chinese Holidays indefinite uses of interrogative pronouns, cohesion Week 15: Review
CHNS 3010Advanced Chinese IAdvanced grammar, reading, conversation, and composition.The purpose of this course is to hone reading, writing and conversational skills in Modern Chinese, and to prepare students for more advanced studies at the University and in China. Emphasis will be placed on rapid expansion of vocabulary and increasing facility with complex grammar structures. Students will practice more advanced conversational styles and begin to work with formal written Chinese.Unit 1: Discussing Sports Competitions forms for comparison, written style, literary prepositions Unit 2: Family directional complements indicating state, potential complements and optatives, topicalization Unit 3: Male-Female Equality forms for describing similarity, area or scope, changes in circumstance; emphatic forms Unit 4: Health and Insurance multiple attributives, indicating confirmation, reduplication of measure words
CHNS 3020Advanced Chinese IIA continuation of Advanced Chinese I.The purpose of this course is to hone reading, writing and conversational skills in Modern Chinese, and to prepare students for more advanced studies at the University and in China. Emphasis will be placed on rapid expansion of vocabulary and increasing facility with complex grammar structures. Students will practice more advanced conversational styles and begin to work with formal written Chinese.Unit 1: Education exaggeration, passive forms, emphatic negation, appropriateness Unit 2: Crime and Firearms enumerative phrases, forms for describing chance Unit 3: Animal Rights forms for describing cause, literary conjunctions Unit 4: Environment review of interrogatives, forms for indicating frequency
CHNS 3990Directed Study in Chinese Language and/or LiteratureIndependent study and research under the direction of individual faculty members.Focusing on current issues in modern Chinese society, this course trains advanced students in formal Chinese writing and conversation. Emphasis is placed on reinforcement, expansion and refinement of grammatical proficiency and communicative skills.Unit 1: Single-Parent Families conjunctions, proposed object forms, time phrases, demonstrative pronouns Unit 2: Adoption prepositions, measure words, equative verb Unit 3: Business and Private Enterprise time phrases, emphasis, causative Unit 4: Peasants and Private Entrepreneurs verbs for possession and existence, possessive pronoun Unit 5: The Culture of Single Children adverbs and forms for modifying verbs
CHNS 4110/6110Advanced Chinese IIIAn introduction to classical Chinese focusing on translation, analysis of grammar, and the semantic range and use of commonly occurring classical Chinese words. Readings include selections of the early classics through later imperial literature.To introduce students to the basics of the classical language, both for further study of literary texts and to improve formal reading and writing in modern standard Chinese.First Semester: Introduction to Classical Chinese Week 1: Introductory readings in Classical Chinese: modified teaching texts basic sentence structure, verbal and nominal predicates Week 2: Introductory readings in Classical Chinese: modified teaching texts subordinative constructions, modification Week 3: “The Good Archer” (adapted from Mencius) nominalization; nominal predicates Week 4: “Drawing a Snake and Adding Feet” (from Schemes of the Warring States) compound sentences Week 5: “King Tai Goes to Bin” (from Mencius) coverbal adjuncts Week 6: “Great Learning” (from Liji) sentences with multiple predicates Week 7: “Laughing at One Hundred Paces from Fifty Paces” (from Mencius) direct speech, conditionals Week 8: “Impartial Caring” (from Mozi) final particles, complex conditionals Week 9: “The Happiness of Fish” (from Zhuangzi) negatives, nominalization in adjuncts Week 10: “Sheep Butcher Yue’s Refusing Reward” (from Zhuangzi) pivotal constructions Week 11: “Lord Meng Chang’s Retainer Feng Xuan” (from Schemes of the Warring States) emphatic particles Week 12: “Fish is What I Like” (from Zhuangzi) connectives, correlative conjunctions Week 13: Selections of Tang Poetry rhyme and tonal form in shi poetry Week 14: “Hemmed in at Gaixia” (from Records of the Grand Historian) interjections, dislocation and ellipsis Week 15: Introduction to Classical Chinese Dictionaries (Cihai and Ciyuan)
CHNS 4120Readings in Classical ChineseA continuation of Advanced Chinese III focusing on translation, analysis of grammar, and the semantic range and use of commonly occurring classical Chinese words. Readings include selections of the early classics through later imperial works.To increase students’ fluency in reading classical Chinese, both for further study of literary texts and to improve formal reading and writing in modern standard Chinese.Week 1: “The King’s Regulations” (from Xunzi) judgemental sentences with nominal predicates Week 2: “Cao Gui Discusses Warfare” (from the Zuo Tradition) The particle ye Week 3: Selections from the Analects narrative sentences Week 4: “Zou Ji’s Remonstrance” (from Schemes of the Warring States) types of verbs Week 5: “Letter in Reply to Liu Yi” (Zong Chen, 1525-1560) the aspectual particle yi Week 6: “Account of a Peachstone Boat” (Wei Xueyi fl. 17th c.) the particle yan Week 7: “Biographies of Eunuchs” (from Ouyang Xiu’s New History of the Five Dynasties) negation of sentences, particles expressing negation Week 8: “The Original Way” (Han Yu, 768-824) interrogative sentences, question particles Week 9: Selected Poems of the Tang, Song and Ming Dynasties personal pronouns Week 10: “Second Letter to the Qing Emperor” (Kang Youwei, 1857-1927) demonstrative pronouns Week 11: “Letter to Li Hongzhang” (Sun Wen, 1866-1925) the particle zhe Week 12: “Discourse on China as a Youthful Country” (Liang Qichao, 1873-1929) the nominalizing particle suo Week 13: “Revolutionary Army” (Zou Rong, 1885-1905) conjunctions Week 14: “Autobiography at Thirty” (Liang Qichao, 1891- 1962) prepositions Week 15: “A Modest Proposal to Improve Literature” (Hu Shi, 1873-1929) emphatic sentence initial and sentence final particles
CHNS 4190Etymological and Literary History of Chinese WritingA review of history of HanZi, Chinese characters, and how they were adopted into Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese literature and culture. All materials will be read and discussed in the original language.To increase students' ability to handle literary texts written with Chinese Characters in Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Vietnamese.Week 1: The beginning of Chinese writing Week 2: Oracle Bone Inscriptions Week 3: Inscriptions in metal and bamboo Week 4: Bronze Inscriptions or jin wen Week 5: da zhuan or Big Seal Week 6: xiao zhuan Small Seal Week 7: li shu , Administrative Style Week 8: kai shu or Exemplar Style Week 9: cao shu or Cursive Week 10: The language of the Buddhist texts Week 11: Modern Chinese Week 12: Chinese Characters in Japanese Week 13: Chinese Characters in Korean Week 14: Chinese Characters in Vietnamese Week 15: The disappearance of Tru Nom
CHNS 4500/6500Readings in Chinese LiteratureSelected readings of Chinese literature and literary criticism in the original language. Texts of various genres and from different periods of the Chinese literary tradition will be read and discussed in Chinese.To enhance the ability of the students to read, speak, write, and exchange ideas on Chinese literature and literary criticism at an advanced level. Students will be trained to handle authentic texts in the original and to do research on/with primary materials.wk1 The Confucian Classics: LUNYU, DAXUE,& ZHONGYONG Selections from READINGS IN CHINESE LITERARY THOUGHT (RCLT-- The Early Period WK2 The Daoist Classics: DAODEJING & ZHUANGZI RCLT--DAXU (The "Great Preface") wk3 A Buddhist Classic: TANJING RCLT--LUNWEN ("A Discourse on Literature") wk4 SHIJING ("THE CLASSIC OF POETRY") RCLT--WENFU ("The Poetic Expression on Literature") wk5 CHUCI ("Lyrics of Chu") RCLT--WENXIN DIAOLONG wk6 YUEFU ("Music Bureau Poetry"),GUSHI ("Classic Poetry")& Tao Qian RCLT--WENXIN DIAOLONG wk7 Tang Poetry: Wang Wei, Li Bo, & Du Fu RCLT--SHIHUA ("Remarks on Poetry") wk8 Tang Poetry: Hanshan, Li He & Li Shangyin RCLT--CANGLANG SHIHUA ("Canglang's Remarks on Poetry") wk9 CHUANQI ("Tang Tales") RCLT--Popular Poetics: Southern Song and Yuan wk10 Song Lyric/Yuan Song: Li Qingzhao, Su Shi, Li Yu, & Ma Zhiyuan RCLT--Critical writings of Wang Fuzhi wk11 HUABEN XIAOSHUO ("Vernacular Stories") RCLT--YUANSHI ("The Origins of Poetry") wk12 Yuan Variety Play: DOU E YUAN ("Injustice to Dou E") SANGUO YANYI ("Romance of Three Kingdoms") wk13 XIYOU JI ("Journey to the West") SHITOU JI ("The Story of the Stone") wk14 SHITOU JI ("The Story of the Stone") RULIN WAISHI ("The Scholars") wk15 LIAOZHAI ZHI YI ("Liaozhai's Tales of Wonders") LAOCAN YOUJI ("The Travels of Laocan") Lu Xun, "Kuangren riji" ("A Madman's Diary")
CHNS 4600/6600Chinese Literature: ProseA survey of traditional and modern Chinese short prose focusing on literary texts in the original language. The course traces the development of short fiction and the essay in China.To introduce students to important short prose works in the original language. To introduce students to Chinese literary criticism and literary theory.Week 1: “Discourse on Making Things Equal” (from Zhuangzi) Anecdotes in Zhou Philosophical Discourse Week 2: “Collected Biographies of Jesters” (from Records of the Grand Historian) Historical Writing in Han China Week 3: “Peach Blossom Spring” (Tao Qian, 365-427) Six Dynasties Prose Week 4: Selections from Gan Bao’s (fl. 320) Soushenji Six Dynasties “Tales of the Strange” zhiguai Week 5: Selections from Liu Yiqing’s (403-444) A New Account of Tales of the World Literary Anecdotes, Jokes and Humorous Tales Week 6: “The Story of Ying Ying” (Yuan Zhen, 779-831) Tang Dynasty Classical Tales Week 7: “Discussion of Jia Yi” (Su Shi, 1037-1101) Selections of Song Prose and Essays Week 8: “Sharp-Tongued Cui Lian” (Anon.) Song Vernacular Fiction Week 9: “The Jade Guanyin” (from Feng Menglong’s Penetrating Tales to Startle the World) Ming Vernacular Stories Week 10:“The Daoist from Lao Mountain” (Pu Songling, 1640-1715) Qing Classical Tales of the Strange Week 11:“The Great Bright Lake” (Liu E, 1857-1909) Qing Dynasty Essays Week 12:“View of the Back” (Zhu Ziqing, 1898-1948) Early Twentieth Century Prose Essays Week 13:“Kong Yiji” (Lu Xun, 1881-1936) Early Twentieth Century Vernacular Literature Week 14:“Fish” (Huang Chunming) Stories from Taiwan Week 15:“Chess King” (A Cheng) Twentieth Century Chinese Fiction
CLAS 1010Roman CultureThe characteristics of Roman literature and culture, taught principally through translations of selections from Roman authors.STUDENTS TAKING ROMAN CULTURE WILL BE EXPOSED TO THE CULTURE, LITERATURE AND HISTORY OF THE ROMAN PEOPLE. THE CLASS BEGINS AT THE CITY'S FOUNDATION (753 BC), MOVES THROUGH THE HEIGHT OF EMPIRE, AND ENDS AT THE RETIREMENT OF THE LAST EMPEROR OF THE WEST (476 AD). LECTURE TOPICS INCLUDE HISTORICAL INTRODUCTIONS TO THE FOUNDATION OF THE CITY, THE AGE OF THE ROMAN MONARCHY, THE REPUBLIC AND RISE OF JULIUS CAESAR AND THE FORMATION OF IMPERIAL RULING STRUCTURES. OTHER LECTURES WILL FOCUS ON LITERARY AND CULTURAL MATTERS: ROMAN POETRY, ROMAN EDUCATION, THE ROLE OF SLAVES AND WOMEN, THE MEANING OF POPULARITY OF MYSTERY CULTS AS WELL AS THE HISTORY OF THE EARLY CHRISTIAN CHURCH. THE STUDENTS WILL READ ORIGINAL WORKS IN TRANSLATION AND WILL ENGAGE IN DISCUSSION ABOUT THE LITERARY MERIT, MEANING IMPORTANCE OF THE TEXTS. THE STUDENTS WILL ALSO WRITE PAPERS AND ROUTINELY TAKE EXAMINATIONS. THE COURSE WILL CONSIST OF LECTURES AND CLASS DISCUSSION. STUDENTS WILL BE GRADED ON THE STANDARD A TO F GRADING SCALE AND WILL PROVIDE END OF COURSE EVALUATIONS ON THE INSTRUCTION AND COURSE CONTENT FOLLOWING ESTABLISHED CLASSICS DEPARTMENT EVALUATION PROCEDURES.I. WHO WERE THE ROMANS? A. THE FOUNDATION OF ROME B. THE MONARCHY C. THE OVERTHROW OF THE KINGS AND THE BEGINNING OF THE REPUBLIC READING LIVY'S HISTORY OF ROME II. THE ROMAN REPUBLIC: HISTORY, ARISTOCRACY AND IMPERIALISM A. ROMAN REPUBLICAN GOVERNMENT B. ROMAN IMPERIAL EXPANSION AND CONQUEST C. CIVIL WAR READING SUETONIUS: THE LIVES OF JULIUS CAESAR AND AUGUSTUS III. INTRODUCTION TO THE AUGUSTAN AGE A. GOVERNMENTAL STABILITY AND REFORM B. AUGUSTUS' RELIGIOUS AND MORAL REFORMS C. INTELLECTUAL AND ARTISTIC TRENDS OF THE AUGUSTAN AGE READING THE AENEID OF VERGIL IV. THE JULIO-CLAUDIAN AGE A. DEVELOPMENTS IN THE IMPERIAL SYSTEM OF GOVERNING B. PUBLIC FORMS OF ENTERTAINMENT C. CLASS STURCTURE (SLAVE, FREED AND FREE) READING SUETONIUS' LIFE OF NERO AND PETRONIUS' SATYRICON V. THE SECOND CENTURY A. MYSTERY CULTS B. THE RISE OF CHRISTIANITY C. PERSECUTIONS AND MARTYRDOM ACCOUNTS READING APULEIUS' THE GOLDEN ASS VI. THE THIRD AND FOURTH CENTURIES A. COLLAPSE AND RECOVERY B. BUREAUCRACY AND STABILITY C. EDUCATION AND THE PRESERVATION OF ANCIENT TEXTS READING AUGUSTINE'S CONFESSIONS
CLAS 1010HRoman Culture (Honors)The characteristics of Roman literature and culture, taught principally through translations of selections from Roman authors.STUDENTS TAKING ROMAN CULTURE WILL BE EXPOSED TO THE CULTURE, LITERATURE AND HISTORY OF THE ROMAN PEOPLE. THE CLASS BEGINS AT THE CITY'S FOUNDATION (753 BC), MOVES THROUGH THE HEIGHT OF EMPIRE, AND ENDS AT THE RETIREMENT OF THE LAST EMPEROR OF THE WEST (476 AD). LECTURE TOPICS INCLUDE HISTORICAL INTRODUCTIONS TO THE FOUNDATION OF THE CITY, THE AGE OF THE ROMAN MONARCHY, THE REPUBLIC AND RISE OF JULIUS CAESAR AND THE FORMATION OF IMPERIAL RULING STRUCTURES. OTHER LECTURES WILL FOCUS ON LITERARY AND CULTURAL MATTERS: ROMAN POETRY, ROMAN EDUCATION, THE ROLE OF SLAVES AND WOMEN, THE MEANING OF POPULARITY OF MYSTERY CULTS AS WELL AS THE HISTORY OF THE EARLY CHRISTIAN CHURCH. THE STUDENTS WILL READ ORIGINAL WORKS IN TRANSLATION AND WILL ENGAGE IN DISCUSSION ABOUT THE LITERARY MERIT, MEANING IMPORTANCE OF TEXTS. THE STUDENTS WILL ALSO WRITE PAPERS AND ROUTINELY TAKE EXAMINATIONS. THE COURSE WILL CONSIST OF LECTURES AND CLASS DISCUSSION. STUDENTS WILL BE GRADED ON THE STANDARD A TO F GRADING SCALE AND WILL PROVIDE END OF COURSE EVALUATIONS ON THE INSTRUCTION AND COURSE CONTENT FOLLOWING ESTABLISHED CLASSICS DEPARTMENT EVALUATION PROCEDURES.I. WHO WERE THE ROMANS? A. THE FOUNDATION OF ROME B. THE MONARCHY C. THE OVERTHROW OF THE KINGS AND THE BEGINNING OF THE REPUBLIC READING LIVY'S HISTORY OF ROME II. THE ROMAN REPUBLIC: HISTORY, ARISTOCRACY AND IMPERIALISM A. ROMAN REPUBLICAN GOVERNMENT B. ROMAN IMPERIAL EXPANSION AND CONQUEST C. CIVIL WAR READING SUETONIUS: THE LIVES OF JULIUS CAESAR AND AUGUSTUS III. INTRODUCTION TO THE AUGUSTAN AGE A. GOVERNMENTAL STABILITY AND REFORM B. AUGUSTUS' RELIGIOUS AND MORAL REFORMS C. INTELLECTUAL AND ARTISTIC TRENDS OF THE AUGUSTAN AGE READING THE AENEID OF VERGIL IV. THE JULIO-CLAUDIAN AGE A. DEVELOPMENTS IN THE IMPERIAL SYSTEM OF GOVERNING B. PUBLIC FORMS OF ENTERTAINMENT C. CLASS STURCTURE (SLAVE, FREED AND FREE) READING SUETONIUS' LIFE OF NERO AND PETRONIUS' SATYRICON V. THE SECOND CENTURY A. MYSTERY CULTS B. THE RISE OF CHRISTIANITY C. PERSECUTIONS AND MARTYRDOM ACCOUNTS READING APULEIUS' THE GOLDEN ASS VI. THE THIRD AND FOURTH CENTURIES A. COLLAPSE AND RECOVERY B. BUREAUCRACY AND STABILITY C. EDUCATION AND THE PRESERVATION OF ANCIENT TEXTS READING AUGUSTINE'S CONFESSIONS
CLAS 1030Medical TerminologyMedical terminology derived from Greek and Latin, concentrating on the meanings of the components of medical terms and the principles that govern their arrangement, with some attention to the history of ancient medicine.THE STUDENT SHOULD LEARN: 1. TO RECOGNIZE THE INDIVIDUAL COMPONENTS OF MEDICAL TERMS 2. THE MEANING OF THE COMPONENTS 3. THE PRINCIPLES THAT GOVERN THE ARRANGEMENT OF THESE COMPONENTS 4. A GENERAL MEDICAL VOCABULARY 5. MEDICAL TERMS FOR SPECIFIC PARTS OF THE HUMAN BODY AND ITS SYSTEMS 6. TO USE AND MANIPULATE THE COMPONENTS OF MEDICAL TERMS 7. THE HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT OF ANCIENT MEDICINEI. MEDICAL TERMS DERIVED FROM GREEK A. NOUNS AND ADJECTIVES B. VERBS C. VOCABULARY II. GENERAL MEDICAL VOCABULARY III. MEDICAL TERMS DERIVED FROM LATIN A. NOUNS AND ADJECTIVES B. VERBS C. VOCABULARY IV. TERMS FOR MEDICAL SPECIALTIES A. THE CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM B. THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM C. THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM D. HEMATOLOGY, THE LYMPHATIC SYSTEM E. OPHTHALMOLOGY F. GYNECOLOGY G. UROLOGY V. ANCIENT MEDICINE A. DEVELOPMENT B. ANCIENT MEDICAL WRITERS C. ANCIENT MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE AND PRACTICE
CLAS 2110Reacting to the Past: Athens and ChinaIn “Athens, Greece, 403 BCE” students, as Athenians, reestablish the polis after war and tyranny, debating amnesty, citizenry, education, foreign policy. In “China, 1587” students, as Chinese scholars, apply Confucian precepts to a dynasty in peril and confront a crisis in succession raised by the Wanli Emperor’s break with tradition.1. to provide a setting in which students can explore ideas 2. to promote the habit of active learning 3. to promote integrative thinking about culture and history 4. to develop public speaking skills 5. to develop the habit of writing clearly and persuasively 6. to promote working effectively with others 7. to promote problem solving skills 8. to develop student civic-mindedness as participants in a political community 9. to promote an understanding of the dynamic interplay in human events between individual action and the constraints of economic and social forces More information on Reacting can be found at these websites: http://www.barnard.edu/reacting/ http://www.classics.uga.edu/reactingATHENS, 403BCE I. Introduction to "Reacting to the Past" and to 5th century Athens Expectations of students in this pedagogy II. Setup of Athens Game A. Historical Context B. Cultural Contexts for Democracy C. Plato's Republic, Aristotle's Politics III. Athens Game: A. Meetings of the Assembly (5-6 sessions), to debate: amnesty, electorate (who should be citizens?), government agencies (ekklesia or additional boule), education of citizens, foreign policy (rebuilding the empire) B. Dionysia: a day at the theater C. Trial of Socrates (2 sessions) IV. Post mortem: what happened in history China: Confucianism and the Succession Crisis of the Wan-Li Emperor, 1587 Discussion of The Analects of Confucius: Roots of Chinese political philosophy: Confucianism, Daoism, Legalism • community structure and the constraints of social roles • the role of the head of state in creating social and cosmic order • practical application of rewards and punishments • Chinese imperial bureaucratic structure • the uses of art and ritual in establishing political authority Discussion of The Analects of Confucius, Ray Huang’s 1587, A year of no significance: Selection of the first Grand Secretary; distribution of roles; memorial assignments Discussion/Faction meetings: Moral philosophy (largely Confucianism) vs. Realpolitik (largely Legalism) The First Audience with Wan-Li; first memorials The Second Audience with Wan-Li: first memorials, continued Responses by the Emperor and First Grand Secretary to the first memorials; general discussion 2nd and 3rd Memorials on various topics: • family structure and family roles as a model for good government (Daxue [The Great Learning]) • flooding and irrigation; examples from the ancients • imperial policy for foreign visitors, foreign traders and Jesuits • Confucianism and the empire, the Ming founders as exemplars • government bureaucracy in the Qin and Han • What is the role of the eunuchs? • the imperial exams and the structure of Ming bureaucracy • the Mandate of Heaven, imperial legitimacy and dynastic rule
CLAS 2113Reacting to the Past: Athens and Revolution in FranceIn “Athens, Greece, 403 BCE” students, as Athenians, reestablish the polis after war and tyranny, debating amnesty, citizenry, education and foreign policy. In “France, 1791” students, as members of the parliament, formulate a constitution that redistributes power differently from the ancien regime, determining the direction of the revolution in progress.1. to provide a setting in which students can explore ideas 2. to promote the habit of active learning 3. to promote integrative thinking about culture and history 4. to develop public speaking skills 5. to develop the habit of writing clearly and persuasively 6. to promote working effectively with others 7. to promote problem solving skills 8. to develop student civic-mindedness as participants in a political community 9. to promote an understanding of the dynamic interplay in human events between individual action and the constraints of economic and social forces More information on Reacting can be found at these websites: http://www.barnard.edu/reacting/ http://www.classics.uga.edu/reactingATHENS, 403BCE I. Introduction to "Reacting to the Past" and to 5th century Athens Expectations of students in this pedagogy II. Setup of Athens Game A. Historical Context B. Cultural Contexts for Democracy C. Plato's Republic, Aristotle's Politics III. Athens Game: A. Meetings of the Assembly (5-6 sessions), to debate: amnesty, electorate (who should be citizens?), government agencies (ekklesia or additional boule), education of citizens, foreign policy (rebuilding the empire) B. Dionysia: a day at the theater C. Trial of Socrates (2 sessions) IV. Post mortem: what happened in history REVOLUTION IN FRANCE: I. Introduction to Enlightenment and Revolution: historical context a. Voltaire, “On the Church of England” b. Rousseau, “Discourse on the Sciences & Arts” c. Rousseau, Social Contract, Books I-IV d. Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France II. Game set-up a. Roles assigned b. Assembly President and of Newspaper Editors chosen c. Indeterminates meet individually with GameMaster III. General Assembly Sessions (run by students, who set all agenda after the first) a. Issues of the Catholic Church i. Civil Constitution of the Clergy ii. Riots in the Vendee b. The Monarchy i. Flight to Varennes ii. Royal Sanctions iii.King’s relations with emigres c. Constitutional Issues i. Ancient regime ii. Constitution of 1791 iii.Suffrage iv. Organization of Legislature v. Membership in and function of National Guard d. Slave Ownership & riots in Saint-Domingue e. War and peace; dangers from Austria and Prussia (their ties to the Queen) IV. Uncovering the Game: what really happened? a. Danton, Lafayette, Robespierre, King Louis XVI (all characters in the Game) – their aftermath
CLAS 4040/6040The Hellenistic WorldArchaeology, art, culture, and history of Greece and the East from the rise of Alexander to Rome's annexation of Egypt.1. STUDENTS WILL REVIEW THE BASIC HISTORY OF THE HELLENISTIC ERA. 2. STUDENTS WILL BECOME FAMILIAR WITH THE MAJOR ARTISTIC MONUMENTS OF THE HELLENISTIC CITIES AND WILL LEARN BOTH HOW THEY DERIVE FROM CLASSICAL GREEK PROTOTYPES AND HOW THEY INFLUENCE ROMAN MONUMENTS. 3. STUDENTS WILL STUDY AND LEARN HOW TO DOCUMENT ARCHAEOLOGICALLY THE PROCESS OF HELLENIZATION -- HOW THE HELLENISTIC RULERS USED CLASSICAL GREEK ARTISTIC, ARCHITECTURAL, RELIGIOUS, URBAN, LITERARY AND PHILOSOPHICAL PROTOTYPES TO UNIFY THEIR KINGDOMS. 4. STUDENTS WILL, IN PARTICULAR, LEARN HOW NUMISMATICS AND POTTERY CAN BE USED BY THE ARCHAEOLOGIST TO DOCUMENT HELLENIZATION.I. THE MACEDONIAN HOUSE AND THE RISE OF ALEXANDER. II. ALEXANDER'S SUCCESSORS AND THE DIVISION OF HIS EMPIRE. III. THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF MACEDONIA -- THE PALACE AT PELLA AND THE RECENTLY DISCOVERED TOMBS. IV. THE ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE HELLENISTIC CAPITALS -- SELEUICA, ANTIOCH, AND ALEXANDRIA. V. HELLENISTIC ATHENS AND HELLENISTIC KINGS IN GREEK SANCTUARIES. VI. PERGAMON AND THE RISE OF ROME. GRADUATE STUDENTS ARE EXPECTED TO WRITE A MORE COMPREHENSIVE AND SYNTHETIC RESEARCH PAPER AND TO GIVE AT LEAST ONE ORAL PRESENTATION IN CLASS.
CLAS 4100/6100Ancient Roman CitiesSelected Roman cities and their architecture; principles upon which they were planned and designed. Roman reworking of the theories of Hippodamus, and study of the architectural writings of Vitruvius. Detailed study of the topography and monuments of various Roman cities, including Rome, Ostia, Alba Fucens, Saepinum, cities of Rome's provinces.1. STUDENTS WILL DISCOVER WAYS IN WHICH A PRELITERATE CULTURE CAN BE TRACED AND ANALYZED WITHOUT THE AID OF WRITTEN DOCUMENTS, MOST ESPECIALLY THROUGH A CLOSE STUDY OF THE CULTURE'S MATERIAL POSSESSIONS. 2. STUDENTS WILL OBSERVE PROCESSES OF CONTACT BETWEEN MORE AND LESS ADVANCED CULTURES, AND LEARN HOW SUCH CULTURES INTERACT. 3. STUDENTS WILL LEARN APPROACHES FOR ATTEMPTING TO DECIPHER AN UNKNOWN LANGUAGE. 4. STUDENTS WILL BE SHOWN THE ROOTS OF MUCH OF ROME'S EARLY DEVELOPMENT AND THE BASIS FOR ITS FUTURE EXPANSION INTO A WORLD POWER.I. BACKGROUND: THE GREEKS IN THE WEST II. ITALIAN ORIGINS: THE VILLANOVANS III. CULTURAL CONTACT BETWEEN EAST AND WEST: THE ORIENTALIZING PERIOD IV. THE ETRUSCANS: CITIES AND CEMETERIES V. THE ETRUSCANS AND ROME: THE TARQUIN KINGS VI. THE AFTERMATH: DECLINE AND ABSORPTION OF ETRURIA
CLAS 4110/6110The Etruscans and Early RomeThe art and culture of the people of Northern Italy known as the Etruscans, with special attention to their relationship with the Greek world and their role in the development of Rome as a city.STUDENTS WILL BECOME FAMILIAR WITH THE CULTURES OF THE BRONZE AGE LEVANT AND MESOPOTAMIA WHICH TOGETHER WITH THOSE OF THE GREEK MAINLAND HAD AN IMPACT ON THE LESS CULTURALLY AND TECHNOLOGICALLY DEVELOPED CULTURES OF NORTHERN ITALY. STUDENTS WILL STUDY THE RELATIONSHIPS THAT DEVELOPED BETWEEN GREEK AND PHOENICIAN TRADERS, WITH THEIR ACCESS TO SOPHISTICATED FINISHED PRODUCTS AND LITERATURE/MYTHOLOGY, AND THE RELATIVELY BACKWARD BUT MINERAL-RICH PEOPLE OF ETRURIA, WHO HAD WEALTH TO BUY AND AN EAGERNESS TO ABSORB, BUT ON THEIR OWN TERMS. SPECIAL ATTENTION WILL BE GIVEN TO ARCHAEOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES FOR ANALYZING AND RECONSTRUCTING THE BELIEFS, VALUES, AND LIFESTYLE OF A CULTURE WHICH HAS LEFT NO WRITTEN RECORDS. FINALLY, STUDENTS WILL EXPLORE THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THIS NEWLY EMPOWERED CULTURE IN THE NORTH AND THE FLEDGLING LATIN CITY OF ROME ON THE TIBER, ITSELF IN THE BEGINNING PRIMITIVE BY ETRUSCAN STANDARDS.BRONZE AGE CULTURES OF THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN BRONZE AGE EXPLORATION OF ITALY THE LEVANT AND MESOPOTAMIA AFTER 1000 BC THE VILLANOVANS EARLY GREEK COLONIES IN ITALY & SICILY ORIENTALIZING: THE CONTACT BETWEEN GREEKS AND ETRUSCANS CAERE TARQUINIA AND WALL PAINTING VEII CHIUSI POPULONIA AND THE NORTHERN COAST MURLO BOLOGNA AND OTHER POINTS NORTH OF THE ARNO WRITING AND RELITION EARLY ROME - BEGINNINGS EARLY ROME - THE ETRUSCAN CONTRIBUTION
CLAS 4160/6160History of Late AntiquityThe literature and history of late antiquity (270-400 AD) with attention to political, social, intellectual, and religious developments.STUDENTS WILL READ IN TRANSLATION A VARIETY OF HISTORICAL, RHETORICAL AND RELIGIOUS WORKS BY ANCIENT AUTHORS. THEY WILL BE ASKED TO ENGAGE CRITICALLY WITH THE TEXTS AND THUS WILL BE EXPECTED TO UNDERSTAND THE RHETORICAL AND PROPAGANDISTIC STRATEGIES EMPLOYED BY ANCIENT PHILOSOPHERS, THEOLOGIANS AND POLITICIANS. THE RELIGIOUS TRENDS WITHIN PAGAN AND CHRISTIAN COMMUNITIES WILL BE INVESTIGATED FROM STRICTLY HISTORICAL AND SOCIAL CONTEXTS. STUDENTS WILL BE EXPECTED TO ENGAGE IN A HIGH LEVELS OF ANALYSIS AND DISCUSSION AND WILL BE EXPECTED TO WRITE A MAJOR RESEARCH PAPER. EXAMINATIONS WILL TEST THE STUDENTS' ABILITY TO DISCUSS THE PROJECTS AND STRATEGIES OF THE ANCIENT WRITERS AS WELL AS LARGER HISTORICAL AND SOCIAL TRENDS AS DEMONSTRATED BY THE ANCIENT TEXTS.GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO THE WORLD OF LATE ANTIQUITY THE CRISIS OF THE THIRD CENTURY HISTORY AND POLITICS OF THE TETRARCHY (READING THE PANEGYRICI LATINI) INTRODUCTION TO THE RELIGIOUS WORLD OF LATE ANTIQUITY (READING MARTYRDOM ACCOUNTS, SPECIFICALLY THE MARTYRDOMS OF PERPETUA, FELICITAS, MARCELLUS, JULIUS THE VETERAN AND THE SAINTS AGAPE, IRENE AND CHIONE). CONSTANTINE AND THE TETRARCHY (READING LACTANTIUS, ON THE DEATH OF THE PERSECUTORS). CONSTANTINE THE EMPEROR (READING EUSEBIUS' LIFE OF CONSTANTINE) READING CONSTANTINE'S ORATION TO THE SAINTS CONSTANTIUS II, THE SON AND SUCCESSOR OF CONSTANTINE. CHRISTIANITY IN THE REIGNS OF CONSTANTINE AND CONSTANTIUS (READING ATHENASIUS' LIFE OF ST. ANTONY). INTRODUCTION TO THE EMPEROR JULIAN. READING JULIAN'S LETTER TO THE SENATE AND PEOPLE OF ATHENS. THE REIGN OF JULIAN AND PAGANISM IN LATE ANTIQUITY (READING THE HISTORIES OF AMMIANUS MARCELLINUS, BOOKS 20 - 26). READING JULIAN'S CAESARS. THE LEGACY OF JULIAN THE APOSTATE. THE INTELLECTUAL WORLD OF LATE ANTIQUITY READING PORPHYRY'S LIFE OF PLOTINUS. THE WORLD OF LAW: READING EXCERPTS FROM THE THEODOSIAN CODE. THE TENACITY OF CLASSICAL LIFE. READING THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF LIBANIUS.
CLAS 4210/6210Ancient TragedyThe conventions of classical tragedy as exemplified in the plays (in English translation) of the Greek dramatists Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, as well as the Roman tragedian Seneca.1. STUDENTS WILL BECOME AWARE OF THE TRADITION OF GREEK TRAGEDY THROUGH THE ANALYSIS OF THE EXTANT PLAYS OF AESCHYLUS, SOPHOCLES, AND EURIPIDES. 2. STUDENTS WILL LEARN ABOUT THE PREHISTORY OF TRAGEDY AS TRANSMITTED BY ARISTOTLE AND OTHER ANCIENT WRITERS. 3. STUDENTS WILL BECOME MORE AWARE OF TRAGEDY'S INSTITUTIONAL STATUS AS PART OF THE CITY DIONYSIA AND ITS ROLE IN CREATING AND MAINTAINING BOTH ATHENIAN AND PAN- HELLENIC IDENTITIES. 4. STUDENTS WILL BECOME AWARE OF THE FORMAL FEATURES OF TRAGEDY AND LEARN TO ASSESS THEIR CONTRIBUTION TO THE EFFECT OF A PLAY. 5. STUDENTS WILL BECOME AWARE OF THE DEVELOPMENTAL TRAGEDY IN THE FIFTH CENTURY AND BE ABLE TO CONTRAST THE APPROACHES OF AESCHYLUS, SOPHOCLES, AND EURIPIDES. 6. STUDENTS WILL BE EXPOSED TO A WIDE RANGE OF APPROACHES TO TRAGEDY, INCLUDING FORMALIST, PSYCHOANALITICAL, FEMINIST APPROACHES. 7. STUDENTS WILL BE EVALUATED BY A MID-TERM, A FINAL EXAM AND A 10-15 PAGE PAPER. 8. MUCH MORE ACTIVE INVOLVEMENT WILL BE EXPECTED BY THOSE ENROLLED FOR GRADUATE CREDIT, INCLUDING SEVERAL SEMINAR PRESENTATIONS AND A MORE EXTENSIVE TERM PAPER.I. ARISTOTLE ON TRAGEDY; PICKARD-CAMBRIDGE, DITTYRAMB, TRAGEDY AND COMEDY. II. AESCHYLUS, PERSIANS, SEVEN AGAINST THEBES HIKETES, AGAMEMNON, CHOEPHAROI, EUMERIDES, PROMETHUS BOUND. III. SOPHOCLES ANTIGONE, OEDIPUS THE KING, ELECTRA, WOMEN OF TRACHIS, PHILOCTETES, OEDIPUS AT COLONUS. IV. EURIPIDES, MEDIA, HIPPOLYTUS, ELECTRA, IPIGENCIA IN TAURIS, CYCLOPS, HELEN, BACCAE.
CLAS 4300/6300Selected Topics in Ancient CivilizationSpecial topics in the civilization of Greece and Rome. Topics will vary as demand requires.1. GENERAL (ADMINISTRATIVE) A. TO PROVIDE STUDENTS AN OPPORTUNITY TO EXPLORE IN SIGNIFICANT DEPTH A SPECIAL TOPIC NOT COVERED BY OTHER DEPARTMENTAL COURSES. B. TO PERMIT STUDENTS TO COMPLETE REQUIREMENT FOR THE CLAS, LATN, OR GREK MAJORS IN A TIMELY FASHION WHEN REGULAR COURSE OFFERINGS ARE NOT AVAILABLE. 2. SPECIFIC (ILLUSTRATIVE OF EXAMPLE OUTLINED BELOW) A. STUDENTS WILL DISCERN THE DEVELOPMENT OF ROMAN MILITARY STRUCTURE OVER A CA. 1,000 YEAR PERIOD. B. STUDENTS WILL RECOGNIZE THE ARMY'S ROLE IN ROMAN SOCIETY AND POLITICS. C. UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS WILL DEMONSTRATE KNOWLEDGE BY WRITTEN EXAMS AND A TERM PAPER OF CA. 10-15 PAGES. IN ADDITION TO WRITTEN EXAMS, GRADUATE STUDENTS WILL DELIVER AN ORAL PRESENTATION AND WRITE A PAPER CA. 15-20 PAGES IN LENGTH.***EXAMPLE ONLY*** THE ROMAN ARMY I. ORIGINS OF THE ROMAN ARMY II. THE ARMY OF THE REGAL PERIOD AND THE SERVIAN REFORMS. III. THE MANIPULAR ARMY OF THE ROMAN REPUBLIC IV. THE MARIAN REFORMS V. THE ARMY OF CAESAR A. ORGANIZATION B. INFANTRY AND INFANTRY TACTICS C. CAVALRY AND CAVALRY TACTICS D. ARTILLERY VI. THE ROMAN IMPERIAL ARMY, 27 B.C. - A.D. 284 A. RECRUITMENT, SERVICE, AND RETIREMENT B. RANK STRUCTURE C. PEACETIME ACTIVITIES D. SOCIAL AND POLITICAL STATUS OF ROMAN SOLDIERS VII. THE PRAETORIAN GUARD VIII. THE ROMAN NAVY IX. THE REFORMS OF DIOCLETIAN
CLAS 4310Directed Readings in Classical CultureIndividual study, reading, or projects under the direction of a faculty project director.GENERAL OBJECTIVES: 1. TO PROVIDE JUNIOR OR SENIOR MAJORS THE OPPORTUNITY TO EXPLORE A TOPIC NOT AVAILABLE TO HIM/HER IN THE REGULAR CURRICULUM. 2. TO PERMIT A MAJOR TO COMPLETE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CLAS, GREK, OR LATN MAJOR IN A TIMELY FASHION WHEN REGULAR COURSE OFFERINGS ARE NOT AVAILABLE. SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES FOR THE DIRECTED READING OUTLINED BELOW: 1. TO CONSIDER THE APPEARANCE AND APPLICATION OF THE GODS, HEROES AND STORY PATTERNS OF CLASSICAL MYTH TO THE WRITING OF PHILOSOPHY IN ANCIENT GREECE. 2. TO EXPLORE CONNECTIONS BETWEEN PHILOSOPHICAL AND RELIGIOUS THOUGHT AND IMAGERY AMONG THE PRE-SOCRATICS, PLATO AND ARISTOTLE. 3. TO READ AND STUDY WORKS (BOTH MAJOR AND MINOR) OF THE PRE-SOCRATICS, OF PLATO AND OF ARISTOTLE, WITH PRIMARY ATTENTION TO THE USES OF MYTHOLOGY FOR SYMBOLIC AND ALLEGORICAL PURPOSES WITHIN GREEK PHILOSOPHICAL LITERATURE AND THOUGHT.ONE EXAMPLE OF A DIRECTED READING COURSE MIGHT BE: GREEK MYTHOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY I. MYTHOLOGY IN THE PRE-SOCRATICS A. PYTHAGORAS B. HERACLITUS C. PARMENIDES D. ANAXAGORAS II. MYTHOLOGY IN PLATO'S DIALOGUES A. LACHES B. LYSIS C. CHARMIDES D. ION E. SYMPOSIUM F. PHAEDRUS G. PROTAGORAS III. MYTHOLOGY IN THE WORKS OF ARISTOTLE A. NICOMACHEAN ETHICS B. POETICS
CLAS 4990HHonors ThesisIndividual research in the major field or a closely related field.STUDENTS COMPLETING THE HONORS THESIS RESEARCH CLASS WILL WORK WITH AN ADVISING PROFESSOR WHO WILL DETERMINE A COURSE OF RESEARCH AND STUDY. THE STUDENT AND FACULTY MEMBER WILL AGREE UPON THE NECESSARY MEETING ARRANGEMENTS WITH THE AIM THAT THE STUDENT COMPLETING THIS CLASS WILL HAVE RECEIVED THE NECESSARY GUIDANCE AND INSTRUCTION TO SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETE AN HONORS THESIS. STUDENTS WILL BE GRADED ON THE STANDARD A TO F GRADING SCALE.THE ADVISING PROFESSOR OVERSEEING THE RESEARCH AND WRITING OF THE UNDERGRADUATE HONORS THESIS WILL DETERMINE THE OUTLINE AND CONTENTS OF THE COURSE.
CLAS 7000Master's ResearchResearch while enrolled for a master's degree under the direction of faculty members.STUDENTS COMPLETING THE CLAS 7000 MASTER'S RESEARCH CLASS WILL WORK WITH AN ADVISING PROFESSOR WHO WILL HELP DETERMINE A COURSE OF RESEARCH AND STUDY. THE STUDENT AND FACULTY MEMBER WILL AGREE UPON THE NECESSARY ASSIGNMENTS AND MEETING ARRANGEMENTS WITH THE AIM THAT THE STUDENT COMPLETING THIS CLASS WILL HAVE RECEIVED ADEQUATE GUIDANCE AND INSTRUCTION TO SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETE THE RESEARCH NECESSARY TO WRITE A MASTER'S THESIS. STUDENTS WILL BE GRADED ON A SATISFACTORY/UNSATISFACTORY SCALE. THIS COURSE MAY BE REPEATED FOR UP TO 12 HOURS OF CREDIT.THE ADVISING PROFESSOR OVERSEEING THE COMPLETION OF THE CLAS 7000 MASTER'S RESEARCH CLASS DETERMINES THE OUTLINE AND CONTENTS OF THE COURSE, WHICH WILL BE BASED UPON THE RESEARCH INTERESTS OF THE STUDENT.
CLAS 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.STUDENTS COMPLETING THE CLAS 7300 MASTER'S THESIS CLASS WILL WORK WITH AN ADVISING PROFESSOR WHO WILL HELP DETERMINE A COURSE OF RESEARCH AND WRITING. THE STUDENT AND FACULTY MEMBER WILL AGREE UPON THE NECESSARY ASSIGNMENTS AND MEETING ARRANGEMENTS WITH THE AIM THAT THE STUDENT COMPLETING THIS CLASS WILL HAVE RECEIVED ADEQUATE GUIDANCE AND INSTRUCTION TO SUCCESSFULLY WRITE A MASTER'S THESIS. STUDENTS WILL BE GRADED ON A SATISFACTORY/UNSATISFACTORY SCALE. THIS COURSE MAY BE REPEATED FOR UP TO 12 HOURS OF CREDIT.THE ADVISING PROFESSOR OVERSEEING THE COMPLETION OF THE CLAS 7300 MASTER'S THESIS CLASS DETERMINES THE OUTLINE AND CONTENTS OF THE COURSE.
CMLT 2111World Literature IWorld literature from antiquity to the seventeenth century.The primary objectives are to introduce students to major works of world literature written up to the 17th century; to help students situate those works within larger historical and cultural contexts; to provide students with an understanding of the conventions of literary composition and reception that inform their creation, such as conventions of genre, metrics, style, etc.; and to improve students' communication skills through oral presentations in class and expository writing assignments, including in-class and out-of-class essays. Students' performance will be evaluated through a variety of means, including assessment of oral presentations, objective tests, essays, and the final examination.The typical course consists of a series of readings in world literature up to the 17th century. The topics considered are generated by the specific work under analysis. (The question of writing systems and the preservation of literary works, for example, is germane to the study of Gilgamesh.) The works treated will vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Gilgamesh Homer. The Iliad (selections) Confucius. Analects (selections) Ramayana (selections) Virgil. The Aeneid (selections) Murasaki. The Tale of Genji (selections) Ishaq. The Biography of the Prophet (selections) Boccaccio. The Decameron (selections) Cervantes. Don Quijote (selections) Milton. Paradise Lost (selections)
CMLT 2210Western World Literature IWestern World Literature from Homer to the seventeenth century.The primary objectives are to introduce students to major works of Western world literature written up to the 17th century; to help students situate those works within larger historical and cultural contexts; to provide students with an understanding of the conventions of literary composition and reception that inform their creation, such as conventions of genre, metrics, style, etc.; and to improve students' communication skills through oral presentations in class and expository writing assignments, including in-class and out-of-class essays. Students' performance will be evaluated through a variety of means, including assessment of oral presentations, objective tests, essays, and the final examination.The typical course consists of a series of readings in Western world literature up to the 17th century. The topics considered are generated by the specific work under analysis. (The question of the Roman assimilation of Greek culture,for example, is germane to the study of the Aeneid.) The works treated will vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Homer. The Odyssey Virgil. The Aeneid Augustine. The Confessions Chaucer. The Canterbury Tales (selections) Dante. The Inferno Petrarch. Selected sonnets Rabelais. Gargantua and Pantagruel (selections) Montaigne. Essays (selections) Cervantes. Don Quijote (selections) Calderon. Life Is a Dream Shakespeare. Hamlet
CMLT 2212World Literature IIWorld literature from the seventeenth century to the present.The primary objectives are to introduce students to major works of world literature written from the 17th century to the present; to help students situate those works within larger historical and cultural contexts; to provide students with an understanding of the conventions of literary composition and reception that inform their creation, such as conventions of genre, metrics, style, etc.; and to improve students' communication skills through oral presentations in class and expository writing assignments, including in-class and out-of-class essays. Students' performance will be evaluated through a variety of means, including assessment of oral presentations, objective tests, essays, and the final examination.The typical course consists of a series of readings in world literature from the 17th century to the present. The topics considered are generated by the specific work under analysis. (The question of the relationship between philosophy and literature arises in the study of Candide, for instance.) The works treated will vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Racine. Phaedra Basho. The Narrow Road of the Interior Akinari. Bewitched Voltaire. Candide Goethe. Faust (selections) Douglass. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass Ibsen. Hedda Gabler Tagore. "Punishment" Premchand. "The Road to Salvation" Lu Xun. "Diary of a Madman" Borges. "The Garden of Forking Paths" Achebe. Things Fall Apart
CMLT 2220Western World Literature IIWestern World Literature from the seventeenth to twentieth century.The primary objectives are to introduce students to major works of Western world literature written from the 17th century to the present; to help students situate those works within larger historical and cultural contexts; to provide students with an understanding of the conventions of literary composition and reception that inform their creation, such as conventions of genre, metrics, style, etc.; and to improve students' communication skills through oral presentations in class and expository writing assignments, including in-class and out-of-class essays. Students' performance will be evaluated through a variety of means, including assessment of oral presentations, objective tests, essays and the final examination.The typical course consists of a series of readings in Western world literature from the 17th century to the present. The topics considered are generated by the specific work under analysis. (The question of utilitarianism and utopianism, for example, will be of concern in an analysis of Notes from Underground.) The works treated will vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Moliere. Tartuffe Swift. Gulliver's Travels, Book IV Voltaire. Candide Rousseau. Confessions (selections) Wordsworth. Selected poetry Lermentov. A Hero of our Times Melville. Billy Budd Chekhov. The Cherry Orchard Pirandello. Six Characters in Search of an Author Eliot. The Wasteland Sartre. No Exit Silko. Yellow Woman
CMLT 2250HWestern World Literature I (Honors)Western World Literature from Homer to the twentieth century.The primary objectives are to introduce students to major works of Western world literature written up to the 17th century; to help students situate those works within larger historical and cultural contexts; to provide students with an understanding of the conventions of literary composition and reception that inform their creation, such as conventions of genre, metrics, style, etc.; and to improve students' communication skills through oral presentations in class and expository writing assignments, including in-class and out-of-class essays. Students' performance will be evaluated through a variety of means, including assessment of oral presentations, objective tests, essays, and the final examination.The typical course consists of a series of readings in Western world literature up to the 17th century. The topics considered are generated by the specific work under analysis. (The question of the Roman assimilation of Greek culture,for example, is germane to the study of the Aeneid.) The works treated will vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Homer. The Odyssey Virgil. The Aeneid Augustine. The Confessions Chaucer. The Canterbury Tales (selections) Dante. The Inferno Petrarch. Selected sonnets Rabelais. Gargantua and Pantagruel (selections) Montaigne. Essays (selections) Cervantes. Don Quijote (selections) Calderon. Life Is a Dream Shakespeare. Hamlet
CMLT 2260HWestern World Literature II (Honors)Western world literature from the seventeenth century to the twenty-first century.The primary objectives are to introduce students to major works of Western world literature written from the 17th century to the present; to help students situate those works within larger historical and cultural contexts; to provide students with an understanding of the conventions of literary composition and reception that inform their creation, such as conventions of genre, metrics, style, etc.; and to improve students' communication skills through oral presentations in class and expository writing assignments, including in-class and out-of-class essays. Students' performance will be evaluated through a variety of means, including assessment of oral presentations, objective tests, essays and the final examination.The typical course consists of a series of readings in Western world literature from the 17th century to the present. The topics considered are generated by the specific work under analysis. (The question of utilitarianism and utopianism, for example, will be of concern in an analysis of Notes from Underground.) The works treated will vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Moliere. Tartuffe Swift. Gulliver's Travels, Book IV Voltaire. Candide Rousseau. Confessions (selections) Wordsworth. Selected poetry Lermentov. A Hero of our Times Melville. Billy Budd Chekhov. The Cherry Orchard Pirandello. Six Characters in Search of an Author Eliot. The Wasteland Sartre. No Exit Silko. Yellow Woman
CMLT 2270HWorld Literature I (Honors)World literature from antiquity to the seventeenth century.The primary objectives are to introduce students to major works of world literature written up to the 17th century; to help students situate those works within larger historical and cultural contexts; to provide students with an understanding of the conventions of literary composition and reception that inform their creation, such as conventions of genre, metrics, style, etc.; and to improve students' communication skills through oral presentations in class and expository writing assignments, including in-class and out-of-class essays. Students' performance will be evaluated through a variety of means, including assessment of oral presentations, objective tests, essays, and the final examination.The typical course consists of a series of readings in world literature up to the 17th century. The topics considered are generated by the specific work under analysis. (The question of writing systems and the preservation of literary works, for example, is germane to the study of Gilgamesh.) The works treated will vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Gilgamesh Homer. The Iliad (selections) Confucius. Analects (selections) Ramayana (selections) Virgil. The Aeneid (selections) Murasaki. The Tale of Genji (selections) Ishaq. The Biography of the Prophet (selections) Boccaccio. The Decameron (selections) Cervantes. Don Quijote (selections) Milton. Paradise Lost (selections)
CMLT 2280HWorld Literature II (Honors)World literature from the seventeenth century to present.The primary objectives are to introduce students to major works of world literature written from the 17th century to the present; to help students situate those works within larger historical and cultural contexts; to provide students with an understanding of the conventions of literary composition and reception that inform their creation, such as conventions of genre, metrics, style, etc.; and to improve students' communication skills through oral presentations in class and expository writing assignments, including in-class and out-of-class essays. Students' performance will be evaluated through a variety of means, including assessment of oral presentations, objective tests, essays, and the final examination.The typical course consists of a series of readings in world literature from the 17th century to the present. The topics considered are generated by the specific work under analysis. (The question of the relationship between philosophy and literature arises in the study of Candide, for instance.) The works treated will vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Racine. Phaedra Basho. The Narrow Road of the Interior Akinari. Bewitched Voltaire. Candide Goethe. Faust (selections) Douglass. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass Ibsen. Hedda Gabler Tagore. "Punishment" Premchand. "The Road to Salvation" Lu Xun. "Diary of a Madman" Borges. "The Garden of Forking Paths" Achebe. Things Fall Apart
CMLT 2400Asian-American LiteratureWorks of literature by Asian-American writers, including works written in English and translations of works originally written in Asian languages.Students will gain knowledge of the various cultural traditions of Asian ethnic groups within the United States, including Asian Americans of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Vietnames, Filipino, Indian, and Indonesian descent. They will become familiar with the history of diverse immigration experiences, the problems of assimilation encountered by each group, the linguistic issues specific to each community, and the modifications in source culture values that each group undergoes during the process of assimilation. Students will also learn to analyze individual literary works, identifying thematic, stylistic, and generic elements and interpreting each work within its social, historical and aesthetic context. Students will improve their communication skills through oral presentations, in-class writing assignments and out-of-class essays. Students' comprehension of factual material will be assessed through objective tests and the final examination.The typical course consists of a series of readings in Asian American literature, as well as readings dealing with Asian American culture. Generally, the topics discussed will focus on the issues specific to the ethnic group represented by a given work of literature (e.g., the problems specific to Chinese Americans will be central to the study of Kingston's The Woman Warrior). The works treated will vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: John Okada. No-no Boy Maxine Hong Kingston. The Woman Warrior Bharati Mukerjee. Jasmine Amy Tan. The joy Luck Club Joy Kogawa. Obasan David Henry Hwang. M. Butterfly Chang-rae Lee. Native Speaker Nora Okja Keller. Comfort Woman
CMLT 2410HAsian-American Literature (Honors)Works of literature by Asian-American writers, including works written in English and translation of works originally written in Asian languages.Students will gain knowledge of the various cultural traditions of Asian ethnic groups within the United States, including Asian Americans of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Vietnames, Filipino, Indian, and Indonesian descent. They will become familiar with the history of diverse immigration experiences, the problems of assimilation encountered by each group, the linguistic issues specific to each community, and the modifications in source culture values that each group undergoes during the process of assimilation. Students will also learn to analyze individual literary works, identifying thematic, stylistic, and generic elements and interpreting each work within its social, historical and aesthetic context. Students will improve their communication skills through oral presentations, in-class writing assignments and out-of-class essays. Students' comprehension of factual material will be assessed through objective tests and the final examination.The typical course consists of a series of readings in Asian American literature, as well as readings dealing with Asian American culture. Generally, the topics discussed will focus on the issues specific to the ethnic group represented by a given work of literature (e.g., the problems specific to Chinese Americans will be central to the study of Kingston's The Woman Warrior). The works treated will vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: John Okada. No-no Boy Maxine Hong Kingston. The Woman Warrior Bharati Mukerjee. Jasmine Amy Tan. The joy Luck Club Joy Kogawa. Obasan David Henry Hwang. M. Butterfly Chang-rae Lee. Native Speaker
CMLT 2500Comparative Ethnic American LiteraturesA comparative study of ethnic literatures in the United States, including African-American, Arabic-American, Asian-American, Hispanic-American, Jewish-American, and Native-American literatures.Students will gain knowledge of the various ethnic cultural traditions in the United States as exhibited in their literatures. They will become familiar with the history of different immigrant groups, the varied problems of assimilation encountered by diverse populations in different eras, the linguistic issues specific to each ethnic group, and the modifications in source culture values that each group experiences during the process of assimilation. Students will also learn to analyze individual literary works, identifying thematic, stylistic, and generic elements and interpreting the work within its social, historical and aesthetic context. Finally, students will improve their skills in expository writing by composing three analytic essays during the semester.The following is a sample syllabus. Specific works treated will vary with the instructor. Week One: The African-American Experience Olaudah Equiano, Frederick Douglass, Narrative (Norton Anthology) Week Two: Ralph Ellison, Zora Neale Hurston (Norton Anthology) Week Three: Ishmael Reed, Maya Angelou, Rita Dove (Norton Anthology) Week Four: The Latino-Experience Rudolfo Anaya, Bless Me, Ultima Week Five: Cristina Garcia, Dreaming in Cuban Week Six: Velez, Bus Stops, and stories by Pi¤ero, Cisneros, Hijuelos and Cofer (Latino Reader) Week Seven: The Asian-American Experience Maxine Hong Kingston, The Warrior Woman Week Eight: John Okada, No-No Boy Week Nine: Stories from Charlie Chan Is Dead Week Ten: The Jewish-American Experience Abraham Cahan, The Imported Bride Week Eleven: Isaac Bashevis Singer, Collected Stories Week Twelve: The Native-American Experience N. Scott Momaday, In the Presence of the Sun Week Thirteen: Joy Harjo, She Had Some Horses, Stories from The Remembered Earth Week Fourteen: The Arab-American Experience Grape Leaves: A Century of Arab American Poetry Week Fifteen: Nehid Rachlin, Veils Texts: Gates, Henry Louis, Jr. and Nellie Y. McKay. Norton Anthology of African American Literature Anaya, Rudolfo. Bless Me, Ultima Garcia, Cristina. Dreaming in Cuban Velez, Manuel. Bus Stops and Other Poems Augenbraum, Harold, and Margarite Fern ndez Olmos, eds. The Latino Reader Kingston, Maxine Hong. The Warrior Woman Hagedorn, Jessica, ed. Charlie Chan Is Dead Okada, John. No-No Boy Singer, Isaac Bashevis. Collected Stories Cahan, Abraham. The Imported Bridegroom and Other Stories Momaday, N. Scott. In the Presence of the Sun Harjo, Joy. She Had Some Horses Hobson, Geary. The Remembered Earth: An Anthology of Contemporary Native American Literature. Orfalea, Gregory, and Sharif Elmusa. Grape Leaves: A Century of Arab American Poetry Rachlin, Nehid. Veils. Requirements: Three expository papers (5 pages) One mid-term examination One final examination
CMLT 3100Speculative FictionHistorical and thematic treatment of fictional speculation about scientific matters from the dialogues of Plato to the contemporary science fiction of Vonnegut.Students will be introduced to the major works of speculative fiction in the Western tradition. They will become familiar with the history of relations between literature and science in the West, as well as the shifting cultural values that shape those relations. Students will analyze a series of literary works and improve their skills in textual interpretation, examining works in terms of their generic, thematic and stylistic characteristics. They will also improve their communication skills through oral presentations and various writing assignments. Students' performance will be evaluated through a variety of means, including assessment of oral presentations, objective tests, essays, and the final examination.The typical course consists of a series of readings in speculative fiction from antiquity to the present. The topics considered correspond to the specific works studied. (The issue of technological innovation and its relation to ecological concerns, for instance, emerges as an important theme in Verne's 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.) The works treated will vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Cicero. The Dream of Scipio Cyrano de Bergerac. Voyage to the Moon Jules Verne. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea Jorge Luis Borges. Collected Stories Yevgeny Zamyatin. We Stanislav Lem. Solaris Ursula Le Guin. The Left Hand of Darkness Octavia Butler. Dawn William Gibson. Neuromancer Greg Egan. Teranesia
CMLT 3110Literature of the SelfComparative study of the self as presented in literature of the first person (such as lyric poetry and autobiography) with particular emphasis on questions of genre, rhetoric, and poetics.The primary objectives of the course are to introduce students to major works of world literature devoted to the presentation of the self, such as lyric poetry and autobiography; to inform them of diverse conceptions of the self in different cultures and historical periods; to situate each literary work within its larger social and cultural context; and to hone students' skills in literary analysis. Students' critical abilities will be developed through classroom analysis of texts and through expository writing assignments. Students' performance will be assessed through presentations, in-class writing assignments, essays, tests and a final examination.The course is comprised primarily of readings of literary works focusing on the self. The topics covered are generated by the works under analysis, with recurrent issues consisting of those of the conception of the self, its relation to familial, ethnic and class structures, the rhetoric of self presentation, the relation of inner sincerity to external standards of truth, etc. The works treated vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Sei Shonagon. The Pillow Book Cellini. Autobiography Rousseau. Confessions Wordsworth. The Prelude Newman. Apologia Pro Vita Sua Chopin. The Awakening Shen. Six Records of a Floating Life Plath. Selected Poetry
CMLT 3140Women WritersWorld literature represented by women writers from the seventh century B.C. through the seventeenth century A.D.The primary objectives of the course are to introduce students to major works of world literature written by women from antiquity through the seventeenth century; to instruct them in the specific problems and issues related to women's writing in various cultural contexts; to interpret women's literary texts as both autonomous aesthetic creations and statements within broad social and cultural milieus; to hone students' interpretive skills through the analysis of individual works of literature; and to improve students' communication skills through classroom discussions and presentations and out-of-class writing assignments. Students' performance is assessed through presentations, tests, in-class writing exercises, papers, and a final examination.The course is structured through a chronological series of readings of works by women writers from around the world. The topics considered are specific to the works studied, with issues commonly treated in the course including gender and the institution of writing, women's writing and education, style and gender, sexual identity and interpretation, etc. The works treated vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Sappho. Selected Poems Sei Shonagon. The Pillow Book Murasaki Shikibu. The Tale of Genji (selections) Hrosvit of Gandersheim. Dramas Marie de France. Lais Hildegard of Bingen. Selected writings Christine de Pizan. The Book of the City of Ladies Marguerite de Navarre. Heptameron Gaspara Stampa. Selected Poems Madame de Lafayette. The Princess of Cleves
CMLT 3160Myth and Oral TraditionA discussion of twentieth-century literary works (emphasis on narrative and drama) dealing with the reinterpretation of ancient classical myths, inclusive of English, American, Italian, French, German, and Russian Literatures.The course objectives are to introduce students to major twentieth-century works of world literature that rely on traditional myths; to situate those works within their cultural contexts, including those of the culture within which they were produced and the culture from which their mythic sources derive; to enhance students' critical abilities through the analysis of individual literary works; and to improve students' communication skills through oral presentations and expository writing assigments. Students' performance will be assessed through presentations, in-class writing assigments, papers, tests and a final examination.The course is organized around a series of readings of twentieth-century literary works from various countries. The topics discussed are specific to the works under analysis, but in all cases emphasis is placed on the relationship between the work and the myths it responds to. The works studied vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Eliot. The Waste Land Giraudoux. Electra Mann. Death in Venice Rilke. The Duino Elegies Svevo. The Confessions of Zeno Tutuola. The Palm-wine Drinkard Okri. The Famished Road Garcia Marquez. One Hundred Years of Solitude Neruda. Canto General Galleano. Century of the Wind
CMLT 3170Detective FictionThe evolution of the mystery story in the United States, England, and Europe, based on readings from such masters of the genre as Poe, Doyle, Christie, Simenon, Hammett, Chandler, et al. All readings in English.Students will learn about the development of the genre of detective fiction in various national literatures. They will study several examples of the genre, as well as a number of critical and analytical studies. Students will improve their communications skills through oral participation in class and through various writing assignments. Students' performance will be assessed through a variety of means, including presentations, in-class writing assignments, papers, tests and a final examination.The course generally consists of a series of readings in detective fiction, with examples selected to provide an overview of the historical development of the genre in various countries. The works treated will vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Heta Pyrhonen. Mayhem and Murder Edgar Allan Poe. The Fall of the House of Usher and other writings. Arthur Conan Doyle. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes Elizabeth George. A Great Deliverance Agatha Christie. Evil Under the Sun Colin Dexter. The Jewel That Was Ours Ruth Rendell. Wolf to the Slaughter Dashiell Hammett. The Maltese Falcon Raymond Chandler. The Long Goodbye Ross MacDonald. The Moving target Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo. The Laughing Policeman Batya Gur. Literary Murder Vladimir Nabokov. The Real Life of Sebastian Knight
CMLT 3200Contemporary LiteratureSelected works of contemporary world literature, with emphasis on works from Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America.Students will gain knowledge of developments in world literature during the last twenty-five years. They will read several works of contemporary literature in various genres, including the novel, short story, poetry and drama. They will gain familiarity with literary trends in various regions of the world, with readings coming from Latin America, Africa, Asia (West, Central, South and East), Australia and North America. Students will learn to analyze individual literary works, identifying thematic, stylistic, and generic elements and interpreting each work within its social, historical and aesthetic context. Students will improve their skills in expository composition by writing two to three analytic essays during the semester. Students will also demonstrate their mastery of the factual content of the course through an objective test and final examination.The typical course consists of a series of readings in contemporary world literature. The topics considered are generated by the specific work under analysis. (The question of indigenous vs. colonial languages as media for literary expression, for example, comes to the fore in the study of a work such as Assia Djebar's Fantasia.) The works treated will vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Wislawa Szymborska. View with a Grain of Sand Mario Vargas Llosa. Death in the Andes Assia Djebar. Fantasia Toni Morrison. Paradise Peter Carey. True History of the Kelly Gang Haruki Murakami. Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World Maryse Conde. Windward Heights Tsitsi Dangarembga. Nervous Conditions
CMLT 3220Women and Writing in East AsiaThis course addresses issues related to women in East Asia from comparative perspectives by examining how they are represented and how they choose to represent themselves in literary texts, film, and sociological material.1. By examining course materials, the students will learn in detail how social, cultural, and historical circumstances affect women in several East Asian nations, and how they cope with resulting problems. 2. The students will compare situations of women in several different cultures, including American culture, thereby gaining analytical skills to discern similarities and differences for a better understanding of each of the involved cultures. 3. The students will examine how female writers in East Asia choose to represent themselves and other women in their various literary expressions. 4. This course will widen choice of courses for students' programs of study as an elective course of CMLT and JPNS undergraduate majors as well as of five minors, including CHNS, CMLT, JPNS, KREN, and Asian Languages and Literatures. If cross-listed with Women's Studies, the new course will also enrich the course offering of that program. 5. The course will provide non-CMLT undergraduate students with relatively easy access to the discipline of Comparative Literature without having to major or minor in it.Topics to be explored in CMLT 3220 include, among others: Women's role in East Asian family life Women's status as a labor force in East Asian society Women, education, and women's movement in East Asia Representation and self-representation of women in East Asian film "Feminine" writing in East Asia Women and belief systems in East Asia
CMLT 3250Children's LiteratureSelected works written for children from antiquity to the nineteenth century. Special emphasis on historical, cultural, religious, social, and linguistic contexts. The course objectives are to introduce students to a variety of literary works written with children in mind or traditionally considered to be children's literary works; to teach students about changing conceptions of childhood and its relation to adult experience; to situate individual literary works within larger social and cultural contexts; to develop students' critical skills through the analysis of individual literary works; and to improve students' communication skills through oral presentations and expository writing assignments. Students' performance is assessed through presentations, tests, writing assignments, and a final examination.The course is organized around a series of readings in children's literature. Topics considered include genre (fable, fairy tale, parable), popular sources of children's literature (e.g., folklore, myth, nonsense verse, surrealism) and frequent motifs (cruelty, orphanhood, violence, fantasy, magic, etc.). The works treated vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Propp. "Folklore and Literature" Bettelheim. "The Struggle for Meaning" "Little Red Riding Hood" "Beauty and the Beast" "Snow White" "Cinderella" "Bluebeard" "Hansel and Gretel" Hans Christian Andersen. Selected Fairy Tales Oscar Wilde. Selected Fairy Tales Harris. The Complete Tales of Uncle Remus Carroll. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland Barrie. Peter Pan Jansson. Tales from Moominvalley Saint-Exupery. The Little Prince
CMLT 3990Directed Study in Comparative LiteratureIndependent study and research under the direction of individual faculty members.The course objectives are to provide students with the opportunity for in-depth study of a set of readings organized by the student in consultation with a faculty member; to enhance the students' critical faculties through intense discussion of literary works with an individual faculty member; and to improve the students' communication skills through regular oral presentations and expository writing assignments. Typically, students meet at least weekly with an individual faculty member and write an extended paper or a series of papers on the course readings.Topics vary with the individual series of readings determined by the faculty member and student. Readings can focus on very specific topics (e.g., the works of a single author, an in-depth analysis of a single literary work, such as The Tale of Genji), or on broad generic or thematic concerns (e.g., didactic fiction, wisdom literature, war and literature, marriage and the role of women). Generally, the readings will be in areas not covered by regularly offered courses.
CMLT 4010Approaches in Comparative LiteratureThe methods and literary theories encompassed by the discipline of Comparative Literature.The course objectives are to introduce students to the methods and theories commonly used in the study of comparative literature; to enhance students' critical skills through the analysis of literary and theoretical texts; and to improve students' communication skills through oral presentations and expository writing assignments.The specific topics vary with the instructor; however, the following are methods and theories generally examined in the course: Philological exegesis Manuscripts, editions and the establishment of reliable texts Hermeneutics and interpretation Russian formalism, the Prague School and Soviet Semiotics Structuralism Reader Response Theory and Reception Theory New Literary History and Cultural Studies Poststructuralism and Deconstruction Feminism and Gender Studies Postcolonialism and Globalism
CMLT 4050/6050Literature and Ideas of NatureLiterary and philosophical texts of various historical periods that trace changes in how human beings understand their non-human environment.The objectives of the course are to teach students about attitudes toward nature as expressed in literature; to introduce students to works of world literature that focus on the natural world; to inform students of varying cultural models of the relationship between humans and the non-human world; to develop students' critical abilities through analysis of literary and non-literary texts; and to hone students' communication skills through oral presentations and expository writing assignments. Students' performance will be assessed through presentations, tests, papers and a final examination.Topics vary with the instructor, but common themes treated in the course include traditional Western conceptions of order (such as the great chain of being); Darwinian conceptions of competition and cooperation; holism and ecosystem concepts; ecocriticism, ecofeminism, ecophilosophy; environmentalism and the literary essay. The works examined differ with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Pope. Essay on Man Lovejoy. The Great Chain of Being Conrad. Heart of Darkness. "Caliban: A Sequel to 'Ariel'" Gilman. "The Yellow Wallpaper" Darwin. The Origin of Species (selections) Odum. "Ecosystem Management: A New Venture" James Lovelock. Gaia: A New Look at Life on Earth (selections) Danial Quinn. Ishmael J. Baird Callicott. "The Metaphysical Implications of Ecology" Warren. "The Power and Promise of Ecological Feminism" Leopold. "The Land Ethic," "Thinking Like a Mountain," "Conservation Esthetic" Borges. "The Babylon Lottery" Celaya. Selected Poetry
CMLT 4070/6070Renaissance European LiteratureLiterature of Western Europe (Italian, French, Spanish, Germanic, and English) 1450-1600, with emphasis on literary types and prevailing ideas. The course objectives are to introduce students to major works of European Renaissance literature; to teach them about the larger social, historical and cultural developments of the period; to enhance their critical abilities through the analysis of individual works of literature; and to improve their communication skills through oral presentations and expository writing assignments. Students' performance will be assessed through presentations, tests, essays and a final examination.The course is organized around readings of majors works of European Renaissance literature. The topics considered are specific to the works under analysis. The works studied vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Boccaccio. The Decameron (selections) Erasmus. The Praise of Folly Rabelais. Gargantua and Pantagruel Castiglione. The Courtier Machiavelli. The Prince and Mandragola Ariosto. Orlando Furioso (selections) Spenser. The Faerie Queene (selections) Gaspara Stampa. Selected Poetry Marguerite of Navarre. The Heptameron (selections) Montaigne. Essays (selections)
CMLT 4080/6080Romantic European LiteratureThe rise and development of Romanticism in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, with reading of selected literature and criticism.The course objectives are to introduce students to major works of European and American literature from the Romantic period; to teach students about the movement of Romanticism as both a literary movement and a broader movement in the arts and in culture as a whole; to trace the development of the Romantic period in various nations; to improve students' critical skills through the analysis of individual works of literature; and to develop students' communication skills through oral presentations and expository writing assignments. Students' performance will be assessed through presentations, papers, tests and a final examination.The course is organized around a series of readings of majors works of Romantic literature. The topics and works selected vary with the instructor, but generally the following issues are considered: the relation of romanticism to classicism and the European Enlightenment; romanticism and revolution; the distinctions between national (and regional) romanticisms and romanticism as a global phenomenon; poetic perceptions of and critical reflections on nature and its relation to art; the romantic interest in dreams and death; and the formal features of romantic writing. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Isaiah Berlin and Henry Hardy. The Roots of Romanticism Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Reveries of the Solitary Walker Novalis. Henry von Ofterndingen Wordsworth. The Prelude Penelope Fitzgerald. The Blue Flower Heinrich von Kleist. The Marquise of O and Other Stories Gerard de Nerval. Aurelia and Other Writings Lermentov. A Hero of Our Times J-K Huysmans. Against Nature
CMLT 4081/6081World Romanticism IEarly Romanticism: 1750–1830, with readings of selected literature and criticism.The course objectives are to introduce students to significant international works from the early to middle periods of Romanticism; to teach students about the movement of Romanticism as both a literary movement and a broader movement in the arts and in culture as a whole; to trace the development of the Romantic period in various nations; to improve students’ critical skills through the analysis of individual works of literature; to develop students’ communication skills through oral presentations and expository writing assignments. Students’ performance will be assessed through quizzes, presentations, papers, midterm and final examination.The course is organized around a series of readings of significant works of literature from the early to middle period of Romanticism, as well as representative works from painting, sculpture and music. The topics and works selected vary with the individual instructor, but generally the following issues are considered: the relation of Romanticism to Classicism and the European Enlightenment; Romanticism and revolution; the distinctions between national (and regional) Romanticisms and Romanticism as a global phenomenon; paradigm shifts in ideas of aesthetics and personal identity; poetic perceptions of and critical reflections on nature and its relation to art; the Romantic interest in dreams and death; the relation of the sublime and the grotesque to Romanticism; horror and the Gothic in Romanticism, and the formal features of Romantic writing. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Friedrich von Schiller, Naïve and Sentimental Poetry Jean-Jacques Rousseau Reveries of a Solitary Walker William Blake: Letter to Dr. Trussler; Songs of Innocence and Experience; Marriage of Heaven and Hell Heinrich von Kleist: The Broken Jug Madame de Staël, On Literature Johann Wolfgang von Goethe: Sorrows of Young Werther; Faust Clemens Brentano and Achim von Arnim: The Boy’s Magic Horn (folk- song collection 18o6-08) Friedrich Schlegel: Lucinde, Athenaeum Fragments William Wordsworth, Preface to the Lyrical Ballads; The Prelude selected poems (1798- 1820) Sir Walter Scott, The Heart of Midlothian S. T. Coleridge: Rime of the Ancient Mariner; selected poems
CMLT 4082/6082World Romanticism IIMiddle to late romanticism: 1820 -1900, with readings of selected literature and criticism.The course objectives are to introduce students to significant international works from the middle to late periods of Romanticism; to teach students about the movement of Romanticism as both a literary movement and a broader movement in the arts and in culture as a whole; to trace the development of the Romantic period in various nations; to improve students’ critical l skills through the analysis of individual works of literature; to develop students’ communication skills through oral presentations and expository writing assignments. Students’ performance will be assessed through quizzes, presentations, papers, midterm and final examination.The course is organized around a series of readings of significant works of literature from the middle to the late periods of Romanticism, as well as representative works from painting, sculpture and music. The topics and works selected vary with the individual instructor, but generally the following issues are considered: the relation of Romanticism to Classicism and the European Enlightenment; Romanticism and revolution; the distinctions between national (and regional) Romanticisms and Romanticism as a global phenomenon; paradigm shifts in ideas of aesthetics and personal identity; poetic perceptions of and critical reflections on nature and its relation to art; the romantic interest in dreams and death; the romantic interest in the self; the relation of the sublime and the grotesque to Romanticism; horror and the Gothic in Romanticism, and the formal features of Romantic writing. The following is a sample syllabus for a single semester: Thomas Love Peacock: Headlong Hall, Nightmare Abbey, "The Four Ages of Poetry" Percy Bysshe Shelley, Prometheus Unbound (1820); A Defense of Poetry;selected poems Mary Wollstoncraft Shelley, Frankenstein John Keats: letters, Eve of St. Agnes, Fall of Hyperion; the Great Odes; selected poems George Gordon, Lord Byron; Childe Harold, Don Juan, selected poems Stendahl(Henri Beyle): Racine and Shakespeare(1823-5); The Red and the Black Gerard de Nerval: Aurélia Alfred de Vigny, Chatterton Victor Hugo: "Preface to Cromwell"; Hernani Alexander Pushkin, Eugene Onegin, selected poems Mikhail Yurevich Lermontov, A Hero of Our Time Thomas Carlyle: Sartor Resartus Baudelaire, "In Praise of Cosmetics" Oscar Wilde, “The Decay of Lying” Joris Karl Huysmans, Against Nature
CMLT 4090/6090PoetryLyric poetry from the mid-nineteenth century to the present.The course objectives are to introduce students to major works of lyric poetry from the mid-nineteenth century to the present; to examine the conventions of the genre; to situate the works within their social and cultural contexts; to develop students' critical skills in the exegesis of poetry; and to improve students' communication skills through oral presentations and expository writing assignments. Students' performance will be assessed through presentations, papers, tests, and a final examination.The focus of the course is on readings of lyric poetry. The works covered vary with the individual instructor. Among the topics generally treated are: the formal, rhetorical and thematic patterns common to modern poetry; the function of symbol, irony, paradox, allegory, synaesthesia and myth in modern verse; the persistence of themes of displacement, withdrawal and alienation; and the the preoccupation with questions of epistemology and axiology in modern poetry. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Holderlin. Hymns and Fragments Baudelaire. The Flowers of Evil Dickinson. Collected Poems Saint-John Perse. Exil Rilke. Duino Elegies Pessoa. Poems Plath. Collected Poems Kaschnitz. Selected Later Poems Akhmatova. Poem Without a Hero Herbert. Report from a Besieged City Brodsky. Less Than One, On Grief and Reason Szymborska. Poems New and Collected Zagajewski. Canvas
CMLT 4100/6100Mannerist and Baroque LiteratureLiterary forms and issues in Europe ca. 1550-1700, with special attention to the intellectual background and the interrelationships between literature and other arts and sciences.The course objectives are to acquaint students with the literature of the Mannerist and Baroque periods; to situate those works in relation to the other arts and the sciences of the period; to elucidate the cultural and intellectual components of these period designations; to enhance students' critical abilities through the analysis of individual literary works; and to improve students' communication skills through oral presentations and expository writing assignments. Students' performance will be assessed through presentations, tests, papers, and a final examination.The course is structured by the readings, which vary with the individual instructor. Topics frequently covered include: allegory and history; life as a dream and the world as a stage; incarnation and transubstantiation; spectacle, theater and the manifestation of power; artifice, decoration and the ornamental. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Tasso. Jerusalem Delivered Descartes. Meditations Aubigne. Les Tragiques Gryphius. Simplicissimus Shakespeare. Hamlet Calderon. Life Is a Dream Gongora. Selected Poetry Donne. Selected Poetry Pascal. Pensees Corneille. Horace Milton. Paradise Lost
CMLT 4110/6110Medieval European LiteratureThe literatures of medieval Europe with emphasis on major literary genres and the philosophical and social presuppositions which inform them.The course objectives are to introduce students to major works of medieval European literature; to situate those works within the social, cultural, historical, political and intellectual contexts that inform them; to delineate the primary characteristics of medieval European civilization; to enhance students' critical skills through the exegesis of individual literary works; and to improve students' communication skills through oral presentations and expository writing assignments. Students' performance will be assessed through presentations, tests, papers, and a final examination.The course is organized around readings of major works of medieval European literature, with the specific works studied varying with the individual instructor. The topics examined are specific to the works under analysis, with recurrent themes including: Latin and the development of national languages as vehicles for literary expression; the church and education; feudalism and social hierarchy; gender, literacy and literature; allegory and textual exegesis; romance and the chivalric code. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Hrosvit of Gandersheim. Dramas Beowulf Marie de France. Lais Langland. Piers Plowman Thorstein the Staff Struck de Lorris and de Meung. The Romance of the Rose Chretien de Troyes. Lancelot Everyman Chaucer. The Canterbury Tales Dante. The Divine Comedy
CMLT 4120/6120Eighteenth-Century European LiteratureThe literature of England, France, and Germany in the eighteenth century, with emphasis on literary types and prevailing ideas. The course objectives are to introduce students to major works of European 18th- century literature; to situate those works within the social, historical, political, and cultural developments of the period; to enhance students' critical abilities through the analysis of individual texts; and to improve students' communication skills through oral presentations and expository writing assignments. Students' performance will be assessed through presentations, tests, papers, and a final examination.The readings of literary works structure the course, with the specific works selected varying with the instructor. Topics frequently covered in the course include: sentiment and enlightenment; the domestication of women and the drama of marriage; courtship and seduction; comedy and the popular theater; gothic fiction; French classicism and the development of the German theater; reason and revolution. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Pope. The Rape of the Lock Swift. Gulliver's Travels Farquhar. The Beaux' Strategem Marivaux. The Game of Love and Chance Richardson. Pamela Goldoni. The Mistress of the Inn Lessing. Amelia Galotti Goethe. The Sorrows of Young Werther Schiller. The Robbers Burney. Evelina Laclos. Dangerous Liaisons Bernardin de Saint Pierre. Paul and Virginia Radcliffe. The Mysteries of Udolpho
CMLT 4150/6150The NovelThe novel as a genre. Origins of prose fiction, theory of the novel, and representative readings of novels from the sixteenth through the twentieth centuries will be included.The course objectives are to introduce students to major examples of the novel; to trace the development of the genre in various cultural traditions; to situate the literary works within larger social and historical patterns; to improve students' critical abilities through the analysis of individual literary works; and to develop students' communication skills through oral presentations and expository writing assignments. Students' performance will be assessed through presentations, papers, tests, and a final examination.The course is organized around readings from major world novels, with the specific works under analysis varying with the individual instructor. Topics covered include: prose fiction, the romance and the novel; the novel in the West and the East; the novel and the rise of print culture; literacy, the novel and the development of mass culture; modernity, postmodernity and the transformation of the novel. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Longus. Daphnis and Chloe Murakami. The Tale of Genji (selections) Cao Xueqin. The Story of the Stone (volume one) Cervantes. Don Quijote Richardson. Clarissa Stendhal. The Red and the Black Mann. The Magic Mountain Pynchon. Gravity's Rainbow Morrison. Beloved
CMLT 4200/6200Literature and the Visual ArtsFormal, philosophical, and thematic relationships between literature and one or more of the visual arts in a given period. The course objectives are to introduce students to the major issues surrounding the relationship between literature and the visual arts; to examine these issues in the context of specific works of literature and visual art; to develop students' critical abilities in the analysis of visual and literary artworks; and to improve students' communication skills through oral presentations and expository writing assignments. Students' performance will be assessed through presentations, tests, papers, and a final examination.The topics vary with the individual instructor, with the emphasis typically falling on a specific period, problem or theme. Examples include: Renaissance painting and poetry; representations of nature in Eastern and Western literature and painting; representation, reproduction and simulation in modern and postmodern visual and verbal artworks; gender and the representation of the body in 18th- century painting and prose. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Horace's Ars Poetica and the Classical Tradition of Mimetic Art Blake's Songs of Innocence and Experience and the Romantic Tradition of Expressive Art Balzac's "Unknown Masterpiece" and the Conventions of Realism Pirandello's The Notebooks of Serafino Gubbio and the Recording Arts Robbe-Grillet and Magritte's La Belle Captive and surrealism Pynchon's Crying of Lot 49 and Magic Realism Spiegelman's Maus and the Graphic Novel DeLillo's Mao II and Postmodernism
CMLT 4210/6210Literature and CinemaFormal, philosophical, and thematic relationships between literature and cinema.The primary objective of the course is to develop and hone reading and viewing skills connected with the critical analysis of literature and film. Readings of literary works representing different historical periods and cultural backgrounds are combined with screenings of films based on or related to those texts. Students learn about the literary and cinematic works themselves, while gaining knowledge about various aspects of the relationship between the two media. Students improve their communication skills through oral participation in class and various writing assignments. Students' performance is assessed through presentations, tests, in-class writing assignments, essays and a final examination.Typically, the course consists of a series of readings of literary works and screenings of films related to the readings. The topics covered correspond to the issues generated by the pairings of films and literary texts. The works treated will vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings and screenings for a single semester: Films: An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge Grand Illusion Sabotage Apocalypse Now Throne of Blood Death and the Maiden Blow-up Kiss of the Spider Woman The Shining Short Cuts Pola X Readings: Timothy Corrigan. Film and Literature Luigi Pirandello. The Notebooks of Serafino Gubbio: Shoot! Joseph Conrad. The Secret Agent Joseph Conrad. Heart of Darkness William Shakespeare. Macbeth. Ariel Dorfman. Death and the Maiden Vladimir Nabokov. Laughter in the Dark Manuel Puig. Kiss of the Spider Woman Stephen King. The Shining Walker Percy. The Movie-goer Raymond Carver. Short Cuts Herman Melville. Pierre, or the Ambiguities
CMLT 4250/6250DramaDrama as a genre from its beginnings to the present.The course objectives are to introduce students to major works of world drama; to teach students about the different theatrical conventions around the world; to consider the genre of drama in relation to its larger cultural context; to enhance students' critical skills through the analysis of individual plays; and to develop students' communication skills through oral presentations and expository writing assignments. Students' performance will be assessed through presentations, papers, tests and a final examination.The course is organized around a chronological series of readings from world drama. The topics considered are specific to the works under analysis, with recurrent concerns being the physical nature of the theater; costumes, gesture, lighting, sets, props, etc.; conventions of representation and questions of verisimilitude; the relation between script and performance; the social status of actors and the relation of the theater to various cultural groups (the court, aristocracy, commoners, peasants, etc.). The works studied vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Aeschylus. The Oresteia Kalidasa. Sakuntala Noh Theater Everyman Shakespeare. The Tempest Calderon. Life Is a Dream Ibsen. A Doll's House Chekhov. The Cherry Orchard Cesaire. A Tempest Kushner. Angels in America Soyinka. Death and the King's Horseman Wertenbaker. Our Country's Good Churchill. Cloud Nine
CMLT 4300/6300Modernism and PostmodernismModernism and postmodernism as literary movements, with reading of selected literature and criticism.The course objectives are to introduce students to major works of modern and postmodern literature; to delineate the primary characteristics of the movements of modernism and postmodernism; to situate the literary works within broad social and historical contexts; to develop students' critical skills through the analysis of individual works of literature; and to improve students' communication through oral presentations and expository writing assignments. Students' performance will be assessed through presentations, papers, tests, and a final examination.The course is structured through a series of readings in modern and postmodern literature. The topics covered include modernism and modernization; technology and the institution of literature; colonialism and Euro-American modernism; postmodernism and the age of information; postcolonialism and the relevance of postmodernity; postmodernism as a social, political, philosophical and aesthetic category. The works studied vary with the individual instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Kafka. The Trial Pound. The Cantos (selections) Proust. Swann's Way Faulkner. Absalom, Absalom! Pynchon. Gravity's Rainbow Okri. The Famished Road Garcia Marquez. One Hundred Years of Solitude Rushdie. Midnight's Children Abe. Kangaroo Notebook
CMLT 4350/6350Nineteenth-Century LiteratureReadings in major writers and works of nineteenth-century European and world literature.The course objectives are to introduce students to major writers and works of nineteenth-century European and world literature; to provide a survey of historical developments during the period; to contextualize the works within broad literary and cultural movements, such as Romanticism, realism, naturalism, symbolism, and decadence; to improve students' critical skills through the analysis of individual works of literature; and to develop students' communication skills through oral presentations and writing assignments. Students' performance will be assessed through presentations, papers, tests and a final examination.A set of readings of 19th-century literary works provides the structure of the course. The topics covered are generated by the individual works under consideration. Among the issues commonly treated are: major literary movements of the 19th century; urbanization, industrialization and the formation of 19th-century class structure; Europe, colonialism and imperialism; mass culture and the development of a publishing industry; intellectuals and the formation of the modern university; culture, taste and education as elements in the formation of culture. The specific works treated vary with the individual instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Austen. Pride and Prejudice Buchner. Wozzeck Heine. Selected Poetry Stendhal. The Charterhouse of Parma Balzac. Le Pere Goriot Dickens. Hard Times Eliot. Middlemarch Goncharov. Oblomov Tolstoy. Anna Karenina Dostoevsky. The Idiot Zola. Germinal
CMLT 4400/6400East Central European Literature and CultureThe works of major modern East Central European writers, with some attention to representative cinema.The course objectives are to introduce students to major works of literature written by modern East Central European writers; to outline the social, historical and cultural events that have led to the formation of the various traditions of the region; to situate the literary works within regional and global contexts; to improve students' critical skills through the analysis of individual works of literature; and to develop students' communication skills through oral presentations and expository writing assignments. Students' performance will be assessed through presentations, tests, papers, and a final examination.The sequence of readings provides the structure of the course, with the topics covered being generated by the specific works under analysis. The works selected vary with the individual instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of a single semester's readings: Rilke. The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge Kafka. The Complete Stories Canetti. The Tongue Set Free Adorno. Minima Moralia Cioran. All Gall is Divided Gombrowicz. Diary Herbert. Elegy for the Departure Krleza. The Return of Philip Latinowicz von Rezzori. Memoirs of an Anti-Semite Hrabal/Menzel. Closely Watched Trains Wajda. The Maids of Wilko Brodsky. On Grief and Reason Tarkovsky. Nostalgia
CMLT 4510/6510Literature and MusicThe forms, relationships, and aesthetics of music and literature.The course objectives are to introduce students to the central issues in the study of literature and its relation to music; to study a series of literary works with important ties to music; to enhance students' critical skills through the analysis of individual works of literature; and to develop students' communication skills through oral presentations and expository writing assignments. Students' performance will be assessed through presentations, papers, tests, and a final examination.The focus of the course varies with the individual instructor, with common topics including opera as literature; literary representations of music; the music of poetry; literary and musical metrics; timbre, tone and voice; and ethnomusicology and the function of the word in traditional music. The following is a sample syllabus of the works considered in a single semester: Opera as Literature Monteverdi. Orfeo Mozart. The Marriage of Figaro Rossini. The Barber of Seville Verdi. Otello Wagner. Tristan and Isolde Puccini. Madame Butterfly Prokofiev. War and Peace Britten. Billy Budd Wilson. Einstein on the Beach
CMLT 4600/6600Survey of East Asian Literature IPoetry, prose, and drama in traditional China and Japan. The works will be in English translation.The course objectives are to introduce students to major works of traditional China and Japan; to situate those works within their cultural, social and historical contexts; to enhance students' critical abilities through the analysis of individual literary works; and to develop students' communication skills through oral presentations and expository writing assignments. Students' performance will be assessed through presentations, tests, papers, and a final examination.The course is organized around a series of readings in traditional Chinese and Japanese literature. The topics covered are specific to the works under analysis. The works selected vary with the individual instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Murakami. The Tale of Genji (selections) The Tale of Heike (selections) Shonagon. The Pillow Book Confucius. The Analects The Essential Tao The Confessions of Lady Nijo Basho. The Narrow Road to the Deep North
CMLT 4610/6610Survey of East Asian Literature IIPoetry, prose, and drama in China and Japan from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The works will be in English translation.The course objectives are to introduce students to major works of 19th- and 20th- century Chinese and Japanese literature; to situate those works within their cultural, social and historical contexts; to enhance students' critical abilities through the analysis of individual literary works; and to develop students' communication skills through oral presentations and expository writing assignments. Students' performance will be assessed through presentations, tests, papers, and a final examination.The course is organized around a series of readings of literary works by 19th- and 20th-century Chinese and Japanese writers. The topics covered are specific to the works under analysis. The works studied vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Cao Xueqin. The Story of the Stone (volume 1) Shen Fu. Six Records of a Floating Life Liu E. Travels of Lao Can Enchin Fumiko. The Waiting Years Kobo Abe. The Woman in the Dunes Xingjian Gao. The Other Shore Yasunari Kawabata. Snow Country Yukio Mishima. The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea Tsao Yu. Thunderstorm
CMLT 4620/6620East Asian NovelThe major/minor novelists and their works, especially those of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The novels are in English translation. The course objectives are to introduce students to major East Asian novels of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; to study the social, historical, political and cultural contexts within which they were created; to enhance students' critical skills through the exegesis of individual literary texts; and to improve students' communication skills through oral presentations and expository writing assignments. Students' performance will be assessed through presentations, papers, tests, and a final examination.The course is organized around readings of major East Asian novels of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with the specific works studied varying with the individual instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Kang Sok-kyong, Kim Chi-won and O Chong-hui. Words of Farewell: Stories by Korean Women Yasunari Kawabata. Snow Country Yukio Mishima. Confessions of a Mask Haruki Murakami. A Wild Sheep Chase Kenzaburo Oe. A Personal Matter Soseki. Kokoro Xingjian Gao. Soul Mountain Yu. Thunderstorm
CMLT 4875/6875The African DiasporaExploration of creative works by younger Africans whose primary socialization took place in Europe (Great Britain, France, Germany) and in the United States. Their contribution to African culture as well as to Western cultural life in the Western World.Since the Sixties, the number of Africans permanently residing in Europe, in the USA, and elswhere outside of Africa, has continously increased. The purpose of this course is to introduce to the students the creative works of these Africans by origin who write, sing or make films, etc, outside of Africa. Students will learn about their artistic production as well as their meta-discourse and their cultural function as "trend setters" in Africa. Furthermore, the acquaintance with their work shall help understand the complexity of the issues such as "Globalization" and "Multiculturalism".a. Survey of the domains of African cultural productions in the Western World; b. Survey of African culture producers in the Western World, and their institutions (primarily writers); c. Literature/Culture and Nationality/Nationalism/Identity: literary/fictional discourse and meta-discourse; d. Relevant topics in 'diasporaic' literatures; e. Relationship between 'diasporaic' culture producers and Western cultural institutions; their relationship with Africa. f. Detailed literary analysis of (3-5) selected novels/works.
CMLT 4970HDirected Reading and/or Projects (Honors)Individual study, reading, or projects under the direction of a project director.The course objective is to provide honors students with the opportunity of studying individually with a faculty member, thereby developing the student's knowledge of a given problem or area of research, enhancing the student's analytic abilities, and improving the student's communication skills. Typically, the student's performance is assessed through evaluation of individual presentations and through the completion of a writing project.Topics will vary with the individual program of study determined jointly by the student and the professor.
CMLT 4980HDirected Reading and/or Projects (Honors)Individual study, reading, or projects under the guidance of a project director.The course objective is to provide honors students with the opportunity of studying individually with a faculty member, thereby developing the student's knowledge of a given problem or area of research, enhancing the student's analytic abilities, and improving the student's communication skills. Typically, the student's performance is assessed through evaluation of individual presentations and through the completion of a writing project.Topics will vary with the individual program of study determined jointly by the student and the professor.
CMLT 4990HHonors ThesisIndividual research in the major field or in a closely related field under the guidance of a project director.The course objective is to provide honors students with the opportunity of studying individually with a faculty member, thereby developing the student's knowledge of a given problem or area of research, enhancing the student's analytic abilities, and improving the student's communication skills. Typically, the student's performance is assessed through evaluation of individual presentations and through the completion of a writing project.Topics will vary with the individual program of study determined jointly by the student and the professor.
CMLT 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.The course objective is to provide an opportunity for master's students in comparative literature to work on a thesis under the direction of the student's major professor.The topic varies with the research program of the individual student.
CMLT 8310Seminar in East Central European StudiesIntellectual trends in their East Central European inflection. The philosophical and ideological underpinnings of the East Central European aesthetic and sociological thought and expression.The course objectives are to introduce students to intellectual trends in East Central Europe; to acquaint them with philosophical and ideological considerations that have influenced the development of East Central European literature; to hone students' critical abilities through analysis of literary texts; and to develop students' communication skills through oral exercise and expository writing assignments.The specific topics covered will vary with the instructor. Issues addressed will include: legacies of communism and the formation of new political structures; the role of the writer in post-communist societies; ethnicity and the conception of the nation; minorities and dissent in the arts; popular culture and regional identity.
CMLT 8980Readings in Comparative LiteratureIndependent reading with regular conferences and reports, in some aspects of comparative literature.The course objectives are to provide students with the opportunity for in-depth study of a set of readings organized by the student in consultation with a faculty member; to enhance the students' critical faculties through intense discussion of literary works with an individual faculty member; and to improve the students' communication skills through regular oral presentations and expository writing assignments. Typically, students meet at least weekly with an individual faculty member and write an extended paper or a series of papers on the course readings.Topics covered will be determined by the student in consultation with the faculty member responsible for the directed readings.
CMLT 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.The course objective is to provide doctoral students in comparative literature with the opportunity of writing a dissertation under the supervision of an individual faculty member.Topics will vary with the research project of the individual student.
CMLT(AFST) 3150Introduction to Modern African LiteratureThe literature of twentieth-century Africa in translation with emphasis on the African novel.The primary objectives of the course are to introduce students to representative works of contemporary African literature; to provide students with an understanding and appreciation of the literary and cultural traditions of the various works under analysis; to situate the works in the history of African cultures; to hone students' critical skills through analysis of individual literary works; and to improve students' communication skills through classroom interaction and expository writing exercises. Students' performance is assessed through presentations, tests, essays, and a final examination.The course is structured through a series of readings in contemporary African literature. The topics covered are specific to the works under analysis; however, certain issues often recur, such as questions of ethnicity, gender and class; the use of indigenous languages vs European languages; the status of the writer in postcolonial society; the question of audience, etc. The works treated vary with the individual instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Chinua Achebe. Things Fall Apart Camara Laye. The Dark Child Ferdinand Oyono. Houseboy Alex LaGuma. In the Fog of the Seasons' End Mariama Ba. So Long a Letter Okot p'Bitek. Song of Lawino Mongo Beti. Mission to Kala
CMLT(AFST) 4880/6880Survey of African Literature IAfrican literature from its ancient oral traditions to the European colonial period based on works of African authors written in English and English translations of the African works.The objectives of the course are to expose students to representative works of traditional African oral literature and African literature of the colonial period; to inform students of the nature of oral literature as an art form; to instruct students about the cultural, social and political concerns that shape literature of the colonial period; to enhance students' critical skills through analysis of individual literary texts; and to develop students' communication skills through oral presentations and expository writing assignments. Students' performance will be assessed through presentations, tests, essays and a final examination.The course is structured according to a series of readings of transcriptions of oral literature and literary works written during the colonial period. Topics considered are generated by the individual texts under analysis. The works treated vary with the individual instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: The Epic of Sundiata and other oral epics Amos Tutuola. The Palm-wine Drinkard Negritude Poetry Sembene Ousmane. God's Bits of Wood M. Beti. The Poor Christ of Bomba C. H. Kane. Ambiguous Adventure
CMLT(AFST) 4890/6890Survey of African Literature IIAfrican literature since the independence of the African people from European colonial rule.The objectives of the course are to introduce students to representative works of African literature written since the independence of African countries in the 1960s; to give students an appreciation of these works and the cultures they reflect; to situate these works within larger cultural, historical and political contexts; to hone students' critical skills through the analysis of individual works of literature; and to improve students' communication skills through oral presentations and expository writing assigments.The course is organized around a series of readings of African literary works written since the independence of African countries in the 1960s. Topics of emphasis include the portrayal of neo-colonialism, the betrayal of independence and the aspirations of the masses, the need for social and political justice, as well as the search for African aesthetics by African writers. The works treated vary with the individual instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Chinua Achebe. Anthills of the Savannah Sembene Ousmane. Xala Ngugi wa Thiong'o. Petals of Blood Mariama Ba. So Long a Letter Buchi Emecheta. The Bride Price Okot p'Bitek. Song of Lawino and Song of Ocol Wole Soyinka. Death and the King's Horseman
CMLT(ANTH) 3180Introduction to East Asian CulturesCultures of China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, with emphasis on the formation of Chinese culture and its diffusion and variation within the other national groups.The course objectives are to introduce students to important cultural elements of East Asian nations, including China, Korea, Japan, and Vietnam; to expose students to literary works, films, texts and visual artifacts from these countries; to teach students about the evolving legacies of these cultures, their interrelationships with one another, and their changing relations to other cultures outside the region; to enhance students' critical abilities through the analysis of literary texts; and to improve students' communications skills through oral presentations and expository writing assignments. Students' performance is assessed through presentations, writing assignments, tests, and a final examination.The focus of the course varies with the individual instructor, but the following is a list of the topics typically covered in a single semester: China: geography and history Confucius. Analects Tao Te Ching Film: Woman Wang Korea: geography and history writing system shamanism arts and literature Buddhism Japan: geography and history Shinto The Tale of Genji Tanizaki. In Praise of Shadows Vietnam: geography and history war and culture--the future
CMSD 3020Language ScienceIntroduction to language and its components, to language variation and bilingualism, and to language development and processes, in the oral and written modality. Students will learn how these concepts and language analyses relate to speech-language pathology.By the conclusion of this course, students will be able to: - define what language is and describe its components - describe what influences language change and language variation - understand the impact of cultural and biological influences on language - discuss how these different topics relate to speech-language pathology1. Language definition 2. Brain and language 3. Phonology 4. Syntax 5. Morphology 6. Semantics and pragmatics 7. Language development 8. Cognitive processes 9. Evolution of language 10. Reading and writing
CMSD 5000Clinical Procedures in Communication Sciences and DisordersTo synthesize and integrate the basic components of professional clinical procedures, including confidentiality and privacy, writing behavioral treatment objectives, collecting data and documenting treatment results, as well as the impact of professional standards and public law on the practice of speech/language pathology and audiology.1. Identify the standards and ethical conduct as set forth in the ASHA Code of Ethics. 2. Compare the requirements for professional credentials of the SLP in various work settings in Georgia i.e. state licensure, Professional Standards Commission (educational) and AHSA Certificate of Clinical Competence. 3. Demonstrate ability to write behavioral objectives as a means of identifying treatment goals during video observations of "real" therapy sessions with clients from across the lifespan and with varied social, linguistic, cultural and economic backgrounds, as well as, collect data and write treatment session results for those sessions. 4. Demonstrate ability to compute a person's chronological age and discuss the necessity of using chronological age when using standardized testing instruments. 5. Explain UGA Speech and Hearing Clinic's policy on protecting confidentiality of client information through the appropriate use of authorization and release forms.Introduction to course Expectations, grading, academic honesty, etc. Observation hours requirement for graduate school Professionalism/confidentiality, HIPPA (privacy law), ethics AHSA Code of Ethics ASHA's Certificate of Clinical Competence SLP/AUD Credentialing GA Board of Examiners in Speech/Language Pathology and Audiology GA Professional Standards Commission (public school) AHSA Writing behavioral objectives/results of treatment Chronological age - How, why, and when Guided video observations - write behavioral treatment objectives Collect data Write treatment results
CMSD 6700Diagnosis in Speech-Language PathologyBasic principles of the diagnostic process, including test selection, administration, and interpretation; interviewing techniques; and report writing. Analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of scholarship concerning the nature, prevention, and assessment of communication disorders. Consideration of anatomical/physiological, psychological, developmental, and linguistic/cultural correlates of the disorders. Requires supervised lab activities.At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify and differentiate various qualitative and quantitative methods available for screening and assessment. 2. Evaluate diagnostic instruments through the application, analysis, and synthesis of psychometric principles. 3. Perform test administration procedures accurately, applying test standardization principles. 4. Integrate knowledge of cultural and linguistic differences into diagnostic procedures and processes. 5. Demonstrate appropriate interview and counseling techniques for clients with communication or swallowing disorders and their families. 6. Apply and sythesize basic principles and methods for screening and assessing communication disorders, including diagnostic planning; case history intergration; and test selection, analysis, administration, and scoring. 7. Analyze, synthesize, and evaluate diagnostic information to complete interpretation, assessment, referrals, recommendations, and report writing. 8. Demonstrate oral and written communication skills required for achieving competency in the diagnostic process, including (a) oral communication skills needed for interviewing and conferencing and (b) written communcation of diagnostic reports and professional correspondence.· The Diagnostic Process · Professional Report Writing/Professional Correspondence · Psychometric Considerations · Test Interpretation · Multicultural Considerations in Assessment · Alternate Assessment Methods · PPVT-III Administration · Pre-assessment Information and Interviews · Oral-Facial Mechanism Exam · Assessment of Articulation/Phonology Overview · Assessment of Language Overview · Observation and Informal Assessment · Screening and Prevention · Hearing Screening Procedures and Reporting · Summary and Interpretations, Recommendations, Prognosis: Analysis, Synthesis, and Reporting · Exit Interviews: Interpreting Results and Counseling Considerations · Syndrome Identification · Diagnostic Planning
CMSD 6750Voice Science and InstrumentationThe nature and treatment of physiological and neurophysiological disorders of pitch, loudness, and voice quality, including those associated with cleft palate and laryngectomy. Aspects of anatomy, physiology, and neurophysiology of the normal voice. Assessment and intervention plans are devised for each type of voice client.Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information related to the voice. In addition, the student will: 1) Describe the anatomical structures of the larynx, respiration, and phonation as it relates to the normal voice, aging voice, and abnormal voice. 2) Identify the appropriate information that should be obtained during the case history through patient/client interview and/or patient questionnaire. 3) Identify the appropriate measures to assess a client’s voice and generate a report that reflects the results of a clinical voice evaluation. 4) Describe the purpose of instrumentation as it relates to the assessment of voice disorders. 5) Describe techniques used to train patients on the awareness of proper vocal hygiene, counseling patients on voice disorders, and proper management of voice disorders. 6) Describe the role of the SLP in presurgical counseling and postsurgical management in the laryngectomized patient and other disorders which lack phonatory function. 7) Describe communication options for patients with a compromised phonatory system. 8) Identify criteria used to refer patients to other disciplines. 9) Describe multicultural issues relating to voice production/disorders. 10) Describe appropriate intervention techniques with measurable and achievable goals which meet the client’s needs according to their type of disorder and determine if progress has been made.* Voice Assessment and Evaluation * Anatomy/Physiology/ Neurophysiology of the Normal Voice * Aerodynamic Assessment * Source Filter Theory * Formants * Functional and Organic Voice Disorders * Introduction to the Computerized Speech Lab * How to manage the laryngectomy patient * What is the Passy Muir speaking valve and how does it relate to voice? * Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease * Resonance * Treatment of voice disorders and goal writing * The professional voice and age related issues * Multicultural issues relating to voice production and care of the voice
CMSD 6850AphasiaAnalysis, synthesis, and evaluation of the nature, prevention, assessment, and intervention of aphasia, including cognitive and social aspects of communication, psychological, neurologic, linguistic, and cultural correlates of aphasia.Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to: 1)Describe the nature, prevention, assessment, and intervention of aphasia. 2)Describe the basic principles of information processing and its application to aphasia. 3)Distinguish diagnoses of aphasia from other acquired speech and language disorders. 4)Identify and utilize appropriate assessment tools in aphasia. 5)Identify and utilize appropriate intervention strategies for aphasia and their underlying theoretical constructs. 6)Analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information related to aphasia. 7)Apply theory of cognitive and social aspects of communication, psychological, neurologic, and cultural correlates, as well as other types of diversity (i.e., age, gender, etc.) as it relates to aphasia.· Introduction and overview of aphasia · Overview of normal aging and information processing · History of aphasia · Causes of aphasia · Nature of aphasia · Characteristics and types of aphasia · Assessment and diagnosis of aphasia · Prognosis of aphasia · Differential diagnosis · Treatment of aphasia · Acquired reading and writing disorders · Group Treatment of aphasia
CMSD 6860Acquired Cognitive-Communication DisordersAnalysis, synthesis, and evaluation of the nature, prevention, assessment, and intervention of acquired cognitive-communication disorders, including cognitive and social aspects of communication, psychological, neurologic, linguistic, and cultural correlates of acquired cognitive-communication disorders.Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to: 1)Describe the nature, prevention, assessment, and intervention of cognitive communication disorders in adults (i.e., dementia, right brain injury, and traumatic brain injury as well as other related impairments). 2)Describe cognitive and social aspects of communication, psychological, neurologic, and cultural correlates, as well as other types of diversity (i.e., age, gender, etc.) as it relates to acquired cognitive communication disorders in adults. 3)Describe the nature of normal cognitive processing. 4)Distinguish diagnoses of various adult cognitive and communication disorders. 5)Identify and utilize appropriate assessment tools in adult acquired cognitive and communication disorders. 6)Identify and utilize appropriate intervention strategies for cognitive communication disorders and their underlying theoretical constructs. 7)Analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information as it relates to adult cognitive and language processes in aging populations and, populations with various disorders. 8)Apply theory of cognitive and social aspects of communication, psychological, neurologic, and cultural correlates, as well as other types of diversity (i.e., age, gender, etc.) as it relates to cognitive communication disorders. 9)Identify ethical issues related to treatment regarding dementia and coma. 10)Read and write about current research in the above areas through reading, lecture, and projects.A. Introduction and overview of acquired cognitive communication disorders 1. Changes in the brain with normal aging 2. Cognitive theories of language processing 3. Linguistic communication in normal aging B. Right Hemisphere syndrome overview 1. Attention 2. Neglect 3. Other Right hemisphere syndromes 4. Assessment and treatment of right hemisphere syndromes C. Memory and Dementia 1. Assessment and treatment of dementia D. Traumatic Brain Injury overview 1. Traumatic Brain Injury: nature, assessment, and treatment 2. Overview of Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury 3. Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury: speech and language intervention E. Counseling for Adults F. Apraxia Assessment and management
CMSD 6870DysphagiaAnalysis, synthesis, and evaluation of the nature, prevention, assessment, and intervention of acquired swallowing disorders, including functional and social aspects of neurologic and cultural correlates.Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information related to dysphagia. In addition, the student will: 1. Describe the normal anatomy, physiology, and development of swallowing 2. Identify the various etiologies and components of abnormal swallowing 3. Describe the development and impairments of feeding in infancy and childhood 4. Describe the principles of clinical examinations 5. Identify various instrumental procedures to evaluate swallowing and their advantages and disadvantages 6. Describe the principles of dysphagia diagnosis and treatment and write the results of the assessment and design appropriate recommendations 7. Identify feeding and nutritional issues 8. Describe the aging process of the swallowing mechanism 9. Identify multicultural issues as it relates to swallowing 10. Describe how to counsel patients, family members, and caregivers regarding swallowing issues 11. Describe the signs and symptoms of dysphagia as revealed by videofluoroscopy 12. Describe the dysphagia team structure and its function 13. Identify risk behaviors associated with dysphagia and preventative measures for complications in dysphagia management and treatment. 14. Identify ethical and legal aspects of swallowing managementA. Overview of normal anatomy 1. Overview of the cranial nerves B. Bedside evaluation 1. Oral stage dysphagia and goal writing 2. Pharyngeal stage dysphagia and goal writing C. Treatment of oral and pharyngeal dysphagia 1. Issues relating to trachs and ventilators 2. Multicultural issues relating to swallowing 3. How drugs affect swallowing D. Pediatric issues in swallowing E. Dysphagia in the neurogenic population F. Dietary issues 1. How gastroesophageal reflux affects swallowing G. Dysphagia in the geriatric population 1.Medicare issues relating to dysphagia
CMSD 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.
CMSD 7850Written Language of Deaf and Hard of HearingTheories and strategies for assessing and facilitating reading and writing in individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. Impact of hearing loss on written language and language processes.
CMSD 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
CMSD(LING) 3120Study of Language DevelopmentNormal development of children's reception, integration, and expression of linguistic information; cultural, gender, socioeconomic, cognitive, and prelinguistic influences on language development.At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. integrate critical thinking and writing skills into discussions of language development; 2. analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information in order to draw conclusions from direct empirical data and reason through discrepancies presented by different data sets focused on the same area of inquiry; 3. examine the role of language in human development beyond its obvious role in communication; 4. identify and discuss the various components of language and demonstrate appropriate use of basic terminology; 5. describe the developmental sequences in English of the various components of language (phonology, syntax, morphology, semantics, and pragmatics); 6. analyze, synthesize, and evaluate theories of language development, discuss the empirical evidence refuting or supporting them, and examine hose this research is conducted and what is focused upon in that research; 7. explain and evaluate how profoundly cultural and linguistic differences can influence all dimensions of language development and communicative processes; 8. recognize and discuss both endogenous (biological, neurological, cognitive, and psychological) and exogenous (cultural, socioeconomic, and familial) factors that influence language development; 9. demonstrate knowledge of the basic principles and methods for language sample collection and analysis.The goals of this course are: 1)To introduce the components of language and consider their developmental trajectories 2)To consider the varied and critical roles of language in human development 3)To understand the impact of culture, different languages, child factors and the environment on development 4)To be introduced to the theoretical perspectives driving research and thinking in this area of inquiry.
CRSS 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.
CRSS 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
CRSS(ECOL) 8650Nutrient Cycling ModelsStructure, function, and performance of current nutrient cycling models used to simulate carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur transformations in the soil.1. Provide an overview of modeling techniques. 2. Help students understand and discuss the structure and functioning of nutrient cycling models for N, C, and P in soil. 3. Help students become familiar with a visual modeling tool and develop a nutrient cycling model in their own area of interest.I. Review of Important Concepts A. Soil Concepts B. Mathematical Concepts II. Systems Science and Models A. Definition of System B. Systems versus Non-systems Science C. Models D. Terminology III. Model Development A. Methods for mapping relationships between variables B. Steps in model development IV. Numerical Solutions to Partial Differential Equations A. Writing differential equations B. Numerical methods V. Visual Software Tools for Model Development A. Stella Research B. Other tools (ModelMaker, Vensim, Powersim, etc.) VI. Modeling Carbon and Nitrogen Processes A. Common kinetic models for mineralization of a single organic compound B. Temperature and Moisture Factors in Simulation Models C. Carbon and N mineralization/immobilization D. Modeling other N processes VII. Modeling Phosphorus Processes A. Mineralization/Immobilization B. Adsorption/Precipitation C. Phosphorus in Runoff
CSCI 1130Hands-On Programming for BeginnersA hands-on introduction to computers and computer programming using the LEGO MindStorms Robotics Invention System. Programming language concepts will be introduced using languages that control a small mobile robot.Students will learn to write simple computer programs that control a primitive mobile robot. Students will learn to build robots and use a program development environment to program their robot. Students will learn the sequenced use of sensors and actuators via program control. Students will be exposed to engineering-style problem solving and solution implementation.Robotics and Problem Solving Software, Firmware, and Hardware Solution Design Languages to Control Machines Simple Robot Construction Simple Robot Control Sensors and Motors Using the Block Language Sequences, Loops, and Conditions Variables and Constants Reading Sensor Input Controlling Motor Output Simple and Compound Modules Development Environment Settings NQC
CSCI 1301-1301LIntroduction to Computing and ProgrammingAlgorithms, programs, and computing systems. Fundamental techniques of program development and supportive software tools. Programming projects and applications in a structured computer language. Hands-on experience using microcomputers.Students will be able to write simple programs in a modern computer language. Students will understand the development process and be able to use an IDE (Integrated Development Environment) effectively. Students will demonstrate competence through individual programming projects, labs and examinations throughout the course.Algorithms Programming style (documentation, specifications, naming conventions, indenting, comments) Basic program structure, Tracing, Stacks The IDE (Integrated Development Environment) Constants Variables (local, parameters, instance, class) Operators (arithmetic, relational, logical) Expressions Decisions, Blocks Input, Output, Formatting, Graphics Methods (procedures & functions) Primitive types (floating point numbers, integers, characters, booleans), Casting, Strings Library functions, Math functions Classes, Objects, Constructors, Visibility Subclasses, Inheritance Overloading, Overriding, Polymorphism Loops, Invariants Arrays (one & two dimensional, ragged) Searching (linear, binary) Sorting (non-recursive) Modular arithmetic GUI's (introduction) Exceptions (introduction) Random numbers
CSCI 1710-1710LIntroduction to Computer Science and Computer SystemsThe basics of computer hardware and systems from the viewpoint of a potential computer science major. The associated laboratory uses the personal computer as a case study for computer architecture and operating systems. Students study and become familiar with the machine and its operating system by writing programs in a low-level (assembler) language.Students completing this course will have had an overview of computing systems, both hardware and software. They will understand the architectural structure of a simple monoprocessor computing system and the hierarchical structure and function of a typical operating system. They will be able to program small routines in assembler.The fundamentals of computer systems: hardware, operating systems, and application programs. The personal computer (simplified) is used as a case study in computer architecture, resource management software, and user interface. There will be design projects in the areas of computer hardware, computer systems software (at assembly-level), and application programs.
CSCI 4500/6500Programming LanguagesSeveral modern programming languages and the paradigm -- procedural programming, object-oriented programming, functional programming, and logic programming -- that each strives to accommodate. Projects involve at least three languages.Students will understand the basic concepts, notations, and uses of various programming paradigms: procedural, object-oriented, functional, concurrent, and logic programming. They will have some understanding of how programming languages are defined -- in terms of syntax and semantics. They will have some ability to choose which paradigm to use for a given problem, and they will have some facility in writing and testing programs in at least three languages that use different paradigms.Language description: syntactic structure (lexical syntax, context-free grammars, abstract syntax trees, etc.) Language description: semantics: operational, denotational semantics, and axiomatic semantics; attribute grammars. Issues of type and scope: the role of types and scope; weak typing versus strong (syntatic) typing; basic types; arrays; records; abstract types; Procedures/functions: Parameter-passing methods; implementation of procedure/ function calls; frames; understanding procedure/function calls, including recursive procedures/functions. Functional programming Procedural programming in a structured fashion: variable declaration, assignment statement, conditional statement, loops (in terms of invariants and bound functions) Object-oriented programming: objects, classes, subclasses, inheritance, etc. Concurrent programming: parallelism in hardware; concurrency as interleaving; shared memory model; message-passing model; synchronization. Logic programming
CSCI 4520/6520Functional ProgrammingThe functional programming paradigm: functions and types, type inference and polymorphism, higher order functions and recursion, evaluation strategies, abstract data types and modules, lists, trees, and lazy data structures, reasoning about functional programs.Students will have a skill in writing, reasoning about, and testing functional programs in at least one functional language (examples of such languages are Lisp, Scheme, ML, and Haskell), including concepts such as mathematical induction, type inference, polymorphism, recursion, higher order functions, evaluation strategies, abstract data types, list, trees, lazy data structures.Functions: order of evaluation, referential transparency, function definitions, hisotry of functional programming languages, tail recursion and iteration Applicative-programming methodology: atomic datatypes, sequences The type
CSCI 4830/6830Virtual RealityIntroduction to the technology and techniques used in virtual environments (also known as virtual reality). Students will gain knowledge about the latest innovations in this field, will understand the important research issues and methodologies for VEs, and will have the opportunity to gain practical experience with the hardware and software used to create VE applications.After taking this class, the students will be familiar with most VR hardware devices, Java3D and VRML. They will be able to write 3D immersive programs and they will be able to design navigation and interaction techniques.Applications of Virtual Environments (VE) VE displays Tracking in space Eye-tracking Real-time 3D graphics for VEs 3D input devices 3D interaction and navigation Collaborative VEs Distributed VEs
CSCI 7010Computer ProgrammingAlgorithms, programs, and computing systems. Topics studied include: fundamental techniques of program development and supportive software tools; and programming projects and applications in a structured computer language. Hands-on experience using microcomputers.Students will understand the basic concepts, notations, and uses of various programming paradigms: procedural, object-oriented, functional, concurrent, and logic programming. They will have some understanding of how programming languages are defined --in terms of syntax and semantics. They will have some ability to choose which paradigm to use for a given problem, and they will have some facility in writing and testing programs in at least three languages that use different paradigms.- Introduction to computers (hardware/software, terms): CPU, RAM, secondary memory, I/O, binary numbers, 2's complement, machine language, high-level language, compiler, editor; - Algorithm (development, pseudo-code, ...); - Program variables; - Logical, relational, arithmetic operators; - Data types (integer, floating-point, character, ...); - Constants; - Operator precedence and assignment operator; - Design of simple programs; - Program structure; - Control flows; - Documentation and program comments; - Standard library functions and parameters; - Modular programming and top-down design; - User-written functions and parameters; - Simple I/O, standard streams, formatting output; - Testing for End of File and End of Line; - Conditional statements; - Looping statements; - Pointers, memory cells; - Debugging (setting break points, displaying data, stepping); - Selection statement; - Duality of characters and integers; - One-dimensional arrays and more on pointers; - Simple sorting algorithms; - User defined types; - Multi-dimensional arrays and records; - Pointers revisited; - Introduction to linked lists and recursion.
CSCI 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.Preparation of MS thesis under faculty supervision.The thesis topic is chosen by the student with faculty approval.
CSCI 8050Knowledge-Based SystemsTheory and practice of knowledge-based system construction. Topics will include knowledge-based construction, inference engines, reasoning from incomplete or uncertain information, and user interfaces.1.Student will demonstrate understanding of inference engines by hand- computing their operations. 2.Student will demonstrate understanding of standard methods for knowledge representation by constructing knowledge bases for appropriate tasks. 3.Student will write critiques of classic expert systems and other examples provided for analysis. 4.Student will complete a major project in small expert system development. a. Student will identify a domain, a problem, and at least one available expert. b. Student will interview expert(s) and organize data. c. Student will provide a study showing the feasibility of the project, including a conceptual analysis of the problem and the method of solution. d. Student will develop an expert system using an appropriate programing language or expert system shell. e. Student will write complete documentation for the system. f. Student will critique his/her own project, providing benchmarks, discussion of features present or absent, and a justification for the choice of techniques.I. Inference Engines (Rule Production Systems, Logic Programming, EMYCIN, Non-monotonic systems) II. Knowledge Representation (Clauses and Rules, Frames and Scripts, Defaults) III. Classic Systems (MYCIN, DENDRAL, PROSPECTOR, etc.) IV. Expert System Shells (Personal Consultant, ESP Advisor, APES, etc.) V. Knowledge Acquisition VI. Problem Analysis VII. User Interfaces.
CSCI 8380Advanced Topics in Information SystemsAdvanced topics in information systems and databases. The two major issues dealt with are: (1) information integration and interoperability, and (2) novel database technologies. The first addresses the integration of autonomous and heterogeneous resources managing structured, semi-structured, and unstructured data. The second deals with the query formulation, and processing on heterogeneous content. Special attention will be given to emerging research areas fueled by the Web and related technologies.Students completing "Advanced Topics in Information Systems" will have been exposed to a number of lecture topics as well as many practical topics. Lecture topics include information integration and interoperability, federation/mediator/brokering architectures, agent-oriented systems, query formulation and processing, semi- structured and multimedia data management, metadata, and knowledge management. Practical topics include implementation issues such as languages and protocols for developing advanced/ distributed/global information systems and their applications. The students will be exposed to very recent advances and research issues in the database and intelligent systems communities. The course will consist of lectures, student presentations, a major course project, and a final write up of activities. Students will be graded on the standard A to F grading scale, and will provide end of course evaluations on the instruction and course content following established Computer Science Department course evaluation procedures.- Methodologies and Models for Advanced Information Systems (ISs) - Integration and Interoperation of Heterogeneous and Distributed ISs - Federated Database, Mediator and Information Brokering Architectures - Object-oriented and Agent-Oriented ISs - Query Processing Including Planning and Optimization - Content Organization Including Taxonomy, Classification and Ontologies - Knowledge Sharing and Knowledge Management - Novel Database Technologies - Languages and Protocols for Advanced ISs - Applications of Advanced ISs in Enterprises and for the Web
CSCI 8730Software Systems for Parallel and Distributed ComputingSoftware systems geared at supporting parallel and distributed computing. Programming language support will focus on simple and efficient ways to express parallel programs. Compiler and operating system support will focus on new optimizations to make parallel programs execute more efficiently.The course builds on the students' knowledge of operating systems and covers topics such as software distributed shared memory, parallelizing compilers, annotated parallel programming languages, run-time parallelization, parallel I/O, and fine-grain parallelism. The course involves programming assignments and a significant, research-level final project. Students completing the course are prepared for research work in the application of software systems techniques to parallel and distributed computing problems.Writing Parallel Programs Synchronization Distributed Shared Memory Parallelizing Compilers Data Distribution Processor Assignment Performance Analysis Grid Computing Current Research Topics
CSCI 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.Preparation of doctoral dissertaion under faculty supervision.The dissertation topic is chosen by the student with faculty approval.
DANC 2300Dance Improvisation IProvides the individual an opportunity to explore movement initiated through various sources including internal motivation. Emphasis will be on individual and group interaction within structured and free improvisational situations, all for the purpose of developing the student's creative approach to composing and performing. Experience and explore improvisational approaches, devices and elements. Develop proficiency in creating movement studies based on a variety of design, content, thematic problems. Gain skills in the art of improvisation leading to solo and group performances. Learn creative approaches to making/enhancing/developing dance choreography.The class will consist of improvisation studies, informal performances, observation, research and reflective writing. A wide variety of exploratory movement studies will develop both leadership, following and collaborative abilities as commonly used in the dance making process. The course will provide adequate lab time for the practice of fundamental skills in improvisation such as immediacy; intrapersonal contact; spontaneous reaction; sensory response; movement recall; reformation and performance.
DANC 2600Tap Dance and Rhythmic AnalysisFundamentals of rhythm and musical form relevant to the needs of the dance educator, performer, and choreographer. Tap dance will serve as a basis of study.At the end of this course the successful student will be able to: Identify classic tap dance sequences in feature-length films and analyze some of them. Execute tap dance combinations taught by the teacher and by selected students, memorizing some of them and performing some of them for classmates. Perform a solo song and dance - 128 count/32 measure popular song. Any tone-deaf student will say the words rhythmically, with the same performance quality as a singer. Demonstrate understanding of and ease in using the basic rhythmic elements of music and dance, including duple vs. triple meter, simple vs. compound meter, time-signature, syncopation, polyrhythms. Demonstrate ability to write basic rhythms when heard in music, when heard in classroom dictation, and when seen in dance movement. Demonstrate ability to notate selected tap dance combinations, using standard musical notation symbols andImplied in Course Objectives above.
DANC 2900Young Choreographer's Series IPerformance in or choreographing of an original work through a faculty supervised process to be presented in YCS Stage One Showing to be held fall semester each year.Students will develop knowledge and skills in choreography and performance, culminating in a public performance, which will help prepare dance majors for DANC 4800,4900 (Senior Choreographic Project).Attendance to auditions Write descriptive proposal for dance piece (choreographers) Attendance to weekly rehearsals Attendance to Technical and Dress rehearsals, production responsibilities Written reflection of process (choreographers)
DANC 3900Young Choreographer's Series IIPerformance in or choreographing of an original dance work through a faculty supervised process to be presented in YCS Stage One Showing to be held fall semester each year.Students will develop knowledge and skills in choreography and performance, culminating in a public performance, which will help prepare dance majors for DANC 4800,4900 (Senior Choreographic Project).Attendance to auditions Write descriptive proposal for dance piece (choreographers) Attendance to weekly rehearsals Attendance to Technical and Dress rehearsals, production responsibilities Written reflection of process (choreographers)
DANC 4500World Dance HistoryDance as a reflection of culture and as an art form from the times of earliest lineage-based societies to the present. Socio-cultural influence and the contributions of individual artists will be investigated.To further the student's understanding of the various functions of dance in human society, and particularly its function as a fine art form. To further the student's understanding of dance in cultures outside his/her own To increase the student's knowledge of historical facts influencing the development of dance in Western culture. To increase the students' knowledge of the inter-relationship among dance and the other fine arts. To introduce scholarly historical research as a stimulating brance of dance education. To develop the student's ability to express himself/herself orally and in writing. To provide the developing dance artist with sources of inspiration and influence.Functions of dance in society Dance in rituals of lineage-based societies; dance of the American Indians Court and classical dance forms of Africa, India, Indonesia (Bali and Java), and Japan Slavery's transplanting of African and Caribbean dance to America Dance in early civilizations: Egyptian, Hebrew, Greek, Roman, Early Christian, Medieval Dance in the Courts of Eurpoe: Renaissance and Baroque Romantic ballet at the Paris Opera Classical ballet in St. Petersburg, Russia Twentieth century ballet The pioneers of modern dance and their descendants Modern dance as standard-bearer of freedom and innovation Post-modern dance American entertainment dance: jazz, Broadway, film, music video
DANC 4510Dance History IIPrevalent twentieth-century dance forms. Socio-cultural influences and the contributions of individual artists will be investigated.To guide the student's exploration of the various functions of dance in human society as revealed in contemporary dance art To further the student's understanding of dance in cultures outside his/her own To increase the student's understanding of how the dance art of earlier eras informs contemporary dance art To increase the student's knowledge of the inter-relationship among dance and the other fine arts. To provide opportunities for to student to undertake scholarly historical research. To refine the student's ability to express himself/herself orally and in writing. To provide the developing dance artist with sources of inspiration and influence.Functions of dance in society Twentieth century ballet The pioneers of modern dance and their descendants Modern dance as standard-bearer of freedom and innovation Post-modern dance American entertainment dance: jazz, Broadway, film, music video
DANC 4800Choreographic ProjectFully produced concert presentation of the student's original choreography. Student will write a brief project proposal and project write-up and assist in duties required for concert production.Student will play a major role in the formal concert presentation that includes the student's original choreography. In addition, the student will write a brief pre-production proposal and post production summary.Student will create an original dance piece 5-12 minutes in length, providing input to all other aspects of the production of the dance piece including costume design, light design, prop, set, film or video or any other visual/media aspects. The student choreograph may consider collaborating with other visual artists, musicians etc. in the creation of their choreographic project. The student should participate in the coordination of the concert production.
DANC 4810Applied ResearchFaculty-supervised research in a student-selected topic in aesthetics, education, history, science, or technology. The student will write a proposal, conduct research, and present findings.In-depth research of selected topic relating to dance studies. Faculty supervised research project resulting in comprehensive research paper and public oral presentation.The selected research project should promote one the following lines of research: to become well read in dance literature and produce a comprehensive paper on a dance topic; to become a sophisticated and self-conscious analyst of movement providing insightful observation to dance and the movement realm; to understand the relationship of dance to other media; to be knowledgeable in the field of dance pedagogy, history or criticism; to understand dance in terms of its broad cultural and aesthetic impact in the world; to become familiarized with the impact of technological interface with dance production.
DANC 4900Choreographic Project and Concert ProductionCo-producer of concert and fully produced concert presentation of the student's original choreography. The student will write a pre-production proposal, comprehensive post-production summary, and present an oral presentation of his/her critical analysis of the choreographic project following the concert production.Fully produced formal concert presentation of student’s original choreographic piece. The student will write a pre-production proposal and post-production summary, and complete an oral exit exam.In a collaborative effort, participate in the coordination of a dance concert to be held at a designated weekend during Fall Semester. Each student will create an original dance piece 5- 12 minutes in length, providing input to all other aspects of the production of the piece including costume design, light design, prop, set, film or video or any other visual/media aspects. The student choreographer may consider collaborating with other visual artists, musicians etc. in the creation of their project.
DRAM 2000Appreciation of Dramatic ArtAesthetics and craft of the theatrical experience on stage, screen, and television. Discussions and analyses of all aspects of the theatrical arts; critical viewing of performances both in and out of class with written analyses. May not be used for credit towards the drama major.To provide the student with a general understanding and appreciation of the variations of theatrical arts.A. Theatre Spaces: A look at the theoretical aesthetic and physical architecture of entertainment. B. Comedy: The history and theory of what makes us laugh. C. Dramatic Structure; The mechanics of the script. D. Writing on Theatre: How to write a basic theatrical review. E. Acting: Techniques, theories, and history of the primary dramatic agent. F. Direction: Techniques, theories and history of the director as artist. G. The Playwright: Methods, theories and the people who write the script. H. Multimedia: The current trends involving live performers and technology. I. Lighting Design: The art of lighting in entertainment. J. Costume Design: The aesthetics and practical aspects of what the actor wears. K. Scenic Design: The physical environment of the entertainment experience. L. The Craftspeople: Technicians, trade unions and the profession of technical production. M. Today's Theatre: Current trends in live theatre.
DRAM 2040Applied Drama LaboratoryIndividual production crew assignments.The objective of this course is to give the student practical theatrical production experience. Individual production assignments vary, and are subject to the needs of the production program. Production experiences include preparations in the costume and scenery shops, publicity office, media lab, and technical rehearsals leading to performances for the general public.The topics in this course are varied, but will include some of the following: -construction of costumes, scenery, or properties -scheduling of tasks/rehearsal time for production -time management and cooperative effort; all students work together to read production goals by opening night -operation of specialized equipment which may include power tools, light boards, sound equipment, computers, sewing machines, editing beds, video and projection equipment -specialized production tasks such as painting and decorating skills, interviewing, copy writing and editing, timing and calling of performance cues, shifting of scenery and scenic units, rigging, hairdressing, photography, and craft work.
DRAM 2050Applied Drama LaboratoryIndividual production crew assignments.The objective of this course is to give the student practical theatrical production experience. Individual production assignments vary and are subject to the needs of the production program. Production experiences include preparations in the costume and scenery shops, publicity office, media lab, and technical rehearsals leading to performances for the general public.The topics of this course are varied, but will include some of the following: -construction of costumes, scenery, or properties -scheduling of tasks/rehearsal time for production -time management and copperative effort; all students work together to read production goals by opening night -operation of specialized equipment which may include power tools, light boards, sound equipment, computers, sewing machines, editing beds, video and projection equipment -specialized production tasks such as painting and decorating skills, interviewing, copy writing and editing, timing and calling of performance cues, shifting of scenery and scenic units, rigging, hair dressing, photography, and craft work.
DRAM 2060Applied Drama LaboratoryIndividual production crew assignments.The objective of this course is to give the student practical theatrical production experience. Individual production assignments vary and are subject to the needs of the production program. Production experiences include preparations in the costume and scenery shops, publicity office, and media lab, and technical rehearsals leading to performances for the general public.The topics in this course are varied, but will include some of the following: -construction of costumes, scenery or properties -scheduling of tasks/rehearsal time for production -time management and cooperative effort; all students work together to read production goals by opening night -operation of specialized equipment which may include power tools, light boards, sound equipment, computers, sewing machines, editing beds, video and projection equipment -specialized production tasks such as painting and decorating skills, interviewing, copy writing and editing, timing and calling of performance cues, shifting of scenery and scenic units, rigging, hair dressing, photography, and craft work.
DRAM 2100HAppreciation of Theatre (Honors)All aspects of the theatrical experience on stage and screen, emphasizing the role of the audience as well as that of the artist. May not be used for credit towards the drama major.To develop a working vocabulary pertinent to and descriptive of the elements and methodology of theatrical production. To study representative dramatic literature in its historical and theatrical contexts. To critically analyze selected theatrical productions.I. Elements of theatre a. Definitions: Drama vs. Theatre b. Theatrical spaces: where theatre takes place 1) Arena; 2) Thrust; 3) Proscenium; 4) Black Box c. Theatre Practitioners 1) The Playwright; 2) Designers and Technicians; 3) The Director; 4) The Critics II. Types of Drama a. How to read a play b. Genres (tragedy, comedy, tragicomedy) c. How to see and hear a play III. Historical contexts a. Classical Greece and Rome b. Medieval Europe c. Major Asian theatres d. Renaissance e. Age of Modernism 1) Realism; 2) Anti-realism f. Post-modernism IV. Writing about theatre a. Reviews b. Research and anlaysis
DRAM 2110Voice of Diversity in Contemporary American DramaDramatic works which foreground issues of race, gender, culture, and/or ethnicity. Concepts of perception and identity, group relationships, and social/political protest.To read and analyze American plays of multicultural focus which have been traditionally under-recognized and/or under-represented in the canon. To identify several types of constituency theatres (Native American, African- American, Hispanic, Asian-American). To outline the development of constituency theatres in the US within their historical contexts.I. What is American theatre? a. Why are constituency theatres necessary? b. Historical contexts for constituency theatres II. African American drama and theatre a. Working definition b. Representative plays III. Native American drama and theatre a. Working definition b. Representative plays IV. Asian-American Theatre a. Working definition b. Representative plays V. Hispanic American Theatre a. Working definition b. Representative plays VI. Research and Writing
DRAM 2130American Ethnic CinemaCultural history of the most important ethnic film makers in the American cinema from the 1920's to the present, with emphasis on stories and styles of the films, as well as on the underlying economic and social contexts.Students will become familiar with the cultural, political, psychological and historical discourses crucial to the understanding of cultural diversity and racial struggle in American film history. Students will be required to read, research and write on the topics as well as participate in class presentations and discussion.This course focuses on the history of Ethnic American Cinema and its directors.
DRAM 3020Basic Dramatic WritingThe principles and process of dramatic writing.Upon completion of this course, the successful student will have written two short dramatic pieces for the stage, the cinema, or a new media format. These pieces will demonstrate creative control of characterization, story conflict, story structure, dialogue and medium. Rudiments of formatting will be learned but are secondary: the process of commanding one's own creativity.Month one: Modes of brainstorming a script. Comic strip. Verbal "pitching" as a creative form. "Exquisite corpse" style exercises for creative juxtaposition of ideas and characters. Collaborative exercises in creating stories with characters from two sources. Getting used to telling the story over and over: actually, on paper, in outline form, purely via dialogue, purely via description as if describing a finished movie or play and in numerous other modes. Absurd text's ideas; evolve two or more ways of "reaching" the story. Learn to tell stories from each character's viewpoint, both as a means of learning how to evolve conflict and as a way of finding whether one's main characters are the most advantageous. Month two: continue writing the story, over at least four "drafts". Turn in the "first acceptable" draft. Month three: rewrite the first story until you are happy with the grade. Each rewrite offers the chance for a better story, hence a better grade. Meanwhile, start (and draft at least twice) the second story. Put the first story into industry format. Month four: finish the second story. Multiple drafts, plus final formatting will be involved. Final exam as scheduled: stories will be read and "pitched" as if for sale.
DRAM 4000/6000Dramatic Writing IPlanning, writing, and polishing the short script for performance.The course is intended to give the student the experience of working in the manner of a professional dramatist. That entails doing all the things professional dramatists do: maintaining notebooks, accomplishing dramatic sketches and exercises, planning plays with the use of a scenario or a treatment, and completing one short stage or screen play through its polishing draft. Graduate students also carry out at least one draft of a second short play.I. Basic principles of dramatic writing. II. Writing for the stage. III. Writing for the screen. IV. Maintaining of the writer's notebook. V. Exercises in dramatic writing. VI. Review of the first draft. VII. Review of second, third and fourth drafts.
DRAM 4210/6210Theatre History IIHistory of theatre and dramatic arts from ca. 1800 to the present.The objective of this course is to achieve not only a high degree of cultural literacy on the subject of modern theatre history, but also to become familiar with the methodology of historians. Historians in the postmodern age are being compelled to re-address the basic assumptions of their discipline: how (and why) do we study, research, read, and write history? In this course, the approach we will take is designed to promote critical thinking about the problems of linear, narrative historiography. One aim of this process is to make fresh connections between various movements and legacies outside of the chronological framework. We will subject our textbook to the same methodical scrutiny that historians give to primary sources.1. 18th Century Theatre According to Brockett a. Restoration Comedy b. Scenic practices and innovations 2. 19th Century Theatre: Romanticism; Popular Theatre a. German Romanticism, Sturm und Drang b. Goethe, Gottschedd, Neuber c. Melodrama 3. Late 19th and Early 20th century: Naturalism and Realism a. The Well-Made Play: Scribe and Sardou b. Wagner c. Duke of Saxe-Meinegen troupe d. Ibsen and Chekhov e. Antoine and the Theatre Libre f. Stanislavsky and the Moscow Art Thetare g. Independent theatre movement 4. Antirealism, Symbolist and Popular Theatre a. Jarry b. Symbolism, Strindberg c. Yeats and other poetic drama d. Cabaret, Music Hall and Vaudeville 5. Expressionism and the New Stagecraft a. German Expressionism b. New Stagecraft: Appia, Craig, and their legacy c. Eugene O'Neill's early plays 6. Futurism, Dada, and Surrealism a. Italian Futurists b. Zurich and Paris Dada c. Breton, Cocteau, Bunuel d. Antonin Artaud (early) 8. The Interwar Years: Italy, France a. Theatre of the grotesque, Pirandello b. Antonin Artaud's Theatre of Cruelty c. Coupeaaaau, Jouvet 9. German and Austrian Thetare and Drama Between the Wars a. Max Reinhardt b. Piscator and Brecht c. Epic theatre 10. Interwar British, Irish and American Theatre, and Drama Between the Wars a. Little Theatre Movement b. Federal Theatre Project: Leftist theatre c. Broadway, Lilian Hellman, Folk drama d. Old Vic, Tyrone Guthrie, National theatre, Abbey Theatre, Dublin 11. War, Recovery, Absurdity, Anger a. American Musicals, Broadway b. English actors, Olivier, Gielgud, Evans, Redgrave, Ashcroft, Richardson etc c. Existentialism, Sartre, Camus d. Absurdism? Genet, Ionesco e. Samuel Beckett
DRAM 4600/6600Women and FilmA survey of feminist film criticism and theory, as well as the valuable contributions of key women directors.Women and Film introduces students to the history and criticism of feminist theory and filmmaking. European and American critics, historians, and directors are studied for how feminist practice and theory have developed. Exemplary films by women directors are evaluated in relation to their historical and critical contexts, giving students a working understanding of the issues at stake within writing about films as well as making them from a feminist perspective.I. Women and Film: Early European Women Directors A. Germaine Dulac and French Impressionism B. Leni Riefenstahal: Aesthetics, Ideology, Politics II. Classical Era Hollywood and its Alternative A. Dorothy Arzner as Test Case B. Maya Deren and the Avant-Garde III. Radical Feminist Film Practice A. Chantal Akerman's Counter-Cinema B. Margarethe von Trotta and New German Cinema C. Feminist Theory and Narratives 1. Marleen Gorris 2. Jennie Livingston IV: Feminism and Independent Cinema A. Nancy Savoca and Female Perspective B. Sally Potter and Feminist Literary Adaptation C. Julie Dash and African American Representations D. Jane Campion's Romances E. Maggie Greenwald Reworks Genre
DRAM 5051Applied Drama LaboratoryOpen only to drama majors. Individually assigned production and/or performance crew.The objective of this course is to give the student practical theatrical production experience. Individual production assignments vary and are subject to the needs of the production program. Production experiences include preparations in the costume and scenery shops, publicity office, and media lab, and technical rehearsals leading to performances for the general public.The topics in this course are varied, but will include some of the following: -construction of costumes, scenery or properties -scheduling of tasks/rehearsal time for production -time management and cooperative effort; all students work together to read production goals by opening night -operation of specialized equipment which include power tools, light boards, sound equipment, computers, sewing machines, editing beds, video and projection equipment -specialized production tasks such as painting and decorating skills, interviewing, copy writing and editing, timing and calling of performance cues, shifting of scenery and scenic units, rigging, hair dressing, photography, and craft work.
DRAM 5052Applied Drama LaboratoryOpen only to drama majors. Individually assigned production and/or performance crew.The objective of this course is to give the student practical theatrical production experience. Individual production assignments vary and are subject to the needs of the production program. Production experiences include preparations in the costume and scenery shops, publicity office, and media lab, and technical rehearsals leading to performances for the general public.The topics in this course are varied, but will include some of the following: -construction of costumes, scenery, or properties -scheduling of tasks/rehearsl time for production -time management and cooperative effort; all students work together to read production goals by opening night -operation of specialized equipment which may include power tools, light boards, sound equipment, computers, sewing machines, editing beds, video and projection equipment -specialized production tasks such as painting and decorating skills, interviewing, copy writing and editing, timing and calling of performance cues, shifting of scenery and scenic units, rigging, hair dressing, photography, and craft work.
DRAM 5053Senior SeminarThe current status of dramatic arts with specific planning and preparation to enter into the profession. The course includes Senior Exit Examination. Open only to drama majors.The current status of dramatic arts with specific planning and preparation to enter into the profession. The course includes Senior Exit Examination. Open only to drama students.I. The nature of employment in the dramatic art. II. Preparing resumes. III. Making contacts. IV. Portfolios, writing samples, audition pieces. V. National organizations, publications, and services. VI. State of the arts of theatre and film.
DRAM 5481/7481Topics in CinemaSpecial topics course in cinema studies, combining history and critical analysis of specific topics (animation, national cinema, authorship, genre).Depending on the topic, students will be required to read, research, and write on subject.Special topics courses in cinema studies cover a variety of subjects, including animation, national cinemas, various directors, film genres, and women and film. Depending on the topic, students will become familiar with the historical and critical discourse on the subject.
DRAM 5620/7620Dramatic Writing IIDeveloping the full length script for performance.The successful student will produce a professional-quality draft of a full-length play or screenplay.Month one: identify and analyze, from a writer's perspective, a dozen to twenty works (cinema, cable, TV, stage) that might serve in one respect or another as potential models for the work to be attempted. Go to the library or do other research to get sufficient background on the topic to begin writing. Write backstories, collect information, tell the basic story a dozen or hundred different ways until the story, from each major (and supporting) character's perspective, becomes completely familiar, as familiar as if one were talking about family secrets and legends. Months two, three, and four: write, rewrite, cope with critiques, rewrite some more, do trial readings, and finally do a draft that's for the semester.
DRAM 5630/7630Producing the New ScriptCritical and practical work in producing new scripts for writers, actors, directors, and designers.1. To understand and experience the process, tasks, organization, and skills necessary to bring a new script to a public viewing. 2. To provide practical experience in perfoming as actors in staged readings. 3. To provide practical experience in organizing and/or directing a staged reading. 4. To understand the working relationships between the following: Actor-Playwright Playwright-Director Director-Actor Playwright-Director-ActorA. New plays and their importance to theatre artists B. Director-writer relationship C. Actor-playwright relationship D. Groundplan E. Mock stagings F. Cold readings G. Casting a new play H. Oral research assignments I. Design approach J. Stagings of new plays for public viewing K. Graduate research paper
DRAM 5680/7680Topics in Dramatic WritingA special topics course in dramatic writing.On completion of the course, the successful student will be able to trace the relationships between the forms and styles of play scripts and scripts written for various media to the historical conditions, assumptions about performance, and the shifting role of the writer in crafting dramatic works and dialogue.Week 1: Early forms of play scripts. Remnants from the Greco-Roman and Medieval periods. Styles of writing in Spain, France, and England. Week 2: Elizabethan and Jacobean Scripts. Built-in assumptions about the relationship between companies of players and the script. The question of what a playing script was. How the scripts we now regard as "authoritative" came about. Week 3: The script as a work for performance versus as a work of "dramatic literature" as plays have been passed down to us: the case of 16th through 19th century plays. Week 4: Plays NOT meant to be read: the curious example of the melodramatic play from Pixerecourt onward, and the evolution of scenarios for spectacle theatre in the 19th century. Week 5: Forms of realist play scripts in the 19th and early 20th centuries: the well-made play, Ibsen, et al. Week 6: Scripts for expressionistic and "non-realistic" forms of theatre. Week 7: Vaudeville, popular performance, and the script (or lack thereof) Week 8: The early film script. Week 9: Adaptations from literature and theatre during the silent film period. Week 10: The script as outlined for performance versus as blueprint for production: D. W. Griffith vs. William Inge. Week 11: The evolution of the "Continuity" script in Hollywood from 1927 through the early 1950s. Week 12: Variations on the continuity script: French and English examples. Week 13: The shift to "Master Scene" format. This format's variations, virtures, and problems. Week 14: Variant forms reflecting different realities: TV series, etc. Week 15: Current European script forms. Week 16: Scripting for New Media
DRAM 5900/7900Film TheoryAn introduction to 100 years of film theory and criticism. Students are introduced to key concepts and major figures from Classical Film Theory (Eisenstein, Arnheim, Bazin) through Structuralism, Semiotics, Psychoanalysis, Feminism, and Cognitive Studies.Students will learn to read critically the key film theorists, but also situate those arguments within an historical context. The exams and writing components for this class require students to summarize, synthesize, and finally evaluate the major figures and trends in cinema theory.I. Silent Film Theory A. Early Theorists: Hugo Munsterberg, Bela Balazs B. French Criticism: Germaine Dulac and Louis Delluc C. Soviet Montage: Sergei Eisenstein and Lev Kuleshov II. Sound Film Theory: Politics, and "Realism" A. Siegfried Kracauer's Popular Psychology: From Caligari to Hitler B. Andre Bazin and Realist Film Language C. Jean Mitry, Psychology and Aesthetics III. Authorship, Signs, and Ideology A. Auteur Theory B. Structuralist Theory C. Christian Metz: From Semiotics to Psychoanalysis IV: Post Theory A. Post-Structural Alternatives B. Cultural Studies: Race, Class, Gender C. Cognitive Studies: Where does meaining really come from?
DRAM 7524Voice IV: Voice for MediaThis course focuses on the use of the voice in media, including vocal extremes and character voices. Examination of the business of marketing, the actor as a voice over artist, and ultimately production of a professional voice reel.This course focuses on the use of the voice in media including vocal extremes and character voices. An often-unexplored venue for actors is the work of the voice over artist. The objective of this course is to train actors in character voice work for media including radio, animation and voice-overs. It examines the business of marketing the actor as a voice over artist and ultimately produces a professional voice reel to enable an actor to market himself within this industry.A. Getting Started 1. What is the voice over? B. Character Vocal Extremes 1. Bioenergetics 2. Transactional Analysis 3. Voice Over Aerobics 4. Development of Personal Character Voices 5. Development of Voices for Previously Animated Characters C. Copy Basics 1. Hiding the sell 2. Making it mine 3. Copywriter’s Intention 4. Believing what you Say D. Layering Techniques E. Tags, Donuts, Promos F. Announcer G. Spokesperson H. Real-Person Spots I. Industrial Narrations, Multimedia and Audio Books H. Radio Drama I. Getting a Foot in the Door 1. Unions 2. Agents 3. Auditions J. Making the Demo Reel 1..Microphone techniques K. Marketing Your Talent
DRAM 7660Playwrights StudioLaboratory course testing new dramatic writing by critical examination of scripts in progress, public readings, trial stagings of scenes, and improvisational work.1. Maintaining ongoing discipline of writing. 2. Providing a forum for critical review of work. 3. Testing works in progress by public readings. 4. Providing a variety of writing challenges and exercises.I. Creation of a series of writing assignments. II. Working toward presentable pieces. III. Organizing public readings. IV. Review of pertinent literature.
DRAM 8030Seminar in Dramatic WritingDramatic form and style concentrating on specific problems and writers. The seminar is intended to provide the opportunity to investigate thoroughly the work of a single, significant playwright. By the end of the semester the student can be counted an expert on that dramatist. The investigation should concentrate on the playwright's preferred forms, themes, and style. Doing so requires a good understanding of form and style as general considerations in dramatic art. It then calls for the examination of the full body of the playwright's produced plays. The playwright's life, association in the theatre, collaborators, influences, and other literary work can all prove useful as can criticism available of the work.I. Exploration of a form and style as concepts II. General overview of the work of each playwright taken under examination III. The evolution of the playwright's work. IV. Critical responses OR exercises in style V. Associations and influences and general criticism assessement VI. Conclusions
DRAM 8200Seminar in History of the Performance ArtsProblems in the study of stage, cinema, and media history. In this course we will survey modern (mostly Post-Enlightenment) theories of history in order to understand how the idea of history and the project of Western history has changed across time. We will practice historical approaches to dramatic literature by examining some of Shakespeare's history plays in various contexts, including their original audience and time period, but extending to two different 20th century (film) productions of Henry V. Our goal at the end of this course is to be able to incorporate and apply an understanding of historiography to our research, critical writing, and play analysis and production.1. Historiography and Casual Explanations a. Poetics of History and Historical Explanation b. The Rise of Historicism: Kant and Hegel 2. The Hermeneutic Tradition: Dilthey and Gadamer 3. Historicism and Modernity a. Freud and Lacan b. Foucault 4. Historicisms of the Present a. New Historicism (Greenblatt) b. Postcolonial: Appropriation, Otherness, and Identity (Spivak, Said, etc.) c. Postmodern: Lyotard, Jameson, Habermas, Foucault, Derrida d. Herstory, Ferminism (Joan W. Scott) 5. Historiographical Approaches to Shakespeare's Historical Drama a. Henry IV Part One; Discussion and assigned topics b. Critiques of Tillyard's Elizabethan World Picture c. Henry IV Part Two: Target Passages
DRAM 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
EADU 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
EADU 9601Foundations of Adult Education ResearchThe conceptual and logical underpinnings of the research process in adult education.This course is designed to help Ph.D. doctoral students to become acquainted with, develop and articulate a conceptual foundation for their research. This will be achieved by reading a range of works, by focused writing, and by discussion. Students will learn how to distinguish among various research epistemologies, how to structure inquiry consistent with various epistemologies, and how to critique research based on different epistemologies.Epistemology, knowledge and justification Forms of Knowledge Science and Pseudoscience Rationality, Objectivity, and Values Induction, Prediction, and Evidence Models of Explanation Intertheoretic Reduction Empiricism and Scientific Realism Postmodernism Afrocentric Feminist Epistemology Pragmatism
EADU 9602Research Practices in Adult EducationProvides doctoral students with practical experience in the mechanics of adult education research.This seminar is designed to assist students in becoming familiar with the practical aspects of conducting adult education research. Unlike the companion seminar, EADU 9601, that concentrates on the philosophical foundations of research, this seminar has as its objective the carrying out of an actual research project. Students will learn how to conceptualize, implement, and present the results of an actual research project in adult education.How Epistemology Underpins the Research Process Conceptualizing the Research Problem Traditional and Non-traditional Research Designs in Adult Education Sample Selection and Data Collection Data Analysis Writing up the Research Results Dissemination of Research Results
EADU 9630Critique of Educational Literature in Adult EducationResearch studies, dissertations, and journal articles in adult education.The course will enable students to: 1) understand uses of “the literature” in social science research; 2) write a review of the literature on a problem area related to their dissertation; 3) recognize and overcome their own personal and organizational barriers to effective academic writing.- Beginning to define your topic/problem area - Strategies for starting and finishing your dissertation - What and why of the literature review - Constructing the literature review: issues and strategies - Purposes and structure of “free-standing” reviews - Purposes and structure of “embedded” reviews - The social practice of research and writing - Format styles and APA - Issues and strategies for managing the literature - Writing and re-writing - Defending of your dissertation topic - Working effectively with your Major Professor
EADU 9640Prospectus Development in Adult EducationResearch methods for dissertation in adult education, including preparation of dissertation prospectus.The course will enable students to: 1) understand the structure of the dissertation; 2) develop a draft of their prospectus, and in particular, Chapter One; 3) begin to focus the research problem and the logic of the method; 4)become proficient in editing and the use of APA guidelines- Overview of the structure of the dissertation - Structure of the problem statement and purpose statement - Problem statement components - Writing styles and grammatical issues - Introduction/Background to the Problem - Components and transitional flow of introduction/background - APA style of writing - Significance of the study - Definitions of the study - Overview of Methods chapter - Defending the Prospectus
EBUS 4010/6010Business CommunicationTheory and practice of thinking, reading, writing, speaking, and listening processes involved in business education.1. Understanding the communication process 2. Understand and demonstrate the research process and formal report writing 3. Various types of business letters and memoranda 4. Letters of application and resumesThe course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary. 1. Introduction; establishing a Framework for Business Communications 2. Establishing a Framework for Business Communications 3. Valuing Diversity 4. Organizing and Composing Messages 5. Revising and Proofreading Messages 6. Understanding the Report Process and Research Methods 7. Managing Data and Using Graphics 8. Organizing and Preparing Reports and Proposals 9. Preparing Résumés and Application Letters 10. Interviewing for a Job and Preparing Employment Messages 11. Writing About Good News, Routine, and Goodwill Letters 12. Writing Memos and Electronic Communications 13. Writing Bad News Messages
EBUS 5060/7060Desktop Publishing in Occupational StudiesComputer applications for electronic publishing, including elements of page design, effective publications, presentations, instructional materials, and instructional approaches for teaching desktop publishing in occupational studies.1. Recognize and appreciate the complexities of desktop publishing. 2. Demonstrate use of desktop publishing technology by creating and manipulating text and graphics. 3. Demonstrate applications of desktop publishing by developing and designing a variety of effective publications. 4. Integrate knowledge of components related to applications of desktop publishing and instruction such as composing, editing, word processing, and software troubleshooting. 5. Develop, design, and format a variety of DTP formats used by graphic artists, designers, writers, editors, production artists, typesetters, or pre-press professionals. 6. Identify common instructional approaches used for teaching skill-based courses, including desktop publishing.The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary. 1. Orientation to the course 2. Design software overview 3. Design guidelines 4. Principles of design and tools for effective design 5. Page assembly, importing text and graphics, drawing graphics, columns, keying text 6. Arranging text and graphics, using colors and tints 7. Using master pages, resizing objects, page numbering, leading, tracking, kerning 8. Layers, frames, reverse text, rules, text flow, modifying controlling images 9. Polygon frames, text within frames, creating and editing styles, plug-ins, adjusting layouts, formatting, editing and adjusting master pages 10. Spell-checking, story editing, widows, orphans, hyphenation
EBUS 5090/7090Spreadsheet and Presentation Applications in Occupational StudiesSpreadsheet and presentation software, including spreadsheet commands, graphs, data sorting, querying, and macro design and presentation software commands, design, sequencing and practice demonstration. Instructional approaches for teaching spreadsheets and presentation software in occupational studies. 1. Identify learning assumptions that can be applied when students are learning business education software. 2. Identify specific instructional methods appropriate for teaching. 3. Define and appropriately use and teach Windows computer terms. 4. Write necessary computer applications to effectively use spreadsheet and presentation software in a Windows environment to solve problems in business education. 5. Prepare lesson plans to effectively communicate instructional activities regarding selected projects.The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary. Spreadsheet Applications 1. Introduction, Syllabus, Classroom Policies and Excel Project 1 and Case Study selection 2. Excel Project 2 and Case Study 3. Excel Project 3 and Case Study 4. Excel Project 4 and Case Study 5. Excel Project 5 and Case Study 6. Excel Project 6 and Case Study 7. Excel Project 7 and Case Study 8. Excel Project 8 and Case Study 9. Excel Project 9 and Case Study PowerPoint Applications 1. PowerPoint Project 1 and Case Study 2. PowerPoint Project 2 and Case Study 3. PowerPoint Project 3 and Case Study 4. PowerPoint Project 4 and 5 and Case Study 5. Complete Project Presentations 6. Project Presentations
ECHD 6000Special Problems in Counseling and Human Development ServicesSpecialized training appropriate to the needs of the individual. The student's project may involve intensive library investigation or the collection and analysis of original data pertinent to a given problem.Develop knowledge of needs assessment strategies and models Identify area of special interests (individuals or groups of students) Shape specific areas of study Build and refine research questions(s) Improve understanding of research methodology Conduct investigation (theoretical and/or empirical) Draw data-based conclusions and discuss implicationsBasic research methodology terms and constructs Program development models and strategies Research methodologies Literature review and evaluation approaches Information acquisition and processing skills Analytical, writing, and editing skills Integration and synthesis
ECHD 7000Master's ResearchResearch while enrolled for a master's degree under the direction of faculty members.Developing the ability to identify problems of significance to the profession that are worthy of study Becoming familiar with basic constructs and terms related to understanding research studies Learning how to design and implement research studies Enhancing ability to translate interesting problems to researchable questions Developing preferred research methodologies Designing and implementing a research study, using either quantitative or qualitative methodologies Communicating results of the study in writing and in oral presentationsProblem analysis Information acquisition and processing models Establishing research organizational strategy Critiquing research designs Priorities in personal preferences regarding research areas of interest, and methodological approaches Communicating results
ECHD 7250Medical Information and Assistive TechnologyEtiology, prognosis, treatment, and vocational implications of varying disabling conditions. Assisting persons with severe disabilities to select technology and other forms of support.1. Demonstrate knowledge of basic medical terminology and common drugs used for treatment 2. Conduct an intake of medical informatiom including writing letters to physicians requesting specific information 3. Describe the medical system and its role in the rehabilitation process 4. Understand the management of the medical aspects of varying disabilities 5. Understand how to coordinate resources to promote medical restoration and use of available assistive technology (high and low tech). 6. Describe various sources of medical information and how they can be beneficial to the rehabilitation counselor, consumer, and to the consumer's significant others. 7. Demonstrate an understanding of the etiology, prognosis, treatment, and characteristics of different types of disabilities. 8. Demonstrate knowledge of the functional limitations associated with different kinds of disabilities and strategies for determining individual support needs that will facilitate a) the highest degree of independent living and b) obtaining employment that matches the consumer's interests and abilities 9. Demonstrate knowledge of a variety of support options and strategies for obtaining information about assistive technology and information about disabilities 10. Demonstrate knowledge in developing consumer-directed rehabilitation plans that reflect individual choice.Rehabilitation process and issues Medical terminology and body system Blood, lymph, and immune systems Nervous system Cardiovascular system Musculoskeletal system Respiratory system Gastrointestinal system Genitourinary Endocrine system Auditory and visual system Computers and assistive technology
ECHD 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.Understand and execute properly each of the steps involved in conducting a master's level research project. Learn how to identify and justify a significant problem. Develop research questions and hypotheses that hold promise for answering the research questions. Develop a research design, identify the methodology required to implement the design, and develop a research proposal. Submit a proposal to the Institutional Review Board if design includes human subjects. Demonstrate data processing and analysis skills and write results of study. Submit and defend thesis.Identifying problems of interest and determining significance of problem to discipline Research designs, literature review methodology, and hypothesis-related statistics APA style manual guidelines Committee development Proposal writing Implementation of study and write-up Oral defense
ECHD 7400Foundations of College Student Affairs AdministrationThe field of college student affairs with emphasis on historical, philosophical, psychological, and sociological foundations, and student service functions.Students will: 1. Understand the history and evolution of American higher education and the student affairs profession. 2. Investigate the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of student affairs practice. 3. Grasp the scope of activities associated with typical student affairs functional areas. 4. Learn about student affairs practices as a professional acitivity and the organizations and standards that support the profession. 5. Understand some of the diversity of institutional types in higher education and how their varying missions and student clienteles affect student affairs practice.Team oral and written history objective Student services functional area objective panel presentation and discussion Student service functional area objective written report Read fellow students' functional area papers Select a journal article from selected journals and write a review
ECHD 7410College Student Affairs InterventionsApplication of student development and organization development theories to the institutional environments of college students for purposes of enhancing their personal and educational development.1. Implement student development theories, principles, and models in practice. 2. Identify and understand student affairs practice in different institutional settings. 3. Plan, implement, and evaluate educational and developmentally oriented programs and services. 4. Conceptualize and design computer assisted approaches to development interventions. 5. Cogently summarize intervention results to share with professional colleagues.Team Assignments: Program Development Consultation Project World Wide Web Page dyads Defining Developmental Intervention Approaches WWW Page training Developmental Interventions: Process Models Developmental Interventions: Assessment Models Developmental Interventions: Design and Practice Intentional Programming Models Writing for Publication Intervention Team Presentation
ECHD 7700Individual Counseling PracticumSupervised psychological counseling practice in a setting consistent with the student's professional goals.To enhance counseling skills and the application of techniques in practical settings. To increase awareness of personal abilities, behaviors, values, and attitudes and the ways in which they impact counseling. To develop and/or refine the ability to assist clients; problem exploration. To help students acquire proficiency and gain confidence by applying theoretical knowledge and integrating skills with the assistance of an experienced supervisor. To explore problematic clinical issues, ethical dilemmas, and other professional concerns relating to the practicum experience. To increase critical thinking skills and the ability to provide helpful feedback to others through class interaction and group supervision. To learn how to do a formal case presentation. To explore personal/professional development throughout the semester.Intake interviewing Intake/Report Writing Suicide/Homicide Assessment Beginning Therapists Questions/Answers Client Fears Therapist Fears Ethical/Legal Issues Difficulty Clients Diagnosis Debate Termination Multicultural Issues
ECHD 7770Issues in Student Affairs Assessment and EvaluationProgram evaluation and outcomes assessment techniques appropriate for use by college student affairs divisions, which includes review of student affairs literature on evaluation and outcomes measurement, scrutiny of issues associated with assessment of out-of-class learning, published instruments, and qualitative and quantitative designs for outcomes assessment and program evaluation.Critique and construct non-theory based surveys/assessments Write measurable program objectives that facilitate outcome assessment Understand the rudiments of developing theory-based instruments Select and evaluate instruments using basic psychometric criteria Identify key assessments and assessment-related resources used in student affairs Conduct a focus group Write assessment/evaluation reports, read and critique reports Identify and address common challenges of assessment/evaluation and understand the essentials of managing assessment work groups.1. The context for assessment in student affairs divisions A. Accountability imposed from outside the institution B. Quality assurance C. Affordability D. Strategic planning E. Politics 2. Components of assessment in student affairs A. Identify the purpose B. Select best (better) designs C. Select instruments or qualitative methodology C. Data gathering plan E. Data analysis strategies F. Reporting the results 3. Program evaluation methods for student affairs A. Understanding and using CAS standards for evaluating units B. Benchmarking programs and services using NACUBO data C. Formative and summative approaches D. Assessing student needs E. Assessing student satisfaction F. Assessing campus environments G. Assessing student cultures H. Assessing student outcomes I. Program evaluation models 4. Assessment and evaluation challenges A. Building rapport and defusing perceived threats B. Communicating findings in meaningful and useful forms C. Dealing with institutional politics and fear of bad public image D. Embedding assessment and evaluation into on-going programs E. Training staff F. Maintaining high ethical standards G. Using the results for program improvement
ECHD 7920Research Methods in Counseling and PsychotherapyBehavioral science research methods used to study counseling and psychotherapy. Examination of frequently used qualitative and quantitative research approaches, critique of published research in the field, and development of research plans.1. Students need to develop a familiarity with basic psychometric constructs 2. Students need to master the analysis and use of basic research designs and methodologies 3. Students need to understand the common quantitative and qualitative methodologies used in the profession’s research 4. Students need to develop the ability to critique designs and methodologies of research reported in counseling and psychotherapy literature 5. Students need to develop a research proposal and defend it orally1. Research questions 2. Research designs 3. Statistical and evaluation constructs 4. Significant differences 5. Applications of traditional qualitative and quantitative designs to counseling and psychotherapy research questions 6. Guidelines for proposal writing
ECHD 7940Research Methods in College Student AffairsBehavioral science research methods used to study college students and higher education institutions. Examination of frequently used qualitative and quantitative research approaches, critique of published research in the field, and development of research plans. 1. Each student will identify and describe the different types of research appropriate to the student affairs and/or counseling fields. 2. Each student will understand and be able to construct a research study. 3. Each student will know the elements of reporting research and will have an understanding of the APA style of referencing and reporting research. 4. Each student will write a research propectus. 5. Each student will critically evaluate published research and research proposals.I. Types of research used in college student affairs II. Similarities and differences in qualitative and quantitative research methods III. Selection of a problem IV. Review the literature V. Construction of research questions and/or hypotheses VI. Identifying and labeling variables VII. Constructing operational definitions VIII. Qualitative research methodologies IX. Quantitative research methodologies X. Mixed research designs XI. Basic statistics XII. Writing a research prospectus XIII. Writing the final report
ECHD 7990Research Seminar in Counseling and Human Development ServicesA seminar for master's level students in counselor education dealing with proposed research projects and critiques of the literature.1. Identify classic research studies in Counseling and Human Development Services 2. Learn major and upcoming research publication outlets in the profession 3. Develop a critique of the literature on a selected topic 4. Present a summary of the findings in class and defend in a mock committee meeting 5. Understand the strengths and weaknesses of the research reported in the professional literature 6. Submit an acceptable proposal for a research study1. Classic studies in counseling and human development services 2. Traditional research designs 3. Unanswered and emerging questions 4. Qualitative and quantitative methodologies 5. Proposal writing 6. Challenges of assessment and evaluation
ECHD 8000Applied Project in Counseling and Human Development ServicesIndividual research in an area pertinent to the field of counseling and human development services, with emphasis on increasing skills necessary to collect, interpret, and utilize research data.1. Identify researchable questions of special interest and importance 2. Document significance of the problem to the profession 3. Review and critique relevant research literature 4. Plan a research design that would answer the research questions 5. Develop appropriate statistical hypotheses and procedures 6. Conduct a research study 7. Develop procedure for collecting, processing and analyzing the data 8. Write up results of the study 9. Draw conclusions and identify implications of the findings1. Researchable questions of significance 2. Literature review approaches 3. Research design and methodology 4. Style manual guidelines for writing 5. Data processing and analysis 6. Guidelines for writing a variety of documents
ECHD 8130Expressive Arts and Play Media in CounselingExpressive arts and play media in counseling with children and adolescents.Develop an appreciation for differences in strategies and basic tenets in working with various age groups. Become familiar with the rationale for the use of expressive arts and play media in counseling. Become aware of various theoretical approaches to using expressive arts and play media in counseling. Become familiar with a variety of media used in expressive arts and play. Become familiar with a variety of resources in expressive arts. Gain experience in using expressive arts in counseling.Visual Arts Children's Literature Mask-making Creative writing Dance and movement Music Clay Processing Practicum Experiences Closure Exam
ECHD 9000Doctoral ResearchResearch while enrolled for a doctoral degree under the direction of faculty members.1. Become an effective member of a functioning research team 2. Demonstrate the ability to conceptualize researchable questions 3. Understand the range of significance of research questions (relative importance) 4. Evidence the ability to successfully initiate and complete a research study 5. Show an appropriate attention to scientific detail and methodology in conducting data collection for a study 6. Execute an independent “publishable paper” project 7. Contribute appropriately to research team efforts 8. Understand professional guidelines related to the use of human subjects in research 9. Show writing skill and oral presentation skill1. Research Teams: Types, Roles, and Functions 2. Research products 3. Quality and quantity issues and concerns 4. Qualitative and quantitative research designs 5. Professional writing guidelines 6. Professional presentations 7. Editorial service contributions to the profession
ECHD 9220Rehabilitation EducationRehabilitation education programming, including accreditation requirements, training grants, field work supervision, and continuing education.1. Help students develop a greater understanding of the role and function of rehabilitation education at both the pre-service and in-service levels. 2. Help students understand the nature of the rehabilitation education curriculum at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. 3. Help students understand the accreditation guidelines for education delivery in rehabilitation services. 4. Improve students’ abilities to write fundable research and training grants related to rehabilitation education. 5. Improve students’ clinical and administrative supervisory skills. 6. Facilitate a deeper understanding of disability issues and their relationship to instructional content and process. 7. Enhance students’ abilities to provide community education initiatives in disability services. 8. Enhance students’ professional identity as rehabilitation educators.1. Role and function of rehabilitation education 2. Developmental curriculum in rehabilitation education 3.Direct and indirect targets for rehabilitation education 4. Grant writing 5. Clinical supervision in rehabilitation education 6. Administrative supervision in rehabilitation education 7. Assessment and evaluation of education, training, and services
ECHD 9240Professional Issues in RehabilitationHistory, development, and current issues related to the profession of rehabilitation counseling. Philosophical assumptions, legal and ethical considerations, new rehabilitation service initiatives, and new consumer populations.1. Facilitate students’ understanding of the history of rehabilitation education. 2. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of philosophical constructs of rehabilitation education 3. Students will know emerging trends in disability services and rehabilitation services. 4. Demonstrate affective and attitudinal commitment to persons with disabilities in direct and indirect interventions. 5. Knowledge of legal and social issues and concerns of persons with disabilities. 6. Students will know federal and state legislative mandates related to rehabilitation services. 7. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the types of services offered in the public and private secotors of rehabilitation counseling. 8. Students will write grant proposals addressing disability needs.1. History of rehabilitation counseling and education 2. Federal legislative support of rehabilitation 3. Rights and responsibilities of persons with disabilities 4. Clinical intervention and supervision skills 5. Legal and ethical parameters of direct service 6. Emerging trends in disability services
ECHD 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.1. Student will demonstrate an ability to conduct original and independent research supervised by major professor 2. Student will select and defend research questions of significance 3. Student will submit and defend acceptable research proposal to doctoral committee 4. Student will show ability to adhere to all professional guidelines and codes pertaining to research with human subjects 5. Student will show ability in data collection, data processing, and data analysis 6. Student will show an ability to draw appropriate conclusions from analyzed data 7. Student will submit and defend dissertation based on his or her “original and independent” research study1. Dissertation Planning 2. Committee Development 3. Meeting Presentations 4. Methodology Issues 5. Timing 6. Understanding Results 7. Mastering Style Guidelines 8. Ethical and Professional Standards
ECHD 9600Foundations of Counseling PsychologyHistory, development, and current issues related to the profession of counseling psychology. Philosophical and cultural assumptions, legal and ethical considerations, and implications of selected research topics.1. Provide a survey of the field of Counseling Psychology. 2. Examine the historical development of Counseling Psychology, including the social and political forces that shaped the profession. 3. Begin the process of establishing a professional identity with Counseling Psychology. 4. Sharpen critical thinking skills as a scientist-practitioner. 5. Introduce students to the research, practice, and service of contemporary Counseling Psychologists.Important Article Assignment. Each student will examine all of the articles written in The Journal of Counseling Psychology and The Counseling Psychologist between 1996 and the present. The student will select an article from each journal that s/he deems as “most important,” and then present the articles and the argument for “most important” to the class. The student will summarize the presentation on one overhead per article with corresponding handout. The student will bring one copy of each article for the class presentation. Annotated Historical Timeline Activity. The class as a whole will review and annotate a historical timeline of Counseling Psychology. The class will take a creative and cooperative approach for the project. Multimodal, multimedia approaches will be encouraged. As part of the activity, each student will contact two leaders in the field of counseling psychology regarding their perspectives of a chosen issue. Book Review. Each student will select a recently published book to review. The student will read the book and then compose a book review for submission to a journal. Annotated Bibliography. Each student will conduct a search for empirically based journal articles on a topic of interest to the student. The student will select a minimum of six such articles and then prepare an annotated bibliography. The student will summarize each study and then critically examine each study for methodological strengths and weaknesses. In addition to internal and external validity, the implications of each study will be discussed. The student will present his/her findings in class. Division 17 Service Project. The class will develop and implement a service project for Division 17. Art and Psychology. Students will read selections on art and psychology. Students will then participate in an interactive tour/lecture of the Georgia Museum of Art under the guidance of the museum curator. Final Examination. Students will write answers to comprehensive final examination questions.
ECHD 9620Assessment in Counseling PsychologyThe administration and interpretation of psychological measure of intellectual, social, and personality characteristics of individuals. The ethical use of test results in counseling individuals from diverse populations.1. To understand the psychometric concepts of reliability, validity, and standard scores. 2. To become competent in the administration of intellectual, achievement, and personality tests commonly used in the practice of psychology. 3. To become familiar with other important tests in psychology such as the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale, Halstead-Reitan Neuropsychological Test Battery, and measures of family functioning. Special issues in assessment (e.g., using tests with minority clients, in child abuse cases, and forensic purposes) are covered. 4. To select and administer tests based on client indications. 5. To interpret test results and to formulate diagnoses and interventions from those results. 6. To write six psychological reports based on test interviews and results (three per semester).1. The student will complete a minimum of six psychological evaluations (including intelligence and personality testing) under the supervision of the instructor. During formulation of test results, students will bring de-identified case summaries and protocols to class for supervision and discussion. 2. The student will complete projects related to assessment under the direction of the instructor. For example, the student will lead seminar discussions regarding journal articles in the area of special issues in psychological assessment.
ECHD 9670Professional Development Seminar in Counseling PsychologyEmphasis on current and emerging professional issues, including psychology licensure, professional and legal standards, and ethical practice in counseling psychology, as well as current topics in therapy.1. Understanding of professional career options and directions 2. Greater identity with counseling psychology as a profession 3. Improved understanding of cutting-edge application approaches and issues 4. Improve application of diversity awareness and commitments 5. Consideration of special issues and emerging topics of importance 6. Increase understanding of professional disciplines not specifically studied in program (i.e., industrial and organizational psychology, projective assessment, test construction, women’s issues, etc.)1. Professional Identity Issues and Concerns 2. Personal Career Plans 3. Licensure, Professional Liability Insurance, and Continuing Education Guidelines 4. Cutting-Edge Topics (emerging ethical and legal issues, new psychodiagnostic issues, projectives, etc.) 5. Presentations and Writings
ECHD 9770Doctoral Assessment PracticumSupervised practice in psychological assessment with opportunities for practical experiences in diverse settings.1. Students will be taught to determine appropriate intellectual, personality, memory, achievement, and vocational tests to be administered to clients based on referral information and presenting concerns. 2. Students will learn fundamentals of the mental status examination and basic clinical interviewing skills. 3. Students will administer standard psychological test batteries to clients under the supervision of a licensed psychologist. 4. Students will gain experience in scoring and interpreting test results. 5. Students will learn to write integrative psychological reports based on test results and clinical interview. Students will learn to write relevant recommendations based on the test results and other clinical information. 6. Students will learn to provide clients with feedback based on the psychological test results.1. Psychological testing skills (intellectual, personality, memory, achievement, and vocational tests) 2. Ethical considerations regarding the protection of test materials and of confidentiality of test results 3. Clinical implications of the psychometric qualities of instruments. 4. Sensitivity to the use and misuse of psychological tests with multicultural populations 5. Synthesis of test results 6. Consultation with other professionals and with clients
ECOL 3220Biology and Conservation of Marine MammalsMarine mammal biology and conservation with a primary focus on marine mammals common to the southeastern United States. Topics will include anatomy/physiology, population dynamics, captive management and rehabilitation, law and public policy, and careers in marine mammal science.1) Provide a brief survey of marine mammals and marine mammal science. 2) Survey career opportunities in marine mammal science. 3) Provide hands-on field experience as budget allows. 4) Develop students’ working knowledge of the scientific method. 5) Develop students’ scientific writing and speaking skills. 6) Use inquiry-based teaching and hands-on exercises as instructional methods instead of traditional lecture format 7) Implement current technology for classroom instruction, e.g., webcasts, and student projects/presentations, e.g., podcasts1) “Who” are marine mammals? – general review of group characteristics 2) Evolution/origin of marine mammals 3) General anatomy & physiology with emphasis on adaptation to aquatic environment 4) Taxonomy/Systematics 5) Ecology/population biology 6) Behavior: social, reproductive, feeding, intelligence and culture 7) Law, public policy & politics of human/marine mammal interaction 8) Husbandry – captive management, public display, research, rescue & rehabilitation 9) Exploitation of marine mammals – historical & current – whaling to ecotourism 10) Effects of human activities on marine mammals – sound, pollution, coastal development & fisheries 11) Conservation of marine mammals – stock assessments, recovery plans, take reduction teams 12) Modern technology and the study of marine mammals 13) Careers in marine mammal science 14) “Hot topics” in marine mammal science Hands-On Activities (list may expand/change): 1) Skeletal characteristics, especially skull measurements & characteristics 2) Species identification (bone matching) -- UGA Museum of Natural History 3) Possible -- Necropsies @ UGA Vet School: expert demonstration on cetacean, manatee & pinniped specimens, as well as gross examination by students, especially dolphin heads; perhaps auditory nerve dissection 4) Tooth Sectioning Field Trips: 1) Georgia Aquarium – behind the scenes 2) On water activities – dolphin watch boat (Skidaway Institute of Oceanography) Special Lectures (possible instructors; list likely to expand/change): The dolphin brain & dolphin-assisted therapy – Lori Marino (Georgia Tech) Atlanta Aquarium Life Support Systems – Ray Davis Right Whales & recovery plans – Hans Neuhauser (Georgia Environmental Policy Institute) Stranding Operations – Charley Potter (Smithsonian Institute of Natural History) Marine Mammal Husbandry – Deke Beusse Systems Ecology – Bernie Patten (UGA Institute of Ecology) Conservation & Public Policy – John Reynolds (Marine Mammal Commission) Student Projects: Developed in conjunction with instructors and tailored to area of student interest. Written and/or oral presentations Use of current modes of instructional technology will be encouraged, e.g., podcasts
ECOL 3910Undergraduate Ecology SeminarAttendance is required at eight ecology lectures and a written review of each that is turned in to the undergraduate coordinator.This course is intended to expose undergraduate ecology majors to a wide variety of recent research and work in ecology, and to give them practice in critical thinking and writing.Students will choose 8 seminars out of approximately 30 offered each semester and attend them. Afterwards they will write a review of the lecture and present it to the undergrauate coordinator, who will grade each review.
ECOL 4100/6100-4100L/6100LEcological BiocomplexityTheory of complex systems applied to ecology and estuarine ecosystems. Team projects will provide experience in field and laboratory methods, data acquisition and analysis, and simulation modeling and systems analysis. Software to be used includes Stella for building simulation models and Matlab for systems analysis methods.Philosophy of course: students build understanding through experiential learning by constructing models and making empirical measurements that are incorporated into a model framework. Learning by exploration of biocomplexity through simulation modeling and systems analysis - compare initial conceptions of biocomplexity with conceptions after completing the course. 1. The student is expected to learn how to perform the following tasks: a) construct a dynamic model in the Stella program and produce a steady-state version of the same ecosystem model b) perform analysis of a dynamic model c) perform systems analysis of steady-state version of the dynamic model d) evaluate the characteristics of the dynamic model results and the steady-state systems analysis results: what do these results tell us about biocomplexity? 2. Demonstration of student competence: a) Demonstrate understanding of the concepts of modeling theory by constructing a dynamic model in the Stella program. b) Demonstrate understanding of ecosystem dynamics and the ideas of inputs, outputs, standing stocks, controlling functions (parameters) and their manipulation in sensitivity analysis of the dynamic model. c) Show understanding of environ theory by conducting systems analysis using the Matlab program and interpreting the results vis-à-vis a set of cardinal hypotheses concerning the holistic properties of steady-state models. d) Articulate how his or her conception of biocomplexity has changed from the beginning to the end of this course. e) Demonstrate facility in synthesis of the concepts of the course by preparing and delivering a final oral presentation at the end of the course. A written synthesis report will accompany and complement this oral presentation. 3. The learner will be evaluated based on the participation in and satisfactory completion of the field and lab tasks. The field sampling program will be designed and completed by the students with supervision and approval of the instructors. The dynamic and steady-state ecosystem models will be constructed by the students. Analysis of these models constitutes a set of tasks that the students will complete and on which they will write reports that the instructors will evaluate. The final synthesis presentation will show how well the students can put together the big picture of the lessons learned in the course and how well they can articulate how the experiences of this course changed their conception of biocomplexity.Lecture 1: Introduction to ecosystems as biocomplex systems - students write out their initial definitions and conceptions of biocomplexity. Present the philosophy of course: students build understanding through experiential learning by constructing models and making empirical measurements incorporated into a model framework. Learning by exploration of biocomplexity through simulation modeling and systems analysis - compare initial conceptions of biocomplexity with conceptions after completing the course. Lecture 2: Informal and formal conceptual models of biocomplexity: 3 C's of conceptual modeling: Compartments, Connections, Controls. Field task 1: Informal description of systems: what's there: fouling community succession on artificial substrates: organisms, succession, biotic interactions, abiotic conditions. Teams of 2-4 students will be chosen so different components or aspects of the fouling community may be investigated during the course. Each team will be responsible for building a conceptual model, Stella model, and steady-state model for systems analysis in Matlab. Field task 2: Implement the 3 C's in the field using observations in the field and lab with the formal modeling framework learned in lecture. Lecture 3: Dynamic models - concepts and methods of implementation in Stella. Lab task 1: Build initial Stella model of chosen ecosystem. Field task 3: Initial measurements of chosen ecosystem parameters. Lecture 4: Dynamic models - Unexpected and indirect effects in dynamic models: "I didn't expect it to do THAT!" Lab task 2: Perform sensitivity analysis on Stella models: change initial conditions or parameters to determine the resultant dynamic behavior of the model - What was expected vs. actual model behavior? Why are they different, and what does this tell about biocomplexity? Lecture 5: What do dynamic simulation models tell us about biocomplexity? Field task 4: Begin time-series measurements of chosen parameters. Lecture 6: Using models as repositories of information and understanding of system processes - how to incorporate empirical data into the developing Stella models. Lab task 3: Provide place-holders for incorporating empirical data into the developing Stella models. Lecture 7: Dynamics: transient response and steady state. Lab task 4: Explore the transient response and approach to steady state of the developing Stella models. Field task 5: Continue time-series measurements of chosen parameters. Lecture 8: Dual concept of environment: Input and output perspective. Lecture 9: Environ theory: An implementation of the dual or input/output perspective on environment Lab task 5: Produce a steady state flow matrix version of the Stella model and use this to conduct initial environ analysis in Matlab. Lecture 10: What does environ analysis tell us about biocomplexity? Describe and discuss some of the relevant cardinal hypotheses: a. network path proliferation b. network nonlocality c. network homogenization d. network amplification. Lab task 6: Conduct further environ analysis in Matlab. Field task 6: Continue time-series measurements of chosen parameters. Lecture 11: Synthesis with student discussion: How has your conception of biocomplexity changed? Why? Has your conception of what approaches scientists should use to study biocomplexity changed after participating in this course? Lab task 7: Students prepare a synthesis of the results of their simulation modeling work and systems analysis work. What concepts did they discover about their focal system that gave them insight into the implications of biocomplexity? What did the analyses demonstrate about how their biocomplex system works. What are the larger implications for the study of ecosystems and other complex systems (e.g. the internet, economies, social systems)? Class presentations of synthesis of field and modeling work and end of Maymester oyster roast.
ECOL 4130LEcological MethodologyIntroduction to conceptual and empirical aspects of field ecology in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.Introduction to conceptual and empirical aspects of ecological methodology in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The course builds on the ideas, principles, and concepts presented in ECOL 3500. In both lecture and lab, students will be exposed to a variety of sampling and experimental methods employed by field ecologists. Emphasis will be placed on hypothesis testing and on the design, execution, analysis, and presentation of ecological experiments. Students will be involved in class exercises, group projects, and independent research projects throughout the course of the semester. This course will provide students with the skills needed to obtain a job as a field ecologist upon graduation. Moreover, this course will include a significant writing component. This writing component will teach students how to write an effective scientific paper, a skill which will be used in all aspects of their other scientific career.Introduction to conceptual and empirical aspects of ecological methodology in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The course builds on the ideas presented in ECOL 3500. In both lecture and lab, students will be exposed to a variety of sampling and experimental methods employed by field ecologists. Emphasis will be placed on hypothesis testing and on the design, execution, analysis, and presentation of ecological experiments. Students will be involved in class exercises, group projects, and individual projects throughout the course of the semester. Course Requirements: Text Book (required): Southwood, T. R. E. and P. A. Henderson. 2000. Ecological Methods. Blackwell Science, Oxford. Optional Text: Cody, R. P. and J. K. Smith. 1997. Applied statistics and the SAS programming language, 4th Edition. Prentice Hall, NJ. Optional Text: Scheiner, S. M. and J. Gurevitch. 2001. Design and analysis of ecological experiments. Oxford University Press, Oxford. Exams/Grading Points Final Exam 75 Writing assignments 200 Grant Proposal 75 Final Project 150 Total 500 Grant Proposal: Due 1 March, 2004 Subject of your choice written in the form of a graduate student Dissertation Improvement Grant to the National Science Foundation. See attached handout for specific requirements and grant review process. You will then conduct the experiments proposed in your grant proposal for your independent final projects. Independent Final Project: In your final project, you will conduct the experiment(s) that you proposed in your grant proposal. You will then write your work up in the form of a scientific paper. This paper will go through the "review process". Stay tuned for details. ECOL 4120 - ECOLOGICAL METHODOLOGY SYLLABUS This course will have 1 hour lecture and 4 hour lab per week. Lecture will cover conceptual aspects associated with each topic. Labs will provide hands-on experience concerning the appropriate methodological tools needed for each topic, including field methods, modeling, and statistical analyses. WEEK # TOPIC 1 Introduction: Theories, hypotheses, and statistics 2 Species richness and diversity (terrestrial) 3 Species richness and diversity (aquatic) 4 Wildlife population estimates 5 Observational vs. experimental methods 6 Experiments in controlled environments (greenhouse) 7 Experiments in controlled environments (field) 8 Large-scale spatial and temporal study and habitat classification 9 Life tables 10 Mark-recapture (invertebrates) 11 Estimation of productivity and the construction of energy budgets 12 Behavioral estimates 13 Independent projects 14 Independent projects 15 Independent projects ECOLOGICAL METHODOLOGY ECOL 4120 Writing Assignments For 3 experiments conducted in class (NOT including the final project), you must write up the work in the form of a Scientific paper. For all other experiments, you will only need to hand in Methods and Results Sections. All assignments must be TYPED and handed in 1 week after termination of the experiment. For the Scientific Paper, you should include the following sections: Title Abstract Introduction Materials and Methods (including Study System, Experimental Protocol, Data Analyses) Results (including Tables and Figures) Discussion Literature Cited. Writing is a creative process and there is no right or wrong way to present your work. The writing in this course is meant to be used as a learning tool so (1) you better understand the experiments you did, and (2) you learn how to write a scientific paper. Below I give you tips on how to write a Scientific Paper. In addition, I strongly encourage you to read current published articles in journals such as the American Journal of Botany or Ecology for further stylistic guidance. Title and Abstract - Should be clear and concise and describe the study you conducted. Introduction - Give brief background on the history of the problem. Why did you conduct the study you did? What new insights does your study bring (i.e., why is it different)? Clearly state the question you addressed. Methods 1. Write in the 1st person (I or we) and/or 3rd person (i.e., The observations were conducted from 7 AM to 6 PM). Mix it up - don't write exclusively in one voice. AVOID 2nd person (i.e., you)! 2. Give enough detail that someone can go back and redo your experiments. This detail may include: study organisms and sites used, sample sizes, measurements made, etc…. 3. Any information concerning the types of data analysis that you did (described below). Prior to writing your Results, you will enter your data into the computer (using Excel, notepad, or JMP) and statistically analyze your data using SAS. Your results section will include what you found written in words as well as any figures or tables that you feel are needed to present your results. Pointers for writing Results: 1. See (1) above. 2. All results should be written in the text even if there is a figure or table to describe them as well (i.e., We found that plants with more flowers received more pollinator visits (Figure 1).). 3. All Figures and Tables should have a title describing them. Discussion - Interpret your results in light of what is known in the literature on this subject. What is the next step in this system? Literature Cited - Only cite literature that was also cited in the text. Use standard citation format as in Ecology. ECOLOGICAL METHODOLOGY ECOL 4120 Grant Proposal February 1st - Topic due April 20th - Last day to hand in rough draft March 1st - Proposal due (no late proposals accepted) Grant writing is an integral part of ecological research - most research projects would be impossible to support without some funding source. This is true for graduate students as well as professors. You are assigned the task of writing a mock proposal to the National Science Foundation for a Dissertation Improvement Grant (DIG). DIGs are awards to graduate students. You must come up with a set of hypotheses that broadly fall under the category of plant-animal interactions, find a study system to address your hypotheses, design experiments to test these hypotheses, and persuasively explain the significance of your proposed work. The outline below will help you structure your proposal. Proposals will be handed in, assigned a number (so no one sees your name), and then sent out 'for review'. Each student in the class will be randomly given 3 proposals to read and comment on. You will be graded both on your proposal (100 points) as well as your constructive reviews of three other proposals (25 points). On the last two days of class, we will discuss the merits of each proposal. Grant Outline Cover Page - Include your name and date on this page only. DO NOT PUT YOUR NAME ON ANY OTHER PART OF THE PROPOSAL. Abstract - Not to exceed 1 page. Should include a title, statement of objectives and methods to be employed, the intellectual merit of the proposed work, and broader impacts of the resulting work. Project Description - Not to exceed 8 pages. This is the main body of your proposal. Include the following subsections: Introduction with objectives and hypotheses/questions clearly stated. Literature review (i.e., where do your hypotheses fit into the broader knowledge of what is already known; this may be combined with the Introduction). Study system - describe the system. Why is this system appropriate to address the proposed hypotheses? Experimental design. Propose experiments to address each of your hypotheses. Your designs should include sample sizes and detailed methods such that someone could go out and do your proposed experiments. Significance of proposed work. Timeline of proposed work (how long is it going to take you and when will each experiment be accomplished). Literature Cited - cite literature as in Ecology. Note - write your proposal in the active voice.
ECOL 4960HResearch (Honors)Independent research in ecology under direction of individual faculty members.The student will gain experience in creating testable hypotheses, design of experiments or field observations, literature review, and report writing.n/a
ECOL 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.
ECOL 8000Topics in Modern EcologyResearch topics in modern ecology presented by faculty of ecology, with emphasis on research grants and proposal writing. This seminar is intended to help beginning doctoral students in ecology review of some of the major ecological concepts. Faculty and students will engage in weekly discussions to explore the history and the current status of the foundations of ecology. Students will lead discussions on selected papers from the literature and become familiar with topics related to their own research interests. Field trips are planned to introduce students to each other and to some local and regional habitats. Attendance at Friday Ecology Seminars will help students connect ecological concepts with current research presentations.1. Impart knowledge of historical and contemporary ecological literature. 2. Review major lines of ecological development, from past to present. 3. Gain exposure to research concepts in ecological sub- disciplines. 4. Begin the process of discussing your plans for your doctoral research. 5. Acquire experience in written and oral scientific communication. 6. Introduce faculty from the Institute of Ecology and explore local and regional habitats.
ECOL 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
ECOL(FORS) 8322Concepts and Approaches in Ecosystem EcologyEcosystem biogeochemical processes and the organism-organism, organism-environment interactions that regulate them. The relationship of ecosystem structure and function to foodwebs, global change, scaling, nonlinearity, self-organization, and approaches to study these.1. To introduce, define, evaluate and develop core concepts in ecosystem ecology through exploration of focal areas of current advances 2. To introduce different experimental/quantitative approaches in ecosystem ecology and explore the pros and cons of each By the end of this course, students will: 1. be familiar with key concepts underlying ecosystem ecology, the extent of the research the supports these concepts, and the most recent, cutting-edge research that tests these concepts; 2. be aware of the range of experimental/quantitative approaches and the practical and philosophical issues relating to their use; 3. be familiar with parallels and differences between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem ecology in the context of concepts and approaches; 4. have developed their critical thinking and scientific discussion; 5. be practiced in writing of Federal grant-agency proposals.Each week the lectures and discussion will revolve around a focal area of current advances in ecosystem ecology. These focal areas are outlined in the table below. Week Lectures (2 x 1 h) & Discussion (1 x 2 h) 1 Course outline; historical introduction of ecosystem ecology, hypothesis testing in ecosystem ecology 2 Global change (elevated CO2, warming, N deposition, hydrology) 3 Biogeochemistry 4 Elemental stoichiometry 5 Food webs 6 Invasive species 7 Biodiversity and ecosystem function 8 Aboveground-belowground interactions; transition zones 9 Urban systems 10 Scaling (temporal & spatial) 11 Nonlinearity: synergies, feedbacks and thresholds 12 Approaches 1 (observation, modeling, experimental design: including validity & scaling; hypothesis testing; meta- analysis) 13 Approaches 2 (whole ecosystem manipulations; stable isotopes;molecular tools) 14 Student oral presentations 15 Student oral presentations cont. Lectures. Monday and Wednesday mornings: 1 h lectures, the first 55 min consisting of approx. 20 min PowerPoint presentation by the instructors interspersed by approx. 35 min student-directed inquiry, and ending with a 5 min, group-led, closing summary. This format is intended to introduce key aspects of the focal area through the PowerPoint presentation and to develop key aspects, or other aspects related to the focal area, through student questioning. The objective of this format is to go into greatest depth about those areas of the material which are of most interest to the class. Prior to each lecture the students will be assigned reading of 1 to 3 recent review papers that deals with current advances and potential future directions for the focal area. Weeks 1-11: Introduction to the central principles, theories and questions of ecosystem ecology through exploration of focal areas of current advances. Weeks 12-13: Introduction to the approaches for research in ecosystem ecology, with particular emphasis on the concepts and assumptions behind them. The expectation is that many of these approaches will have been introduced and/or examined in previous lectures or discussion. These two weeks are to develop the exploration of a subset of approaches considered key to current advances in ecosystems ecology. There will be no discussion in these weeks (see Section: �Class paper�). Seminars. Friday mornings, 2 h discussion. Weeks 1-3: Instructor-led. Weeks 4-11: Student-led discussions. Discussions will center around 1 to 2 recent (within last 24 months) studies, published in the peer-reviewed, primary literature, related to the focal area of the week�s lectures. The purposes of the seminars are to explore contemporary concepts (i.e. principles or theories) in ecosystem ecology in greater depth than facilitated by a lecture approach, to practice/develop verbal expression and reasoning, to practice critical review, and, in the context of the student-led discussions, to develop further effective leadership of discussion. To frame the discussions (for the student-led discussions), students will work in pairs and these leaders are expected to produce a discussion plan, to have read more widely than the class assigned reading about the concept, to guide the discussion, and following the discussion provide a 1-2 page class summary in the following format: (a) Definition of the concept/question tackled (b) The research that led to &/or supports this concept/question (c) How, if at all, the concept/question should be modified in light of the most recent research (d) What are the outstanding questions central &/or related to the concept/question (e) How one would test these questions For lectures, class instructors will produce a similar handout, which addresses (a) to (d). For �approaches� lectures these handouts will follow the format below: (a) Definition of the approach (b) Utilities of the approach (c) Pros (d) Cons (e) Examples of use Class paper Final papers will be in the form of an NSF Dissertation Improvement Grant (DIG) proposal. The central idea for the proposal will be developed with the class instructors and will relate to a real or anticipated research question, with an ecosystem focus, that ideally would compliment the student�s dissertation research. Once the central idea for this proposal has been approved (by Week 5), it will proceed as follows: 1. The project summary (200 words), project description (5 pages,12 pt font) and budget with justification following NSF DIG guidelines will be required. The project description will be reduced from the 8 pages required by NSF, but in all other aspects will follow NSF style and formatting guidelines. This proposal will be due the Monday of Week 10. 2. Weeks 10 and 11. Students will be divided into four groups of four. Each individual in a group will be assigned the same four proposals to peer-review following NSF reviewer guidelines and the ethical guidelines of the ESA. 3. Week 12. Students will receive the four peer-reviews and produce a response to reviewers. This response will be 1 page maximum. The reviews, the response and the proposal (modified in light of the reviews) will be turned in the Monday of Week 13 and then assigned to a group, which did not review the original proposal, for panel review. 4. Week 13. Panel review. Each panel will assess four proposals and produce a summary and recommendation as per NSF format. Summaries and recommendations are due to the class instructors the Monday of Week 14, who will then grade each student on their DIG, individual reviews (by them, not of their work) and panel reviews. There will be no discussions Weeks 12 and 13, to enable time for generating responses to reviewers (Week 12), for panel reviews (Week 13) and for finalization of class presentations (Weeks 14 & 15). Class presentations These will be based on the DIG proposals, with each student presenting for 12 min (using PowerPoint), with a further 5 min for questions. Three presentations will be given per Mon, Wed, Fri class of Weeks 14 and 15, except for the final class on Friday of Week 15. This final class will be used for course evaluation and student involvement in course development for the next academic year. Responsibilities Students and instructor: 1. to have read all material and prepared written notes (for individual use in the class; not to hand-in) prior to each class 2. to participate fully in discussion 3. to embrace differences in opinion without intellectual or emotional judgment 4. to maintain the agreed focus of discussion Grading policy Grades will be composed of the following elements: 30% class participation (presence, contribution, originality, enthusiasm, preparation, discussion guides and syntheses) 30% final paper (NSF DIG proposal) 20% individual and panel reviews of DIGs 20% final presentation Grade bands A 90% and above B 80% - 89% C 70% - 79% D 60% - 69% F less than 60% Late assignment policy 5% from the final grade for each piece of work per day late, up to 15% in total grade reduction. Missed class policy Unless appropriate paperwork received (e.g., doctor�s note), or previously agreed with class instructors, 5% from the final grade for class participation per absence up to 10% in total grade reduction.
ECOL(PBIO) 4520/6520Plant-Animal InteractionsTheoretical and applied issues surrounding the ecology and evolution of plant-animal interactions, ranging from antagonistic to mutualistic relationships.This course will cover the ecology and evolution of plant-animal interactions in terrestrial, marine, and freshwater environments. The interactions between plant and animals are of fundamental importance to the structure and function of natural ecosystems. After successful completion of this course, a student should be able to: 1. Comprehend both conceptually and empirically complex interactions among species. 2. Read a scientific paper and verbally discuss the findings. 3. Design an experiment and both verbally and in written form describe the importance and mechanics of the experiment. We will use these interactions as models to empirically explore the concepts and general principles covered in Population and Community Ecology (ECOL 4000). Using formal lectures, interactive discussions, and readings from the primary literature, this course will examine all major classes of plant-animal interactions and their theoretical and applied consequences at multiple hierarchical levels. Through this course, students will gain a deeper understanding of the complex webs of interactions in natural ecosystems.Weekly Discussions: Each week we will discuss a paper from the primary literature. Papers will include both classic works as well as the most recent findings in this field. Each student must lead one discussion and all students are expected to participate in discussion. Grant Proposal Writing/Review: Subject of student's choice written to the National Science Foundation. Students will write a mock proposal to the National Science Foundation using a set of hypotheses that broadly fall under the category of plant-animal interactions, in the form of a graduate student Dissertation Improvement Grant, find a study system to address the hypotheses, design experiments to test these hypotheses, and persuasively explain the significance of the proposed work. Proposals will be assigned numbers and each student will be randomly given 3 proposals to read and comment on. Students will be graded on both their proposals as well as constructive reviews of 3 other proposals. On the last two days of class, the class will discuss the merits of each proposal. Week 1 Monday Introduction to Plant-Animal Interactions Wednesday Review of natural selection,species interactions Friday Developing hypotheses; experimental design Week 2 Monday Plant Defenses Wednesday Theories of Plant Defense Friday Discussion 1 - Theories of Plant Defense Week 3 Monday Induced Defenses and Costs of Defense Wednesday Herbivore as a Benefit Friday Discussion 2 - Induced Defenses Week 4 Monday Community-Level Interactions Wednesday Ecosystem-Level Responses Friday Discussion 3 - Ecosystem-Level Responses Week 5 Monday Herbivore Offense - adaptation vs. exaptation Wednesday Evolution of Herbivore Diet Breadth Friday Discussion 4 - Herbivore Offense Monday Herbivore Population Growth Wednesday Herbivore and Metapopulation Dynamics Friday EXAM 1 Monday Marine Herbivore I - associational resistance Wednesday Marine Herbivore II - tri-trophic interactions Friday Discussion 5 - Associational Resistance Monday Freshwater Herbivore I - path analysis Wednesday Freshwater Herbivore II - trophic cascades Friday Discussion 6 - Trophic Cascades Monday Theories of Coevolution Wednesday Pollination I - plant perspective Friday Discussion 7 - Theories of Coevolution Monday Pollination II - pollinator perspective Wednesday Seed dispersal and plant population genetic structure Friday Movie - Sexual Encounters of the Floral Kind Monday Spring Break Wednesday Spring Break Friday Spring Break Monday Seed predation as a benefit Wednesday Cheating - Mutualists Friday EXAM 2 Monday Ant-Plant Interactions Wednesday Endophytic Fungi Friday Discussion 8 - Cheating - Mutualists Monday GM Plants I Wednesday GM Plants II Friday Discussion 9 - GM Plants Monday Species Invasions Wednesday Biological Control Friday Discussion 10 - Species Invasions Monday Global Environmental Change and Plant-Animal Int's Wednesday Grant Proposal Review Friday Grant Proposal Review FINAL EXAM
ECON 4800Internship and/or Cooperative EducationStudents are permitted to enter business establishments or governmental agencies for the purpose of obtaining practical and applied business experience. An in-depth paper based on an approved economics topic is required.Students are permitted to enter business establishments or governmental agencies for the purpose of obtaining practical and applied business experience. The student use their experience to write an in-depth paper on a topic relating to their internship.Topics will be discussed and decided by the student and the faculty advisor.
ECON 5900Senior ThesisAn extensive economics research paper, written under the direction of a faculty member. This course should be taken during the term just prior to the student's planned graduation.In this class, each student researches an economic issue of his or her choice and writes a documented paper of approximately 15-25 pages about it. This paper, which demonstrates mastery of economic concepts and proficiency in writing, is required for the economic degree. It should be an original synthesis of material, primarily in the student's own words, and cannot have been submitted in another course.I. Course Goals and Policies II. Choosing a Topic and Choosing an Advisor III. Thesis Statements IV. Note-Taking and Rules of Good Writing V. Preliminary Research VI. Writing the Proposal VII. Writing the Paper A. Plagiarism B. Quotation and Paraphrase C. Ellipsis Marks and In-Text Citations D. Synthesis E. Paper Format F. Abstracts, Introductions and Conclusions G. Tables and Diagrams
ECON 5900HSenior Thesis (Honors)An extensive economics research paper, written under the direction of a faculty member. This course should be taken during the term just prior to the student's planned graduation.In this class, each student researches an economic issue of his or her choice and writes a documented paper of approximately 15-25 pages about it. This paper, which demonstrates mastery of economic concepts and proficiency in writing, is required for the economic degree. It should be an original synthesis of material, primarily in the student's own words, and cannot have been submitted in another course.I. Course Goals and Policies II. Choosing a Topic and Choosing an Advisor III. Thesis Statements IV. Note-Taking and Rules of Good Writing V. Preliminary Research VI. Writing the Proposal VII. Writing the Paper A. Plagiarism B. Quotation and Paraphrase C. Ellipsis Marks and In-Text Citations D. Synthesis E. Paper Format F. Abstracts, Introductions and Conclusions G. Tables and Diagrams
ECON 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.Thesis writing pursuant to a master's degree.Topics will be discussed and decided by the student and the faculty advisor.
ECON 8090Research Methods in EconomicsPractical issues in conducting applied economic research. Topics include choosing dissertation/research topics; data sources and methods; presenting, publishing, and refereeing research papers and critical analysis of the literature. Students are required to write and present a research paper to the department in partial fulfillment of the course requirements.To help promote dissertation research1. choosing dissertation/research topics 2. data sources and methods 3. presenting, publishing and refereeing research papers and critical analysis of the literature
ECON 8420Labor Economics IILabor economics, with special emphasis on current theoretical and empirical issues. The demand for and supply of labor, compensating wage differentials, the structure of compensation, worker displacement, unemployment, and the distribution of labor-market income.This course will teach students how to apply basic economic principles to analyze cutting-edge empirical and theoretical research in labor economics, human capital and education. Students will both write a paper where they apply what they have learned and will take an exam.Human Capital Signaling Education Trends in Racial and Gender Earnings Inequality Effects of Government Intervention in the Labor Market Taxes Minimum Wage Unemployment Compensation AFDC Social Security
ECON 8720Topics in Economic HistoryCurrent research topics in historical economics, aimed at a deeper understanding of these topics and of modern cliometric techniques for examining them as demonstrated in recent scholarly writings. Topics will reflect student interests and current research trends.In this course the students are expected to go into greater depth in a specific area or areas of American economic history and development. Given the student's interests, each selects a topic on which to conduct intensive reading and research. Each student then prepares a term project that integrates economic analysis, econometrics and historoical data. Additionally, students meet regularly with the instructor to discsuss the project topic or other areas of scholarly interest.The topics vary according to students' interests. All lie within the field of American economic history and development, and all involve the use of analytical techniques and data.
ECON 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.Dissertation writing pursuant to a doctoral degree.Topics will be discussed and decided by the student and the faculty advisor.
EDAP 9170Seminar in School LawAdvanced study of school law, current issues in school law, and other specific areas of law mutually agreed upon by the student and the professor.Students in the seminar will: Further develop their understanding of American governance systems, sources of the law, and the role of the courts in American education. Explore constitutional principles and their application to the school context. Review court decisions, statutory law, and administrative regulations concerning education. Discuss and reflect on legal principles and their application to schools. Engage in legal research and writing, and present and debate their findings on legal problems related to schools.This is a seminar course. Topics will be drawn from the most significant current issues in education law and selected based on students’ interests in particular areas of law.
EDAP 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.Student will conduct dissertation research.Topic will vary according to the student's research problem.
EDEC 7170Evaluation of the Elementary SchoolComponents of evaluation, appropriate evaluation techniques, procedures, collection, and utilization of research data for improving elementary schools.Identify the major functions, strengths, limitations, and errors in measurement and evaluation. Define and illustrate the essential characteristics of good assessment procedures, including relevance, represenativeness, reliability, validity, normative samples, and usability. Compare, contrast, and illustrate technical concepts and practical concerns of measurement including correlation, reliability, validity, and measurement error. Identify, write, and classify educational objectives according to specific criteria and given classification schemes. Identify the basic types of test items and compare and contrast these types. Critique examples of various types of test items and compare and contrast these types. Employ rules for item writing in constructing tasks designed to measure specific educational objectives. Plan and construct a classroom test designed to measure the objectives of a particular unit of instruction. Identify major issues on the administration and scoring of various assessment procedures. Evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of test items. Demonstrate understanding and application of basic test statistics. Describe, compare and interpret various types of test scores: relative scores, standard scores, and norms. Analyze and interpret various types of test data. Differentiate between absolute and relative standards of performance. Identify methods of marking and grading and applying various systems to given test results. Integrate, evaluate, and report data concerning student achievement. Differentiate between maximum and typical performance measures and illustrate each type. Identify the strengths, weaknesses, and uses of observation and nontest assessment techniques. Assess strategies used to communicate evaluation to parents. Demonstrate understanding of school-wide evaluation, improvement, accreditation procedures. Describe positive and negative outcomes of teacher evaluation. Describe appropriate forms of self-evaluation. Describe strengths and weaknesses of student-led evaluation.History of evaluation, why teachers need to know about assessment, achievement assessment and instruction, discussing evaluation with parents, classification of scales and measurement, absence of bias, improving teacher-developed assessments, characteristics of measurement instruments, reliability of assessment, validity, the nature of assessment, criterion v. norm-references measures, deciding what to assess and how to assess it, behavioral objectives, planning the test, instructionally-oriented assessment, translating scores, the normal distribution, different types of tests (multiple choice, true/false, matching, short answer, essay), assembling, administering, and evaluating the test, difficulty and discrimination, item-response theory, performance assessment, portfolio assessment, authentic assessment, digital portfolios, evaluating teaching and grading students, student-led evaluation, interpreting standardized tests, school-wide evaluation, teacher evaluation, accreditation, self-evaluation, school improvement.
EDEC 7200Developmental Issues of Elementary School LearnersImplications of developmental issues in children grades Pre-K through 5. Focus on the elementary school teacher's role in fostering the development of the whole child in the school context.Research and theoretical base for understanding the elementary school child (PreK-5th) Maturational issues and school performance Metacognitive abilities, intelligence and standardized testing Motivational strategies used by teachers and effect in psychosocial development Implications of language development in school work Effects of social emotional development in children's behavior in schools Developmental tasks of early and middle childhoodAge appropriate indicators of cognitive competence Readiness skills for basic reading writing, and calculating Classroom environments that support language and literacy skills Age appropriate indicators of social/emotional competence Learning to get along with age-mates and adults Building positive attitudes towards oneself Learning masculine and feminine social roles Developmental concerns for character education Age appropriate indicators of physical competence Achieving personal independence Emerging physical skills Physical maturation Assessing classroom and school practices that support development Role of the teacher Classroom environment Extracurricular and community activities
EDEC 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.Student will prepare dissertation.Doctoral candidate will prepare dissertation under the directino of major professor and advisory committee.
EDEC 9630Critique of Educational Literature in Early Childhood EducationInterpretation and evaluation of research and theoretical writing in early childhood education.To organizationally present topics of need and interest to students. To provide an analysis, interpretation, and constructive reaction to student needs in connection with literature in a selected area and the overall dissertation. To provide guidance toward the completion of the student's entire doctoral dissertation. To encourage appropriate applications of technology for literature reviews and the presentation of course work.Purposes and components of a literature review; identifying, storing, and critiquing the literature; organizing, writing, and revising a literature review
EDEL 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.Prepare dissertation.Dissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
EDEL 9630Critique of Educational Literature in Elementary EducationCritical interpretation and evaluation of research and theoretical writing in elementary education. To organizationally present topics of need and interest to students. To provide an analysis, interpretation, and constructive reaction to student needs in connection with literature in a selected area and the overall dissertation. To provide guidance toward the completion of the student's entire doctoral dissertation. To encourage appropriate applications of technology for literature reviews and the presentation of course work.Purposes and components of a literature review Identifying, storing, and critiquing the literature Organizing, writing, and revising a literature review
EDES 6520Ideas of the GardenThe garden as an archetypal concept through which different cultural groups have expressed their understanding of the world and of human history from ancient times to the present.Knowledge: Identify the ideological and philosophical bases upon which gardens were created by different people at various places and times. Identify significant garden archetypes within specified time frames. Describe and compare various garden forms during specific historic periods. Describe the varying attitudes or values toward the natural environment that have influenced the creation of different garden forms by different people at various places and times. Identify the physical resource conditions and the social, cultural and economic conditions that influenced or inspired different garden making traditions. Define various concepts, principles, techniques or features constituting an introductory vocabulary related to man-made garden types. Identify the major plant and other natural and building materials that were brought together in the making of gardens by different people at various places and times. Skills: Analytical thinking - an ability to demonstrate an understanding of the climatic, physiographic, ecological and cultural determinants of built gardens: understanding the structural, functional, aesthetic, and symbolic make-up of built gardens. Visual and spatial perception - an ability to demonstrate an understanding of the planimetric, three-dimensional formation an the visual composition of exemplary garden types. Descriptive and analytical writing about the built gardens - through quizzes and case study assignments, a demonstration of an ability to represent historic gardens in a reasonably understandable graphic and written form. Reinforce simple graphic skills through exercises that focus on ecological structural and planting principles.Introduction/Review of LAND 2510/2520 and EDES 6670 Pre-Historic Gardening Early Agriculture and garden making Ancient garden making Ancient garden making and literature and art Non-Western garden making of the Ancient era Medieval garden making and literature and art Midterm Exam Non-Western garden making of the Renaissance era Renaissance garden making and literature and art 17th century garden making and literature and art 18th Century garden making and literature and art 19th Century garden making and literature and art Early-20th Century garden making and literature and art Mid-20th Century garden making and literature and art Contemporary garden making and literature and art Final Exam
EDES 6560History of the Built Environment IIArchitecture and landscape from the seventeenth century to the present. Emphasizes relationship between the built environment and culture, aesthetics, the environment.Knowledge: Identify movements and persons prominent in the development of design and their major contributions to the development of the professions of architecture and landscape architecture. Identify significant works of contributors within specified time frames. Describe and compare various styles or historic periods of design activity and the guiding concepts or design principles that characterized them. Identify the physical resource conditions and the social, cultural and economic conditions that shaped the designed response. Define various concepts, principles, techniques or features constituting an introductory vocabulary for design. Skills: Analytical thinking - an ability to demonstrate an understanding of the climatic, physiographic, ecological and cultural determinants of built works; understanding the structural functional and aesthetic make-up of built environments. Visual and spatial perception - an ability to demonstrate an understanding of the planimetric, three-dimensional formation and the visual composition of exemplary built works. Descriptive and analytical writing about the built environment - through quizzes and case study assignments, a demonstration of an ability to represent historic works in a reasonably understandable graphic and written form. Reinforce simple graphic skills and simple structural and engineering principles. Values: Appreciating the value of history in understanding the present built environment. One must be able to perceive the relationships between past actions and current problems or "those who ignore the lessons of history are doomed to relive it." Students in the School should be aware of the relationship between humankind and its environment as an aspect of the cultural history which is so rich in lessons about life. An understanding of aesthetic principals and an appreciation of beauty in man made works.The primary instructional method is slide lectures, with textbooks to provide reinforcement. The course follows a chronology, which is overlaid with certain themes, some extending through the whole course and some pertaining to specific units. week 1 - Part 1 Europe 18th Century, English 17th century site and architecture week 2 - French and English 17th century city planning and Sir Christopher Wren week 3 - England 1700-1750 architecture, landscape gardens, 18th century romantic classicism in France week 4 - Humphry Repton, Romantic classicism in English Architecture, English public parks/Prince Puckler-Muskau week 5 - 19th Century, American Colonial architecture and gardens, American romantic classicism, 19th Century classicism in architecture week 6 - American landscape gardening - Andrew Jackson Downing, Picturesque styles of architecture week 7 - 19th century city planning, Frederick Law Olmsted-Planned suburbs week 8 - American house, 19th century technology and skyscraper week 9 - 1880-1910s City Beautiful movement, town planning, parks, Country Place era, landscape architecture, Jens Jensen & early 20th century landscape architecture week 10 - Frank Lloyd Wright - Proto-modernism in Europe/German modernism/Bauhaus week 11 - Le Corbusier, early 1910-1930 WPA, TVA, public parks and parkways 20th century American skyscraper week 12 - Harvard Revolution/Modern landscape architecture (1930s), Modern Architecture in America week 13 - Modern landscape architecture and town planning week 14 - Contemporary landscape and architecture week 15 - Contemporary landscape and architecture week 16 - Make-up, review final exam
EDES 6900Research StrategiesAlternative methods of inquiry appropriate to environmental design.Knowledge: An understanding of alternative methods of inquiry appropriate to the student's field of study An awareness of the directions of current research and other creative activities within that field An understanding of the criteria used to evaluate research and other creative projects in that field Skills; An ability to write a thesis proposal that defines a particular method of inquiry and sets a direction for research or other creative activity appropriate to the student's course of study Value: An appreciation of the contributions of current research and other creative activities to environmental design and historic preservationThe following types of inquiry are considered to be appropriate to environmental design and historic preservation: Creative Exploration of Physical Design issues: in the tradition of design set pieces (originating in the Ecole des Beaux-Arts) this type of inquiry utilizes drawing and/or other forms of design representation supported by an explanatory written text to explore one or more solutions(s) to a problem of form or process. Evaluation of this type of inquiry considers the originality and completeness of the design proposal, the quality of the representation and the strength of the supporting explanation. Scholarly Examination of ideas: in the tradition of the humanities (including history and philosophy) this type of inquiry takes the form of a critical investigation of new ideas or new interpretations of enduring ideas, with a demonstration of their potential applications in the field of environmental design or historic preservation. Evaluation considers the quality of the insights provided by the scholarly examination, the clarity of the exposition, the significance and timeliness of potential applications. Empirical and Experimental Research: in the tradition of the natural and social sciences (such as landscape ecology and environmental psychology) this type of inquiry is based on observation of natural and/or social processes at work at a particular place, leading to conclusions that can be applied in the design or management of that place or other places. Evaluation of this type of inquiry considers the validity of the observations and conclusions, the clarity of the exposition, and the potential of the research to lead out significant improvement in design or management. Technological and Methodological Development: in the tradition of the environmental design and historic preservation professions, this type of inquiry requires a critical analysis of existing technologies or methodologies in these fields, leading to the development and evaluation of alternatives. Evaluation of this type of inquiry considers the depth and range of the analysis. The effectiveness of the alternatives proposed and the clarity of the exposition.
EDHI 8300The Law and Higher EducationThe legal aspects of higher education through pertinent court decisions affecting the administration of the institution, faculty, staff, and students.To demystify the law and help the student: to understand the legal problems and implications that surround higher education; to understand the current law concerning these legal problems and implications; to be acquainted with appropriate legal resources and reference materials and significant court decisions affecting higher education; to think, speak and write confidently about legal issues in higher education.The course syllabus provides a general plan for the course; deviations may be necessary Legal basis for public higher education • the legal hierarchy • sources of higher education law • function, structure, and powers of the judiciary • the common law • state control of education • state action • constitutional limitations on state power • legal basis for private higher education • governing boards Legal research on the Internet for non-lawyers (guest speaker) • discussion of articles and abstracts • discussion of cases Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia • historical overview • organization and governance • regents policy vis-a-vis institutional policy • current issues and priorities • discussion of articles and abstracts • discussion of cases Administrative law in a nutshell • discussion of articles and abstracts • discussion of cases Students • rights, responsibilities, and obligations of students • contract theory • in loco parentis • due process • freedom of speech, expression, and assembly • student organizations • activity fees • freedom of the press - and campus publications Legal affairs at the University of Georgia (guest speakers) • affirmative action • fraternity hazing • sexual harassment policy • other • discussion of articles and abstracts • discussion of cases Students (Cont.) • academic affairs • academic dishonesty • student housing • athletics Students (Cont.) • search and seizure • equal protection • dress and appearance regulations • out-of-state tuition • admissions Mediation and alternative dispute resolution • class exercise • discussion of articles and abstracts • discussion of cases Faculty and Staff • academic freedom • loyalty oaths • contracts • tenure vs non-tenure • non-renewal and dismissal • collective bargaining Tort Liability • definition • negligence • defamation • governmental immunity • proprietary functions • liability insurance • liability of faculty, staff, and administrators Civil rights liability • definition •
EDHI 8500Outreach and Public Service in the UniversityA survey of the public service, outreach, engagement, and extension dimensions of the United States university. It focuses on the conceptions that undergird the idea of public service and on various dimensions of the public service mission.1. to provide students with an understanding of the historical background and origins of public service and outreach in the modern U.S.university; 2. to have students review, critique, and become conversant with the literature related to the subject; 3. to have students discover the bibliographical "gaps" within this literature which offer scholarly opportunity for the future; 4. to have students learn various organizational models for conducting public service in the modern university; 5. to have students learn various funding models for the support of the public service mission within the university; 6. to have students become thoroughly conversant with a single public service program in a university including its rationale program objectives, funding model, faculty expertise, organizational structure, and evaluation; 7. to have students gain an understanding of the public service culture within the university and its potential conflict with the overarching culture of the research university; 8. to have students complete the course with the ability to articulate and define clearly outreach and public service in the modern university from an historical perspective through to its modern manifestations.Course topics addressed in detail will include, but may not be limited to, the following: 1. Definitions of terms and historical background - This concentration of the course will examine the meaning of public service in the U.S. college and university as manifested in such terms as outreach, extension, service, engagement and other terms. The historical basis for these concepts and their incorporation into the tripartite mission of the modern, comprehensive institution as the third element in that mission will be analyzed through assigned readings and the "oral histories" of faculty who have participated in such activities. Sample questions addressed will be: Is all applied research outreach? Are university clinical activities outreach? Are university profit centers outreach? 2. The land-grant concept - From the historical background, a detailed examination of the legislation (Morrill Act)that led to the land-grant college will be conducted. The philosophical underpinnings of the concept, democratic access and utilitarianism, will be explored to help students understand the modern political pressures on universities to be attuned to matters of "economic development" that hinge on concepts of a "relevant" curriculum which leads to an employed workforce in the minds of many politicians. 3. Agriculture and Cooperative Extension To understand outreach and public service in the modern university requires a full understanding of the role of Cooperative Extension and the "appropriation" of the term "extension." Related to this will be for the student to see the relationship among funding agencies at the local, state, and federal levels. This background will provide understanding for why politicians and ordinary citizens expect "services" from "their" colleges and universities. This will be contrasted with the classical approach of the European university. 4. University public service and government - This topic will explore the relationship between academic technical assistance and local and state governments. 5. Economic development, community development, technology transfer - The focus of this thematic concentration will be to examine relationships of the university to society in transfering the benefits of applied and basic research to applied formats in society. This will include incubator programs and their ability to enhance entrepreneurial initiatives and to stimulate small business development, as well as those projects which have more sweeping applications. Also included will be examples of international outreach and the benefits which can accrue from these activities to advance democratic principles while offering opportunities for economic improvement and educational development. 6. Continuing education in the modern university - This manifestation of outreach and service will be examined as to philosophy in a lifelong learning society as well as internal university issues related to mission, funding, and organizational structure. 7. The faculty and public service: qualifications, evaluation, career path, and university culture - This topic seeks to outline issues related to the faculty reward system, faculty preparation for service assignments, faculty career paths, and the impact of the research university's culture on fulfiling the service mission. 8. Financial and Budgetary Issues Related to Public Service Funding strategies, practices, and models for the future will be examined with an eye to how one "pays for" the service mission when formulas won't work and dollars aren't attracted, as with research. What degree of self support must/should be employed? What are the accountability measures that can and should be employed? 9. Scholarship in the field of university outreach and public service - The approach to this topic will be to help the student examine outlets for scholarly writing in the arena of outreach and public service while also exploring areas for research and study in the field of outreach and public service.
EDHI 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.In EDHI 9300, a student is in the final stages of dissertation research (e.g., data analysis, interpretation, and writing the dissertation). The major professor directs this phase in consultation with the student's doctoral advisory committee.EDHI 9300 is a directed study between a doctoral student admitted to candidacy and his/her major professor. Because of the independent study format, a course outline is not available.
EDHI 9400Comparative Higher EducationHigher education systems and institutions outside North America.This course surveys higher education outside the United States. We will read widely and gather sources that pertain to higher education in specific nations and illuminate themes that cut across national and regional boundaries. During the course, we will meet together once weekly according to the semester schedule. During these sessions, we will discuss readings ( both readings-in-common and assigned readings) and distribute for discussion brief papers that each of you will write dealing with higher education in a specific country. Each paper will be approximately five pages in length and should provide an overview of the structure and key issues pertaining to contemporary higher education in that country. Specific guidance concerning the papers will be given in class and to individual students. Each student will also meet with the instructor five times during the semester for a tutorial session in which we will discuss your research, your papers and your reading as it pertains to areas of individual interest. I ask that you provide a draft of each assigned paper to me twenty-four hours before the scheduled tutorial so that you and I may review it before distribution to the entire class. In order to enrich the class, we will have a few visitors who have taught or studied in universities abroad. The dates for these appearances will be announced later in the semester. We will use a variety of sources in our studies. Our core text will be Comparative Education, edited by Ken Kempner et al. It is available in the University book store. We will also rely heavily upon Philip G. Altbach, ed., International Higher Education: An Encyclopedia (New York: Garland, 1991) which is located in the main reference section of the Main Library and in the library of the Institute of Higher Education. In addition to other scholarly sources included in this syllabus, consult Professor Altbach's excellent reading list for his course in global and comparative systems of higher education located at the web site of the Center for International Higher Education, Boston College. Since the course concentrates heavily on current issues and trends, we will regularly read journalistic accounts. The best American source for these is The Chronicle of Higher Education which publishes weekly reports concerning higher education abroad. Back issues of the Chronicle are available electronically to subscribers and on microfilm at the Main Library. From time to time, we will also consult The Times Higher Education Supplement, available in the Main Library. Many other contemporary accounts concerning universities and higher education abroad are published in newspapers in the United States and elsewhere and can also be accessed electronically. The World Wide Web contains a profusion of sources pertaining to individual universities outside the United States. These are easily accessed through most search engines. The material contained in these websites (maps, illustrations, and text) tells us much about contemporary universities abroad. There are numerous bibliographies dealing with comparative and international higher education. Strong bibliographies are found at the end of volume two of International Higher Education: An Encyclopedia. Professor Altbach has also edited numerous book length bibliographies on the subject.Comparing What? Introduction to the course Assignment of first papers Schedule first tutorial. Common reading: Kempner, pp. 3-62. Harold Perkin, "History of Universities," in Altbach, International Higher Education: An Encyclopedia, 169-204. Edward Shils, "Academic Freedom," in Altbach, International Higher Education: An Encyclopedia, 1-22. Assigned Reading: Materials drawn from WWW and articles from contemporary sources (newspaper and periodical articles). Western and Eastern Europe (Part I) 1. Tutorial (by appointment) 2. Distribute paper #1 to class. Common reading: Kempner, pp. 433-67. Philip G. Altbach, "The Academic Profession," in International Higher Education: An Encyclopedia, 23-45. Gary Rhoads, "Graduate Education," in International Higher Education: An Encyclopedia, 127-46. Joseph Ben-David, Centers of Learning: Britain, France, Germany, United States (New Brunswick, N.J.: 1992). On reserve, Main Library. 1977 edition also on reserve. John L. Davies, "New Universities: Their Origins and Strategic Development," in Altbach, International Higher Education: An Encyclopedia: 205-231. Ulreich Teichler, "Western Europe," in Altbach, 607-642. Assigned reading: Articles dealing with individual nations as previously assigned; newspaper articles and materials from the WWW. Western and Eastern Europe (Part II) 1. Tutorial (by appointment) 2. Distribute paper #2 to class Common reading: Kempner, 63-77. Christopher Fuhr, "The German University--Basically Healthy or Rotten? Reflections on an Overdue Reorientation of German Higher-Education Policy," European Education (Winter 1993): 41-51. Ian Baillie, "Higher Education in Eastern Germany--Some Personal Impressions," Higher Education Review 26(Autumn 1993): 48-53. T.O. Eismon et al, "Higher Education Reform in Romania," Higher Education 30 (September 1995): 135-152. Materials on Carpathian universities; supplied by instructor. Assigned Reading Articles dealing with individual countries as previously assigned; materials from newspapers and WWW. Latin America and Canada 1. Tutorial (by appointment) 2. Disribute paper #3 to class. Common reading: Kempner, pp. 176-90; 236-43; 255-82; 309-315;409-421;478-503. Rollin Kent, "Higher Education in Mexico: From Unregulated Expansion to Evaluation," Higher Education 25(1993): 73-83. David E. Lorey, "Universities, Public Policy and Economic Development in Latin America: the Cases of Mexico and Venezuela," Higher Education 23(1992): 65-78. Michael L. Skolnik, "Canada," in Altbach, International Higher Education: An Encyclopedia: 1067-1080. Assigned Reading: Materials drawn from the WWW and articles from contemporary sources (newspapers and periodicals). Asia and Australia 1. Tutorial (by appointment) 2. Distribute paper #4 to class. Common reading: Kempner, pp. 163-175; 214-226;384-408;422-432;504- . Wing-Wah Law, "Fortress State, Cultural Continuities and Economic Change: Higher Education in Mainland China and Taiwan," Comparative Education (November 1996): 377-394. Neil Johnson, "Managing Australia's Higher Education Institutions in an Era of Change," Higher Education Review 26(Autumn 1993): 7-24. Shen Chenru and Zhang Shaozong, "Impact of Opening Up and Reform on University Science and Technology Education in China," Impact of Science on Society (No. 164): 367-376. Assigned Reading: Articles dealing with Asia and Australia as previously assigned; materials from WWW and newspapers. Africa and the Middle East 1. Tutorial (by appointment) 2. Distribute last paper to class. Common reading: Kempner, pp. 156-62; 468-77. John Davies, "The State and South African University System under Apartheid," Comparative Education 32(November 1996): 319-332. Thomas O. Eisemon and Charles H. Davis, "University Research and Scientific Capacity in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia," in International Higher Education: An Encyclopedia: 275-296. Fred M. Hayward, "The Changing African Landscape: Implications for Higher Education," Educational Record 272(Fall 1991): 34-39. John A. Nkinyangi, "Student Protests in Sub-Saharan Africa," Higher Education 22 (September 1991): 157-174. Assigned Reading: Articles dealing with Africa and the Middle East as assigned. Materials from newspapers and the WWW.
EDHI(HIST) 8000History of American Higher EducationDevelopment and scope of American higher education.1)To acquire a good knowledge of the history of American higher education. 2)To relate that knowledge to contemporary concerns. 3)To acquire skills that are useful to research and writing in higher education and history.The course will be conducted as a topics seminar with students taking active parts. Each session will focus upon discussion and analysis of assigned reading or upon research problems. From time to time, brief supplementary lectures will be given and documentary readings supplied. A substantial portion of the course will be devoted to the research and writing of the paper.
EDIT 4160Design and Development ToolsStudents learn a variety of tools appropriate for computer-based development. These include graphics, media, and software development tools. Students are required to write a contract for the specific tools to be learned.Use a variety of computer-based development tools: Prerequisite Tools _Word processing _Spreadsheets _Database Browsers (Web) Examples of Tools that Students Can Contract to Learn _Graphics _Virtual Reality Development _Media digitizing _Video production _Audio production _Animation _Photography _Modeling _Programming Languages _Authoring Requirements 1 Graphic Tool 2 authoring tools 1 media capture tool Total Tool set will be 6 tools with which the student can demonstrate competency A sample contract is attached. Sample Contract I will demonstrate proficiency with Assymetric's Toolbook by completing step-by-step assignments in Hall's "Utilizing Multimedia Toolbook 3.0." In addition, I will show competence by applying these skills to a project initiated by Bruce Smith, a doctoral student in the department, entitled, "Middle School Classroom Management for Pre-service Teachers: A Simulation." I will demonstrate proficiency with Adobe's PhotoShop for Windows by completing step-by-step assignments in the Adobe PhotoShop tutorial included with the software. In addition, I will show competence by applying these skills to image processing requirements in my work with the "Middle School Classroom Management for Pre-service Teachers: A Simulation" Project. I will demonstrate proficiency with Video It Capture Software by using this software to capture images in my work with the "Middle School Classroom Management for Pre-service Teachers: A Simulation" Project. I will demonstrate proficiency with Audio Capture by using this software to capture audio clips and including them in my work with the "Middle School Classroom Management for Pre-service Teachers: A Simuilation" Project. I will demonstrate proficiency with Video Taping by working with Dr. Schrum's mini unit on Video Tape shooting and editing for educational application. I will apply this knowledge by working with Dr. King on a video project he is doing with the Marine Institute on Sapelo Island.I. Tool Skill Development A. Presentation software skill development 1. Learn tools like Photoshop 2. Demonstrate Proficiency B. Authoring software skill development 1. Learn tools like Flash 2. Demonstrate Proficiency II. Apply Knowledge and Skills A. Design and develop a personally Meaningful computer-based product B. Demonstrate product in the showcase III. Apply Knowledge and Skills as Service Learning A. Apply technical knowledge skills in a service fashion B. Provide 10 hours of service IV. Learn design concepts A. General Design Concepts B. Visual Design Concepts C. Personal Design Concepts
EDIT 4170/6170Instructional DesignSystematic procedures for designing, developing, evaluating, and revising instruction to meet identified goals and objectives. At the end of the course, participants will be able to: 1. demonstrate an understanding of the instructional design and development process. 2. demonstrate the following competencies in the completion of an instructional development project: a) identify an instructional problem; b) plan and implement an instructional needs assessment; c) analyze learner, task, and situational characteristics; d) specify terminal and enabling learning objectives; e) prepare macro-instructional designs using instructional curriculum maps; f) prepare micro-instructional designs via the events of instruction; g) select appropriate instructional strategies; h) select appropriate instructional media; i) construct a prototype; j) prepare appropriate assessment/testing instruments and procedures; k) plan and conduct formative evaluations; l) plan and conduct a field test of the prototype; m) specify revisions resulting from field test. 3. compare and contrast various instructional design perspectives and philosophies. Introduction to the systems approach to instructional design (objs. 1 and 3) Instructional congruency Macro- vs. micro-instructional design Constructivism and instructional design Instructional analysis: Learning context (situation) (objs. 2a and 2b) Describing the learning environment Determining resources and constraints Instructional analysis: Learner (obj. 2c) Learner characteristics Similarities and differences among learners from different cultures Prior learning Instructional analysis: Task (objs. 2c, 2d, 2e) Identifying instructional goals Identifying learning outcomes Learning hierarchies Elaboration theory Developing and writing instructional objectives (obj. 2d) Designing and developing assessment measures (obj. 2j) Designing and developing instructional strategies (objs. 2f and 2g) Events of instruction ARCS Model of motivational instructional design Designing education and training for cross-cultural settings Production of instruction (objs. 2h and 2i) Formative and summative evaluation (obj. 2k, 2l, 2m) Rapid prototyping Diffusion, dissemination, and implementation
EDIT 4500/6500Educational Television ProductionDesign, production, and use of digital and analog video. Laboratory experiences with studio and portable cameras; editing and other equipment suitable for school use. 1. Student will analyze communications and instructional needs; determine elements most appropriate to motion display and the associated advantages offered by video. 2. Student will be able to operate the portable and studio cameras, recorder-playback units, studio special effects generator, and the electronic editor. 3. Student will be able to describe and hookup proper connections between cameras, recorders, monitors, and other devices used in class demonstrations and laboratory practice. 4. Working in teams, the student will plan a 10 -15 minute instructional lesson for single camera assembly production. Group will write shooting script and narrative. 5. Working in teams, the student will plan and prepare needed graphics and titles for both single camera productions and revise visuals as needed for multiple-camera studio production. 6. Working in teams, the student will successfully tape the scripted lesson using camera assembly production techniques. 7. Working in teams, the student will successfully place an audio dub of the planned narration and music background on the camera assembly production tape. 8. Working in teams, the student will successfully transfer planned single camera production over to a multiple-camera studio production making use of the special effects generator capabilities. 9. Working in teams, the student will plan a second 10 -15 minute instructional lesson designed for single camera production but utilizing electronic editing techniques. 10. Working in teams, the student will successfully script, shoot, electronically edit, and audio dub their final production. 11. Student will critically analyze finished class productions and discuss their strengths and weaknesses.I. Introduction to Instructional Television A. History B. Purpopses C. Media literacy II. Basic TV equipment A. Studio cameras B. Lighting C. Staging III. Principles of TV Equipment A. Key definitions B. Implications IV. Production Planning and scripting A. Audience Analysis B. Reading Scripts C. Writing Scripts V. TV Graphics VI. Production Laboratory VII. TV Audio techniques VIII.Studio TV Production IX. Editing - Analog and Digital A. Planning Edited Production B. Production Laboratory XI. Evaluation
EDIT 6190Design and Development ToolsStudents learn a variety of tools appropriate for computer-based development. These include graphics, media, and software development tools. Students are required to write a contract for the specific tools to be learned.Learn to use a variety of computer-based development tools: _Prerequisite Tools _Word processing _Spreadsheets _Database Browsers (Web) Examples of Tools that Students Can Contract to Learn _Graphics _Virtual Reality Development _Media digitizing _Video production _Audio production _Animation _Photography _Modeling _Programming Languages _Authoring Requirements 1 Graphic Tool 2 authoring tools 1 media capture tool Total Tool set will be 6 tools with which the student can demonstrate competency A sample contract is attached. Sample Contract I will demonstrate proficiency with Assymetric1s Toolbook by completing step-by-step assignments in Hall1s 3Utilizing Multimedia Toolbook 3.0.2 In addition, I will show competence by applying these skills to a project initiated by Bruce Smith, a doctoral student in the department, entitled, 3Middle School Classroom Management for Pre-service Teachers: A Simuilation.2 I will demonstrate proficiency with Adobe1s PhotoShop for Windows by completing step-by-step assignments in the Adobe PhotoShop tutorial included with the software. In addition, I will show competence by applying these skills to image processing requirements in my work with the 3Middle School Classroom Management for Pre-service Teachers: A Simuilation2 Project. I will demonstrate proficiency with Video It Capture Software by using this software to capture images in my work with the 3Middle School Classroom Management for Pre-service Teachers: A Simuilation2 Project. I will demonstrate proficiency with Audio Capture by using this software to capture audio clips and including them in my work with the 3Middle School Classroom Management for Pre-service Teachers: A Simuilation2 Project. I will demonstrate proficiency with Video Taping by working with Dr. Schrum1s mini unit on Video Tape shooting and editing for educational application. I will apply this knowledge by working with Dr. King on a video project he is doing with the Marine Institute on Sapelo Island.I. Tool Skill Development A. Presentation software skill development 1. Learn tools like Photoshop 2. Demonstrate Proficiency B. Authoring software skill development 1. Learn tools like Flash 2. Demonstrate Proficiency II. Apply Knowledge and Skills A. Design and develop a personally Meaningful computer-based product B. Demonstrate product in the showcase III. Apply Knowledge and Skills as Service Learning A. Apply technical knowledge skills in a service fashion B. Provide 10 hours of service IV. Learn design concepts A. General Design Concepts B. Visual Design Concepts C. Personal Design Concepts
EDIT 6320Information TechnologyEffective utilization, integration, and management of technology tools within the curriculum, with emphasis on planning, needs assessment, and organizational structure. EDIT 6320 Information Technology Course goal: This course is designed to provide the student with the theory and tools to prepare a technology plan that is responsive to community and school needs for computer, library and classroom technologies that facilitate teaching and learning. Course objectives: 1.The student will demonstrate the assessment of community and school information needs. 2.The student will create a curriculum map of the school's major curriculum units to include such information as text or resource-based, student assessment product types (e.g.,test, project, report), fact or concept emphasis, major teaching pedagogy used, QCCs emphasized, technology tools used. 3.The student will apply information from the community and school assessment to the choice, evaluation, and justification of classroom and information technologies to meet teaching and student learning needs.This course is taught as an asynchronous online course depending on community building through the WebCT bulletin board and chat room tools. We will be creating a technology plan for a school of your choosing. 1.Brainstorm and collect information on the community where your school is located. Write this date into report form for inclusion in your technology report. Readers of your technology plan will refer to this report for demographic information to understand the school setting. 2.Devise a technology needs assessment instrument that you could use for teachers, administrators, students, and parents. Include these instruments in the appendix of your technology plan. The needs assessment instruments should reflect some of what you have learned about the community and its perspective of the importance of technology in its schools. 3. Create a curriculum map of your school to find out what are each month's main units for each teacher.
EDIT 7320Research in School Media ServicesIdentifies contemporary problems in the field of school media services around which students design appropriate research studies.Goal: To provide the students with a research foundation needed for completing their specialist project. Objectives: The learner will be able to: 1. Identify and narrow the focus for a researchable project 2. Identify techniques and methodologies applicable to the learner's choice of project 3. Develop and present a satisfactory proposal for completion of the project 4. Analyze and discuss at least one case study of a learner from an ethnically different background Topics: What is a researchable problem? Narrowing a topic Preliminary exploration of topic Writing the proposal Using the literature Selecting search terms Selecting multicultural resources and databases Trial and error method Summarizing and evaluating search strategies Appropriate methodology Quantitative Qualitative Combinations Finding and using examples Instrumentation What is a good instrument? Does it help answer the question? Piloting the instrument Writing the first draft Organizing the content Selecting a bibliographic style Final product Paper Presentation Combination Evaluating the process Assignments: Identify and critique an action research study in the area of student interest citing implications for the proposed research project. Investigate methodologies for action research, qualitative research, and quantitative research problem-solving. Create and present a satisfactory research proposal to three members of the faculty. Identify and present findings from case study of an ethnically different learner.What is a researchable problem? --Narrowing a topic --Preliminary exploration of topic --Writing the proposal Using the literature --Selecting search terms --Selecting multicultural resources and databases --Trial and error method --Summarizing and evaluating search strategies Appropriate methodology --Quantitative --Qualitative --Combinations --Finding and using examples Instrumentation --What is a good instrument? --Does it help answer the question? Piloting the instrument Writing the first draft --Organizing the content --Selecting a bibliographic style Final product --Paper --Presentation --Combination Evaluating the process
EDIT 7340Issues in School Media ProgramsExplores contemporary trends, problem areas, and issues in management of school media programs through literature investigations, seminar discussions, and case studies.Goal: To identify trends, issues, and problem areas in schools and school media services and relate these to the area of curriculum development for student learning. Implied in this course is the development of professional leadership skills. Objectives: The learner will be able to: 1. Explore the current research and professional literature for contemporary trends, issues, and problems. 2. Analyze findings for discussion, suggest avenues for solutions, and make recommendations for curriculum improvement. 3. Offer alternative media program functions that meet multicultural and diverse curricular trends. 4. Suggest professional development that reflect the current trends and concerns within the curriculum. Topics: Identifying trends and issues How do you know it's a trend? Analyzing the literature Significance of professional development Areas for investigation Curriculum The profession Societal influences Legal and legislative concerns The need for research Assignments: Read and critique selections from the literature Present formal analyses of key ideas from selected readings Write a critical analysis paper of a trend Design a professional development plan Design an alternative media program component that meets needs of diverse student body and school communityIdentifying trends and issues --How do you know it's a trend? Analyzing the literature Significance of professional development Areas for investigation --Curriculum --The profession --Societal influences --Legal and legislative concerns The need for research
EDIT 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.The purpose of this course is to give doctoral students the opportunity to engage in independent research that will lead to the completion of a successful dissertation. The research is supervised by the student's major professor, with additional support provided by the other members of the student's dissertation committee.The purpose of this course is to give doctoral students the opportunity to engage in independent research that will lead to the completion of a successful dissertation. The research is supervised by the student's major professor, with additional support provided by the other members of the student's dissertation committee.
EDIT 9990Doctoral Topical SeminarExamination of topical issues in instructional technology. 1. Acquire in-depth knowledge on a topic of general interest to the field. 2. Read and write about a topic of general interest to the field. 3. Explore topics of general interest to the doctoral students in the department under the direction of a faculty member. Topical Outline - This will vary since topics will change from semester to semester.
EDMS 7650Literature Review in Middle School EducationPreparation of a literature review on a topic related to middle school education.Students will develop skills in reviewing early childhood and middle school education research. Students will prepare a literature review in an area of interest to them.Purposes and Components of a Literature Review Organizing, Writing, and Revising A Literature Review
EDMS 8990Research Seminar in Middle School EducationSeminars on topics related to middle school education.Students will understand professional issues and topics related to pursuing a doctorate in education. Students will understand the policies and procedures for structuring their doctoral program in education. Students will be introduced to the fundamental issues and processes in the development, writing, and presentation of original research in education. Students will understand the issues and procedures involved in the conceptualization, design, and development of a doctoral dissertation.Professional Issues Doctoral Programs in the Elementary Education Department Professional Educational Research The Doctoral Dissertation
EDMS 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.Prepare dissertationDoctoral candidate will prepare dissertation under the direction of major professor and advisory committee.
EDMS 9630Critique of Literature in Middle School EducationInterpretation and evaluation of research and theoretical writing in middle school education.Students will be able to write an integrated review of research.Identify sources; critique research; write literature review
EDMS(EDEC)(QUAL) 7500Action ResearchAction research and participatory action research across diverse contexts. The course includes a consideration of history and definitions of action research and participatory action research, and an analysis of their purposes, processes, and theoretical foundations. Students will engage in practitioner-based research strategies such as observations, interviewing, and document analysis.Examine the historical and philosophical issues underlying teacher action research. Analyze the purposes and methods of conducting teacher action research by discussing pertinent articles. Design and implement a teacher action research study based on questions raised by each participant in the class. Examine the problems involved in teachers doing research in their own classrooms and schools, by keeping a research journal and responding to other students' presentation of their research results.Participants' conceptions of action research; history of action research and teachers' involvement in research; examples of teachers reporting their research studies; asking research questions and designing a teacher action research study; doing school-wide research; students and action research; presenting and writing up what we learn from action research
EDUC 6000Classroom-Based ResearchStudents will investigate professional teaching standards to guide their classroom inquiries as they assemble tools, strategies, and methodologies for classroom-based research. The course is designed to encourage experienced teachers to articulate theories upon which their practice is based, critique those theories, and prepare for advanced graduate degree programs. Students must be practicing teachers when they take this course.a. To identify and examine local/state/national standards for professional development of teachers. b. To design action research plans based on professional development standards. c. To identify and use research tools and methodologies to carry out classroom-based inquiries. d. To practice different strategies of writing up data. e. To produce visual representation of data as a means of communicating student achievement to stakeholders.a. Professional development standards b. Grounded and a priority theory c. Research questions d. Data sources e. Teacher research as professional development f. Assessment g. Action research methods h. Writing strategies
EDUC 6010Documenting Effective TeachingFocusing on real classroom inquiries about pupils' academic learning, teachers develop and document individualized professional development plans based on national standards. Requires 3 years teaching experience. Students must be practicing teachers when they take this course.a. To confront teachers' unexamined working theories about teaching and learning. b. To base teacher research plans on professional development standards. c. To cultivate professional development of experienced teachers through assessment and reflection on data directly connected to their pupils' learning needs. d. To provide experienced teachers with sustained one-to-one and small group support within a professional learning community in order to implement and document their action research plans. e. To teach novice teacher researchers effective strategies for writing up qualitative and quantitative data. f. To construct a standards-based professional teaching portfolio based on action research plans carried out in classroom contexts.a. Standards-based professional development b. Grounded and a priority theory c. Culturally appropriate teaching d. Classroom-based, student-involved assessment practices e. Writing critically about teaching practices and teacher research f. Peer Coaching and Critical Friends processes and strategies g. Professional learning communities as sites for construction of new knowledge
EDUL 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.
EDUL 8140Schools as a Social SystemSchools viewed as one social system within the matrices of other social systems.To demonstrate application of knowledge to one's local social systems regarding: .theoretical perspectives of social systems; .boundaries; .inputs including values and norms from individuals (e.g., students, teachers, administrators, support personnel) and community groups--both school oriented and other interest groups; .subsystems; .outputs including those for students, faculty, and the community; .feedback loops--both internal and external; .external social systems. To demonstrate critical thinking skills in class, in oral report, and in written materials. To write abstracts, papers, and written products from special projects in clear, concise, meaningful ways. To present an oral report on the abstracts read or on one's special project. To consider the perspective of multi-cultural education as an integral part of quality educational programming. To incorporate technology application into the completion of course requirements. To investigate one issue in the area of local social systems in depth. To describe one's social system(s)in the local school situation.Introduction, Social System Description, Interpersonal Style, WHW Exercise; ISLLC Standards/Regents' Expectations; Social Systems: Theoretical Perspectives; Units Boundaries, Inputs; Leadership Paradigm; Social Systems: Outputs; Scenarios 1,2, & 3 Procedures/Examples; Change Agentry Social Systems: Subsystems Social Systems: Feedback Loops; External Social Systems External Speakers: Practical Application: Principal/Assistant Principal/Superintendent Behaviors/Communication
EDUL 8410Administration and Supervision of Special EducationThe needs of exceptional children with particular emphasis on planning and implementing comprehensive special education programs, including a supervised field experience.To demonstrate knowledge and application of: .overview and history of special education administration and supervision. .groups and roles in special education and related areas. .SST, due process, eligibility decisions, placement decisions, and paperwork processing procedures in special education. .formal and informal sources of control, power, and influence in special education leadership and human resources management and instructional leadership. .program evaluation. .QBE certification, and other state processes. To analyze the srengths and weaknesses of special education organizational charts and depict one's own. To demonstrate application of the change process. To compute earnings from QBE and to develop budgets based on needs and QBE earnings. To investigate one issue in special education leadership/ administration/supervision in depth by producing abstracts on ten articles/chapters or by completing a special project. To state one's philosophy/vision/theoretical base of leadership/ administration/supervision. To consider the perspective of multi-cultural education as an integral part of special education. To incorporate technology applications into the completion of course requirements. To write abstracts and, papers, and other products (e.g., special projects) in clear, concise, meaningful ways. To present an oral report on the abstracts one reads or in one's special project. To apply new knowledge and skills to real world situations in special education in collaboration with a special education leader.Individual Study by Assignment Introduction; Paradigms; Leadership Styles; OEA Data Leadership Approaches; Roles-General Education/Special Education A Plus Education Reform Act; State Rules; IDEA (1997) Overview/History; Theoretical Bases; Groups/Roles The Change Process Formal Sources of Control, Power, & Influence Collaborative Leadership Development, Part I. Leadership and Human Resource Management; Instructional Leadership Budget Preparation and Use Collaborative Leadership Development, Part II Program Evaluation Future Directions Philosophy/Vision Statement; Shadowing
EDUL 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
EDUL 9630Critique of the Literature in Educational LeadershipCritical interpretation and evaluation of research and theoretical writing in the field of educational leadership.To apply research analysis skills (research design, statistics, interpretation of results; qualitative analysis) to selected research studies on aspects/components specified in the A Plus Education Reform Act of 2000. To identify effective/ineffective practices based on research for consideration in assisting in the implementation of specific aspects/components of the A Plus Act in local schools (elementary/middle/secondary). To develop an action research plan to evaluate the impact of the selected effective practices in implementing the specific parts of A Plus legislation. To participate in a cooperative learning approach with other doctoral students toward building a community of learners. To demonstrate critical thinking skills in class, in oral report, and in written materials. To write abstracts, papers, and other products in clear, concise, meaningful ways. To present an oral report on the abstracts one read or on one's special project. To consider the perspective of multi-cultured education as an integral part of quality educational programming. To incorporate technology applications into the completion of course requirements.Introduction; Paradigms; WHW Article A Plus Education Reform Act 2000; Needs Assessment Research Design; Statistics Interpretation of Results Statistics; Discussion of Initial Findings Applications to Dissertation Research Topics Based on Student Needs Oral Report Simulation
EFND 7040History of Education in the United StatesExamination of changing forms, philosophical orientations, and operations of education in the United States from its colonial origins to the present. Includes consideration of both formal and informal education, though the emphasis is on formal institutions. Encompasses education from early childhood through various forms of adult education, and education of majority and minority populations.1. Surveying the rang of formal and informal means to gain literacy and other social and economic skills available to learn of all ages in the U.S.; 2. Becoming acquainted with the major educational ideas, movements, practices, and leaders in U.S. education; 3. Evaluating alternative ideas, dissident and unsuccessful movements, alternate practices, and lesser know or silenced leaders in the effort to educate in the U.S.; 4. Examining the political, economic, and social contexts in which formal and informal education grew, withered, or changed; 5. Comparing the educational opportunities afforded groups according to their social class, gender, race and ethnicities; 6. Clarifying the relationship between unequal educations and unequal social power; 7.Examining the impacts of evolving forms of schooling on families, communities, and more informal means of learning; 8. Articulating a historically and ethically grounded vision of contemporary educational possibilities; 9. Extending skills in historical analysis and writing.I. Education in Colonial America A. Regional variations in formal and informal systems B. Men, women, Native Americans, and African Americans C. Families, Communities, churches and work-place II. Educational ideas in the age of revolution A. Education in Enlightenment and republican thought B. Change and continuity in Revolutionary and Early National U.S. Education III. Age of the Common School A. Northern and western development 1. From district schools to common schools 2. Urbanization, industrialization, and formal education 3. Spread and decline of academies 4. Changing patterns of adult and informal education 5. Changing patters of women's, Native American, and Black education B. Southern developments 1. Ambivalence toward the common school idea 2. King Cotton, Civil War, Reconstruction, and formal education 3. Spread and decline of academies 4. Adult and informal education 5. Education in the slave quarters, in free black communities, and in freedom 6. Women's education IV. The transformation of the school: Progressive Education, 1890s to 1950s A. Social, political, and economic roots of Progressive education 1. Progressive education and the Progressive movement 2. The meanings of Progressive Education: contradiction and confusion 3. The second industrial revolution B. Expansion of secondary education C. Curricular expansion and differentiation D. Mass culture and education E. Movements: 1. Vocational education 2. Intercultural Education Movement 3. Social Reconstructionism 4. Life Adjustment Education 5. Consolidation 6. Rural Life Education 7. Attack on segregated education 8. Workers' college movement ETC. V. Post-Progressive Education A. Social, political, and economic roots of Post-Progressive education 1. Post-Progressivism and the collapse of corporate liberalism 2. Cold War 3. Third industrial revolution B. Expansion of higher education C. Desegregation and resegregation D. Student movements E. Perpetual crisis, perpetual reform 1. The early attack on Progressive education 2. The romantic reformers 3. Career and other forms of vocational education 4. "A Nation at Risk" 5. The "manufacture crisis" and the internal logic of Post-Progressivism VI. The contemporary scene
EFND 7110Race, Class, and EducationResearch and practice variations that impact individuals socially; constructed interactions, meaning and conceptions of racial and ethnic groups in United States society and social institutions. Topics include the historical, sociocultural, and schooling influences that inform and shape race, class, and schooling dynamics.Students will: 1.Analyze the evolution of American racial attitudes and their impact upon Black education. 2. Demonstrate familiarity with the most important historical literature on African- American education, ranging from the classic works of W.E.B. DuBoise, Horace Mann Bond, and Carter G. Woodson, to the latest scholarship. 3. Assess this literature and the major debates concerning African-American history and education, a skill to be learned through writing a series of critical book reviews on assigned authors. 4. Study and assess the political, legal, and intellectual foundations of the Jim Crow educational system in the South, and the discriminatory patterns in the North. 5. Compare the pre- and post-Brown struggles of African-Americans and their white allies to challenge segregation and educational inequality on both sides of the Mason-Dixon line (so as to learn the history of de facto as well as de jure discrimination). 6. Identify and analyze the major leaders and institutions responsible for promoting Black education in the U.S., as well as achievements and problems of African- American educational institutions. 7. Engage in archival research, through work on assigned research paper (requiring the use of primary sources) on the history of race relations in local educational institutions. 8. Identify, describe, and apply relevant theoretical perspectives to the examination of selected issues in race and education. 9. Examine ways that material covered in this course can help them in their work as public school teachers to teach African-American history more effectively.1. Slavery and Freedom: Introduction to African-American History and Race Relations in the U.S., 1607-1865. 2. Race, Education, and Social Change: Freedmen’s Schools and the Crusade for Black Education During Radical Reconstruction. 3. Separate and Unequal: The Rise of Jim Crow Education 4. Education for Servitude or Leadership? The DuBois-Washington Debate and African- American Higher Education. 5. Race and Gender: The Educational Experience of African-American Women. 6. Black Nationalism and African-American Education: The Black Student Revolts of the 1920s and the 1960s. 7. A New Deal for Blacks? African-American Education During the Great Depression. 8. From Plessy to Brown: The NAACP and the Struggle to Desegregate American Education. 9. Case Studies: Desegregation and Race Relations in Georgia’s Educational History. 10. Resegregation? Race and Education in the late 20th Century.
EFND 8020Seminar in History of Education in the United States to 1900Examines changes and continuities in formal and informal educational structures from the early colonial era to the beginnings of progressive education. Gives particular consideration to the social, cultural, economic, and political contexts that sustained and transformed educational structures and opportunities, and includes female, Native American, and African American education.1. Examine the range of formal and informal means to gain literacy and other social and economic skills available to learners of all ages from the colonial period to the beginnings of Progressive education at the end of the nineteenth century; 2. Become acquainted with the major educational ideas, movements, practices, and leaders in U.S. education prior to the twentieth century; 3. Evaluate alternative ideas, dissident and unsuccessful movements, alternate practices, and lesser known or silenced leaders in the effort to educate in the U.S.; 4. Examine the political, economic, and social contexts in which formal and informal education grew, withered, or changed; 5. Compare the educational opportunities afforded groups according to their social class, gender, race and ethnicities; 6. Clarify the relationship between unequal educations and unequal social power; 7. Understand the ideas regarding education held by both dominant and subordinate groups, and their efforts to act upon those competing visions; 8. Examine the impacts of evolving forms of schooling on families, communities, and more informal means of learning; 9. Articulate a historically and ethically grounded vision of contemporary educational possibilities; 10. Extend skills in historical analysis and writing.I. Pre-colonial patterns of education in America, Africa, and Europe II. Education in Colonial America A. Regional variations in formal and informal systems B. Men, women, Native Americans, and African Americans C. Families, communities, churches and work-places III. Educational ideas in the age of revolution A. Education in Enlightenment and republican thought B. Change and continuity in Revolutionary and Early National U.S. education IV. Age of the Common School A. Northern and western developments 1. From district schools to common schools 2. Urbanization, industrialization, and formal education 3. Spread and decline of academies 4. Changing patterns of adult and informal education 5. Changing patterns of women*, Native American, and Black education B. Southern developments 1. Ambivalence toward the common school ideal 2. King Cotton, Civil War, Reconstruction, and formal education 3. Spread and decline of academies 4. Adult and informal education 5. Education in the slave quarters, in free black communities, and in freedom 6. Women* education V. Roots of Progressive Education
EFND 8030Seminar in History of Twentieth-Century Education in the United StatesExamines the historical development of Progressive and post-Progressive education in the United States with particular emphasis on the economic, political, and social transformations that conditioned educational change during the century.1. Examine the changing ideas about and structures of public and private education from the demise of the Common School to the recent past; 2. Become acquainted with the major educational movements, practices, and leaders in U.S. education in the twentieth century; 3. Evaluate alternative ideas, dissident and unsuccessful movements, alternate practices, and lesser known or silenced leaders in the effort to educate in the U.S.; 4. Examine the political, economic, and social contexts in which formal and informal education grew, withered, or changed; 5. Evaluate the impacts of formalizing and bureaucratizing education upon class formation, family structures, communities, individuals, social and political theory and practice, and the idea of the educated person; 6. Compare the educational opportunities afforded groups according to their social class, gender, race and ethnicities, and their change over time; 7. Clarify the relationship between unequal educations and unequal social power; 8. Understand the ideas regarding education held by both dominant and subordinate groups, and their efforts to act upon those competing visions; 9. Deepen understandings of the current conditions of formal schooling; 10. Articulate a historically and ethically grounded vision of contemporary educational possibilities; 11. Extend skills in historical analysis and writing.The educational inheritance of the nineteenth century A. The Common School ideal and democracy B. Educational opportunities by the 1890s 1. The extent of elementary schooling 2. The condition of secondary and higher education 3. Opportunities for immigrants, Blacks, Native Americans, and women 4. Informal education II. The transformation of the school: Progressive Education, 1890s to 1950s A. Social, political, and economic roots of Progressive education 1. Progressive education and the Progressive movement 2. The meanings of Progressive Education: contradiction and confusion 3. The second industrial revolution B. Expansion of secondary education C. Curricular expansion and differentiation D. Mass culture and education E. Movements: 1. Vocational education 2. Intercultural Education Movement 3. Social Reconstructionism 4. Life Adjustment Education 5. Consolidation 6. Rural Life Education 7. Attack on segregated education 8. Workers' college movement Etc. III. Post-Progressive Education A. Social, political, and economic roots of post-Progressive education 1. Post-progressivism and the collapse of corporate liberalism 2. Cold War 3. Third industrial revolution B. Expansion of higher education C. Desegregation and resegregation D. Student movements E. Perpetual crisis, perpetual reform 1. The early attack on Progressive education 2. The romantic reformers 3. Career and other forms of vocational education 4. "A Nation at Risk" 5. The "manufactured crisis" and the internal logic of post-Progressivism IV. The contemporary scene
EFND 8040Pragmatism and EducationEducational writings of William James, Charles S. Pierce, and John Dewey.As a learner in this course you will read and reflect on major texts in pragmatism and education. At the end of the course you will 1. Specify the different ways pragmatism has been defined by philosophers and others, summarize the history and development of philosophical pragmatism, and compare and contrast with those of other philosophical traditions pragmatists’ positions on ethics, epistemology, logic, aesthetics, and metaphysics. 2. Identify the influence of pragmatism on educational thought and practice, compare and contrast pragmatism with alternative philosophies of education (including nonwestern traditions such as Africana and Native American thought), analyze the assumptions and assertions pragmatists make about education, and delineate the strengths and limitations of pragmatic views of education. 3. Recognize the major figures in pragmatism and compare and contrast their positions. 4. Analyze the influence of pragmatism on various traditions in educational scholarship, the scholarships of teaching, service, and research, especially scholarship in your area(s) of concentration. 5. Formulate ways that pragmatic thought may contribute to your own educational practice: as teacher, administrator, policy maker, and researcher.1. Definitions of pragmatism and philosophical pragmatism, and comparisons of differing uses of the term. Philosophical pragmatism, for example, includes such themes as life is continuous change and transition and that theory and practice, experience and knowledge, facts and values, are inextricably interrelated. 2. History of pragmatic thought and comparison with other traditions (western as well as such nonwestern traditions as Africana and Native American thought) 3. Pragmatism and ethics, epistemology, logic, aesthetics, and metaphysics. 4. Pragmatism and education: what education is and ought to be; what policies should guide education 5. Major historical figures: John Dewey, William James, Charles S. Pierce, Jane Addams, Louise M. Rosenblatt; current contributors: Richard Rorty, Cornell West, Charlene Haddock Siegfried, Thomas Alexander, James Garrison, Raymond Boisvert, Larry Hickman, Mark Johnson 6. Strengths and limitations of pragmatism for educational practice–teaching, administering, policy making, and researching
EFND 8060Social and Political Philosophies of EducationAnalyzes educational problems from standpoint of various social and political theories. Theorists considered are Locke, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, and Dewey. Educational problems examined include authority, curriculum, public good, social oppression, and equality. Class presentations and papers focus on application of political theory to contemporary educational issues.This course is concerned with philosophies of education. Emphasis is on those philosophies that place social and political thought at the core of education. Students in this class are expected to have a basic understanding of philosophy prior to enrollment.1. Students will cover philosophies from ancient to modern, and examine the societal and political contexts that have shaped these philosophies. 2. Students will take their knowledge of various philosophies and analyze the thinking and actions of an educational leader/thinker. 3. Students will also develop and write their own philosophy of education, which may or may not emanate from the social and political experiences that they consider influential. 4. Readings include: Aristotle, Plato, Emile Durkheim, Paulo Freire, bell hooks, John Dewey, and W.E.B. Du Bois
EFND 8070Ethics and EducationTheories of value and evaluation, ethical discourse and arguments, and other uses of ethics in educational writings.As a learner in the course, you will read and reflect on major texts in ethics and education. At the end of the course you will 1. Identify the variety of philosophical approaches to ethical decision making: utilitarianism, Kantian categorical imperatives, pragmatism, existentialism, wide reflective equilibrium, feminism, and selected nonwestern traditions (e.g., Confucianism, Buddhism, Gandhi’s ahimsa). How do these different frameworks compare and contrast? 2. Distinguish between ethical content and ethical processes, between ethical acts and ethical standards. What is the relationship among values, ethics, and morality? What makes ethics and moral decision making so central to human conduct? Explain the development of cultural and moral relativism and how they are linked to the globalization of the modern and postmodern eras. 3. Specify the variety of relationships between education and ethics. What are the influences on educational systems of the differing philosophical approaches to ethics? What is the relationship between these philosophical approaches and the bases of educational policy around the world? 4. Recognize the major thinkers in ethics and education and compare and contrast their positions. 5. Analyze how differing philosophical approaches to ethics may contribute to choices teachers make in instruction, curriculum, and classroom management and administrators make in organization, management, and supervision. 6. Formulate your own ethical premises, compare and contrast these to other approaches, and explain how they might affect your own policy preferences and instructional choices.1.Philosophical approaches to ethics: utilitarianism, Kantian categorical imperatives, pragmatism, existentialism, wide reflective equilibrium, feminism, and selected nonwestern traditions (e.g., Confucianism, Buddhism, Gandhi’s ahimsa, and Africana and Native American philosophies) 2. Ethical acts and ethical standards; moral content and moral reasoning 3. History of ethical thought and sociopolitical contexts 4. Values, ethics, and morality defined and conceptualized in a global context; the Declaration of Human Rights and other codes of moral conduct 5. Cultural and moral relativism. 6. Ethics and educational systems 7. Major thinkers in ethics and education: Plato, Mary Wollstonecraft, Emma Hart Willard, W.E.B. Du Bois, John Dewey, Emile Durkheim, Lawrence Kohlberg, Carol Gilligan, Nel Noddings, Maxine Greene 8. Contemporary ethical issues in education
EFND 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.Determined individually according to the needs and interest of student.Dependent upon objectives.
EFND(HIST) 4010/6010The Hip-Hop Mind: History, Ideology, and PedagogyExamination of the history, ideology, and pedagogy of the Hip-Hop generation (those born between 1965 and 1984). Focuses on the connections of Hip-Hop to previous social, intellectual, and pedagogical movements. The course is interactive, includes poetry reading sessions, guest lecturers, and presentations by former students of the course.1. Students will obtain a comprehensive knowledge in social theory related to Hip-Hop Studies. 2. Students will obtain skills in developing and understanding academic proposal writing for possible thesis or dissertation work related to Hip-Hop. 3. Students will develop skills and a knowledge base for writing a near publishable paper in the field of Hip-Hop Studies.I. Setting the Context of Hip-Hop as a social movement A. Blues Ideology and the Blues Tradition-Late 1800s and Early 1900s B. Art, Music, and Culture during the Harlem Renaissance-The 1920s C. The Jazz Era and Bebop, 1940s- 1960s D. Music and the Civil Rights Movement, 1954-1968 E. The Black Arts Movement, 1960s-early 1970s F. The Funk and Disco Eras, 1970s G. The Rise of Hip-Hop, 1970s to Present II. Intellectual Foundations of Socially Conscious Hip-Hop (1900-1950) A. Malcolm X B. Martin Luther King, Jr. C. Angela Davis D. Harriet Tubman E. Frantz Fanon F. Marcus Garvey G. Sonia Sanchez H. Amiri Baraka I. Gil Scot-Heron J. The Last Poets III. Time Frame of Social and Educational Ideas in Hip-Hop Music and Film A. The 1970s Blaixploitation films B. The Origins of Hip-Hop (Break dancing, Graffiti Writing, MCing, and DJing (1975-1985) C. The Golden Age of Hip-Hop Nationalism (late 1980s and early 1900s) D. Gangster Rap (mid 1980s to mid 1990s) E. Neo-Soul and Politically Conscious Hip-Hop (mid 1990s- Present) IV. A Study of Ideas in Socially and Politically Conscious Hip- Hop A. Black Self-Determination B. Black Nationalism C. Liberatory Education D. Resistance Pedagogy E. Pan-Africanism F. Economic Independence and Interdependence V. Areas of Contention in Hip-Hop A. Race and Racism B. Class and Economics C. Gender and Feminism D. Sexuality VI. Toward Hip-Hop as a Radical Pedagogy in History A. Freedom Schools B. Curricular changes in public schools C. Black Studies Programs D. Blacks in Higher Education E. Hip-Hop artists and education
EHSC 3800Environmental Health SeminarSelected topics in Environmental Health. Papers to be presented by students. 1) To learn the use of a presentation software package, such as PowerPoint. 2) To research two approved topics in Environmental Health Science and for each topic prepare and present a 10-15 minute oral presentation. 3) To write a concise, comprehensive and effective abstract for each presentation. 4) To learn how to peer review oral presentations.The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary. Course Requirements: 1) Mandatory attendance! Roll will be taken at the beginning of each class. Each absence will result in a reduction of 1 letter grade (i.e., from "A" to "B"). Excused absences will be noted only if accompanied with written documentation. Please give instructor sufficient prior notification of any excused absences. 2) Presentations: Each student will make two presentations during the quarter. Each presentation should last 10-15 minutes, followed by a 5 minute period for questions. 3) Seminar topic/preliminary outline: Each student will present 2 talks on instructor-approved topics in EHS. Students must submit their proposed seminar title and preliminary outline to the instructor a minimum of 1 week prior to the presentation for approval. 4) Required materials: a. Abstract: Seminar speakers must prepare a 200-400 word abstract (typed) and make 12 copies available to the class in the EHS office (206 EHS Bldg) by 9 AM on the morning of the seminar. b. Visual aids: The use of computer-generated visual aids is required for each presentation. Speakers should prepare slides using a presentation graphics program such as PowerPoint. During the presentation slides can be shown using the computer projection system, a slide projector, or a combination of the two media. (Note: Overhead transparencies cannot be used for entire presentations; however, occasional use of overheads within a PowerPoint or slide presentation is OK.) Each student is responsible for reserving and setting up any necessary equipment prior to his/her seminar. c. Bibliography: On the day of the presentation, each student must turn in a bibliography citing all reference materials used for the presentation. A minimum of 3 sources from the scientific literature must be used for each presentation. Internet sites may NOT be used as factual references. (This is because many sites state opinion rather than documented facts. These types of sites should not be used to supply factual information, but under some circumstances can be used to document a group's opinions.) 5) Grades: a. Reviews: Each presentation will be evaluated by the instructor and two peer (student) reviewers. Peer reviewers are also responsible for asking at least 1 question per presentation. b. Grades: Grades will be based equally on student presentations (based on instructor's and peer reviewers' comments) and participation, including written reviews and questions asked. 6) Schedule: Week 1 Organizational Meeting Week 2 Effective PowerPoint Presentations; Demonstration in computer lab. Week 3 Topics due to instructor (No class) Weeks 5-15 Student presentations
EHSC 6010Proseminar in Environmental HealthResearch methods with an emphasis on presentation and instructional techniques.1) To learn the use of a presentation software package, such as PowerPoint. 2) To research and give a 30-40 minute oral presentation on the proposed thesis or dissertation research. 3) To learn to write a concise and effective technical abstract for the presentation. 4) To learn how to peer review oral presentations.The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary. Course Requirements: 1) Mandatory attendance! Roll will be taken at the beginning of each class. Each absence will result in a reduction of 1 letter grade (i.e., from "A" to "B"). Excused absences will be noted only if accompanied with written documentation. Please give instructor sufficient prior notification of any excused absences. 2) Presentations: Each student will make one presentation during the quarter. Each presentation should last 30-40 minutes, followed by a 10-15 minute period for questions. 3) Seminar topic: Each student will present his/her proposed research plan. The presentation will be developed under the advisement of the student's major professor. The presentation should include a review of the literature pertaining to the thesis/dissertation project, an overview of the approach of the proposed project, objectives, hypotheses, experimental design and summary of the methods to be used. Students must submit their proposed seminar title to the instructor 2 weeks prior to their seminar date. 4) Required materials: a. Abstract: Seminar speakers must submit a 300-400 word abstract to the instructor by noon on the day before their seminar. Copies of the abstracts will made available to the class and EHS faculty on the morning of the seminar. b. Visual aids: The use of computer-generated visual aids is required for each presentation. Speakers should prepare slides using a presentation graphics program such as PowerPoint. During the presentation slides can be shown using a slide projector, the computer projection system, or a combination of the two media. Each student is responsible for reserving and setting up any necessary equipment prior to his/her seminar. c. Bibliography: On the day of the presentation, each student must turn in a bibliography citing all reference materials used for the presentation. A minimum of 6 sources must be used for each talk. 5) Grades: a. Reviews: Each presentation will be evaluated by the instructor and each nonpresenting student in the class. Review forms are available on the EHS server "dropbox" and must be emailed as an attached file to the instructor. b. Grades: Grades will be based equally on student presentations (based on instructor's and peer reviewers' comments) and class participation, including written reviews and questions asked. 6) Tentative schedule: Week 1: Organizational meeting Week 2: Powerpoint demonstration (if needed) Weeks 3-15: Student presentations
EHSC 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.
EHSC 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of a major professor.n/an/a
ELAN 3110Children's Literature and Oral Language, Grades P-5Wide reading from all genres of children's literature and criteria for selection and response. Students examine how literature can be used to facilitate reading, writing, speaking, and listening in content areas (e.g., social studies, science). Students are introduced to theory and research in language acquisition, development, and linguistic variation.1. Students will read widely from literature written and published for children in grades Pre-K - 5 including culturally diverse literature for these grades. 2. Students will explore theory of response to literature and practices for supporting response. 3. Students will explore topics and issues related to first and second language acquisition and dialect
ELAN 3461Issues in English Education, Grades 7-12Community work with adolescents (mentoring, tutoring, etc.), common readings in education, and interactions with professional educators. English education majors build on individual and shared experiences and readings to examine issues of English education in public schools. They construct a portfolio of insights and experiences. The learners will: a) work (mentor, tutor, etc.) with adolescents in a community or public school setting b) maintain records of and reflections on their work experiences c) analyze common readings on issues in English education d) interact orally and in writing with professional educators e) demonstrate reading, writing, and oral language skills needed for teaching English in grades 7-12 f) clarify and assess their own motivations for teaching in light of experiences, readings, and discussions g) construct a portfolio to display their experiences and insightsa) adolescents as readers, writers, and users of language b) adolescents in families, communities, and public schools c) issues of race, class, and gender in public schools d) history, organization, and status of public schools e) history, organization, and status of teaching English f) why teaching English?
ELAN 3461HIssues in English Education, Grades 7-12 (Honors)Community work with adolescents (mentoring, tutoring, etc.), common readings in education, and interactions with professional educators. English education majors build on individual and shared experiences and readings to examine issues of English education in public schools. They construct a portfolio of insights and experiences.The student will: a) work (mentor, tutor, etc.) with adolescents in a community or public school setting b) maintain records of and reflections on their work experiences c) analyze common readings on issues in English education d) interact orally and in writing with professional educators e) demonstrate reading, writing, and oral language skills needed for teaching English in grades 7-12 f) clarify and assess their own motivations for teaching in light of experiences, readings, and discussions g) construct a portfolio to display their experiences and insightsa) adolescents as readers, writers, and users of language b) adolescents in families, communities, and public schools c) issues of race, class, and gender in public schools d) history, organization, and status of public schools e) history, organization, and status of teaching English f) why teaching English?
ELAN 4120Language and Literacy, Grades P-5Recent theory and research on written language acquisition and development and linguistic variation. Students develop strategies for development of oral and written language in reading, language arts, and in the content areas.I will work with you to: o understand the interactive nature of literacy development o understand written language development, both general patterns and individual differences, with parallels to oral language acquisition, the role of social interactions (especially dialogue), and how to assess this development o recognize varied authentic contexts and purposes for written language use at home, in school, and in the broader community o develop classroom strategies for building an inclusive writing community o explore language and literacy curricula and classroom practices that promote educational and social justice for all students o recognize that language diversity is enriching and does not require remediation o identify and understand the impact of differential access on language and literacy based on ethnicity, age, class, gender, and abilityLife stories, whole language and literacy Cultural/personal Funds of Knowledge Writing processes, writing workshop Writing workshop, direct instruction Writing development, primary Writing development, intermediate Writing conferences Reading/writing connections Editing for readability, and publishing Inclusive language arts instruction (learners with physical disabilities, ADD/ADHD or cocaine-exposure, learning disabilities) Spelling development and assessment Spelling instruction and communication Internship Language diversity Culturally relevant teaching Genre: Poetry Genre: Memoir Genre: Nonfiction Theme studies: Prejudice Drama as culturally relevant teaching Georgia Writing Assessment, informal assessment Family connections Family connections Sharing of letters: you as a teacher, cultural influences
ELAN 4401Teaching as Collaborative Inquiry in English Education, Grades 7-12Literacy research for practitioners including research design, methodology, data analysis and interpretation for questions about students as readers/writers/language users.The learners will: a) study teacher research and explore its limits and its possibilities b) apply knowledge of research design, methodology, appropriate methods, data analysis and interpretation, theorizing and represention to classroom questions c) collect and analyze data in schools and communities as initial fieldwork d) collect and analyze data through participant-observation in order to identify research questions in the field e) design a study in collaboration with their mentor teachers to address the research question(s) they identify f) disseminate research reports in professional settingsDefining teacher research/collaborative inquiry Research designs and methods Participant-observation Research questions in the classroom focusing on students as readers, writers, and language users Data collection, analysis, and interpretation Theorizing and representation: Shaping presentations for other professionals
ELAN 4410/6410Adolescent Literature, Grades 7-12Adolescent literature and its selection and use in the middle school and high school to promote engagement with literature.a) To identify a large body of literature in various genres appropriate for adolescents b) To examine in depth exceptional authors who write for adolescents c) To identify developmentally appropriate strategies through which adolescents may experience literature d) To explore themes and issues related to diversity in adolescent literature e) To develop guidelines for dealing with censorship issues in adolescent literatureThe evolution of adolescent literature: An overview Literature and adolescent readers: Developmental perspectives Engagement with literature: Response processes through short fiction The adolescent novel since 1965: Major and minor authors Fantasy and science fiction for adolescents Poetry and drama for adolescents Nonfiction for adolescents Gender and culture in adolescent literature Censorship and adolescent literature
ELAN 4450Teaching Writing in the Secondary SchoolApproaches to teaching writing to middle and high school students.Students will design writing instruction for a variety of genres (e.g., argumentation, narrative, satire) that correspond to learning objectives in the Georgia Quality Core Curriculum. This instruction will take into account a general process model (prewriting, drafting, revision) and task-specific processes (e.g., designing activities specific to particular genres). The instruction will further take into account principles of culturally informed instruction, e.g., understanding that there is cultural variation in how narratives are produced and related; recognizing that Toulmin's principles of argumentation are appropriated differently by different disciplines. Writing instruction will be linked to evaluative rubrics that specify criteria and are related to broader instructional goals. These rubrics will include attention to issues of standard language usage and language variation.1. Introduction to general process model 2. Identification of principles of writing instruction (e.g., identifying goals/objectives, conducting task analysis, designing task-related activities, developing criteria for rubrics) 3. Designing instruction for various tasks (e.g., argumentation, narrative, description, comparison/contrast, parody, etc.) that includes both general and task-specific processes. 4. Attention to language issues, e.g., questions about standard forms of language, politics and linguists of language variation, etc.
ELAN 4530Foreign Language Curriculum and Methods, P-8Foundations of second language learning, curricular and materials design, and methods of teaching foreign languages in the elementary and middle schools.Students will: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of the development of language and literacy skills in childhood 2. Demonstrate the ability to reinforce, enrich, or directly teach elementary school content areas through the medium of the target language 3. Demonstrate the ability to reinforce, enrich, or directly teach elementary school content areas through the medium of the target language 4. Demonstrate the ability to employ a repertoire of strategies for teaching reading, writing, and the oral language skills 5. Demonstrate the ability to employ a variety of evaluative techniques to measure proficiency achieved in the L21. Characteristics of the FL (foreign language) learner from preschool to the 8th grade 2. First language development and its relation to second language learning in children 3. The elementary school curriculum and how different areas in the curriculum can be taught in a foreign language 4. Techniques for teaching and evaluating oral language skills in the second language 5. Techniques for teaching and evaluating reading and writing in the target language
ELAN 4531Foreign Language Curriculum and Methods, Grades 7-12Curricular design of foreign languages and the techniques and strategies for teaching and evaluating language acquisition.Students will: 1. Learn to evaluate and apply theory and research underlying French, German, Latin, and Spanish instruction in secondary school classrooms in the U.S. 2. Learn to create, adapt, and collect appropriate instructional materials including lesson plans for secondary school FL classrooms 3. Learn to create and maintain a positive classroom atmosphere conducive to FL learning 4. Learn how to evaluate and assess student progress in learning a FL1. Contextualized FL instruction in secondary schools 2. National Standard for FL Learning and Teaching 3. Behavior management 4. Effective résumé writing 5. Observing and analyzing effective FL teaching practices
ELAN 5030American Language and Cultural Studies for International StudentsDesigned to help international students develop advanced English skills in understanding academic lectures, comprehending reading materials, speaking with grammatical accuracy and acceptable pronunciation, and writing for academic purposes.1. A good deal of time will be spent on refining pronunciation of difficult American English sounds. Diagnostic tests will be given to determine which pronunciation problems a student has. Through guided classroom practice and use of specifically prepared cassette tapes in the language lab, a student will be able to improve his/her pronunciation of American English. 2. A set of tapes has been designed to aid in development of listening comprehension. Each of the tapes includes a question-answer component for evaluating listening comprehension. In addition, the texts of the tapes will be used for vocabulary expansion activities. 3. Since success at an American university depends to a large extent on facility in writing expository prose, writing will receive a great deal of emphasis. There will be in-class themes and longer writing assignments involving reference work in the library. Instruction will also be aimed at vocabulary expansion, increasing a student's repertoire of idiomatic expressions, and developing fluency and stylistic flexibility. 4. Students will be evaluated on their progress in pronunciation. Their performance on the question-answer section of the tapes will serve as a check on listening comprehension development. Written assignments will be evaluated according to an error/word-count ratio and content. Class participation will also be taken into account.1. Enhancement of proficiency in American English (i.e., pronunciation, grammar knowledge, vocabulary acquisition, receptive and productive skills) 2. Study of cross-cultural comparisons
ELAN 5200Literature and Language Arts Across the Curriculum, Grades 4-8Uses writing as a teaching strategy in elementary and middle school content area classrooms. Students experience writing as a process to develop their writing skills, plan content area assignments, evaluate writing, and understand how young people think about and learn content material through writing.1. Students will become aware of their strengths and weaknesses in reading, writing, speaking, listening and thinking as a means of understanding what it might mean to teach middle school students. 2. Students will demonstrate the extent to which literature and language arts can be used in science, math, and social science. 3. Students will differentiate between writing to learn and writing to produce a text. 4. Students will discover types of writing in various modes as these relate to science, math, and social science. 5. Students will examine the writing process in order to produce a product related to science, math and/or social science. 6. Students will investigate and apply effective ways of responding to and evaluating writing. 7. Students will learn how to use writing as a means of reflecting on and monitoring one's own learning.1. Introduction and Course Overview 2. Literature & Language Arts in Math Class 3. Literature & Language Arts in Math Class 4. Literature & Language Arts in Math Class 5. Literature & Language Arts in Math Class 6. Literature & Language Arts in Science Class 7. Literature & Language Arts in Science Class 8. Literature & Language Arts in Science Class 9. Literature & Language Arts in Science Class 10. Literature & Language Arts in Social Studies Class 11. Literature & Language Arts in Social Studies Class 12. Literature & Language Arts in Social Studies Class 13. Literature & Language Arts in Social Studies Class
ELAN 5220Writing Pedagogy, Grades 4-8Strategies for building a literate learning community. Students write fiction, poetry, and information texts, engaging in as well as studying the pedagogy of writing development, conference, revision, assessment, and publishing.1. Students will recognize various contexts and purposes for written language use at home, school, and community. 2. Students will develop classroom strategies for building a community of writers. 3. Students will recognize the value of literacy in learning through considerations of writing as an aspect. 4. Students will build a dynamic community of researchers/teachers/learnings who share the lens of what it means to write. 5. Students will gain an understanding of themselves as writers as they engage in a variety of sociocultural, litterary and aesthetic issues relating to writing.1. Course Introduction 2. Recalling Writing, Journal Writing 3. Portfolio Keeping 4. Portfolio Keeping 5. Developing and Clarifying, Letter Writing 6. Reading, Revising, Responding, Teaching Fiction Writing 7. Teaching Poetry 8. Reading a Writer's Audience, Teaching Non-Fiction Writing 9. Grammar and Editing 10. Grammar and Editing 11. Language Assessment 12. Language Assessment 13. Being Reflective
ELAN 5312/7312Poetry, Grades P-8Poems and enrichment activities for use in elementary and middle school classes; ways of encouraging children to respond to published poetry, to understand poetic devices, and to write poetry.Develop an appreciation for a wide variety of poetry Develop own skills as a reader and writer of poetry Learn strategies for supporting the reading of poetry in various content areas Learn strategies for supporting the writing of poetry Learn strategies for accommodating for diverse learners Learn strategies for teaching English Language LearnersPoetry immersion Reading poetry Starting points Writing poetry Teaching young poets Building a community of poetry readers; Love poems Poetic Environments Building a community of poets Important subjects and words How Poetry Works Poetry across the curriculum Poetry of social issues Poetry through art Nature Poetry Celebration
ELAN 5332/7332Drama, Grades P-8Integrating drama across the curriculum, including improvisational process drama, connecting to issues associated with children's literature, reading, writing, storytelling, and thematic oriented units of study with students in grades prekindergarten through middle school.1. Explore purposes and value of drama in grades PK-8 2. Explore dramatic practices suitable for the classroom 3. Explore drama as it can be applied across the curriculumI. Drama in Education A. Educational Objectives B. Value C. Definitions D. Drama as a Way of Learning E. Research F. Mantle of the Expert G. Process Drama II. Drama and Oral Language Arts A. Imagination B. Play C. Movement D. Pantomime E. Puppetry F. Choral Speaking G. Readers Theatre III. Drama and Oral Tradition A. Storytelling B. Folk Lore C. Legends/Myths IV. Drama and Children's Literature A. Stories B. Poetry C. Informational Books V. Improvisation A. Situation B. Objects C. Characters D. Group E. Stories F. Role Playing VI. Process Drama A. Engagement with the Event B. Role Taking C. Encounters D. Structuring the Drama Experience VII. Drama as a Teaching Tool A. Integrated Projects B. Art Form C. Learning Medium D. Curriculum Development Texts: McCaslin, N. (1990). CREATIVE DRAMA IN THE CLASSROOM. White Plains, NY: Longman. O'Neill, C. (1995). DRAMA WORLDS: A FRAMEWORK FOR PROCESS DRAMA. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Heathcote, D., & Bolton, G. (1995). DRAMA FOR LEARNING: DORTHY HEATHCOTE'S MANTLE OF THE EXPERT APPROACH TO EDUCATION. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. O'Neill, C., Lampert, A., Linnell, R., & Warr-Wood, J. (1977). DRAMA GUIDELINES. London: Heinemann. O'Neill, C., & Lambert, A. (1982). DRAMA STRUCTURES. London: Hutchinson. Krogness, M. M. (1995). Acting out: Improvised classroom drama. In JUST TEACH ME, MRS. K.: TALKING, READING, AND WRITING WITH RESISTANT ADOLESCENT LEARNERS. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Rogers, T., & O'Neill, C. (1993). Creating multiple worlds: Drama, language, and literary response. In G. Newell & R. Durst (Eds.), EXPLORING TEXT: THE ROLE OF DISCUSSION AND WRITING IN THE TEACHING AND LEARNING OF LITERATURE (pp. 175-190). Norwood, MA: Christopher-Gordon. Golub, J., & Reid, L. (1989). Activities for an
ELAN 5390/7390Difficulties in Literacy Teaching and Learning, Grades P-8Issues related to preschool through 8th grade readers and writers with diverse learning paths, including learning disabilities, English as a second language, and histories of school failure. Effective teaching strategies include culturally-responsive teaching, student-generated curriculum and assessment links, interdisciplinary connections, and family involvement.o Identify and address critical issues in teaching children who struggle as readers and writers in school; o Become more effective teachers through exploring theory, research, and practices others have identified as useful, while at the same time developing local and personal practices; o Examine social, cultural, and political influences on teaching and learning with special attention to how cultural, linguistic, and socio-economic diversity affects the quality of education of children in Georgia; and o Model as much as possible in our own class setting what you will be doing in your classrooms, including (1) generating our own curriculum, (2) designing our own evaluation processes, and (3) assuming dual roles as teachers and students.Identifying and owning the problems Culturally engaged teaching Language diversity Teaching across cultures Teaching across cultures Reading Poverty Connecting home, school, & community Improving reading developmen Improving reading development Improving writing development Teaching second language learners Issues of disenfranchisement Teaching for social justice Assessment issues
ELAN 5555Supervised Foreign Language InternshipSupervised foreign language internship in a public school for teachers employed with a provisional certificate. Students will: 1. Demonstrate that they can use in their instruction a variety of methods and techniques for teaching listening, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural knowledge 2. Will show that they can evaluate student learning effectively 3. Will show that they can prepare clear, logically organized lesson plans 4. Will demonstrate that they can maintain in their classes a climate conducive to optimal learning1. Methods for teaching the receptive skills, listening and reading 2. Methods for teaching the productive skills, speaking and writing 3. Methods for teaching for cultural understanding 4. Techniques for testing and evaluating the acquisition of second language skills 5. Preparing lesson plans for instructional units 6. Techniques for effective classroom management
ELAN 5630/7630ESOL, Grades P-12Foundations of second language learning, curricular and materials design, and methods of teaching non-native speakers of English in primary through secondary school settings.· To understand the relationship between SLA theory and teaching methodology · To gain proficiency in designing and using language teaching methods and materials · To gain hands-on experience teaching ESOL · To develop as a reflective practitioner in educationApproaches to language acquisition Language competence Multiple intelligences in TESOL; Lesson planning TPR Music, chants, poetry, drama Listening and Speaking C.A.L.L. and Multimedia Literacy development: Writing in L2; Reading in L2 Content-Area teaching ESOL students in the mainstream class Grammar instruction Vocabulary learning and instruction Language Learning through Games Assessment
ELAN 7030American Language and Cultural Studies for International StudentsDesigned to help international graduate students develop advanced English skills in understanding academic and professional lectures and reading materials and in speaking and writing for academic and professional purposes. Focus is on North American English used in context.1. Comprehend gist and most supporting details in: (a) lectures intended for an educated North American public (b) academic lectures at the U.S. baccalaureate level in one's own discipline (c) conference presentations directed to practitioners of one's profession 2. Create intelligible impromptu oral responses (questions and comments) to lectures and presentations. 3. Develop listening and reading vocabulary in one's academic and professional fields as well as strategies for predicting and critiquing meaning. 4. Present a poster or demonstration in one's discipline or profession using intelligible extemporaneous language appropriate for a North American audience. 5. Participate constructively in work or research team meetings in North American contexts. 6. Emulate written style of typical reports in one's academic discipline or profession.1. Factors in oral intelligibility 2. Listening comprehension for lectures 3. Listening comprehension for meetings and conversation 4. Discourse strategies for meetings and conversation 5. Genre analysis for disciplinary and professional speaking and writing 6. Engagement in disciplinary and professional speaking and writing
ELAN 7070Research Methods in Language EducationResearch methods appropriate for studying language teaching and learning.· To become conversant with major research paradigms in language education · To develop students' ability to critically interpret and evaluate research on language learning and education · To become conversant with ways of communicating research findings in language education · To learn how to undertake research projects as a means of reflecting on and improving educational practiceIntroduction to WebCT Quantitative & qualitative approaches to inquiry Research vocabulary & jargon Designing a Research Project Ethics, Human Subjects Protocols Reading critically The investigatory mindset Quantitative Research tools Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Studies Surveys Classroom Discourse Qualitative Traditions and their Philosophical Basis Standards of Quality in Qualitative vs. Quantitative Research Data collection in Qualitative Research Components of a Research Write-up Writing the Introduction and Lit Review Qualitative & Quantitative Data Analysis Writing the Study Presentation and publication Funding classroom research
ELAN 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.Progress in research, analysis, or writing related to Masters thesisN/A
ELAN 7320Writing Pedagogy, Grades P-8Strategies for building literate classroom communities based on current theory and research.1. Students will become aware of current theoretical orientations addressing the complex relationship between language and written composition. 2. Students will develop classroom strategies for building a community of writers 3. Students will develop classroom strategies for responding to students writing in P-8 classrooms. 4. Students will recognize various contexts and purposes for written language use across multiple contexts. 5. Students will recognize the value of literacy in learning through considerations of writing as an aspect. 6. Students will build a dynamic community of researchers/teachers/learners who share the lens of what it means to write. 7. Students will gain an understanding of themselves as writers as they engage in a variety of sociocultural, literary and aesthetic issues relating to writing.1. Course Introduction 2. Recalling Writing Journal Writing 3. Portfolio Keeping 4. Portfolio Keeping 5. Developing and Clarifying, Letter Writing 6. Reading, Revising, Responding, Teaching Fiction Writing 7. Teaching Poetry 8. Reading a Writer's Audience, Teaching Non-Fiction Writing 9. Grammar and Editing 10. Grammar and Editing 11. Language Assessment 12. Language Assessment 13. Being Reflective
ELAN 7420Writing and Literacies in English Education, Grades 7-12Theoretical implications of traditional, critical, and deconstructive pedagogies of writing and their usefulness in the classroom.-Survey the history of writing instruction -Identify the theories that have informed writing instruction -Analyze issues related to teaching writers from diverse backgrounds -Write an autobiography of self as writer -Develop personal theory based on experience and research for teaching writing-History of writing instruction in schools -Theories that inform writing instruction -Examination of current practice -Examination of self as writer
ELAN 7430Language and Learning in English Education, Grades 7-12Linguistic diversity, the varieties of English, English as a second language, and exploring the power of language as a cultural and political tool.-Survey the history of English language -Explore issues of linguistic diversity -Discuss the varieties of English used by different groups within society -Analyze the structure of English -Explore issues of teaching English as a second language -Write autobiography of self as language user-History of English language -Linguistic diversity -Varieties of English -English as a Second Language -Structure, semantics, and lexicography -Power of language to construct the world -Examination of self as language user
ELAN 7440Assessment and Evaluation in Secondary English ClassroomsEmphasis on developing classroom assessment practices that enhance student learning in secondary language arts through assessment task development, analysis, and interpretation. Examination of grading practices, uses of standardized test information, student involvement in assessment, and balancing assessment information.Students will: * Identify the distinct characteristics and uses of assessment * (formative and summative), evaluation, and grading in the secondary language arts classroom. * Understand the strengths, weaknesses and sources of subjectivity * of different types of assessments commonly used in the secondary language arts classroom. * Analyze the influence of standardized tests in reading and writing on classroom assessment practices in secondary language arts. * Develop a model plan for using assessment, evaluation and grading to positively impact student learning in secondary language arts. * Develop a plan that systematically defines achievement targets, knowledge to be mastered, reasoning proficiencies, skills to be developed, and products to be created (utilizing the GPS in grades 7-12 Reading/Literature, Writing, Reading Across the Curriculum, Conventions, and Listening/Speaking/Viewing) * Engage students in the assessment process to assess their own learning and develop their meta-cognitive ability*Users and uses of assessment: How various constituencies view assessment *The impact of classroom assessment on student learning *Connecting educational standards, learning goals, and assessment options *Considering classroom assessment in planning for instruction *Developing effective grading systems classroom assessment *Pre-assessment: Discovering what students already know *Balancing assessment options in the classroom *Student self-assessment *Standardized assessments and classroom assessment practices
ELAN 7601Non-Native Language Literacy: Elementary to Middle School YearsExamines sociocultural and pedagogical issues concerning literacy in a non-native language in emergent and newly fluent readers and writers in the elementary to middle school years. Students apply linguistics to literacy theory and learn to contextualize literacy instruction and assessment to meet local community needs.Through assignments and project work, students will: 1. List the sociocultural and cognitive dimensions of non-native language literacy 2. Enumerate major theoretical perspectives and research traditions 3. Describe L2 literacy assessment methods 4. Recommend techniques for teaching reading and writing to adolescent and adult L2 learners 5. Identify the phonetic, syntactic and pragmatic aspects of the biliteracy continua1. Theories on literacy development and SLA: Historical and theoretical overview a. literacy as social phenomenon b. literacy as individual phenomenon 2. What is biliteracy? What is a sociocultural approach to Literacy? a. the context b. content c. media d. development 3. What is the relationship between Oralcy and Literacy; L1 and L2? a. the primitive vs. civilized distinction b. literacies on a continuum 4. Linguistics and Liliteracy: a focus on phonology a. International Phonetics Association b. contrast and complementary distribution c. applied linguistics, error analysis and correction 5. Second Language Literacy in two languages a. Mathematics and literacy in two languages b. social studies and science and literacy in two languages 6. Assessment--driving instruction a. product oriented, summative assessments b. process oriented, formative assessments 7. Ethnographies of Literacy to understand cultural impacts
ELAN 7602Non-native Language Literacy: Secondary to AdultAn introduction to sociocultural and pedagogical issues concerning writing, and reading in a non-native language in adolescents and adults. Major theoretical perspectives and research traditions are reviewed.Learners will: 1. explore the social, cultural and cognitive dimensions of literacy in a non-native language 2. through readings and project work; 3. become conversant with major theoretical perspectives and research traditions; 4. contextualize literacy instruction and assessment 5. examine various aspects of linguistics related to literacy and second language acquisition 6. complete a case study project on bilingual youth. 7. become knowledgeable of internal review board policies and procedures for university research.1. Theories on literacy development and SLA: Historical and theoretical overview a. literacy as social phenomenon b. literacy as individual phenomenon 2. What is biliteracy? What is a sociocultural approach to Literacy? a. the context b. content c. media d. development 3. What is the relationship between Oralcy and Literacy; L1 and L2? e. the primitive vs. civilized distinction f. literacies on a continuum 4. Linguistics and Biliteracy: a focus on phonology a. International Phonetics Association b. contrast and complementary distribution c. applied linguistics, error analysis and correction 5. Second Language Literacy in the content areas for ELLS a. Mathematics and literacy in two languages b. social studies and science and literacy in two languages 6. Assessment-driving instruction. a. product oriented, summative assessments b. process oriented, formative assessments 7. Ethnographies of Literacy to understand cultural impacts
ELAN 7655Master's and Ed.S. Research PracticumGuided collection and analysis of data on student-selected topics; completion of applied project research paper.Students will: Develop first-hand conversance with data collection in educational settings Build on and further develop skills in qualitative and quantitative data analysis such as: inductive coding and identification of themes and processes, narrative analysis, interaction analysis, descriptive and inferential statistics. Learn about various formats and techniques for writing research reports for academic and professional audiences in education. Develop abilities to write research reports. Learn procedures for submitting, writing, and presenting conference proposals and develop a presentation based on their own research. Learn about academic publication procedures including: identifying possible venues for publication, writing manuscripts, and the submission and review process. Further develop abilities to network with peers to support the research and writing process.Working with a peer response group Archiving and transcribing audio/video data Entering survey data into spreadsheet software Methods of inductive and qualitative analysis Generating descriptive and inferential statistics Forms of research writing and reports Identifying journal venues for publication of work and the review process Scholarly presentations
ELAN 8000Doctoral Seminar in Language EducationCritiques of published research and reports of original research conducted by faculty members and doctoral students.To read critically across genres, texts, disciplines, and theories To write about what you read in various academic genres To participate in academic discourse To learn and use EndNote (or another computer program of your choice) for keeping notes, quotes, and citations To evaluate your growth as a scholar To participate in aFoundations of Education: Conservative (Hirsch, Ravitch, Adler), Progressive (Dewey, Kilpatrick), Critical (Giroux, Apple, Freire, Illich) Other People's Children Curriculum and Instruction: Schooling (Montessori, Dewey School, Child Centered), Curriculum Theory (Taba, Sizer), Curriculum Development (McLaren, Hirsch) Actual Minds Possible Worlds (Jerome Bruner) Schools in a Multicultural Society: Freedom in Education (Ravitch, BT Washington, DuBois, Baldwin, Weinberg), Critical Perspectives (Freire & Macedo, Barber), Women and Education (Stanton, AAUW, hooks) Con Respeto :Bridging the Distances Between Culturally Diverse Families and Schools : An Ethnographic Portrait ( Guadalupe Valdes) Assessment: Testing and Critical Response (Bloom, Wiggins), Cognitive Revolution (Brown, Bransford, Gardner) Mind in Society :The Development of Higher Psychological Processes (L. S. Vygotsky) and
ELAN 8020Research Seminar on Composing ProcessesResearch on the composing processes, including developmental rhetoric, speaking and writing relationships, thought processes involved in composing, qualitative research methodology, and implications of research for curriculum and instruction in writing.
ELAN 8032Seminar on Thought and LanguageTheories of the relation between thought and language, with emphasis on the works of Vygotsky and educational theorists and researchers working from a Vygotskian frame. Explores pedagogical implications for literacy, literature, and language learning.Develop thought and language in social and semiotic ways Tap in to your ZPD, building scientific concepts on spontaneous concepts Enter into a scientific thought collective:Myths and Legends: Gita Bygodskaya remembering her father Vygotsky in Historical Context Tool and Symbol Higher Psychological Functions Research Methods Interaction of Learning and Development Play and Writing Wertsch on Vygotsky's Semiotic Analysis Sociohistorical Approach Roots and Relationships of Thought and Speech Concept Development Concept Development in the ZPD Thought and Word Sociocultural Approach to Mediated Action Sociocultural Approach to Mediated Action
ELAN 8040Languages, Cultures, and LiteraciesTheory and research on literacy and its relationship to culture, social process, and identity.To gain an understanding of the anthropological, sociological, and linguistic perspectives underlying research on literacy as social practice.1. Definitions of text and literacy 2. Writing, speech, and cognition 3. Writing and speech in linguistic perspective 4. Ethnography and the study of literacy 5. Bakhtin and the social genesis of genre 6. Literacy and power: Critical perspectives 7. Literacy and power: Post-structuralisms 8. Literacy, culture, and identity 9. Literacy, (post)colonialism, and language policy 10. Literacy in diverse classrooms: The contact zone 11. Research methodologies for investigating literacy as social practice
ELAN 8310Race, Class, and Gender in Literature for Young PeopleHistorical evolution of representations of women and racial minorities in children's literature. Theory and research exploring the relation between children's literature and changing sociocultural and political values and ideologies provide the framework for the course. The relation between sociocultural and political values and more traditional aesthetic considerations. 1. Students will become aware (through extensive reading of theoretical and empirical research and the literature itself) of the ways representations of women, selected racial/ethnic groups, and the various social classes are constructed in children's literature. 2. Students will understand the ways representations of women, selected racial/ethnic groups, and the various social classes have evolved over time. 3. Students will become aware of the relation between the evaluation of literature's aesthetic and sociocultural and political values. 4. Students will understand the relation between literature's role as a source of entertainment and delight and its socializing functions. 5. Students will understand the relation between representation and issues of literary response or reception. 6. Students will gain greater understanding of questions of authorship such as whether one must be a member of a culture (e.g., an African or Native American) to write about that culture with authenticity and verisimilitude. 7. Students will become aware of currently available literature about, and resources related to, culturally diverse groups in the United States.1. Course Introduction 2. Literature, Response, & Ideology 3. Narrative as a Model of Social Action 4. The Selective Tradition I: Introduction 5. The Selective Tradition II: Selective Forgetfulness 6. The Selective Tradition III: The Slave Experience 7. The Selective Tradition IV: The Civil Rights Era 8. The Politics of Representation and the Construction of Identity 9. The Construction of Gender I 10. The Construction of Gender II: Sexual Identity 11. Folk Literature and Gender 12. Gender and Romance Novels 13. Summaries and Conclusions
ELAN 8600Research on Second Language AcquisitionResearch and theories on the acquisition of other languages in classroom settings.Through extended readings, discussions, and a variety of written projects, learners will: 1. Examine a variety of theoretical approaches to the investigation of classroom-based second and foreign language learning; 2. become familiar with the assumptions about language and learning embedded in each of three paradigms, including some of the more prominent concepts used to talk about SLA; 3. become knowledgeable of the different methodologies used in research, and of current research trends and findings, 4. gain experience in writing literature reviews and research study proposals. 5. gain experience in making formal research presentation1. Linguistic approaches to the study of additional language learning a. Definitions of language and learning b. Methods for collecting and analyzing data c. Findings and conclusions 2. Psycholinguistic/Cognitive approaches to the study of additional language learning a. Definitions of language and learning b. Methods for collecting and analyzing data c. Findings and conclusions 3. Sociocultural approaches to the study of additional language learning a. Definitions of language and learning b. Methods for collecting and analyzing data c. Findings and conclusions
ELAN 9000Doctoral ResearchResearch while enrolled for a doctoral degree under the direction of faculty members.Progress in research, analysis, or writing related to doctoral dissertationN/A
ELAN 9100Doctoral Examinations and Prospectus PreparationWritten and oral comprehensive examinations and development of dissertation prospectus.Progress in research, analysis, or writing related to written exams and prospectus preparation.N/A
ELAN 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.Progress in research, analysis, or writing related to doctoral dissertationN/A
ELAN(QUAL) 8550Writing Up Qualitative ResearchTheoretical, ethical, and practical issues involved in transforming qualitative data into a written research report. Students, both in dissertation and pre-dissertation, will write representations of data they have already collected.a) identify theories of interpretation b) explore theories of representation c) assess data analysis software d) interpret/analyze qualitative data using various strategies e) practice different strategies of writing up data f) produce representation of dataCrisis of representation Grounded and a priori theory Coding and categorizing data Computer assisted data analysis Authority and authorship Writing strategies Exploring alternative representations
ELAN(QUAL) 8565Theoretical Frameworks for Doctoral Studies in the Human SciencesReadings in major theoretical frameworks used in doctoral studies and research, including critical, postmodernism, feminism, Marxism, positivism, and pragmatism.*students will learn how to read challenging, philosophical texts that use unfamiliar language, such as French post-structural discourse *students will develop reading management strategies to further their doctoral studies *students will learn to speak and write theoretical language *students will be introduced to a broad range of macro-level theories they might use in their studies and research *students will begin to situate their work in regard to these theories*Rethinking reading *Troubling the taken-for-granted *Enlightenment humanism *Marxism *Psychoanalytic theories *Pragmatism *Social Constructionism *Conventional science *Critical theory *Feminism *Race theories *Post-colonial theories *Postmodernism
ELAN(QUAL) 8590Arts-Based Inquiry in Diverse Learning CommunitiesExamination of techniques of arts-based scholarship to increase the value, validity, and impact of qualitative research for understanding culturally and linguistically diverse learning communities. Students will practice poetic, theatrical, and artistic data collection, analysis and representation. Students will develop focused expertise, fostering a rigorous critical community for arts-based scholarship.Students will: 1. Explore the history of arts-based and poetic approaches to educational research in culturally and linguistically diverse communities through course readings 2. Acquire the techniques and craft necessary to apply poetry, drama, and the visual arts to data collection, analysis and representation 3. Complete an arts-based inquiry project among culturally and linguistically diverse learning communities 4. Become knowledgeable of internal review board policies and procedures for university research1. Traditions and Imaginations: the history of arts-based and poetic scholarship in social science research a. Arts in Sciences: creating scholarship with aesthetic impact b. Science in Art: Creating art with social meaning c. Taking Risk: Transforming old forms for new possibilities 2. What is Poetry? Examining the technique and craft for poetic methods of inquiry a. rhythm and form b. image and metaphor c. understanding chiasmus and contradiction 3. Literary, Visual, and Performing Arts in data collection a. Creative writing in the field notebook b. Visual images and multimedia c. Augusto Boal and Street Theater 4. Production, Evaluation and Assessment of Arts-based scholarship a. Craft, revision, and sharing b. Creating criteria: examining lower-and upper- case "truth/Truth" in research c. Educating a tough critical community of arts-based scholars d. Exploring literary and scholarly sites for publication and dissemination
EMAT 4200/6200Technology in Teaching Elementary School MathematicsUse of technological tools in teaching elementary mathematics. Current computer software for mathematical explorations.This course will introduce pre-service elementary teachers to the powerful technological tools available to them in today’s modern schools and will enable them to use these tools in their own learning of children’s mathematics. While the content focus of the course is Children’s Mathematics, the technological skills learned and the technological resources that students will use will have applications across the whole elementary curriculum.Technological Resources Email: Students will be given email accounts and will learn how to use email as a required medium of communication in this course. Internet: Students will learn how to use the Internet (in particular, the World Wide Web) to find resources for their teaching activities, to participate in electronic discussions relevant to their own learning, and as a global resource for children’s learning CD-ROM: Students will have opportunities to review and explore CD-ROM resources maintained by OIT and other departments in the College. Mathematics Education is developing a collection of CD-ROM resources for mathematics teaching and learning. Computer Software Tools for Teachers: Students will learn how to use a word processor and will be required to prepare all written assignments using a word processor. They will also learn how to use integrated software packages that provide spreadsheets, data bases and graphics programs together with word processing. They will learn how to use the spreadsheet and data base to maintain typical school records, such as grade sheets, attendance roles, lunchroom and other student data. They will learn how to use the graphics software to prepare attractive and interesting information and activity sheets. Computer Software Tools for Children: Students will learn how children can use the above tools to do mathematical explorations and to present results of their explorations. In addition, specific software for children’s learning of mathematics will be used by the students to explore children’s mathematics. Such software will include, but not be limited to, the microworlds that are being developed by the Fractions Project. Other mathematics software for young children will include: Turtle Math, LogoWriter, Logo Microworlds, Number Connections, and the Geometer’s Sketchpad. Calculators: Students will learn how they can use calculators as tools for developing and exploring number concepts at the elementary level. Video: Video will be used as a resource in this course to introduce students to teachers and children using technology in their teaching and learning of mathematics and other related subjects. Students will also learn how they can use video as a medium for feedback and reflection on their own teaching activities and interactions with children. Local teachers and children will share with students how video is being used in local elementary schools as a tool for learning and a medium of communication. Learning Children’s Mathematics Topics to be covered will include: - Typical counting activities of pre-numerical children - Typical activities associated with the development of an Initial Number Sequence (e.g. counting on, enactive addition) - Typical activities associated with the development of a Tacitly Nested Number Sequence (e.g. double counting, additive problem solving, enactive multiplication, enactive quotitive division, initial measurement activities) - Typical activities associated with the development of an Explicitly Nested Number Sequence (e.g. multiplicative problem solving, partitive division, part-whole reasoning, simple fraction problems, measurement problems) - Typical activities associated with the development of a Generalized Number Sequence (e.g. Operations on fractions, fraction families, simplifying fractions, ratio and proportional reasoning, measurement in 2 and 3 dimensions, exponential reasoning) - Typical activities associated with children’s spatial development (e.g., walking out pathways for open and closed figures, recognition of special shapes and solids, classification of shapes and solids, exploring properties of shapes and solids through dynamic software as well as concrete objects) - Typical activities associated with children’s logical development (e.g. sorting and classifying, order relations, difference relations, equivalence relations, transitive reasoning).
EMAT 5310/7310Teaching Mathematics in the Middle SchoolMethods and materials for teaching mathematics in the middle school, with emphasis on integration of mathematical topics.Students will be able to plan and teach lessons that implement the NCTM Curriculum and Professional Standards. Specifically, these mathematics lessons will include attention to relevant mathematical topics, appropriate use of technology, concerns for equity, and effective assessment. Students will develop their own teaching philosophy and strategies for reflecting on their own teaching and the teaching of others. Students will increase their understanding of mathematics. Students will develop their own area of interest and expertise related to teaching mathematics. Students will form networks, communities, and working relationships that will support their growth as professionalsLearning teaching skills: lesson planning, assessment, class management, working in groups, integrating technology Working in schools: observation & reflection, working with a mentor teacher, teach an enrichment lesson, discussing, and assessing Project: define an area of interest, investigate your area Developing an electronic portfolio: materials for employment, materials for teaching, materials for professional growth Using technology: learning mathematics, teaching mathematics, designing lessons, preparing reports, writing journals, communicating Reading: NCTM's Curriculum and Evaluation Standards, NCTM's Professional and Assessment Standards, class handouts, Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School and other reading materials in area of interest.
EMAT 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.Professional writing under the guidance of major professorMaster's thesis under direction of the major professor
EMAT 8010Advanced Study of Mathematics CurriculumTheoretical bases for mathematics curriculum. The course is designed to: 1. Survey the school mathematics curriculum, in the United States and other countries, from an advanced point of view; 2. Examine information on a variety of curriculum development projects in mathematics, using the information to address issues that have confronted the developers and implementers of new materials; 3. Develop skill in analyzing aspects of a selected project and presenting it to others; 4. Survey and analyze various approaches to curriculum evaluation; and 5. Provide information about and opportunities to reflect on current and past issues in the school mathematics curriculum.1. The course begins with a general discussion of curriculum. It then looks at some issues of curriculum change and innovation. An attempt is made to provide a more theoretical orientation than is taken in the corresponding master’s course EMAT 7080. 2. During the course, students read and discuss in class a variety of articles on curriculum issues, including articles on international comparisons of curriculum. They also read and discuss a reprinted version of Howson, G., Keitel, C., & Kilpatrick, J., (1981), Curriculum development in mathematics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. They write short papers dealing with the readings. 3. Students select a curriculum development project from a country other than the one with which they are most familiar; obtain information about the project, including materials it has produced, using the university libraries and the Internet; and write a paper, due near the end of the semester, in which they first give a brief description of the project and its activities and then analyze the project from the perspective of any of various issues discussed during the course. They are given assistance in locating information about projects, and each student checks his or her selection with the instructor for its appropriateness. 4. At the end of the semester, each student makes a class presentation in which he or she describes the project chosen for the paper and then leads the class through an activity or two based on materials produced by the project. The student serves as the teacher, with the other students serving as the class; the purpose is to give a sense of how mathematics is treated in the project. Students presenting a project provide a brief handout with details on the project and how to obtain more information about it.
EMAT 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.Professional writing under guidance of major professorDissertatation writning under the guidance of major professor
EMAT 9630Critique of Literature in Mathematics EducationCritical interpretation and evaluation of research and theoretical writing in mathematics education.The course is designed to: 1. Survey, from an advanced point of view, the research literature in mathematics education; 2. Give students an opportunity to read extensively the literature relevant to their proposed dissertation research; 3. Help students begin to formulate the research questions for their dissertation; and 4. Improve students’ ability to analyze, summarize, and critique published research.1. The course begins with a general discussion of research in mathematics education— its history, nature, and current status. Students are asked to write one or two pages on their research interests, identifying a likely dissertation topic if possible. These interests are discussed with students over the semester and are also used in selecting literature for class sessions. Depending on their background and preparation, they may be given articles to read and discuss in class that deal with research methods. 2. For each session of the class, students are expected to read a research study selected by the instructor and come to class prepared to offer comments and critique on both the study and how it has been reported. In some cases, they are asked to write an abstract for the study. The studies are selected both to give students an overview of the field and to acquaint them with recent studies of interest to them collectively. The selections change each time the course is offered; there is no textbook for the course. 3. Students are also given a handout with information about resources available through campus libraries and the Internet. During the semester, they are expected to use these resources in identifying literature relevant to their research interests. 4. The main project is a paper, due at the end of the semester, for which each student selects two research studies relevant to his or her interests. In the paper, the students are to describe and critique each study and its report, and then compare the two studies along dimensions discussed in class. They are assisted during the semester in identifying two closely related studies (often reported in dissertations but sometimes in journals) and in obtaining copies to read, analyze, describe, and critique.
EMUS 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
ENGL 1050HComposition and Literature (Honors)Close analysis of literary works as the basis of effective critical writing.1. This class will offer three hours of credit towards the freshman composition requirement. 2. This course will emphasize composition and the study of literary works as specimens of effective writing.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Students will write critical papers in response to the readings.
ENGL 1060HComposition and Multicultural Literature (Honors)Close analysis of multicultural literary works as the basis of effective critical writing.1. This class will parallel the current ENG1050H and offer three hours credit toward the freshman composition requirement. 2. Students taking multicultural ENG1060H will have the same writing requirements as students taking the traditional 1050H. Composition and the study of literary works as specimens of effective writing will be the first emphasis of both courses. 3. Students taking ENG1060H will study the literature representative of one or more of the following cultures: African-American, Hispanic-American, Asian-American, and Native American. Some Anglo-American works may also be taught alongside literature of these other cultures for the purpose of placing them in context.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Students will write critical papers in response to the readings.
ENGL 1101English Composition IExpository themes on both general and literary topics developed by basic rhetorical methods.In English 1101 students will learn to: 1. write papers in and out of class using processes that include discovering ideas and evidence, organizing that material, and revising, editing, and polishing the finished papers; 2. think critically so that they can recognize the difference between opinion and evidence and so that they can support an intelligent, challenging thesis; 3. read non-fiction critically and write analytically about it; 4.address papers to a range of audiences; 5. develop a sense of voice appropriate to the subject, the writer's purpose, the context, and the reader's expectations; 6. compose unified, coherent paragraphs that develop topic sentences with detailed support; 7. shape effective sentences; 8. write correctly following the conventions of standard edited English; and document essays using textual evidence.ENGL 1101 is centered around expository writing and argumentation. The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. Course requirements policies that apply to all sections of this course will be determined by the current Freshman English Handbook. A possible series of topics might look something like this: A. Topics for Reading 1. Reading and Thinking Critically 2 Learning to Read and Evaluate Arguments 3. Ethos, Pathos, and Logos 4. Other Methods for Analyzing Argument 5. Visual Arguments B. Topics for Writing 6. Learning to write Critically 7. Content: Thesis, Logic, and Support 8. Organization and Development 9. Style and Syntax 10. Diction 11. Grammar, Mechanics, and Citation Format
ENGL 1102English Composition IIThemes on fiction, poetry, and drama.In English 1102 students will learn to: 1. write papers in and out of class using processes that include discovering ideas and evidence, organizing that material, and revising, editing, and polishing the finished papers; 2. think critically so that they can recognize the difference between opinion and evidence and so that they can support an intelligent, challenging thesis; 3. read poetry, fiction, and drama critically and write analytically about it; 4.address papers to a range of audiences; 5. develop a sense of voice appropriate to the subject, the writer's purpose, the context, and the reader's expectations; 6. compose unified, coherent paragraphs that develop topic sentences with detailed support; 7. shape effective sentences; 8. write correctly following the conventions of standard edited English; and document essays using textual evidence.English 1102 is centered around writing critically about literature. The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. Course requirements andpolicies that apply to all sections of this course will be determined by the current Freshman English Handbook. A possible series of topics might look something like this: A. Literary Topics 1. Learning to Read and Evaluate Poetry, the Short Story, the Novel, and Drama 2. Selected works of Poetry 3. Selected works of Drama 4. Selected works of Fiction B. Rhetorical Topics 7. Learning to write Critically about Literature 8. Content: Thesis, Logic, and Support 9. Organization and Development 10. Style and Syntax 11. Diction 12. Grammar, Mechanics, and Citation Format
ENGL 1102MMulticultural English CompositionThemes on fiction, poetry, and drama using multicultural literature.In English 1030 students will learn to: 1. write papers in and out of class using processes that include discovering ideas and evidence, organizing that material, and revising, editing, and polishing the finished papers; 2.think critically so that they can recognize the difference between opinion and evidence and so that they can support an intelligent, challenging thesis; 3. read poetry, drama, and fiction critically and write analytically about it; 4.address papers to a range of audiences; 5. develop a sense of voice appropriate to the subject, the writer's purpose, the context, and the reader's expectations; 6. compose unified, coherent paragraphs that develop topic sentences with detailed support; 7. shape effective sentences; 8.write correctly following the conventions of standard edited English; and document essays using textual evidence.Students taking English 1030 will have the same writing requirements and goals as students taking English 1102, but will study the literature representative of the following cultures: African American, Hispanic American, Asian American, and Native American. The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. Course requirements policies that apply to all sections of this course will be determined by the current Freshman English Handbook. A possible series of topics might look something like this: A. Literary Topics 1. Learning to Read and Evaluate Poetry, the Short Story, the Novel, and Drama 2. Selected works by African American Writers 3. Selected works by Hispanic American Writers 4. Selected works by Asian American Writers 5. Selected works by Hispanic American Writers 6. Selected Works by writers from other groups B. Rhetorical Topics 7. Learning to write Critically about Literature 8. Content: Thesis, Logic, and Support 9. Organization and Development 10. Style and Syntax 11. Diction 12. Grammar, Mechanics, and Citation Format
ENGL 2310English Literature from the Beginnings to 1700Writers typically include the Beowulf poet, Gawain poet, Chaucer, Spenser, Sidney, Marlowe, Donne, Jonson, Shakespeare, and Milton. At the end of the course, which is designed to familiarize the students with representative texts of major English writers from the Beowulf poet to 1700, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.Topical outline: The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of readings might resemble this: Beowulf Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales: "The General Prologue," "The Miller's Tale," "The Wife of Bath's Tale" Sir Thomas Malory, Morte Darthur: selected readings Sir Thomas More, Utopia: selected readings William Shakespeare, Sonnets; The Tempest John Donne, selected readings John Milton, Paradise Lost: selected readings
ENGL 2320English Literature from 1700 to the PresentWriters typically include Pope, Swift, Johnson, Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Tennyson, Arnold, Browning, one or two nineteenth-century novelists, Yeats, Woolf, and Joyce.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of readings might resemble this: --Pope, Essay on Man --essays by Swift and Johnson --selected poems by Blake, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats --selected poems by Tennyson, Browning, Barrett Browning, Arnold --selected poems from Yeats --one novel and several short stories by twentieth-century fiction writers, such as Woolf, Forster, Joyce, Hardy, etc.
ENGL 2330American Literature from the Beginnings to 1865Significant work by writers in America from the seventeenth-century colonists through the Revolution to the Civil War. Writers may include Anne Bradstreet, Benjamin Franklin, Washington Irving, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Emily Dickinson. At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Selections from The Norton Anthology of American Literature, volume 1 Bradford, Of Plymouth Planation Bradstreet, selected poems Franklin, Autobiography Crevecoeur, Notes from an American Farmer Equiano, Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin Emerson, Nature Thoreau, Walden Whitman, selected poems Hawthorne, stories Melville, Billy Budd
ENGL 2340American Literature from 1865 to the PresentSignificant work by American writers between the end of the Civil War and the present. Writers may include Mark Twain, Henry James, Edith Wharton, William Faulkner, Langston Hughes, T.S. Eliot, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Elizabeth Bishop, Saul Bellow, and Adrienne Rich. At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Norton Anthology of American Literature, Vol. 2. Twain, Huck Finn James, Daisy Miller Wharton, Ethan Frome Wright, Native Son Eliot, selected Poems Frost, selected poems Bellow, Henderson the Rain King Erdrich, The Beet Queen
ENGL 2350HEnglish Literature from the Beginnings to 1700 (Honors)Writers typically include the Beowulf poet, Gawain poet, Chaucer, Spenser, Sidney, Marlowe, Donne, Jonson, Shakespeare, and Milton. Course objectives: At the end of the course, which is designed to familiarize the students with representative texts of major English writers from the Beowulf poet to 1700, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.Topical outline: The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of readings might resemble this: Beowulf Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales: "The General Prologue," "The Miller's Tale," "The Wife of Bath's Tale" Sir Thomas Malory, Morte Darthur: selected readings Sir Thomas More, Utopia: selected readings William Shakespeare, Sonnets; The Tempest John Donne, selected readings John Milton, Paradise Lost: selected readings
ENGL 2360HEnglish Literature from 1700 to the Present (Honors)Writers typically include Pope, Swift, Johnson, Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Tennyson, Arnold, Browning, one or two nineteenth-century novelists, Yeats, Woolf, and Joyce.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of readings might resemble this: --Pope, Essay on Man --essays by Swift and Johnson --selected poems by Blake, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats --selected poems by Tennyson, Browning, Barrett Browning, Arnold --selected poems from Yeats --one novel and several short stories by twentieth-century fiction writers, such as Woolf, Forster, Joyce, Hardy, etc.
ENGL 2370HAmerican Literature from the Beginnings to 1865 (Honors)Significant work by writers in America from the seventeenth-century colonists through the Revolution to the Civil War, including Anne Bradstreet, Benjamin Franklin, Washington Irving, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Emily Dickinson. At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Selections from The Norton Anthology of American Literature, volume 1. Bradford, Of Plymouth Planation Bradstreet, selected poems Franklin, Autobiography Crevecoeur, Notes from an American Farmer Equiano, Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin Emerson, Nature Thoreau, Walden Whitman, selected poems Hawthorne, stories Melville, Billy Budd
ENGL 2380HAmerican Literature from 1865 to the Present (Honors)Significant work by American writers between the end of the Civil War and the present including Mark Twain, Henry James, Edith Wharton, William Faulkner, Langston Hughes, T.S. Eliot, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Elizabeth Bishop, Saul Bellow, and Adrienne Rich. At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Norton Anthology of American Literature, Vol. 2. Twain, Huck Finn James, Daisy Miller Wharton, Ethan Frome Wright, Native Son Eliot, selected Poems Frost, selected poems Bellow, Henderson the Rain King Erdrich, The Beet Queen
ENGL 2390HMulticultural Literature in America (Honors)Important writers and movements in the mosaic of American culture and literature with special attention to African American, Native American, Hispanic American, and Asian American literatures.The purpose of the course is an introduction to Multicultural American Literature. At the end of the semester, students will be familiar with African American, Native American, Latino/a, and Asian American culture. They will also hone their skills in the reading and analyzing novels, short stories, poetry, and drama. The course will develop analytical writing skills, helping students to compose focused and coherent scholarly arguments.Reading will include: 1. novels, drama, poetry, short stories, oral literature, popular culture, art, music, and/or architecture. 2. secondary material that provides historical and theoretical context for the literature Topics to be covered may include: 1. African American, Native American, Latino/a, and Asian American literature 2. The history of cultural diversity in the United States 3. Multicultural theory
ENGL 2400Multicultural Literature in AmericaImportant writers and movements in the mosaic of American culture and literature with special attention to African American, Native American, Hispanic American, and Asian American literatures.The purpose of the course is an introduction to Multicultural American Literature. At the end of the semester, students will be familiar with African American, Native American, Latino/a, and Asian American culture. They will also hone their skills in the reading and analyzing novels, short stories, poetry, and drama. The course will develop analytical writing skills, helping students to compose focused and coherent scholarly arguments.Reading will include: 1. novels, drama, poetry, short stories, oral literature, popular culture, art, music, and/or architecture. 2. secondary material that provides historical and theoretical context for the literature Topics to be covered may include: 1. African American, Native American, Latino/a, and Asian American literature 2. The history of cultural diversity in the United States 3. Multicultural theory
ENGL 3000Introduction to English StudiesThe skills and knowledge necessary for successful pursuit of a degree in English: close reading, critical writing, acquaintance with current theoretical issues, and familiarity with bibliographic and electronic resources. Required of all English majors.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course. More specific goals for the Introduction to Engllish Studies include: to become wide-ranging readers of English and American literature; to become sophisticated and self-conscious analysts of texts in different media; to become thorough and careful researchers in the field of literary criticism; to become intelligent producers of original literary criticism and to be the best writers that we can be; to understand literature in terms of its broad cultural function, as "equipment for living"; to understand the relationship between analyzing and producing literature; to take pleasure in both reading and writing, and to enjoy one another's company.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics might look something like this: 1. What is Literature?: Some Criteria 2. Intertextuality and the Nature of Narrative 3. Introduction to Literary Theory 4. Literary Explication and Close Reading 5. Ordinary Language, Figuration, and Rhetorical Analysis 6. Kinds of Criticism: Formalistic, Textual, Cultural, Psychoanalytic, Historicist, Deconstructive, Postcolonial, Feminist, etc. 7. Research and Bibliography 8. Explicating Poetry: Close Reading, Scansion, Tropology, Poetic Form and Genre 9. Kinds of Writing: Novel, Poetry, Short Story, Drama, Creative Non-Fiction 10. Writing Critical Essays: From Thesis to Prose Style and Documentation
ENGL 3010Introduction to FolkloreThe discipline of folklore, its aims, methods, and subject matter. The major genres of verbal folklore--folk speech, proverbs, riddles, rhymes, legends, folktales, ballads, and folksong--along with folk customs, festivals, and material culture.Course objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, a student should be able to recognize what constitutes folklore (including identifying specific genres), to explain basic theories of transmission and function, to discuss how folklore functions in the students' own lives and in others' lives, to appreciate how a community expresses and perpetuates its values through folklore, and to think about folklore in its full socio-historic context.Topical outline: The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of primary materials in both oral and printed forms and secondary writings to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively with consideration of their function, genre identification, and socio-historic context. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks including some combination of tests, out-of-class papers, and fieldwork. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Recognition of Folklore: Readings in Jan H. Brunvand, Study of American Folklore; Readings in Elliott Oring, Folk Groups and Folklore Genres: An Introduction Proverbs and Riddles: F.A. de Caro, "Riddles and Proverbs" Jokes: Robert Cochran, "'What Courage!': Romanian 'Our Leader' Jokes" Legends: Jack Santino, "Occupational Ghostlore" Personal Experience Narratives: Barbara Allen, "Personal Experience Narratives: Use and Meaning in Interaction" Foodways: C. Paige Gutierrez, "The Social and Symbolic Uses of Ethnic/Regional Foodways" Festivals and Celebrations: Robert Jerome Smith, "Festivals and Celebrations" Belief: Anders Salomonsson, "Milk and Folk Belief: with Examples from Sweden" Folktales: Carl Lindahl, Swapping Stories
ENGL 3050Introduction to PoetryFormal and thematic traditions of poetry in English, with emphasis on techniques of reading and of writing critical essays. 1. Students will gain an enhanced capacity to enjoy poetry. 2. Students will develop analytic tools for understanding how poetry works. 3. Students will develop a repertoire of concepts and terms for speaking and writing about poetry. 4. Students will develop a basic sense of the history and evolution of major poetic forms.Instructors may structure the course as they see fit. In general, topics will be chosen from the following list: 1. poetic form (meter, rhyme scheme, stanza, etc., as well as sonnet, villanelle, sestina, etc.) 2. poetic devices (metaphor, imagery, apostrophe, etc.) 3. the development of various poetic themes and styles over time.
ENGL 3300Women in LiteratureReading and analysis of works in British and American literature by and about women.The purpose of this course is to introduce students to an important area of academic inquiry, literary representations by and about women. Students will be expected to become thoroughly acquainted with selected major literary works by and about women, grasp basic concepts of feminist theory, engage in rational and informed discussions of literary texts, and become confident writers about those texts.This course is taught by a number of instructors with a wide range of specialties within the field of British and American literature. Thus, texts to be studied and organizing principles of the course will vary from semester to semester. In general, students can expect that attention will be paid to the following broad topics: 1) women's history; 2) feminist literary theory; 3) continuities and discontinuities of theme in literature by women; 4) aesthethics of women's literature; 5) the representation of women in literature.
ENGL 3320Shakespeare and His WorldIntroduction to the plays and poems of Shakespeare and their historical/cultural background. Aimed at students who do not necessarily plan to major in English, but who have an interest in becoming informed and intelligent readers and viewers of Shakespeare. Does not count towards the English major.•Students will become familiar with the plots, characters and major themes of a range of Shakespeare's plays and poems, and with some basic literary terms necessary for understanding and responding to Shakespeare's works. •Students will learn to read Early Modern English comfortably or even with pleasure and to enjoy viewing performances of the plays on stage or screen. •Students will become familiar with the historical and cultural background of the English Renaissance. •Students will learn to respond orally and in writing to the material that they are studying. •Students may become aware of or even critical of the significance of Shakespeare in twenty-first century American culture. •Each instructor will have the freedom to vary the course structure, assignments, and material. •One version of the course might move through a selection of the plays and poems topically, pausing to give students necessary political and historical background. Such a course might begin with a topical unit on Shakespeare's History plays, reading the two parts of Henry IV and Henry V in the context of the Tudor myth and disputes about succession. Next the course might move to on some comedies (such as The Taming of the Shrew, Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night) in the context of questions of female subordination during the reign of Queen Elizabeth. A historical review of the reign of King James might accompany a reading of Othello, Lear, Hamlet and Macbeth), and the course might conclude with material on the emergence of the nuclear family during the period as it considered the parent-child relationships in The Tempest). •Another version of the course might begin with an overview of the English Renaissance before moving into sustained discussion of the plays and poems, organized chronologically, relating them to the known facts about Shakespeare's life and the political, religious, and literary developments surrounding them. •Assignments might similarly vary. One instructor might assess students with examinations designed to draw out through short questions the knowledge they have acquired in the course; another might mandate essay examinations to assess students' new skills in discussion and synthesis. All instructors would emphasize class participation and discussion, some by requiring oral presentations, some by assigning short response papers or postings, some by requiring frequent quizzes.
ENGL 3400Literature and EvolutionA consideration of literary works that serve as background to, expressions of, and commentary on the theory of evolution and its supporting sciences such as molecular genetics. In addition to Darwin, authors studied may include Mary Shelley, Thomas Huxley, H. G. Wells, Aldous Huxley, James Watson, Richard Powers, and Margaret Atwood.The theory of evolution and its supporting sciences which include molecular genetics, paleontology, and developmental biology are fundamental to contemporary understanding of what it means to be human. Students will achieve: 1. an understanding of background, arguments, and rhetorical strategies Darwin's theory as presented in The Origin of Species 2. an understanding of some preceding conceptions related to evolution as expressed in selected literary works 3. an understanding of the impact of Darwin's theory on subsequent literature 4. an understanding of modifications to Darwin's theory introduced by genetics and molecular biology as evidenced in contemporary literature 5. an understanding of the fraught history of eugenics as evident in selected literary works 6. enhanced understanding of differences between narrative and scientific exposition 7. improved writing skills through drafting and revision of required essays 8. increased vocabularyA possible reading list might look this: Golding, The Inheritors (1955) Aeschylus (525-456 BCE), Prometheus Bound E. Darwin, The Temple of Nature, Cantos I & II (1803) Shelley, Frankenstein, or, The Modern Prometheus (1818) C. Darwin, The Origin of Species (1859) Wells, The Island of Dr. Moreau (1896) (w./ Kenton, dir.) Island of Lost Souls (1933) Mawer, Mendel's Dwarf (1999) Huxley, Brave New World (1932) Lawrence and Lee, Inherit the Wind (1955/1960) Watson, The Double Helix (1968) Powers, The Gold Bug Variations (1991) Atwood, Oryx and Crake (2003) writing: 3 essays and a final research paper or project
ENGL 3590Technical and Professional CommunicationWriting in the professional domains, with an emphasis on research methods, clear and accurate presentation of ideas and data, and computer-mediated communication. 1. Teaching the elements of strategic or professional writing intended to impart technical or organizational information, with an emphasis on audience, research methods, clear and accurate presentation of ideas and data, and computer-mediated communication.1. The choice of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester, ranging in emphasis from the purely technical world of manuals and documentation to the purely organizational. In any case, students should become familiar with the conventions for job search paperwork, internal memos, feasibility reports, procedural manuals, and executive summaries.
ENGL 3600Advanced CompositionWriting as a process, with an emphasis on the conventions of discourse situations, invention, revision, editorial skills, and document design.One of the objectives of this course is to introduce students to the concept of revising prose, as a pre-editing process of re-evaluating the piece as a whole in an attempt to see its effectiveness. An additional objective is to examine prose of various kinds, including academic and more popular writing.The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary. The focus and coverage will vary from semester to semester and instructor to instructor, but topics of examination will include: The Writing Habit The Rhetorical Situation/Audience Awareness/Argumentation Invention and Drafting Strategies Revising: Global Changes Editing: Local Changes Popular Writing Discourse Conventions in the Disciplines
ENGL 3610Introduction to FictionShort fiction in English, with some attention to historical development of the genre, narrative techniques, and the development of critical strategies for reading and writing. Students will be expected to achieve the following: 1) a general understanding of the historical development of prose fiction; 2) an ability to distinguish and discuss the formal elements of prose fiction; 3) a sophisticated vocabulary for discussing prose fiction; 4) an enhanced ability to write fluent analyses of prose fiction texts; 5) an enhanced ability to enjoy prose fiction.This course is taught by instructors with a wide variety of specialties within the field of British and American literature, thus texts to be studied and organizing themes will vary from semester to semester. In general, students can expect that attention will be paid to some or all of the following topics: 1) the history of prose fiction; 2) formal features of prose fiction; 3) terms used to discuss and analyze prose fiction; 4) the development of selected literary themes over time.
ENGL 3650Introduction to DramaDrama in English. Focus may be historical development of the genre, representative themes, the relation between theory and practice, or the relation between text and performance. The course will include critical writing. Students will be expected to achieve the following: 1) a general understanding of the historical development of British and/or American drama; 2) an ability to distinguish and discuss the formal elements of drama; 3) a sophisticated vocabulary for discussing and writing about drama; 4) an enhanced ability to write fluent analyses of plays; 5) an enhanced ability to enjoy drama, both as literature and as performance.This course is taught by instructors with a wide variety of specialties within the field of British and American literature, thus texts to be studied and organizing themes will vary from semester to semester. In general, students can expect that attention will be paid to some or all of the following topics: 1) the history of drama (both literary and performance); 2) formal features of drama; 3) terms used to discuss and analyze plays; 4) the development of selected literary themes over time.
ENGL 3800Introduction to Creative WritingElements of writing poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction through selected readings and discussion of student writing. This course is designed to introduce creative writing as a topic for academic study. Unless otherwise designated, ENGL 3800 is a multi-genre course focusing on at least three of the following genres--poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, memoir, prose poetry, micro fiction, and performative writing. Students will learn about elements of genre, the writing process, and revision. Students will be expected to read contemporary works of literature and to respond to their peers' writing. A final portfolio of student writing is required.The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the intstructor may be necessary. The focus and coverage will vary from semester to semester and instructor to instructor, but topics of study can include: Reading and Writing Poetry Reading and Writing Fiction Reading and Writing Creative Nonfiction Reading and Writing Prose Poetry Reading and Writing Memoir Reading and Writing Micro Fiction Reading and Writing Performative Writing Invention Editing Revising
ENGL 3800HIntroduction to Creative Writing (Honors)Elements of writing poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction through selected readings and discussion of student writing for Honors students.Students will learn about elements of genre, the writing process, and revision. Students will be expected to read contemporary works of literature and to respond to their peers' writing. A final portfolio of student writing is required.The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the intstructor may be necessary. The focus and coverage will vary from semester to semester and instructor to instructor, but topics of study can include: Reading and Writing Poetry Reading and Writing Fiction Reading and Writing Creative Nonfiction Reading and Writing Prose Poetry Reading and Writing Memoir Reading and Writing Micro Fiction Reading and Writing Performative Writing Invention Editing Revising
ENGL 3801Intermediate Creative Writing: TopicsIntermediate study in creative writing, limited to a single genre, such as short fiction, poetry, nonfiction, the novel, performative writing, hypertext, and hybrid form. Focus varies according to professor.This course is designed to continue studying creative writing at the intermediate level, focusing on a single genre of creative writing as a topic for academic study. This course is a single- genre course focusing on poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, memoir, prose poetry, micro fiction, performative writing or hypertext writing. Students will learn about elements of genre, the writing process, and revision. Students will be expected to read contemporary works of literature and to respond to their peers' writing. A final portfolio of student writing is required.The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary. The focus and coverage will vary from semester to semester and instructor to instructor, but topics of study can include: Reading and Writing Poetry Reading and Writing Fiction Reading and Writing Creative Nonfiction Reading and Writing Prose Poetry Reading and Writing Memoir Reading and Writing Micro Fiction Reading, Writing and Performing Performative Writing Invention Editing Revising
ENGL 4210/6210Old English LiteratureProse and poetry of the Old English period, exclusive of Beowulf, with emphasis on poetry. Works will be read in Old English, with supplementary translations.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to read and understand Old English, to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Old English Prose: Historical: Selections from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle and from King Alfred's translation of Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English People. Religious: A selection of sermons by AElfric and Wulfstan; AElfric's Preface to Genesis; selections from King Alfred's translation of Gregory's Pastoral Care. Philosophical: Selections from King Alfred's translation of Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy. Old English Poetry. Heroic: Judith, The Battle of Finnsburh, Widsith, The Battle of Maldon. Elegiac: The Wanderer, The Seafarer, The Wife's Lament, The Husband's Message, The Ruin, Wulf and Eadwacer. Gnomic: Selections from the Riddles, the Charms, The Runic Poem, The Riming Poem. Religious: The Dream of the Rood, Elene, Christ B, The Phoenix.
ENGL 4220/6220BeowulfThe poem in the original Old English, with attention to important critical studies.Course objectives: At the end of the course, students, having read and translated the poem, will be able to discuss Beowulf (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread it with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.Topical outline: The main topic will consist of the poem Beowulf, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined in the context of the times and the circumstances of its composition. Students will work their way through the entire poem during the semester and periodically will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers.
ENGL 4225/6225The Age of Cathedrals: Literary Culture in the High Middle AgesA survey of the literary culture of the High Middle Ages, 1050-1500, in light of discoveries that are unique to this period and that lay the foundations for modernity, such as humanism and the individual, universities and the liberal arts, the city and the guild.This course will survey the literary culture of the High Middle Ages, 1050-1500, in light of discoveries that are unique to this period and lay the foundations for modernity, such as humanism and the individual, universities and the liberal arts, the city and the guild. By the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature (both primary and secondary), will be able to discuss and write about these texts in the broadest of cultural terms. They will gain a sound appreciation of the culture in which late medieval literature was composed, and to which it is responsive.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The literature will be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics might resemble the following: Weeks 1-2: Exemplum to Fabliau: Jacobus De Voragine, Legenda Aurea; Robert Mannyng, Handlyng Synne (selections); Boccaccio, Decameron (selections); Chaucer, Canterbury Tales (selections); Benson and Andersson, The Literary Context of Chaucer's Fabliaux (selections). Week 3-4: Allegory and Satire: Romance of the Rose (Jean de Lorris), DeGuileville, Pilgrimage of the Life of Man (selections); William Langland, Piers Plowman (selections). Weeks 5-6: Writing Medieval, Reading Medieval: Augustine, On Christian Doctrine; Geoffrey of Vinsauf, Poetria Nova; Dante, On the Eloquence of the Vernacular; selections from Minnis and Scot, Medieval Literary Criticism and Theory, and from Watson et al., The Idea of the Vernacular: An Anthology of Middle English Literary Theory, 1280-1520. Weeks 7-8: Cathedral Culture: Lewis, Discarded Image; Duby, The Ages of Cathedrals; Gordon Leff, Paris and Oxford Universities in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries; selections from University Records and Life in the Middle Ages (ed. Lynn Thorndike); Abbot Suger on the Abbey Church of St.-Denis and its art Treasures (Panofsky, ed.). Weeks 9-10: The Individual: Selections from Colin Morris, The Discovery of the Individual, 1050-1200; Robert Hanning, Individual in Twelfth-Century Romance; C. W. Bynum, "Did the Twelfth Century Discover the Individual?," in Jesus as Mother. Chrétien de Troyes and Petrarch. Weeks 11-12: Medieval Studies: Norman Cantor, Inventing the Middle Ages; Lee Patterson, Negotiating the Past (selections); David Matthews, The Making of Middle English, 1765-1910 (selections). Weeks 13-14: Resources: Discussion of major databases; Patrologia Latina, CETA-DOC, Middle English Compendium, International Medieval Bibliography; Online Medieval Source; Labyrinth; discussion of printed serial and descriptive catalogues, and indices such as Index of Middle English Prose; Index of Printed Middle English Prose; Index of Middle English Verse; Manual of Writings in Middle English; Middle English Dictionary; Records in Early English Drama; Stith-Thompson, Motif-Index of Folk Literature. Week 15: The Archive: Work in Middle English book hands and abbreviations; assignments in transcription from facsimiles and online editions. Introduction to major archival sources, and access to them.
ENGL 4230Medieval LiteratureMasterpieces of medieval literature, exclusive of Chaucer. Some works will be read in Modern English translation.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of medieval English literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Medieval Prose: Religious: selections from AElfric and Wulfstan sermons; selections from The Ancrene Wisse, Michael of Northgate's Ayenbit of Inwit, selections from The Travels of Sir John Mandeville. Philosophical: Richard Rolle's The Bee and the Stork, The Cloud of Unknowing. Romance: selections from Malory's Morte d'Arthur. Medieval Poetry: Romance: King Horn, Havelock the Dane, selections from John Barbour's The Bruce, Sir Orfeo, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Dream vision: selections from Piers Plowman, The Pearl. Debate: The Owl and the Nightingale. Medieval dramatic literature: selections from the Mystery Cycle plays, Everyman, The Conversion of Saint Paul.
ENGL 4240/6240ChaucerCanterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and minor poems.The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the work of one of the most important writers of the Middle English period and to enable them to read, pronounce, and understand late fourteenth-century London Middle English with facility. At the end of the course, students, having read a representative selection of texts chosen from Chaucer's principal works (and occasionally other authors too), will be able to discuss these works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of sophistication. Students will further have acquainted themselves with a variety of medieval narrative forms and structures, and the function of traditional genres, particularly, romance, fabliau, and sermon writing, and how Chaucer exploits these in his poetry, and they should be able to evaluate him within the socio-historical context of the late-fourteenth century. They should also be aware of major scholarly debates in the field of Chaucer criticism.The choice and sequence of topics will vary every semester depending on the instructor. The topics will consist of selected primary and secondary texts to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their production as well as in the light of recent scholarly opinion. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks that may include, but is not restricted to, tests, out-of-class papers, and class examinations. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Chaucer and English inheritance: Derek Pearsall, The Life of Geoffrey Chaucer; Essays in Idea of the Vernacular, ed. Jocelyn Wogan-Browne et al.; Christopher Cannon, The Making of Chaucer's English; Laura Hibbard Loomis, "Chaucer and the Breton Lays of the Auchinleck MS"; "Chaucer and the Auchinleck Manuscript: Thopas and Guy of Warwick." Chaucer and Continental inheritance: Piero Boitani, Chaucer and Boccaccio; Chaucer's Imaginary World of Fame; Chaucer and the Italian Trecento; Nicholas Haveley, Chaucer's Boccaccio; Charles Muscatine, Chaucer and the French Tradition; David Wallace, Chaucer and the Early Writings of Boccaccio; James Wimsatt, Chaucer and his French Contemporaries. Chaucerian Polity: Barbara A. Hanawalt (ed.), Chaucer's England; David Wallace, Chaucerian Polity; David Aers, Chaucer, Langland, and the Creative; Lee Patterson, Chaucer and the Subject of History; Paul Strohm, Social Chaucer Boethius, Neo-Platonism: Boethius, Consolation of Philosophy; Seth Lerer, Boethius and Dialogue; A.J. Minnis, Medieval Literary Theory and Criticism; Medieval Boethius; Chaucer's Boece and the medieval tradition of Boethius; Winthrop (Pete) Whetherbee, Chaucer and the Poets. Chaucer's Sources: Larry Benson and T.M. Andersson, Literary Context of Chaucer's Fabliaux; Germaine Dempster, W.F. Bryan et al, Sources and Analogues of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales; Barry Windeatt, Chaucer's Dream Poetry: Sources and Analogues. Chaucer's Readers: Seth Lerer, Chaucer's Readers; Ruth Morse & Barry Windeatt (ed.), Chaucer Traditions.
ENGL 4270Medieval RomanceDevelopment of the Romance form (verse and prose) during the high middle ages and reasons for its historical and continuing appeal. Materials may include: Arthurian romance, the Grail Quest, English and Breton lais, and the matters of France, Rome, and Britain. Some works may be read in modern English translation.This course aims to trace the development of the Romance form during the high middle ages and seeks to understand the reasons for both its historical and continuing appeal. By the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss these texts (both orally and in writing), elucidating something of the conventions and purpose of romance writing. They will also have learned something about the relationship between romance and other genres in the period and will be able to articulate a sophisticated understanding of medieval romances within their literary contexts.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The literature will be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics might resemble this: Early English Romance and the Lay: Havelok the Dane, Sir Orfeo, Sir Launfal, the lais of Marie de France. Arthurian Romance: Chrétien de Troyes, The Knight of the Cart, Cligès; Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; Malory, Morte Darthur; The Wedding of Sir Gawain and Dame Ragnell; Alliterative and Stanzaic Mortes. Secular Hagiography or Pious Romance?: Selection of Narratives of Virgin Martyrs and Royal Saints from Biblical Apocrypha, the South English Legendary, the Cursor Mundi, etc.; Chaucer, Man of Law's Tale, Clerk's Tale; Gower, Tale of Florent, Tale of Constance, Tale of Canace and Machaire; Robert of Sicily. Romance theory and Chivalric Biography/Education: Ramon Llull, Book of the Order of Chivalry; Andreas Capellanus, The Art of Courtly Love; Chandos Herald's Life of the Black Prince, Letters of the Black Prince; Froissart, Les Enseignements Edouard III; Geoffroi de Charny; Christine de Pizan, Book of Fayttes of Armes and Chivalry; Life of Henry V. Romance and History: Alexander and Charlemagne romances; Orange cycle material; Guy of Warwick; Chaucer, The Knight's Tale, Troilus and Criseyde; other selections from Troy Legends including Lydgate's Troy Book; Robert Henryson, Testament of Cressid. 'Romance Redyng on the Boke': Reception and Readership of Romance - The Auchinleck Manuscript; the Interaction of Hagiography and Romance - The Thornton Manuscripts, the Cambridge Miscellanies; the Troilus manuscript; Manuscripts and Gentry Culture in fifteenth- and sixteenth-century England; Paston's 'Grete Boke'. Romance and the Materials of Bourgeois Culture: The Paston Letters, Paston's 'Grete Booke'; conduct books, Hoccleve, Regiment; Le bon ménagier de Paris, the Book of the Knight of the Tour Landry.
ENGL 4290Topics in Medieval LiteratureA special topic not otherwise offered in the English curriculum. Topics and instructors vary from semester to semester. At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: English Literature in the Age of Columbus (including Skelton, Henryson, and other late-fifteenth-century writers). Middle English Romance (including Malory, the Gawain poet, and other writers of Middle English romances). Middle English Religious Writing (including the Ancrene Wisse, the Agenbyt of Inwit, and other Middle English religious writings). Middle English Literature and Classical Tradition (including Middle English mythographers, translations of classical works like Douglas' Aeneid, and other relevant works). Paleography of Medieval English Writings (including Old and Middle English texts).
ENGL 4295/6295Topics in Celtic StudiesA special topic on Celtic literatures, mythology, or culture (for example, Welsh, Irish, Scottish) not otherwise offered in the English curriculum. Topics and instructors may vary from semester to semester.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with critical appreciation of both their artistry and the socio-cultural contexts in which they were composed, to reread them with pleasure, and to read and enjoy other works from the period and culture.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics, through examination of early and medieval literature, will focus on one or more of the Celtic cultures. The literature will be read in translation outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Literature of Medieval Wales (including The Gododdin, Taliesin, Gildas, the Mabinogion, Geoffrey of Monmouth) Early Irish Literature (including Tain, "The Second Battle of Mag Tured," "The Wooing of Etain," "Bricriu's Feast," "The Pursuit of Diarmuid and Grainne") Arthur of the Welsh (including "Spoils of Annwfn," "Culhwch and Olwen," "The Dream of Rhonabwy," various saints' Lives, "Peredur," "Gereint," "Owein")
ENGL 4300/6300Elizabethan PoetryPoetry of the earlier English Renaissance, such as works by Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, Spenser, and Marlowe, and the sonnets of Shakespeare.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: > Early Tudor verse: Thomas More, John Skelton, Thomas Wyatt, Henry Howard (Earl of Surrey), others > Later Tudor writers of short poems: Walter Raleigh, Christopher Marlowe, Edmund Spenser, Philip Sidney, Thomas Campion, Samuel Daniel, Michael Drayton, William Shakespeare, Fulke Greville, others > Longer Tudor poems: Thomas Sackville (and other authors of The Mirror for Magistrates), Marlowe (“Hero and Leander”), Shakespeare (“The Rape of Lucrece” and “Venus and Adonis”), Drayton (“Poly-Olbion”), others > The epic: Spenser’s Faerie Queene
ENGL 4320/6320Shakespeare I: Selected WorksA survey of literature written by Shakespeare throughout his career. delighted English speakers for over four centuries; 2. learn about how an earlier culture confronted experiences and problems that continue to concern us and how our perceptions and tastes have changed over the centuries; 3. hone skills in the reading and analyzing of drama and poetry; 4. hone skills in the writing of a focused and coherent argument. 2. the history and culture of Renaissance England 3. the drama and poetry of Shakespeare.
ENGL 4330Shakespeare II: Special TopicsSpecial topics related to Shakespeare.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice of a topic, and selection and sequence of sub-topics, will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The sub-topics will consist of selected works, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible topic, “Shakespeare on Love,” might result in sub-topics and assignments resembling these: > Coming of age--the magic of love: A Midsummer Night’s Dream and The Tempest > Tragic love for the young and the not-so-young: Romeo and Juliet and Antony and Cleopatra > Miscegenation in love: The Merchant of Venice and Othello > Transgressing (or almost transgressing) other taboos: As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Pericles
ENGL 4340/6340Renaissance DramaEnglish drama from 1576 to 1642, exclusive of Shakespeare, emphasizing dramatists such as Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and Middleton.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: > Thomas Kyd, The Spanish Tragedy > Christopher Marlowe, The Jew of Malta > John Marston, The Malcontent > Cyril Tourneur (or Thomas Middleton), The Revengers’ Tragedy > John Webster, The Duchess of Malfi > Thomas Middleton, The Changeling > John Ford, ’Tis Pity She’s a Whore > Ben Jonson, Volpone
ENGL 4350/6350Seventeenth-Century PoetryMajor English poets of the period, such as Donne, Jonson, Herbert, and Marvell.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: > John Donne > Ben Jonson > Robert Herrick > Thomas Carew > George Herbert > Richard Crashaw > Lesser religious poets > Lesser secular poets > Andrew Marvell
ENGL 4360Renaissance ProseProse of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, such as works by More, Sidney, Bacon, Donne, Browne, and Bunyan.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: > George Cavendish, The Life and Death of Cardinal Wolsey > William Roper, Life of Sir Thomas More > Thomas More, A Dialogue of Comfort against Tribulation > Philip Sidney, Arcadia > Francis Bacon, Selected essays > John Donne, Selected sermons and meditations > Thomas Browne, Hydriotaphia, or Urn Burial (selections) > Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy (selections) > John Bunyan, The Pilgrim’s Progress
ENGL 4370MiltonThe works and times of John Milton. At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: > Short poems > Selected prose works > Paradise Lost > Paradise Regained > Samson Agonistes
ENGL 4390Topics in Renaissance LiteratureA special topic not otherwise offered in the English curriculum. Topics and instructors vary from semester to semester. •Students will become familiar with the plots, characters and major themes of a range of Shakespeare's plays and poems, and with some basic literary terms necessary for understanding and responding to Shakespeare's works. •Students will learn to read Early Modern English comfortably or even with pleasure and to enjoy viewing performances of the plays on stage or screen. •Students will become familiar with the historical and cultural background of the English Renaissance. •Students will learn to respond orally and in writing to the material that they are studying. •Students may become aware of or even critical of the significance of Shakespeare in twenty-first century American culture.•Each instructor will have the freedom to vary the course structure, assignments, and material. •One version of the course might move through a selection of the plays and poems topically, pausing to give students necessary political and historical background. Such a course might begin with a topical unit on Shakespeare's History plays, reading the two parts of Henry IV and Henry V in the context of the Tudor myth and disputes about succession. Next the course might move to on some comedies (such as The Taming of the Shrew, Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night) in the context of questions of female subordination during the reign of Queen Elizabeth. A historical review of the reign of King James might accompany a reading of Othello, Lear, Hamlet and Macbeth), and the course might conclude with material on the emergence of the nuclear family during the period as it considered the parent-child relationships in The Tempest). •Another version of the course might begin with an overview of the English Renaissance before moving into sustained discussion of the plays and poems, organized chronologically, relating them to the known facts about Shakespeare's life and the political, religious, and literary developments surrounding them. •Assignments might similarly vary. One instructor might assess students with examinations designed to draw out through short questions the knowledge they have acquired in the course; another might mandate essay examinations to assess students' new skills in discussion and synthesis. All instructors would emphasize class participation and discussion, some by requiring oral presentations, some by assigning short response papers or postings, some by requiring frequent quizzes.
ENGL 4400/6400Restoration and Eighteenth-Century English DramaOutstanding dramatists of the period: Dryden, Wycherley, Addison, Goldsmith, Sheridan, and others.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course. In particular, 1. The course will introduce students to British drama of the 1660-1800 period. 2. The course will moreover discuss the historical, social, political, and literary background and milieu of this period.The selection of plays read and discussed will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. However, major dramas of the period will be read and analyzed using critical skills of various kinds (e.g., historical, close reading, comparative, structural). In addition to being examined on the material, students will moreover write critically on one or more of the plays. Research projects (particularly in 6400) may also be assigned. A sample syllabus might include Dryden's ALL FOR LOVE, Etherege's MAN OF MODE, Wycherley's THE COUNRTY WIFE, Behn's THE ROVER, Otway's VENICE PRESERVED, Congreve's WAY OF THE WORLD, Goldsmith's SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER, and Sheridan's SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL.
ENGL 4420/6420Early Eighteenth-Century Prose and PoetryPoetry and prose of the earlier eighteenth century, emphasizing Addison, Steele, Defoe, Swift, and Pope.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course. In particular, 1. The course will emphasize the poetry and prose of Swift, Pope, and other members of the Scriblerus Club, with special emphasis on their satire. 2. It will also cover the prose and poetry of Whig writers of the period that might include Addison, Steele, and Defoe. 3. Special attention will be paid to the intellectual, literary, artistic, and political contexts of the writing.A typical general outline might be the following: Weeks 1-4 Swift Weeks 5-9 Pope Weeks 10-12 Addison and Steele Weeks 12-16 Defoe
ENGL 4430The Eighteenth-Century English NovelThe English novel from Defoe to 1800, including novels by Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, and Sterne, the Gothic novel, and the novel of purpose.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course. In particular, 1. The course will introduce students to British fiction of the long eighteenth century (c. 1660 - c.1800). 2. The course will situate this fiction in the historical, social, political and literary milieu of this period.The selection of novels read and discussed will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. However, the novels will be read and analyzed using critical skills of various kinds (e.g., historical, close reading, comparative, structural, psychoanalytical, feminist, etc.) In addition to being examined on the material, students will write critical on one or more of the novels. Research projects may also be assigned. A sample syllabus might include Aphra Behn's OROONOKO, Daniel Defoe's MOLL FLANDERS, Samuel Richardson's PAMELA or CLARISSA, Henry Fielding's TOM JONES or JOSEPH ANDREWS, Sarah Fielding's DAVID SIMPLE, Laurence Sterne's TRISTRAM SHANDY, Tobias Smollett's HUMPHREY CLINKER, Frances Burney's EVELINA and Charlotte Smith's THE YOUNG PHILOSOPHER.
ENGL 4440/6440The Age of JohnsonEnglish literature of the late eighteenth century, emphasizing Johnson, Boswell, and their group. At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course. In particular, 1. The course will introduce studetns to British drama of the 1660-1800 period. 2. The course will discuss the historical, social, political, and literary background and milieu of this period.Topical Outline: The selection of plays read and discussed will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. However, major dramas of the period will be read and analyzed using critical skills of various kinds (e.g., historical, close reading, comparative, structural). In addition to being examined on the material, students will moreover write critically on one or more of the plays. Research projects (particularly in 6400) may also be assigned. A sample syllabus might include Dryden's ALL FOR LOVE, Etherege's MAN OF MODE, Wycherley's THE COUNRTY WIFE, Behn's THE ROVER, Otway's VENICE PRESERVED, Congreve's WAY OF THE WORLD, Goldsmith's SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER, and Sheridan's SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL.
ENGL 4490Topics in Eighteenth-Century LiteratureA special topic not otherwise offered in the English curriculum. Topics and instructors vary from semester to semester. At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course. In particular, 1. This course will focus on selected topics in Restoration and eigteenth-century literature--the works of a major writer or a topic of more concentrated and specialized interest than allowed for in the other courses in the curriculum. 2. The course will moreover discuss the historical, social, political, and literary background of this period.The selection of works will vary from instructor to instructor and topic to topic. Some topics offered in recent years are: Eighteenth-century women writers; the works of Henry Fielding; the works of William Blake; Sentimentalism; Ethical Theory and Women's Fiction. Topics courses are subject to the approval of the undergraduate and committee.
ENGL 4500Romantic LiteratureBritish literature, 1785-1832. An introduction to genres, themes, and contexts of the Romantic period. Authors studied may include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, Mary and Percy Shelley.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Because the course will change from semester to semester, students are encouraged to refer to the English Department website for information concerning the course content for a specific semester. A possible series of texts, topics and assignments might resemble this: Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France and/or other works Mary Wollstonecraft, Vindication of the Rights of Woman and/or other works William Blake, Selected poetry and prose William Wordsworth, Selected poetry and prose Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Selected poetry and prose Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility, Mansfield Park, and/or other novels George Gordon, Lord Byron, Selected poetry and prose Thomas De Quincey, Confessions of an English Opium-Eater and/or other works Percy Bysshe Shelley, Selected poetry and prose Mary Shelley, Frankenstein and/or other texts John Keats, Selected poetry and prose Felicia Hemans, Selected poetry and prose Selected Romantic-era Drama (including the works of Joanna Baillie, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and Felicia Hemans) Selected correspondence of the period (for example, the letters of John Keats) Possible topics could include: the Revolution Controversy, the development of the Gothic, the development of the lyric, and/or innovations in the novel. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests, critical essays, and in-class writing assignments.
ENGL 4510Nineteenth-Century British ProseBritish non-fiction prose from the Romantic period to the death of Queen Victoria (1901), with emphasis on the works of writers such as Wollstonecraft, Coleridge, De Quincey, Hazlitt, Lamb, Carlyle, Newman, Mill, Ruskin, Darwin, Arnold, Pater, and Wilde.Students will become familiar with a selection of nineteenth- century non-fiction prose texts, they will gain some knowledge about the historical, political, and cultural forces that shaped non-fiction prose of the period, and they will gain experience in analyzing and writing about the literature.Instructors are free to structure the course as they see fit. The focus of the course will be works by writers such as those listed in the course description above. In most cases, attention will be paid to contextualizing the works within the chronology of the period as well as within its major literary, historical, cultural, and political movements.
ENGL 4530Victorian LiteratureBritish literature from the first Reform Bill (1832) to the death of Queen Victoria (1901), with emphasis on the poetry and non-fiction prose of writers such as Tennyson, Elizabeth and Robert Browning, Arnold, Carlyle, Mill, Ruskin, and Christina and Dante Gabriel Rossetti.
ENGL 4540Victorian PoetryBritish poetry from the first Reform Bill (1832) to the death of Queen Victoria (1901), with emphasis on the works of writers such as Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning, Tennyson, Emily Bronte, Gabriel Rossetti, Christina Rossetti, Arnold, Clough, Meredith, Swinburne, Webster, Hopkins, Levy, Field, Yeats, and Hardy.Students will become familiar with the works of a selection of Victorian poets, they will gain some knowledge about the historical, political, and cultural forces that shaped the poetry of the period, and they will gain experience in analyzing and writing about these works.Instructors are free to structure the course as they see fit. The focus of the course will be works by writers such as those listed in the course description above. In most cases, attention will be paid to contextualizing the works within the chronology of the period as well as within its major literary, historical, cultural, and political movements.
ENGL 4590Topics in Nineteenth-Century British LiteratureA special topic not otherwise offered in the English curriculum. Topics and instructors vary from semester to semester.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Because the course will change from semester to semester, students are encouraged to refer to the English Department website for information concerning the course content for a specific semester. Topics in the past have included: Byron, the Shelleys and their Circle Celluloid and Cyberspace: Jane Austen in and out of her time From Caleb to Frankenstein: Novels of the Romantic Period Romantic Opera Research in Victorian Literature and Culture: the 1850s Literature, Technology, and Science in the Nineteenth Century Hawthorne, James, Hardy, and Eliot Victorian Gothic The Victorian New Woman Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests, critical essays, and in-class writing assignments.
ENGL 4640Film as LiteratureThe interpretation of films, with emphasis on the relationships between motion pictures and British and American literature. Students will be expected to achieve the following: 1) a general understanding of the theoretical issues surrounding the relationship between literature and film; 2) a general knowledge of the history of filmmaking; 3) a vocabulary for discussing films, in particular those based on specific literary sources; 4) an enhanced ability to write fluent analyses of films and their literary sources 5) an appreciation of film as an artistic medium, especially of its qualities as narrative.This course is taught by instructors with a wide variety of specialties within the field of British and American literature, thus texts and films to be studied and organizing themes will vary from semester to semester. In general, students can expect that attention will be paid to some or all of the following topics: 1) the political, cultural, and historical contexts of film as an artistic medium; 2) the history of filmmaking; 3) theoretical issues surrounding the relationship between literature and film; 4) the use of film as a means of literary, historical, and cultural interpretation.
ENGL 4650Modern DramaThe drama of Europe and America from the realism of Ibsen and Strindberg to the present.The course has three integrated goals. (1) Students will become thoroughly familiar with the major works of the period, as well as their historical and social contexts; (2)students will develop their skills for reading, watching and enjoying plays; (3) students will write and speak fluently about the works studied.This course is taught by instructors with a wide variety of approaches to the field, thus texts to be studied and organizing themes will vary from semester to semester. In general, students can expect that attention will be paid to some or all of the following topics: 1. the history of drama; 2. historical and biographical contexts of modern drama; 3. theoretical issues surrounding plays as both playscript and performance; 4. continuities and discontinuities of theme in modern drama.
ENGL 4660Twentieth-Century British PoetryBritish poetry since the 1890's.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of examinations, essays, and oral presentations. Works to be studied may include the following: Yeats, Selected Poems; Hardy, Selected Poems; Auden, Selected Poems; T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land and Other Poems; Silkin, ed., The Penguin Book of First World War Poetry; Thomas, Selected Poems; Larkin, Whitsun Weddings; Gunn, Selected Poems; Smith, Selected Poems; Hill, Mercian Hymns
ENGL 4670The Twentieth-Century British NovelFiction of such representative British novelists of the twentieth century as Bowen, Conrad, Forster, Joyce, Lawrence, Waugh, Woolf, and Greene.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of examinations, essays, and oral presentations. Works to be studied may include the following: Conrad, _Heart of Darkness_; Lawrence, _Sons and Lovers_; Joyce, _Dubliners_; Forster, _A Passage to India_; Woolf, _To the Lighthouse_; Waugh, _A Handful of Dust_; Isherwood, _Goodbye to Berlin_; Bowen, _The Death of the Heart_; Beckett, _Molloy_; Rhys, _Wide Sargasso Sea_.
ENGL 4680Modern Irish LiteratureFiction, poetry, and drama of the Irish Renaissance and after. At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of examinations, essays, and oral presentations. Works to be studied may include the following: Yeats, Selected Poems; Joyce, Dubliners; Synge, Selected Plays; MacNiece, Selected Poems; Trevor, Ireland; Heaney, Selected Poems; Mahon, Selected Poems; McCabe, The Dead School; Johnston, The Railway Station Man; O’Faiolain, Selected Stories; Ormsby, Poets from the North of Ireland
ENGL 4690Topics in Twentieth-Century British LiteratureA special topic not otherwise offered in the English curriculum. Topics and instructors vary from semester to semester.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject-matter of the course.The instructor will define an area of investigation in the field of twentieth-century British literature, drawing on works of poetry and prose, both fictional and non-fictional. In addition to works by British authors, readings may include other texts pertinent to a particular topic. As well as literary texts, course materials may include music and the visual arts, and readings in history, philosophy, psychology, and critical theory. Student work will consist of some combination of examinations, essays, and oral presentations. Works to be studied for a topic such as “Anglo-American Modernism” may include the following: James, The Turn of the Screw and selected essays; Conrad, The Secret Agent; T.S. Eliot, Collected Poems and selected essays; Ford, The Good Soldier; Lawrence, Women in Love; Joyce, Ulysses; Woolf, Mrs Dalloway and selected essays; Loy, The Last Lunar Baedeker; Gay, ed., A Freud Reader
ENGL 4700People of Paradox: American Colonial VoicesThe literary engagement with cultural pluralism in Colonial America. Writers may include Bradford, Mather, Bradstreet, Taylor, Cooke, Rowlandson, Byrd, Jefferson, Franklin, Brown, and Irving.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation Bradstreet, "Meditations Divine and Moral" Taylor, Selected Poems Rowlandson, "A Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson" Byrd, Histories of the Dividing Line Franklin, The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia Brown, Wieland Irving, The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon
ENGL 4710Emancipated Imagination: American RenaissanceAmerican poetry, fiction, and prose written between 1820 and 1865. Writers may include Cooper, Poe, Caroline Kirkland, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Stowe, Harriet Jacobs, Douglass, Melville, Whitman, and Dickinson.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Cooper, The Last of the Mohicans Emerson, Nature Thoreau, Walden Kirkland, A New Home Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter Melville, Moby-Dick Douglass, The Narrative of Frederick Douglass Whitman, Leaves of Grass Dickinson, selected poems
ENGL 4720American Realism and NaturalismRegionalism, realism, and naturalism from 1865 to 1918 with attention to the themes of ethical conflict, determinism, urbanization, the New Woman, and the contributions of ethnic minorities. Writers may include Twain, James, Wharton, Jewett, Dunbar-Nelson, Zitkala-Sa, Chopin, Chesnutt, Crane, Howells, Dreiser, and Sui Sin Far.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: The Portable American Realism Reader, ed. James Nagel and Thomas Quirk Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Stephen Crane, The Red Badge of Courage Sarah Orne Jewett, The Country of the Pointed Firs Kate Chopin, The Awakening Sui Sin Far, Mrs. Spring Fragrance Charles Chesnutt, The Wife of His Youth and Other Stories Henry James, The Portrait of a Lady
ENGL 4730The American Novel to 1900The growth of the novel in America from its inception in the Romantic to the development of the Realistic novel. Writers may include Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Simms, James, Howells, Stowe, Chesnutt, Dreiser, Norris, and Crane.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Cooper, The Deerslayer Hawthorne, The House of Seven Gables Melville, Redburn Twain, Roughing It Simms, The Yemassee James, The American Howells, The Rise of Silas Lapham Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin Chesnutt, The Marrow of Tradition Dreiser, Sister Carrie Crane, Maggie
ENGL 4740Southern LiteratureThe literature of the South from its roots through the modern renaissance. Writers may include Byrd, Cooke, Longstreet, Simms, Poe, Timrod, Lanier, Chopin, Twain, the Agrarians, Toomer, Roberts, Faulkner, Hurston, Welty, Porter, O'Connor, Wolfe, Percy, Crews, Berry, Kenan, Tyler, Dickey, Chappell, Alice Walker, and McCarthy. At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Simms, The Yemassee Cable, The Grandissimes Chesnutt, The Marrow of Tradition Toomer, Cane Faulkner, Go Down, Moses Porter, Pale Horse, Pale Rider Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God Welty, Golden Apples
ENGL 4750American ModernismThe fiction, poetry, drama, and non-fiction prose that expresses the literary experimentation and social transformations of the period from 1918 to 1960. Writers may include Eliot, Pound, Stein, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Toomer, Miller, O'Neill, Williams, Larsen, Steinbeck, Salinger, and O'Connor. At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Eliot, The Waste Land Pound, Cantos Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises Faulkner, The Sound and the Fury Dos Passos, Mid-Century Toomer, Cane Stein, Three Lives Miller, Death of a Salesman Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye
ENGL 4760Contemporary American LiteratureVarious aspects of American fiction, poetry, drama, or non-fiction prose since 1960. The emphasis will vary from semester to semester following new developments in literature.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: John Ashbery, Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror Sylvia Plath, Ariel Art Spiegelman, Maus Raymond Carver, Cathedral Toni Morrison, Beloved Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49 Maxine Hong Kingston, The Woman Warrior James Baldwin, The Fire Next Time Fredric Jameson, "Postmodernism and Consumer Society" Postmodernism: A Reader, ed. Thomas Docherty
ENGL 4770Twentieth-Century American PoetryIdeas and forms in American poetry in the twentieth century. Writers may include Eliot, Pound, H.D., Stein, Stevens, Rich, Sexton, Roethke, Harjo, Lorde, Perlman, Howe, Ashbery, Lowell, Moore, Williams, and Frost.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: William Carlos Williams, Selected Poems Robert Frost, Selected Poems T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land Gertrude Stein, Tender Buttons H.D., Selected Poems Wallace Stevens, The Palm at the End of the Mind Langston Hughes, Selected Poems Robert Lowell, Selected Poems Sylvia Plath, Ariel Gwendolyn Brooks, Selected Poems Elizabeth Bishop, Geography III
ENGL 4780Twentieth-Century American NovelThe development of the American novel from Naturalism through Modernism and Post-Modernism. Writers may include Cather, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Wright, Steinbeck, Faulkner, Porter, O'Connor, Ellison, Heller, Morrison, and Percy.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Cather, My Antonia! Toomer, Cane Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath Porter, Pale Horse, Pale Rider Erdrich, Love Medicine Morrison, The Bluest Eye Cisneros, The House on Mango Street O'Brien, Going After Cacciato
ENGL 4790Topics in American LiteratureA special topic not otherwise offered in the English curriculum. Topics and instructors vary from semester to semester. At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course. Topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers.The choice and sequence of be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: William Carlos Williams, Selected Poems Wallace Stevens, The Palm at the End of the Mind Gertrude Stein, Tender Buttons John Ashbery, Selected Poems Barbara Guest, Selected Poems James Schuyler, Selected Poems Frank O'Hara, Selected Poems Derek Walcott, Selected Poems Essays on poetry and the visual arts
ENGL 4800Topics in Advanced Creative WritingAdvanced instruction in creative writing. Focus may be short fiction, poetry, non-fiction, performative writing, novel writing, hypertext, or hybrid forms.This course is designed to improve students’ creative and critical faculties as they pertain to a single genre of creative writing. ENGL 4800 focuses on one of the following genres--poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, memoir, prose poetry, micro fiction, or performative writing. Students will learn about the writing process, revision, and editing as well as formal possibilties of the genre under consideration. Students will be expected to read contemporary works of literature and to respond to their peers' writing. A final portfolio of student writing is required.The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the intstructor may be necessary. The focus and coverage will vary from semester to semester and instructor to instructor, but topics of study can include: Reading and Writing Poetry Reading and Writing Fiction Reading and Writing Creative Nonfiction Reading and Writing Prose Poetry Reading and Writing Memoir Reading and Writing Micro Fiction Reading and Writing Performative Writing Craft Lectures Invention Editing Revising
ENGL 4810Literary Magazine Editing and PublishingStudents will engage in all aspects of editing and producing a literary magazine while learning about contemporary literature and literary culture through theoretical, aesthetic, critical, and practical components.Because many students hope to publish their own work in literary magazines or work as editors themselves, this course will give students the opportunity to consider the various issues of editing, as well as learn the more practical side of the process through reading and evaluating submitted poems; discussing submissions at editorial meetings; learning how to solicit authors, copy edit, design and lay out a magazine; and learn about distribution, subscription management, marketing and promotion. At the end of the course, students are expected to have a strong theoretical and practical understanding of literary magazine editing.While assignments and course structure may vary according to professor, in general students will be expected to: Read and evaluate journal submissions weekly and maintain written reports. Research and give a presentation on a literary magazine. Write a review of a recent book and submit it for publication. Perform one production-related task (for example, copy editing, layout, subscription management, advertising, preparing a bid, organizing a promotional event). Attend class regularly, participate actively, lead one weekly editorial meeting.
ENGL 4830Advanced Studies in WritingAdvanced study of writing as process and product, focusing on particular discourse situations or kinds of texts. Topics might typically be advanced technical communication, academic writing for literary scholars, or text and hypertext.ENGL 4830 is a topics course. Its goals are: 1. Advanced study of writing as process and product; 2. Intensive focus on particular discourse situations or kinds of writing; 3. Theoretical and practical experience with the discourses focused on in each version of the course.Since this is a topics course, its subject varies very much from semester to semester and from teacher to teacher. Some of the topics that might be addressed in this class include: 1. Advanced studies in Technical Communication 2. Writing for the World Wide Web 3. Ecological Writing 4. Hypertext and Hypertextuality 5. Autobiography and Personal Writing
ENGL 4835Environmental LiteratureEnglish and American literary works that speak directly to environmental issues and address the consequences of human activity on local, regional, and global natural systems.Upon completion of the course, students will be familiar with environmental themes in the writings of authors in the traditional genres of English and/or American literature and in the emerging contemporary genre of Nature Writing. They will be conversant with contemporary perspectives in environmental studies and the politics of environmental awareness reflected in poetry, short fiction and novels, and non-fiction essays. The course is designed to help students satisfy the Environmental Literacy requirement instituted by the University Council in March 1998, which calls for curriculum addressing (1) "Basic scientific principles which govern natural systems" and (2) "The consequences of human activity on local, regional, and global natural systems."Given the breadth of the subject and the wealth of available textual materials, the topical outline for specific instantiations of the course may vary considerably. For example, the course could be organized as the exploration of diverse writings by a single author such as John Muir, Barbara Kingsolver, Scott Sanders, Edward Abbey, Annie Dillard, or Wendell Berry; it could address environmental themes arising in a single genre such as poetry, short fiction, novels, or non-fiction essays; it could be divided along national lines to highlight environmental issues in traditional authors and genres in English or American literature; the course could focus on recent contributions in the contemporary genre of Nature Writing. A sample outline for a reasonable offering of this course is as follows: Environmental Literature I. Definitions and Distinctions. A. Ecology vs. Environmentalism B. Ecocriticism vs. Nature Writing C. Environmental literature vs. the literature of advocacy II. The Concept of "Nature." A. Ancient Greece B. Medieval Europe C. Modern science D. Contemporary/postmodern III. Nature as subject and the natural world as background. A. Wilderness: conservation vs. preservation B. Agrarianism: "Wise Use" and environmental ethics C. Urbanism/New Urbanism: responsible dwelling on the land D. Domains of devastation: pollution, war, natural disaster IV. Environmental awareness and the construction of character. A. Poetic characters and personae B. The narrators and characters of short fiction C. Character and persona in the novel D. The personae of an essay V. Environmental domains in literary fiction. A. Wilderness: untamed nature B. Rural/Agrarian: nature harnessed C. Suburban: nature subdued D. Urban: nature obliterated E. Domains of devastation Available texts for use in the course might include, e.g., Robert Finch and John Elder, eds., _Nature Writing: The Tradition in English_ (2002); Lorraine Anderson, Scott Slovic, and John P. O'Grady, eds., _Literature and the Environment: A Reader on Nature and Culture_ (1999); John Elder, _Imagining the Earth: Poetry and the Vision of Nature_ (1996); Cheryl Glotfelty, and Harold Fromm, eds., _The Ecocriticism Reader: Landmarks in Literary Ecology_ (1996). Authors and their works could include, among many others too numerous to list, Edward Abbey, Joseph Conrad, Charles Darwin, Annie Dillard, William Faulkner, Wes Jackson, Barbara Kingsolver, Aldo Leopold, John Muir, Sigurd Olson, Scott Sanders, Gary Snyder, Henry David Thoreau, Walt Whitman, and William Wordsworth.
ENGL 4840Internship in Literary MediaAn internship with a literary arts or media venue of the student's choice, with departmental approval and under the direction of the Undergraduate English Program Office and onsite internship advisor. Internship work may include publishing, editing, and arts administration. The internship will culminate with a final academic project.Students will gain experience in the fields of writing, editing, publishing, arts administration, and/or literary media production.Specific topics will be determined by the professor of record in partnership with the student's on-site internship advisor. Topics may include: History of publishing History of alternative presses History of small and minority presses Fundamentals of editing Literary arts administration Grant writing Academic publication marketing Manuscript preparation and review Professional communication
ENGL 4850Rhetoric, Literature, and TextualityThe relationship between rhetoric and the practice of writing, both literary and non-literary; from classical to contemporary theories of rhetoric (especially the role of writing in each theory) and the practical analysis of texts. Prerequisite: Two of the following: CMLT 2210 or CMLT 2220 or ENGL 2310 or ENGL 2320 or ENGL 2330 or ENGL 2340 or ENGL 2400. Course Description: The relationship between rhetoric and the practice of writing, both literary and non-literary; from classical to contemporary theories of rhetoric (especially the role of writing in each theory) and the practical analysis of texts. Course Objectives: A primary objective of the course is to provide students with an understanding of how theories of rhetoric, particularly the classical theories of the sophists, Plato, and Aristotle, have influenced practices of textual production (composition) and of textual reception (reading and interpretation).Topical Outline: The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary. The focus and coverage will vary from semester to semester and instructor to instructor, but topics of examination will include: theories of composing texts, literary and non-literary; rhetorical theories of persuasion, invention, and style and their relationship to literary texts; rhetorical analyses of literary works.
ENGL 4860Multicultural Topics in American LiteratureTopics in multicultural studies, with primary focus on literature by members of one or more traditionally marginalized cultural groups within the United States and with attention to historical context and theoretical aspects.The purpose of the course is to provide students with a detailed knowledge of one or more of the following cultures-- African American, Native American, Latino/a, and/or Asian American. Students will learn about the history of cultural diversity in the United States. They will also be taught how to do scholarly research and to write an analytical essay.Readings will include: 1. novels, drama, poetry, short stories, oral literature, popular culture, art, music, and/or architecture. 2. secondary and primary materials related to the culture(s) being studied. Topics to be covered may include: 1. African American, Native American, Latino/a, and/or Asian American literature 2. The history of cultural diversity in the United States 3. Multicultural theory
ENGL 4888Humanities Computing I: Knowledge RepresentationDesign and creation of data structures for computer-based scholarship in literary and linguistic study. Students will be exposed to the relevant theoretical literature in humanities computing and will study several technologies in detail. Students will be expected to generate critical work and to complete a computer-based project.The student should become conversant with and demonstrate competence in the topics below. In particular, students should be able to understand the principles of mark-up, its differences from conventional editing and its application to literary texts; to write programs using regular expressions to analyze and manipulate text; to author simple conversational "'bots"; to appreciate the impact computer- mediated communication is exerting on print-based conceptions of "literature" and "writing"; and to compose sophisticated unix-based web-sites employing XML-mark-up, cascading style-sheets, and multimedia.1.Unix. an introduction to the operating environment for the department's servers; its history and evolution over three decades; its "philosophy"; utilities; account management; Linux: unix for the desktop. 2. Emacs. the versatile, multi-featured text editors for Unix. 3. Perl. the powerful yet accessible language of choice for text manipulation in Unix; a brief review of programming fundamentals (arrays, conditional statements, loops) and, the reason for preferring Perl: 4. Regular expressions. the art and science of formulating algorithms to search and query strings of characters in ways adequate to the variation and complexity of literary text. 5. Optical character recognition. capturing text with a scanner and OCR software. 6. Mark-up. the art and science of making texts useful for computer manipulation by indicating or "tagging"--marking up-- aspects to be studied (an endeavor which connects directly with the rich history of editorial theory). The principles of eXtensible Mark-up Language (XML) and the Text-Encoding Initiative (TEI) are the principal concerns here, including their application in: 7. Large-text databases. a consideration of the Chadwyck-Healey and other literary databases; the linguistic atlas (UGA); other concordancing programs (TACT, WordCruncher) 8. MOOs. the composition of interactive, text-based environments; especially "'bots"--primitive programs which inter-act on the basis of text expressions and introduce elementary considerations of natural-language processing 9. Hypertext. an historical and theoretical consideration of the concept which embodies the new literary experience wrought by computer-enabled communication. 10. Image editing. basic techniques in "Photoshop," with particular attention to the optimization of images for use over the web. 11. Power point. the widely-used electronic "slide-show" presentation device. 12. Web design. the authoring of web pages using XML, "style- sheets" and web scripting such as Perl-CGI and JavaScript; web site editing programs; an overview of the university-supported web-environment, WebCT. 13. Multimedia. basic audio and video capture, editing, and file management.
ENGL 4995Senior SeminarA seminar-style course whose topic is chosen by the professor and taught with an emphasis on research skills, culminating in a research paper of significant length (twenty pages with bibliography).Senior seminars are focused courses designed by professors, offering interested students a graduate-seminar kind of experience as a capstone course to their studies, and resulting in a research paper of significant length (twenty pages with bibliography). This course is intended to help students prepare for a post-graduate education, and will emphasize literary research methods.The focus and coverage will vary from each semester and by each professor, but topics of study can include: specific literary movements or schools of thought focused look at an author or authors lectures on research methods instruction in writing a research paper
ENGL 6250Medieval DramaEnglish drama from its beginnings to the opening of the public theater in 1576.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of liturgical and dramatic literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. A typical reading list for one presentation of the course would include a selection of dramatically elaborated liturgical rituals; one or more early church dramas such as Le Jeu d'Adam or The Play of Daniel; selections from one or more of the English Mystery Cycles; several examples of English morality plays such as The Castle of Perseverance, Everyman, or Mankind; one or more of the Miracle Plays, such as The Croxton Play of the Sacrament; and one or more examples from 16th century English humanist Drama such as The Play of the Weather or Wit and Science. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers.
ENGL 6260Middle English LiteratureEnglish literature of the thirteenth, fourteenth, and fifteenth centuries, exclusive of Chaucer and the drama.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of representative literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of sophistication. They will have acquainted themselves with a variety of medieval narrative forms and structures, the function of traditional genres, and the socio-historical contexts of the production of these texts. Moreover, students will be able to show a knowledge of key issues in the critical history and reception of these texts and current major trends of research in the area.The choice and sequence of topics will vary every semester depending on the instructor. The topics will consist of selected primary and secondary texts to be read outside of class discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of time and circumstances of their production as well as in the light of recent scholarly opinion. Periodically, during the semester, students will perform a combination of graded tasks which may include, but is not restricted to, tests, out-of-class papers, and class examinations. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Ancrene Wisse and the Katherine Group: Bella Millet & Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, Medieval English Prose for Women; Nicholas Watson et al, Anchoritic Spirituality. Romance/Hagiography/Chronicles: Studies in the Auchinleck and Thornton MSS; Donald Sands, ed, Middle English Verse Romances; Chandos Herald, Life of the Black Prince; Froissart, Les enseignements Edouard III; Eve Salisbury & Anne Laskaya, ed., Breton Lays. The Pearl-Poet: Andrew and Waldron, ed., Poems of the Pearl Manuscript; Brewer & Gibson, ed., Companion to the Gawain Poet. The Mystics--Rolle, Hilton, Julian, and the Cloud-Author: Barry Windeatt, ed., English Mystics of the Middle Ages; Karen Armstorng, Visions of God; Phyllis Hodgson, ed., Three 14th Century English Mystics. Heresy and Apoclaptycism: James Dean, ed., Medieval English Political Writings; James Dean, ed., Six Ecclesiastical Satires; Wimbledon's Sermon; The Poems of Laurence Minot; Wyclif, Extant English Works; Anne Hudson, The Pre-mature Reformation. Langland: E.V.C. Schmidt, ed., B Version; D. Pearsall, ed., C Text; John Alford, ed., Companion to Piers Plowman; Charlotte Brewer, Editing Piers Plowman. Texts, Manuscripts, and Contexts: Siegfried Wenzel & S. Nicholls, ed., The Whole Book; A.J. Minnis, Crux and Controversy; R. Hanna, Pursuing History; Anne Hudson, The Lollards and their Books. Scribes, Scripts, and Readers: Malcolm Parkes, English Cursive Book Hands; Scribes, scripts, and readers; P.N.R. Robinson & Rivkah Zim, ed., Of the making of books. The Scottish Chaucerians: Persall, ed., Chaucer to Spenser, An Anthology; Henryson, Poems & Fables; Gavin Douglas, Palice of Honoure; Dunbar, Selections. The Fifteenth-Century: Malory, Morte Darthur; Derek Pearsall, Chaucer to Spenser, An Anthology. The Late-Medieval Lyric: religious and secular: Rosemary Woolf, English Religious Lyrics in the Middle Ages; Douglas Gray, ed., English Medieval Religious Lyrics; Themes and Images in the Medieval English Lyric; G.L. Brook, ed., The Harley Lyrics; Daniel Ransom, Irony and Parody in the Harley Lyrics; Charles d'Orleans, Lyrics and Ballads.
ENGL 6290Topics in Medieval LiteratureSpecial topics in Medieval literature to 1500.Specific course objectives will be topic-specific; however, the objective of the course overall is to maximize graduate-students' exposure to the broadest range of curricular subjects possible within the very broad range of possibilities inherent within the literature of the Middle Ages. Also, the course aims to maximize the connection between faculty-members specialized research and their graduate-students' studies. At the end of any specific course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course. Graduate-students who enroll in the course will emerge with detailed knowledge of a topic not otherwise treated in the regular medieval curriculum; they will have the advantage of exposure to latest developments in a specialized area of their professors' research.Topics will be determined by the faculty-member offering the course in any given semester and therefore cannot be outlined here. However, the traditional topical outlines by chronological period within the medieval period (Old English and Middle English), by genre (epic, romance, lyric, drama, prose narrative), or author (Chaucer, Skelton, Aelfric, Wulfstan, etc.) would naturally occur as faculty propose offerings of the course. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and readings might resemble this: English Literature in the Age of Columbus (including Skelton, Henryson, and other late-fifteenth-century writers). Middle English Romance (including Malory, the Gawain poet, and other writers of Middle English romances). Middle English Religious Writing (including the Ancrene Wisse, the Agenbyt of Inwit, and other Middle English religious writings). Middle English Literature and Classical Tradition (including Middle English mythographers, translations of classical works like Douglas' Aeneid, and other relevant works). Paleography of Medieval English Writings (including Old and Middle English texts).
ENGL 6310SpenserA study of The Faerie Queene, The Shepheardes Calender, and the Amoretti, with attention to Spenser's other works and his literary context.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: > “The Shepheardes Calender” > Other short poems (commemorative and satirical) > “Amoretti” and “Epithalamion” > The Faerie Queene, book 1 > The Faerie Queene, book 2 > The Faerie Queene, books 3-4 > The Faerie Queene, book 5 > The Faerie Queene, book 6 > “Mutability Cantos” (sometimes called “book 7”)
ENGL 6330Shakespeare II: Special TopicsSpecial topics related to Shakespeare.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with aconsiderable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice of a topic, and selection and sequence of sub- topics, will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The sub-topics will consist of selected works, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible topic, “Shakespeare on Love,” might result in sub- topics and assignments resembling these: > Coming of age--the magic of love: A Midsummer Night’s Dream and The Tempest > Tragic love for the young and the not-so-young: Romeo and Juliet and Antony and Cleopatra > Miscegenation in love: The Merchant of Venice and Othello > Transgressing (or almost transgressing) other taboos: As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Pericles
ENGL 6360Renaissance ProseProse of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, such as works by More, Sidney, Bacon, Donne, Browne, and Bunyan.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: > George Cavendish, The Life and Death of Cardinal Wolsey > William Roper, Life of Sir Thomas More > Thomas More, A Dialogue of Comfort against Tribulation > Philip Sidney, Arcadia > Francis Bacon, Selected essays > John Donne, Selected sermons and meditations > Thomas Browne, Hydriotaphia, or Urn Burial (selections) > Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy (selections) > John Bunyan, The Pilgrim’s Progress
ENGL 6370MiltonThe works and times of John Milton.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: > Short poems > Selected prose works > Paradise Lost > Paradise Regained > Samson Agonistes
ENGL 6430The Eighteenth-Century English NovelThe English novel from Defoe to 1800, including novels by Richardson, Fielding, Smollet, and Sterne, the Gothic novel, and the novel of purpose.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course. In particular, 1. The course will introduce students to British fiction of the long eighteenth century (c. 1660 - c.1800). 2. The course will situate this fiction in the historical, social, political and literary milieu of this period.The selection of novels read and discussed will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. However, the novels will be read and analyzed using critical skills of various kinds (e.g., historical, close reading, comparative, structural, psychoanalytical, feminist, etc.) In addition to being examined on the material, students will write critical on one or more of the novels. Research projects may also be assigned. A sample syllabus might include Aphra Behn's OROONOKO, Daniel Defoe's MOLL FLANDERS, Samuel Richardson's PAMELA or CLARISSA, Henry Fielding's TOM JONES or JOSEPH ANDREWS, Sarah Fielding's DAVID SIMPLE, Laurence Sterne's TRISTRAM SHANDY, Tobias Smollett's HUMPHREY CLINKER, Frances Burney's EVELINA and Charlotte Smith's THE YOUNG PHILOSOPHER.
ENGL 6450William BlakeThe works, times, and critical heritage of William Blake.At the end of our course, students, having read a substantial body of writing by, about, and which influenced William Blake, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) was a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the author and period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.the choice and sequence of topics will very from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: --"Poetical Sketches" --Songs of Innocence and of Experience --The Book of Thel --The Marriage of Heaven and Hell --VISIONS of the Daughters of Albion and Mary Wollstonecraft --The Book of Urizen --Milton: a poem -- Blake's notebook poems and letters
ENGL 6500Early Romantic LiteratureWordsworth, Coleridge, and other writers.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss assigned primary and secondary sources (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Because the course will change from semester to semester, students are encouraged to refer to the English Department website for information concerning the course content for a specific semester. A possible series of texts, topics and assignments might resemble this: Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France and/or other works Mary Wollstonecraft, Vindication of the Rights of Woman and/or other works William Blake, Selected poetry and prose Charlotte Smith, Selected poetry and prose William Wordsworth, Selected poetry and prose Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Selected poetry and prose Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility and/or other novels Readings in literary theory and literary analysis Selected correspondence of the period (for example, the letters of Mary Wollstonecraft) Possible topics could include: the Revolution Controversy, the development of the Gothic, Romantic Drama, the development of the lyric, and/or innovations in the novel. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests, in-class writing assignments, and a long sophisticated and substantial essay informed by an understanding of the critical history of the texts and period.
ENGL 6510Later Romantic LiteratureByron, Shelley, Keats, and other writers.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss assigned primary and secondary sources (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Because the course will change from semester to semester, students are encouraged to refer to the English Department website for information concerning the course content for a specific semester. A possible series of texts, topics and assignments might resemble this: George Gordon, Lord Byron, Selected poetry and prose Thomas De Quincey, Confessions of an English Opium-Eater and/or other works Percy Bysshe Shelley, Selected poetry and prose Mary Shelley, Frankenstein and/or other texts John Keats, Selected poetry and prose Felicia Hemans, Selected poetry and prose Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Selected poetry and prose Readings in literary theory and literary analysis Selected Romantic-era Drama (including the works of Joanna Baillie, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and Felicia Hemans) Selected Correspondence of the period (for example, the letters of John Keats) Possible topics could include: the Revolution Controversy, the development of the Gothic, the development of the lyric, and/or innovations in the novel. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests, in-class writing assignments, and a long sophisticated and substantial essay informed by an understanding of the critical history of the texts and period.
ENGL 6580Topics in Multicultural LiteratureSelected topics focussing on one or more cultures and exploring a variety of literary forms with some attention to historical context and theoretical aspects of multiculturalism.To train students to think and write critically about cultural issues. To improve students' analytical writing skills. To expand students' awareness of literature written in english. To train students to teach multiculturalism (e.g. ENGL 1020M, 2400).Example 1: "The Empire Writes Back" Ashcroft, Griffiths, Tiffin, The Empire Writes Back Frantz Fanon, Blake Faces, White Masks Euripides, The Bacchae Wole Soyinka. The Bacchae of Euripides Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness Tayib Saleh, A Season of Migration to the North excerpts from the Koran Salman Rushdie, Satanic Verses "Song of Solomon" from the Bible Toni Morrison, Song of Solomon Charlotte Bront‰ Jane Eyre Jean Rhys, Sargasso Sea excerpts from Homer's Odyssey Derek Walcott, Omeros Example 2: "The Multicultural Origins of Georgia" Introduction: Guest Lecturer, Hugh Ruppersburg, editor, Georgia Voices Tour to Native American archeological site, Guest Lecturer Charles Hudson, Anthropology The Spanish Influence in Georgia; Guest Lecturer: Carmen Tesser, Romance Languages The African Influence in Georgia; film: Julie Dash, Daughters of the Dust, Guest Lecturer: Josie Beoku-Betts, Sociology Antebellum Georgia and the Civil War, Guest Lecturer: Emory Thomas, History Flannery O'Connor: Guest Lecturer, Jim Kibler, English Alice Walker; Guest Lecturer: Barbara McCaskill, English Appalachian Culture: Foxfire and Deliverance; Guest Lecturer: John Inscoe, History Conclusion Example 3: "The Native American Renaissance" Louis Owens, Other Destinies N. Scott Momaday, The Way to Rainy Mountain N. Scott Momaday, House Made of Dawn James Welch, Fools Crow Gerald Vizenor, Shadow Distance Paula Gunn Allen, The Sacred Hoop Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony Louise Erdrich, Tracks Joy Harjo, The Woman Who Fell from the Sky Thoams King, Green Grass, Running Water
ENGL 6600Issues in Feminist Theory and CriticismStudy of topics and approaches in feminist criticism.This course will explore major questions of gender as they are related to literary study. The course will make it possible for graduate students to read with understanding and to consider questions of reader as writer and as reader, of woman as object and subject, of the ideological construction of gender.The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary. The focus and coverage will vary from semester to semester and instructor to instructor, but topics of examination will include: - What is Woman? - American Feminism: Feminist Critique to Gynocriticism - French Feminisms - Semiotics and Feminism - Psychoanalysis and Feminism - Marxism and Feminism - Black/Women of Color Feminism
ENGL 6640Film as LiteratureThe interpretation of films, with emphasis on the relationships between motion pictures and British and American literature.Students will be expected to achieve the following: 1) a general understanding of the theoretical issues surrounding the relationship between literature and film; 2) a general knowledge of the history of filmmaking; 3) a vocabulary for discussing films, in particular those based on specific literary sources; 4) an enhanced ability to write fluent analyses of films and their literary sources 5) an appreciation of film as an artistic medium, especially of its qualities as narrative.This course is taught by instructors with a wide variety of specialties within the field of British and American literature, thus texts and films to be studied and organizing themes will vary from semester to semester. In general, students can expect that attention will be paid to some or all of the following topics: 1) the political, cultural, and historical contexts of film as an artistic medium; 2) the history of filmmaking; 3) theoretical issues surrounding the relationship between literature and film; 4) the use of film as a means of literary, historical, and cultural interpretation.
ENGL 6660Twentieth-Century British PoetryBritish poetry since the 1890's.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of examinations, essays, and oral presentations. Works to be studied may include the following: Yeats, Selected Poems; Hardy, Selected Poems; Auden, Selected Poems; T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land and Other Poems; Silkin, ed., The Penguin Book of First World War Poetry; Thomas, Selected Poems; Larkin, Whitsun Weddings; Gunn, Selected Poems; Smith, Selected Poems; Hill, Mercian Hymns
ENGL 6670The Twentieth-Century British NovelFiction of such representative British novelists for the twentieth century as Bowen, Conrad, Forster, Joyce, Lawrence, Waugh, Woolf, and Greene.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of examinations, essays, and oral presentations. Works to be studied may include the following: Conrad, Heart of Darkness; Lawrence, Sons and Lovers; Joyce, Dubliners; Forster, A Passage to India; Woolf, To the Lighthouse; Waugh, A Handful of Dust; Isherwood, Goodbye to Berlin; Bowen, The Death of the Heart; Beckett, Molloy; Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea
ENGL 6680Modern Irish LiteratureFiction, poetry and drama of the Irish Renaissance and after.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of examinations, essays, and oral presentations. Works to be studied may include the following: Yeats, Selected Poems; Joyce, Dubliners; Synge, Selected Plays; MacNiece, Selected Poems; Trevor, Ireland; Heaney, Selected Poems; Mahon, Selected Poems; McCabe, The Dead School; Johnston, The Railway Station Man; O’Faiolain, Selected Stories; Ormsby, Poets from the North of Ireland
ENGL 6700Imperfect Unions: American Writing to 1820Literature of British North America and the new United States from William Bradford through the early work of Irving and Cooper. Writers may include Rowlandson, Bradstreet, Mather, Byrd, Woolman, Jefferson, Franklin, Equiano, Paine, Bartram, and Brown.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation Bradstreet, "Meditations Divine and Moral" Taylor, Selected Poems Rowlandson, "A Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson" Byrd, Histories of the Dividing Line Franklin, The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia Brown, Wieland Irving, The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon
ENGL 6710American Writing 1820-1865The writing that represents the achievement of American literature in the decades before the Civil War. Writers may include Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Hawthorne, Stowe, Douglass, Melville, Whitman, and Dickinson.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Cooper, The Deerslayer Hawthorne, The House of Seven Gables Melville, Redburn Simms, The Yemassee Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin Emerson, Nature Thoreau, "Civil Disobedience" Poe, stories and poems Douglass, The Narrative of Frederic Douglass Whitman, Leaves of Grass Dickinson, selected poems
ENGL 6720American Writing 1865-1918The major fiction and poetry of the period, with some attention to literary movements as well as the impact of the Civil War on American literature. Writers may include Whitman, Dickinson, James, Twain, Chesnutt, Crane, Norris, Wharton, and Chopin.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: The Portable American Realism Reader, ed. James Nagel and Thomas Quirk Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Stephen Crane, The Red Badge of Courage Sarah Orne Jewett, The Country of the Pointed Firs Kate Chopin, The Awakening Sui Sin Far, Mrs. Spring Fragrance Charles Chesnutt, The Wife of His Youth and Other Stories Henry James, The Portrait of a Lady
ENGL 6730American Fiction 1918-1960The development of ideas and forms in American fiction from the end of World War I to 1960. Writers may include Cather, Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Wright, Steinbeck, Porter, and Baldwin.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: The Portable American Realism Reader, ed. James Nagel and Thomas Quirk Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Stephen Crane, The Red Badge of Courage Sarah Orne Jewett, The Country of the Pointed Firs Kate Chopin, The Awakening Sui Sin Far, Mrs. Spring Fragrance Charles Chesnutt, The Wife of His Youth and Other Stories Henry James, The Portrait of a Lady
ENGL 6740American Poetry 1918-1960Ideas and forms in American poetry from 1918 to 1960. Among the writers to be considered may be Eliot, Pound, H.D., Stein, Stevens, Moore, Williams, and Frost.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: William Carlos Williams, Selected Poems Wallace Stevens, The Palm at the End of the Mind Gertrude Stein, Tender Buttons John Ashbery, Selected Poems Barbara Guest, Selected Poems James Schuyler, Selected Poems Frank O'Hara, Selected Poems Derek Walcott, Selected Poems
ENGL 6750American Writing After 1960The ideas and artistic expression of contemporary American prose and poetry. Writers may include Heller, Morrison, O'Brien, Kincaid, Erdrich, Lowell, Plath, Sexton, Rich, Roethke, Forche, Harjo, Howe, Ashbery, Lorde, and Perlman.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Heller, Catch-22 Morrison, Beloved O'Brien, Going After Cacciato Kincaid, Annie John Erdrich, Love Medicine Minot, Monkeys Cisneros, The House on Mango Street Butler, A Good Scent from a Strange M
ENGL 6780Southern WritingThe literary legacy of the American South. Writers may include Byrd, Poe, Simms, Cable, Chesnutt, Glasgow, Toomer, Faulkner, Porter, Hurston, Welty, O'Connor, Percy, Chappell, Crews, Cormac McCarthy, and Larry Brown.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Simms, The Yemassee Cable, The Grandissimes Chesnutt, The Marrow of Tradition Toomer, Cane Faulkner, Go Down, Moses Porter, Pale Horse, Pale Rider Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God Welty, Golden Apples
ENGL 6790Topics in American LiteratureThemes, literary traditions, and genres in American writing.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Sample topics course: American Confessional Poetry W.D. Snodgrass, Heart's Needle Robert Lowell, Selected Poems Sylvia Plath, The Collected Poems Elizabeth Bishop, The Complete Poems, 1927-1979 Anne Sexton, The Complete Poems Adrienne Rich, Collected Early Poems, 1950-1970 John Berryman, The Dream Songs Assigned essays in literary criticism and theory
ENGL 6800Topics in Forms and CraftTopics in and issues around the act of writing. Sample courses include The Art of Translation, The Art of the Book, The Novel Form, and Publishing and Editing.
ENGL 6840Folklore StudiesOne or more folk groups, folklore genres, or topics concerning folklore.Upon successful completion of the course, a student should be able to recognize what constitutes folklore (including identifying specific genres), to explain basic theories of transmission and function, to discuss how folklore functions in the students' own lives and in others' lives, to appreciate how a community expresses and perpetuates its values through folklore, and to think about folklore in its full socio-historic context. Depending on the specific course topic, the student should also be able to address all of these concerns with special attention to the folk group or genre under consideration.Topical outline: The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of primary materials in both oral and printed forms and secondary writings to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively with consideration of their function, genre identification, and socio-historic context. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks including some combination of tests, out-of-class papers, and fieldwork. A possible series of topics and assignments for the topic "Folk Narrative" might resemble this: Structure and taxonomy: David Pace, "Beyond Morphology: Levi Strauss and the Analysis of Folktales" Role of the individual tale-teller: Ilhan Basgoz, "The Tale-Singer and His Audience" Role of folktales in society: Carl Lindahl, "Jacks: The Name, the Tales, the American Tradition" Gender issues in folktales: Marcia K. Lieberman, "'Some Day My Prince Will Come': Female Acculturation through the Fairy Tale" Introduction to legend: Linda Degh and Andrew Vazsonyi, "Legend and Belief" Historical legend: Elissa R. Henken, National Redeemer Supernatural legend: Patricia Lysaght, "Women, Milk and Magic at the Boundary Festival of May" Contemporary Legend: Patricia A. Turner, I Heard It through the Grapevine
ENGL 6860History of Rhetoric and TextualityThe rhetorical tradition from antiquity to the present, emphasizing the development of writing and textuality.The purpose of this course is to introduce graduate students in English and related fields to the historical development of rhetoric and its influence on textuality and the teaching of writing.This course will emphasize different historical periods of rhetoric from antiquity to the present, emphasizing the development of writing and textuality. Topics might include 1. Classical rhetoric and its influence on the development of Western rhetoric and textuality. 2. Rhetoric and textuality in the English and/or American traditions. 3. The development of modern rhetoric and composition theory and practice.
ENGL 6870Rhetoric and Textual PracticeThe relationship between rhetorical theory and the practice of writing, both literary and non-literary.Course Description: The relationship between rhetorical theory and the practice of writing, both literary and non-literary. Course Objectives: A primary objective of the course is to provide students with an understanding of how theories of rhetoric, particularly the classical theories of the sophists, Plato, and Aristotle, have influenced practices of textual production (composition) and of textual reception (reading and interpretation).Topical Outline: The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary. The focus and coverage will vary from semester to semester and instructor to instructor, but topics of examination may include: the influence of focus and coverage will vary from semester to semester and instructor to instructor, but topics of examination may include: the influence of rhetoric on the Anglo-American literary tradition, the relationship between rhetoric and gender in texts, rhetorical analyses of texts, both literary and non-literary.
ENGL 6880College Composition Theory and PedagogyCurrent theories of writing pedagogy and strategies for teaching writing at the college level. Topics include the composing process, invention, revision, and assessment of writing."College Composition Theory and Pedagogy": 1. introduces students to cultural, rhetorical, philosophical, and cognitive perspectives on the teaching of writing; 2. helps students to develop strategies for teaching elements of the composing process; 3. encourages students to integrate their roles as students of an academic discipline and as teachers of writing; 4. equips students to produce scholarship and research in the field of Rhetoric and Composition.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. But a sequence of topics might look something like this: 1. The Nature of Teaching and of the Writer 2. Pedagogical Schools: e.g., Expressivist, Cognitive, Social Epistemic, and postmodern 3. Invention 4. Issues of Race, Class, Gender 5. Writing and the Electronic Text 6. Revision and Response 7. Responding to and Evaluating Student Writing 8. Varieties of Textuality 9. Kinds of Literacy 10. Error, Grammar, and Writer's Block 11. Basic Writers 12. Ecologies of Writing
ENGL 6910Apprenticeship in College EnglishAn apprenticeship in the teaching of freshman composition and of sophomore literature.The goals of ENGL 6910 are as follows: 1. to provide mentoring and practical guidance to beginning teachers of writing. 2. to provide hands-on training and an opportunity for beginning teachers to practice their classroom skills. 3. to introduce beginning teachers to program guidelines, Freshman English policies, and the departmental grading rubric.Students (apprentices) are assigned to mentors (experienced teachers of ENGL 1101) at the beginning of the semester. A student will then attend his/her mentor's class throughout the term. Mentors discuss with apprentices: 1. grading strategies; 2. classroom practices and policies; 3. pedagogical strategies; 4. and time management. Mentors also 1. supervise their apprentices' guided practice in grading and classroom instruction; 2. at the end of a semester, submit a brief report about apprentices' readiness to teach. During the semester, apprentices are expected to: 1. grade papers; 2. teach at least a week's worth of classes; 3. assist with group work and student conferences.
ENGL 6911Practicum in Teaching College CompositionProvides intensive training in composition pedagogy. Topics include effective student conferences, grading strategies, writing workshop and peer editing techniques, revision, and topic development. Considers the different demands of teaching composition in an expository writing class and a literature-based writing class.The goals of ENGL 6911 are: 1. To provide practical support for inexperienced teachers of Freshman Composition. 2. To introduce strategies for teaching the composing process, revision, and editing. 3. To provide guidelines for and practice in assessing student writing. 4. To provide guidelines for and practice in teaching writing with technologyThe choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester, but a possible set of topics might look something like this: 1. Understanding the Composing Process 2. Teaching Invention Strategies 3. Teaching Organization 4. Teaching Revision 5. Teaching Grammar 6. Teaching Style 7. Evaluating Student Work 8. Teaching Writing through Argumentation 9. Approaches to Writing about Literature 10. Teaching with Technology 11. Student Conferences 12. Peer Editing and Workshops 13. Basic Writers 14. Strategies for teaching ESL students 15. Adapting your pedagogy to individual needs 16. Philosophies of Teaching
ENGL 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.The purpose of this course is to give M.A. students credit for thesis writing under the direction of the major professor.The course outline will vary according to student interests and faculty direction.
ENGL 8200Seminar in Medieval TopicsSpecial topics in Medieval literature.Specific course objectives will be topic-specific; however, the objective of the course overall is to maximize graduate-students' exposure to the broadest range of curricular subjects possible within the very broad range of possibilities inherent within the literature of the Middle Ages. Also, the course aims to maximize the connection between faculty-members specialized research and their graduate-students' studies. At the end of any specific course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course. Graduate-students who enroll in the course will emerge with detailed knowledge of a topic not otherwise treated in the regular medieval curriculum; they will have the advantage of exposure to latest developments in a specialized area of their professors' research.Topics will be determined by the faculty-member offering the course in any given semester and therefore cannot be outlined here. However, the traditional topical outlines by chronological period within the medieval period (Old English and Middle English), by genre (epic, romance, lyric, drama, prose narrative), or author (Chaucer, Skelton, Aelfric, Wulfstan, etc.) would naturally occur as faculty propose offerings of the course. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: English Literature in the Age of Columbus (including Skelton, Henryson, and other late-fifteenth-century writers). Middle English Romance (including Malory, the Gawain poet, and other writers of Middle English romances). Middle English Religious Writing (including the Ancrene Wisse, the Agenbyt of Inwit, and other Middle English religious writings). Middle English Literature and Classical Tradition (including Middle English mythographers, translations of classical works like Douglas' Aeneid, and other relevant works). Paleography of Medieval English Writings (including Old and Middle English texts).
ENGL 8500Seminar in English Romantic LiteratureA major writer or special topics of the period.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss assigned primary and secondary sources (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course. Seminars are meant to enable students to build on prior knowledge of the period and to focus their attention on a particular issue in literary studies.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Because the course will change from semester to semester, students are encouraged to refer to the English Department website for information concerning the course content for a specific semester. Authors or topics to be covered may include: William Blake, Mary Wollstonecraft, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Jane Austen, Lord Byron, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Mary Shelley, John Keats, and Felicia Hemans Romantic Opera Romantic-Era Women Writers The Gothic Experiments in Form: the Novel, Poetry, and Romantic Writing Romanticism: readings in literary theory and literary analysis Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests, in-class writing assignments, and a long sophisticated and substantial essay informed by an understanding of the critical history of the texts and period.
ENGL 8600Seminar in Modern LiteratureAn author or problem in twentieth-century British or American literature.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject-matter of the course.The instructor will define an area of investigation in the field of twentieth- century literature, drawing on works of poetry and prose, both fictional and non-fictional. In addition to works by British and/or American authors, readings may include other texts pertinent to a particular topic. As well as literary texts, course materials may include music and the visual arts, and readings in history, philosophy, psychology, and critical theory. Student work will consist of some combination of examinations, essays, and oral presentations. Works to be studied for a topic such as “Anglo-American Modernism” may include the following: James, The Turn of the Screw and selected essays; Conrad, The Secret Agent; T.S. Eliot, Collected Poems and selected essays; Pound, Selected Poems and selected essays; H.D., Selected Poems; Ford, The Good Soldier; Lawrence, Women in Love; Joyce, Ulysses; Woolf, Mrs Dalloway and selected essays; Loy, The Last Lunar Baedeker; Gay, ed., A Freud Reader
ENGL 8700Seminar in American LiteratureA research course on special problems in American literature.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Irving, The Sketch Book Jewett, Deephaven Garland, Main-Travelled Roads Sui Sin Far, Mrs. Spring Fragrance Charles Chesnutt, The Wife of His Youth and Other Stories Anderson, Winesburg, Ohio Steinbeck, Pastures of Heaven Kincaid, Annie John Minot, Monkeys
ENGL 8710Major American WritersA detailed examination of the life and works of one or two American authors.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Carlos Baker, Ernest Hemingway: A Life Story Ernest Hemingway, The Complete Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway; The Sun Also Rises; A Farewell to Arms; For Whom the Bell Tolls; The Old Man and the Sea; A Moveable Feast; The Garden of Eden
ENGL 8730Seminar in Multicultural American LiteratureA detailed examination of selected forms and ideas in African American, Native American, Latino/a, and/or Asian American literature.Students will be expected to achieve the following: 1) A detailed understanding of theoretical issues in Multicultural American Literature. 2) A historically rich sense of African American, Native American, Latino/a, and/or Asian American culture. 3) Command of research techniques using primary material, secondary material, material culture, and/or oral history. 4) The ability to write a publishable paper. 5) A greater awareness of pedagogical issues involved in teaching Multicultural American literature.This course will be taught by professors with a wide variety of specialities within the field of Multicultural American Literature, thus texts and cultural contexts will vary from semester to semester. One course that will be offered is "The Origins of Native American Literature." This course will include: 1) A study of the cultural influences on contemporary Native writers. 2) A broader understanding of Native American "literature" (e.g. oral tradition, dances, rock art, pictographic histories, pottery, myths, etc.). 3) Contemporary theoretical issues in both the academic and Native American communities. 4) A detailed historical background (e.g. legal decisions, treaties, Native American representations of history, tribal origin myths, etc.)
ENGL 8750Seminar in Southern LiteratureSpecial problems in Southern literature.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Cable, The Grandissimes Chopin, At Fault Dunbar-Nelson, The Goodness of St. Rocque Warren, World Enough and Time Faulkner, The Unvanquished Welty, Golden Apples McCarthy, Blood Meridian Walker, The Color Purple
ENGL 8800Seminar in Creative WritingAdvanced instruction in the craft of writing.
ENGL 8900Current Issues in Rhetorical TheoryStudy of contemporary rhetorical theory and its relation to literary criticism and English composition.This course has several aims: to acquaint students with important texts in current rhetorical theory; to place modern rhetoric in its historical context, tracing connections between classical and modern rhetoric, between rhetoric and modern literature, and/or between contemporary rhetoric and literary theory; and to connect rhetorical theory with research into writing.Because this is a graduate seminar, topics will vary by instructor. The following general list offers insight into the kinds of topics the could be covered: 1. Relations between traditional and modern rhetorical and literary theory, and its relation to literary criticism and/or composition. 2. Application of recent theories of rhetoric to modern literature. 3. Implications of modern rhetorical theory for the study of writing, specifically the processes of composing and revising. 4. History of rhetorical movements.
ENGL 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
ENGL(AFAM) 3230Development of African American LiteratureAfrican American literature since 1773, particularly 1830 to the present: Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Dorothy West, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Alice Childress, Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka, Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, and August Wilson, including diverse voices rooted in the folk origins for literary forms. At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works (orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.A sample course might consider the following themes: Historical Advance of the Folks and the Spirit Historical Source to Aesthetic Beauty: Lyricism of the African American Imagination Dilemma of the Thinker: Integration or Revolution Ritual of Death, Ritual of Love using the following texts: Hill, Patricia, Trudier Harris, R. Baxter Miller et. al, _The Riverside Anthology of the African American Literary Tradition_ Morrison, Toni. _Song of Solomon_ Jones, LeRoi. _Dutchman_ and _The Slave_ Wright, Richard. _Native Son_
ENGL(AFAM) 4620African American PoetryAfrican American poetry from the colonial period to the present, including slave and folk songs of the mid-nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920's, and contemporary poetry. Emphasis on such figures as Langston Hughes, Margaret Walker, Gwendolyn Brooks, Sonia Sanchez, Amiri Baraka, Yusef Komunyakaa, Rita Dove, Kevin Young, and others.1. Read poetic texts closely and appreciatively. 2. Examine the cultural assumptions of belief and value behind the varied acceptance of Black American Works (hence, people of color) in particular and literary works in general. 3. Place the cultural issues of 1773-2002 (particularly 1960-1990) in historical and critical perspective. 4. Become aware of significant critical challenges in the study of African American Literature and formulate sound solutions as well as personal theories. 5. Practice a few modern trends in critical theory. 6. Deepen the critical reading of primary texts for formal technique and strategy, moral as well social significance, psychological insight, and mythic implications. 7. Encourage lively discussions that are stimulating as well as respectful. 8. Attend all classes in order to be intellectually excited and to excite. 9. Employ at least 15 secondary sources in the support or contradiction of one's own original views in papers over the term. 10. Write critical essays that are fluently well-argued, literate, well- organized, and profound.An example of works to be considered in one class: Brooks, Gwendolyn. _Selected Poems_. Dunbar, Paul L. _Collected Poems_. Harper, Michael S, ed. _Every Shut Eye Ain't Sleep_. Hughes, Langston. _Selected Poems_. Major, Clarence. _The Garden Thrives_. Randall, Dudley. _Black Poets_. Shields, John C. _Collected Work of Phillis Wheatley_.
ENGL(AFAM) 8720Seminar in African American LiteratureA detailed examination of selected forms and ideas in the African American tradition.1. Achieve cultural and historical context of African American short story since 1899. 2. Explore the contribution of Langston Hughes to the historical range (personal and traditional), thought, and formal innovation of the short story. 3. Consider the assumptions of belief and value behind the varying acceptance of African American modern poetry. 4. Recognize the significant critical challenges in the study of African American poetics; formulate intellectually sound solutions as well as personal theories. 5. Practice a few of the modern trends in critical theory. 6. Deepen the critical reading of primary texts for stylistics; for moral as well as social significance, psychological insight, mythic implications, feminism, black aesthetics, and post-structuralism. 7. Encourage provocative and respectful discussions. 8. Extrapolate significant points of pedagogical tension and pose effective ways for engaging them. 9. Understand the concepts necessary to reduce pedagogical tension about provocative ideas. 10. Inspire and produce the next generation of African Americanists and multi-culturalists. 11. Mentor young professionals in the publication of first and early articles.Topics will vary; one recent offering was titled: “Even After I Was Dead: Langston Hughes and the Short Story Tradition" and studied the following texts: Chesnutt, Charles. _The Wife of His Youth and Other Stories_ Hughes, Langston. _The Best Short Stories by Negro Writers_ ______________, Handouts of Seven Stories, from _Short Stories: The Collected Works_ 15 (2001) ______________, _Ways of White Folks_ Walker, Alice. _In Love and Trouble_
ENGL(HIST) 3100Introduction to British Culture IThis course will equip students to pursue more sophisticated studies in the fields of the history, literature, and culture of the British Isles. The British Isles from a variety of perspectives: artistic, historical, political, environmental, and social, will be considered.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial body of literature, will be able to discuss the assigned works(orally and in writing) with a considerable degree of critical sophistication, to reread them with pleasure, to read and enjoy other works from the period, and to converse with fellow students about texts and issues related to the subject matter of the course.The texts covered – from the fields of history, literature, religion, and culture – will range from the Roman occupation of Britain (c. 55 B.C.) to the present day. English 3100 also serves as the gateway course for the certificate in British and Irish Studies.
ENGL(LING) 4060/6060Old EnglishThe language and literature of England before the Norman Conquest, with reading of selected texts.A basic introduction to the language and culture of the Old English period. Students will develop a reading knowledge of Old English in various genres of writing, and an understanding of the place of Old English within the historical development of the Germanic languages.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively.Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Elementary morphology and phonetics Elementary principles of historical linguistics Old English noun, pronoun, and definite article declensions Old English verb conjugations Germanic and Old English sound changes Old English vocabulary Elementary principles of manuscript orthography
ENGL(LING) 4100/6100LexicographyPrinciples and methods of dictionary making with emphasis on monolingual English and bilingual dictionaries. Topics may include typology of dictionaries and dictionary users, the history of lexicography, the collection and selection of headwords and examples; the definition style, pronunciation, labeling, translation equivalents, etymology, illustrations, and encyclopedic information.This split level course in lexicography has two objectives: to give a general introduction to the subject of dictionary making, including some lexicological background, and to provide a guide to modern methods of lexicography. These two objectives are appropriate because the course is aimed at students of several kinds: English students with an interest in English as a language, linguistics students, translators and those intending to become translators, language teachers, and other students with an interest in language. The course is both descriptive regarding contemporary dictionary making practices and their underlying concepts, and advisory regarding certain procedures, such as selecting examples from a large corpus. The graduate students will be evaluated by a midterm exam and a final exam on the concepts and practices of lexicography, and will also write a research paper on some aspect of monolingual or bilingual lexicography. The undergraduate students will be evaluated by the midterm and the final exam. After completing the course, the student should be able to work at an entry-level position in the dictionary division of a major publisher.Brief Topical Outline: I. Lexicography: The Science and Art of Dictionary Making A. Contemporary Lexicography 1. English monolingual dictionaries 2. bilingual dictionaries 3. commercial lexicography 4. academic lexicohraphy B. Dictionary users and types of dictionaries C. History of Lexicography II. The colection of material A. Corpus material B. Traditional sources of material C. The selection of material D. Macrostructure of the dictionary III. The Dictionary Entry A. Headwords B. Pronunciation C. Grammatical Information 1. inflexion 2. part of speech 3. constructions and valency D. Collocations and Idioms IV. Definition A. Defining style B. Paraphrases C. Hybrids D. Suitability for users V. Equivalents in Bilingual Dictionaries A. Translational Equivalence B. Translational Paraphrases C. Alternative Equivalents VI. Encyclopedic Information A. Monolingual English dictionaries B. Bilingual dictionaries VII. Illustrations A. Function and Purpose B. Illustration types. VIII. Register and Subject Lables A. Function and Purpose B. Register and the user. IX. Etymology A. Function and Format X. Cross-References A. Function and Form XI. The Dictionary Entry A. Principles of Microstructure B. Polysemy C. Homonymy D. Multi-word lexical units XI. Dictionary Projects in the Electronic Age
ENGL(LING) 4110/6110English GrammarEnglish grammar in the scholarly tradition of Curme and Jespersen.At the end of the course, students, having read a substantial amount of material about English grammar, will be able to discuss the major theories of grammatical analysis--traditional, structural, and transformational/generative--, to list the basic parts of speech and inflectional forms of modern English, to enumerate the basic sentence patterns found in modern English, to apply scientific grammatical principles to their own writing and to the teaching of writing, and to perform accurate grammatical analyses of English sentences.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and from semester to semester. Topics will consist of readings done in the areas of grammati- cal analysis and will include morphology, syntax, the relationships between grammar and semantics, the differences between prescriptive and descriptive grammars, peda- gocial applications of modern grammatical analysis, and the several theories under- lying different models of grammatical analysis. A number of graded tasks will be assigned, such as quizzes, tests, and various writing assignments done either in or outside of class.
ENGL(LING) 4170/6170Second Language AcquisitionLinguistic theories of second language acquisition, with emphasis on the acquisition of English. Topics include order of acquisition, sociocultural factors with linguistic bases, and neurolinguistic models.At the end of the course, students will be able to explain the major theories of second language acquisition, to discuss those theories in relation to psycho- linguistic and sociolinguistic research, to apply principles of phonemic, morphemic, syntactic, semantic, and discourse analysis studies to specific problems and challenges of second language acquisition, and to understand important pedagogical principles that derive from SLA analysis.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and from semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected readings on the major perspectives on second language acquisition, both in formal and informal environ- ments, morphophonemic and syntactic/semantic theories of language acquisition orders, social factors affecting second language acquisition, including the processes of pidginization and creolization, and cognitive science theories relating to second language acquistion, including neurolinguisitic and information processing models. A number of graded tasks will be assigned, such as quizzes, tests, and various writing assignments done either in or outside of class.
ENGL(LING) 4180/6180ESL Error AnalysisPsycholinguistic theory applied to problems in second language learning, and the prediction of language behavior through the use of contrastive analysis.Students will learn to analyze the linguistic structures of spoken and written samples of non-native English. They will be able to apply the principles of phonological, morphological, syntactic, and conversational analysis in making these analyses. Through investigation of non-natives' spoken and written errors, students will be able to formulate linguistic rules describing the level of competence of the non-natives' English usage.The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and from semester to semester. The topics will consist of readings about the theories and methodologies of linguistic error analysis, including contrastive analysis hypo- theses, interlanguage hypotheses, the application of phonological, morphological, syntactic, lexical, and semantic principles to error analysis, and several discourse theories including spoken/written discourse, foreigner-talk discourse, and specific- purpose discourse. A number of graded tasks will be assigned, such as quizzes, tests, and various writing assignments done either in or outside of class.
ENGR 2120Engineering StaticsTwo and three dimensional force systems, equilibrium, rigid structures, centroids, friction, and area moments of inertia.Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: 1. Determine the resultant of a 2-d or 3-d force system. 2. Determine the resulting moment due to a 2-d or 3-d force or system of forces 3. Understand the properties and applications of a 2-d or 3-d couple. 4. Draw free body diagrams for various types of contact and apply the equations of static equilibrium for 2-d and 3-d systems to determine external reactions. 5. Determine the centroid and center of mass for plane areas and volumes. 6. Analyze the internal forces in 2-d and 3-d truss, frame, and machine structures 7. Determine area moment of inertia for simple and composite areas 8. Solve a repetitive calculation statics problem by writing a procedural computer program and plot and analyze results of solution1. Introduction to statics 2. Two dim. force systems 3. Two dim. moments 4. Couple 5. Two dim. resultants 6. Three dim. force systems 7. Moment and couple 8. Three dim. Resultants 9. Hourly Exam 10. Two dim. Equilibrium Conditions 11. Two dim. Free Body Diagrams and solution for external reactions 12. Pulley systems 13. Three dim. Equilibrium Conditions 14. Three dim. Free Body Diagrams and solution for external reactions 15. Centers of Mass and Centroids 16. Hourly Exam 17. Structures - Plane trusses, method of Joints and Sections 18. Structures - Space truss 19. Structures - Frames and Machines 20. Area moments of Inertia, rectangular and polar, transfer of axis, composite areas
ENGR 2140Strength of MaterialsElements of stress analysis, resistance, and design as applied to engineering materials and structures.Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: 1. Draw free body diagrams for various types of members and apply the equation of statics 2. Determine the internal forces in a member caused by various types of external forces 3. Determine the properties of a cross-section (centroid, area, moment of inertia, polar moment of inertia and Q) 4. Calculate normal and shear stresses caused by various types of external forces. 5. Draw the differential element at a discrete location in a member under various types of loads 6. Draw the shear and moment diagram for a bending member 7. Determine the internal stresses within a member at discrete angles using Mohr's circle 8. Write the equations of shear, moment, slope and deflection of a bending member 9. Understand the physical properties of brittle and ductile engineering materials 10. Design of simple components based on stress criteria1. Axial loaded bars 2. Axial strain 3. Torsion 4. Bending 5. Transverse Shear 6. Combined loading 7. Stress transformation 8. Design of beams 9. Deflection
ENGR 6910Research MethodsThe philosophy of engineering research, research methodology, review of the departmental research programs, and writing and presenting thesis and dissertation proposals and grant proposals. Philosophy of engineering research, statement of problem, reviewing literature, scientific method, design of experiment, analysis of data, report writing and presentation.
ENGR 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor. Master's thesis.
ENGR 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor. Dissertation research.
ENTO 3000Undergraduate Entomology SeminarEntomology seminars presented by faculty from departments throughtout the country in insect molecular biology, systematics, applied ecology, pest management, and medical and vector biology.This course is intended to expose undergraduates to a wide variety of recent research and work in entomology and to give them practice in critical thinking and writing.Students will choose 8 seminars out of approximately 15 offered each semester and attend them. Afterwards they will write a review of the lecture and present it to the undergrauate coordinator, who will grade each review.
ENTO 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.
ENTO 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
EOCS 4350/6350Curriculum Planning in Occupational StudiesContent identification, program organization, preparation of instructional objectives, and guidelines for selection and development of instructional materials for occupational studies programs.1. Define contextual teaching and learning as a basis for curriculum planning. 2. Define curriculum and discuss the levels, approaches, and types of curriculum. 3. Describe the role and interaction of content, context, and learner in delivering curriculum. 4. Examine curriculum guides and curriculum frameworks for organization and content. 5. Become familiar with state (QCC) and national standards. 6. Determine how state and national standards apply to planning. 7. Develop a unit plan and describe its purpose in planning to teach. 8. Prepare appropriate goals, generalizations, and concepts. 9. Write instructional objectives for a unit of instruction and a daily lesson using Bloom's taxonomy as a guide. 10. Compare and contrast models of instructional design (lesson plan formats or models). 11. Discuss and use the elements of instructional design. 12. Describe the functions and stages of planning. 13. Identify designs/plans (yearly, unit, weekly, daily) for various time periods. 14. Identify and analyze different learning styles. 15. Explain and illustrate the relationship between Bloom's taxonomy, and instruction and assessment. 16. Recognize advantages, disadvantages, strengths, and weaknesses of selected kinds of tests. 17. Develop a table of specification based on a unit of instruction. 18. Construct kinds of tests using appropriate guidelines. 19. Discuss alternative methods of assessment. 20. Find and evaluate an alternative assessment approach (form). 21. Distinguish between classroom management and discipline. 22. Discover and analyze the dimensions of classroom management. 23. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of various classroom management models. 24. Evaluate the effectiveness of classroom management models. 25. Show how technology is used to enhance curriculum. 26. Adapt curriculum plans to meet diverse needs of learners. 27. Develop a syllabus for a selected course. 28. Summarize characteristics of professional and youth organizations. 29. Become familiar with and examine examples of instruction sheets, modular materials, and individualized instruction modules. 30. Review and discuss initiatives and legislative mandates that impact curriculum.The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary. 1. Orientation to course (Theory to Practice, Model of Teacher Development, Research Process, Curriculum Development Process, Interaction of content/context/learner) 2. Aspects of Curriculum (Definition, Approach, Levels, Kinds, Products) 3. Content Selection (curriculum guides, quality core curriculum, standards [national, state] textbooks, supplementary materials) 4. Planning (Defined, Functions, Planning Phases) 5. Curriculum Components (Yearly Plan, Scope and Sequence, Block Plan) 6. Elements of Instructional Design/unit plan or unit of instruction (goals, terms, objectives, teaching and learning activities) 7. Designs for Varied Time Periods (Weekly Plan, Models of Instructional Design [Daily Plan]) 8. Student assessment (traditional assessment and construction, authentic assessment, grading criteria) 9. Classroom management (models, strategies, approaches, dimensions) 10. Learning Styles (4Mat, Gardner) 11. Professional Ethics 12. Initiatives and Mandates in Career and Technical Education 13. Certification (industry and programs) 14. Funding (vocational) 15. Modular Materials and Thematic Units 16. Professional Organizations/Learned Societies
EOCS 9200Research Design and Methodology in Occupational StudiesDesign, implementation, and evaluation of scholarly inquiry in occupational studies. Focus on theory and literature to justify problems; appropriate research designs; selection of appropriate data analysis; and determination of quality of research. Students will discuss, apply, and evaluate key elements and strategies involved in development and dissemination of research proposals.Participants who successfully complete this course should have prepared substantial portions of their research proposal that will serve as a basis for the complete dissertation proposal (Chs 1, 2, 3 inclusive). Participants have two options to complete this goal. The first option requires completion of Chapters 1 (Introduction) and 3 (Methods) of the research proposal. A second option requires an extensive written review of the literature that would serve as the basis of Chapter 2. While you are free to choose either option (during first class meeting), I strongly recommend selection of the first option (Chs. 1 and 3) for several reasons that will be discussed in class. Upon successful completion of this course, participants will have had an opportunity to: 1. Identify the structure and key elements of a research (dissertation) proposal. 2. Develop several drafts of selected sections of their dissertation research proposal. 3. Discuss with colleagues successful strategies and problems to avoid during the writing process. 4. Gain some experience in critiquing the scholarly writings of current research literature. 5. Present a completed scholarly proposal to colleagues for feedback.The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary. 1. Elements of successful research papers, dissertations, and scholarly presentations 2. Introduction/Context/Rationale 3. Research problems, questions and objectives 4. Using theory in identifying variables and developing sound research designs 5. Methods included in research proposals 6. Presentation of scholarship
EOCS 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.Dissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.Dissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
EPSY 2020HLearning and Development in Education (Honors)Learning and developmental processes and their application to educational settings. Special emphasis is placed on cognitive theory as it relates to school learning and experimental methods for conducting studies of the learner.Students will learn about the basic cognitive, developmental and motivational issues that might impact classroom learning. Students will learn about how education is a science as well as an art. They will learn to evaluate the research underlying educational programming and scientific ways for investigating their own questions about educational practice.Scientific method and statistics (mean, standard deviation, t-test, correlation) Analyzing data, Writing the research report Attention Short term memory, characteristics and coding strategies How words are read, organized, and learned Reading Comprehension Metacognition and Strategy Use Mathematical Problem Solving Motivation in the classroom Expertise - what happens as we become more knowledgeable people Standardized testing Classroom Assessment and Grading
EPSY 4801Cognitive Foundations for EducationCognitive psychology principles are applied to instructional methods. Processes such as attention, organization, intelligence, memory, language, concept formation, critical thinking, and problem solving are examined. Cognitive theories and models are applied to the instruction and learning of content areas and skills.* Learners will understand the impact of cognitive development and the learning process. * Learners will recognize how cultural and learner differences influence cognition and the educational process. * Learners will be introduced to the Behavioral, Cognitive, and Constructivist views of instruction. * Learners will become familiar with extrinsic and intrinsic . motivational issues * Learners will master cognitive strategies for creating interesting instructional environments. * Learners will be introduced to issues related to cognition, intelligence, and performance assessment. * Learners will refine their own philosophy of instruction and use cognitive principles in evaluating a unit of instruction. * Learners will apply the cognition concepts they have mastered in the course to answer questions about educational issues. * Learners will present empirical research and write a paper in APA style. * Learners will use a variety of their computer skills, including PowerPoint presentation software. * Learners will comprehend relationships between cognition and technology. * Learners will apply cognition concepts to real world problem solving, and learning educational skills (including reading, writing) and content areas (including mathematics, science, and social studies).1. Introduction to Cognitive Psychology 2. Sensory, Short-Term, and Working Memory 3. Long-Term Memory: Structures and Models 4. Encoding Processes 5. Retrieval Processes 6. Beliefs About Self 7. Beliefs About Intelligence and Knowledge 8. Problem Solving and Critical Thinking 9. Building Knowledge and Reflective Thought 10. Learning to Read and Reading to Learn 11. Writing 12. Cognition in the Content Areas 13. Cognition and Technology 14. Future Directions
EPSY 6800Foundations of Cognition for EducationCognitive psychology as applied to education. Cognitive theories, models, and processes are applied to the teaching and learning of school skills and content areas. Processes such as attention, critical thinking, concept formation, language, memory, and problem solving are examined. Cognitive psychology principles are used to examine and refine instructional methods.1. Foundations of Cognitive Science v early history v recent history v structure of cognition: cognitive processes v perception, learning, and memory 2. Cognitive Development v mental growth and intelligence assessment v qualitative shifts: classical views v qualitative shifts: contemporary views 3. Curriculum Applications: Language and Literacy v beginning to read v early writing v advanced reading and writing 4. Curriculum Applications: Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, Art, Music, and Physical Education v developmental and cognitive models v instructional strategies Models of Instruction and Technology Supported Cognition v changing practices v learning environments v instructional design v computer-based instruction Future Directions for Research in Cognition1. Students will learn about the impact of cognition and particularly the learning process. 2. Students will learn how cultural and learner differences influence cognition and the educational process. 3. Students will be introduced to the Behavioral, Cognitive, and Constructivist views of learning. 4. Students will learn about the issues related to motivating students. 5. Students will learn cognitive teaching strategies for creating interesting learning environments. 6. Students will be introduced to issues related to cognition, intelligence, and classroom assessment. 7. Students will refine their own philosophy of teaching and use cognitive principles in evaluating a unit of instruction. 8. Students will apply the cognition concepts they have learned in the course to answer questions about educational issues. 9. Students will present empirical research and write a paper in APA style. 10. Students will use a variety of their computer skills, including PowerPoint presentation software. 11. Students will comprehend relationships between cognition and technology. 12. Students will apply cognition concepts to real world problem solving, and learning educational skills (including reading, writing) and content areas (including mathematics, science, and social studies).
EPSY 7100Individual Assessment of DevelopmentThe measurement of intellectual, academic, and adaptive behavior development, and screening.1. Demonstrate an understanding of test derived scores and their proper interpretation. 2. Become conversant regarding professional issues relating to assessment. 3. Learn to correctly administer, score, and interpret several major tests of children's and adult's intelligence and achievement measures. 4. Effectively communicate, orally and in writing, the results of an intellectual evaluation. 5. Accurately apply accepted diagnostic criteria for Learning Disabilities and Mental Retardation. 6. Use research and theory to interpret test scores within the constraints of the existing scientific literature. 7. Exhibit acceptable interpersonal skillls when evaluating clients and adhere to generally accepted practice and ethical standards.History/Theory Theory and Research Findings Measurement, Practice issues Practice Standards/Guidelines/Culture Interpretation and Report writing Mental Retardation Learning Disabilities/Achievement Testing Nonverbal and Preschool tests Neuropsychological interpretation Professional Issues/testing Latino children
EPSY 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.Prepare master's thesisDetermined by student and major professor
EPSY 8180Psychology of Learning and InstructionThe role that psychology plays in the instructional process. Advanced psychological theories and models are applied to learning in schools and other educational settings. The implications of current cognitive science research for improving teaching and learning at all developmental levels.1. Cognitive Psychology: A brief history *associationist era *cognitive era: cognitive science *constructivism: the role of the learner in transforming knowledge 2. Sensation and Perception *sensory registers *pattern recognition and the assignment of meaning *role of knowledge in perception and meaning *Gestalt laws *attention and cognitive tasks *implications for instruction: guiding and directing attention 3. Memory: Structures and Models *cognitive architecture *concepts, productions, propositions, and schemata *network and parallel distribution processing models *implications for instruction 4. Problem Solving and Critical Thinking *historical perspectives on problem solving *critical thinking *metacognition: thinking about thinking 5. Cognitive Psychology, Language, and Literacy *foundations of literacy in language development *models of reading comprehension *building organized knowledge through reading 6. Cognitive Psychology and Writing Instruction *cognitive models of writing *improving students? writing 7. Cognitive Psychology and Science, Mathematics, Social Studies, Art, Music, and Physical Education *cognitive models of reasoning *improving students? understanding and effective strategy use 8. Motivating Students to Learn *attribution theory *intrinsic motivation *social cognition 9. Technological Enhancement of Cognition 10. Future Directions in Cognitive Psychology1. Define and describe learning, particularly from a cognitive perspective 2. Explain how behavioral and cognitive theories of learning differ. 3. Compare rationalism and empiricism. 4. Explain how behavior becomes conditioned, extinguished, and generalized according to classical conditioning theory. 5. Analyze situations in which an emotional response might become conditioned to an initially neutral object. 6. Apply in context these key operant conditioning concepts: reinforcement (positive, negative), punishment, generalization, discrimination, shaping, Premack Principle. 7. Describe and exemplify the process of triadic reciprocal causality. 8. Distinguish between enactive and vicarious learning and between learning and performance. 9. Analyze how features of models (e.g., peers, multiple, coping) affect self-efficacy and learning. 10. Determine the qualities possessed by someone with high emotional intelligence. 11. Describe the major components of a cognitive information processing system: attention, perception, short-term (working) memory, long-term memory. 12. Differentiate short- and long-term memory on the basis of capacity, duration, and component processes. 13. Distinguish between declarative and procedural knowledge and show how they can be integrated in educational skills. 14. Explain the major factors that influence encoding, retrieval, and forgetting. 15. Compare and contrast discovery learning and meaningful reception learning. 16. Explain metacognition and how it applies in the content and skill areas. 17. Explain what concepts are, how they develop, and how they should be taught. 18. Describe problem solving and demonstrate the general and specific strategies that make it possible in different contexts. 19. Evaluate the major assumptions and the various types of constructivism. 20. For Jean Piaget?s theory, integrate the major developmental processes involved in learning and derive major implications for instruction. 21. For Lev Vygotsky?s theory, integrate its basic principles and draw implications for teaching in the zone of proximal development. 22. Apply two important themes, situated cognition and implicit theories, to learning and teaching. 23. Distinguish between general and specific skills and show how they work together in the acquisition of competence in the content and skill areas of education. 24. Explain the major cognitive processes involved in the content and skill areas of education. 25. Discuss the causal dimensions in attribution theory and the effects they have in achievement situations. 26. Distinguish between learning (process) and performance (product) goals and explain how they can influence motivation and learning. 27. Define self-concept and explain the major factors that affect its development. 29. Distinguish intrinsic from extrinsic motivation and apply motivational strategies. 30. Define self-regulation and contrast it with other related constructs such as learning, motivation, metacognition, and self-verbalization. 31. Define learning strategy and apply the following strategies: rehearsal, elaboration, organization, comprehension monitoring, and affective techniques. 32. Drawing on the research about academic studying, devise a plan for a ?how to study? course that you might teach to students who study poorly. 33. Integrate what research has identified as effective teacher practices in planning and instruction. 34. Explain how teacher expectations are formed and how they may influence teachers? interactions with students. 35. Explain how the classroom variables of dimensionality and differentiation could affect students? learning and motivational beliefs. 36. Evaluate the major functions of technology in instruction and the current key applications of technology in your area of instructional expertise
EPSY 8190Achievement and IntelligenceExamines theories of intelligence and achievement. Different theories, including psychometric, social, and genetic theories of the development of intelligence and achievement.1. To learn about the development of intelligence and how intelligence might be displayed in the classroom and in adult life. 2. To develop speaking and thinking skills. 3. To develop professional writing skills.Potential topics 1. The History of Intelligence Theory. 2. IQ Based Theories of Intelligence: Social Implications. 3. Alternative Theory that Assumes ?g?. 4. Challenges to ?g? Theory: Gardner. 5. Models that Include Genetic Components 6. Expertise Models of Intelligence. 7. Intelligence as a Product of Society. 8. Intelligence as the Development of Cognitive Structures: Piaget and neo-Piagetian theory. 9. Situated Cognition: Intelligence as a Function of Context. 10. Personality, affect and intelligence: Temperament and affect 11. A Darwininan approach to the development of intelligence: The case for language.
EPSY 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.Prepare doctoral dissertationDetermined by student and major professor
EPSY 9330Advanced Psychological Interventions in SchoolsCritical interpretation and evaluation of research and theoretical writing related to selected psychoeducational interventions.
EPSY 9630Critique of Literature in Educational PsychologyCritical interpretation and evaluation of research and theoretical writing in educational psychology.Overall Objective: To enhance to student?s knowledge of a specific literature related to research or policy of specific issues in educational psychology. This course has many of the same goals as the seminar, but the full semester is devoted to a specific topic. 1. Enhancement of the student?s ability to understand cutting edge research topics not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. 2 Enhancement of the student?s ability to understand specific research methodologies as they apply to varied research questions. 3. Enhancement of the student?s ability to make a research presentation to their colleagues. 4. Enhancement of the student?s ability to evaluate the research efforts of others.The specific topic outline of this course varies from semester to semester, depending on the emphasis required by the program, and the needs of the student.
ERSH 4200/6200Methods of Research in EducationDiverse research approaches used in behavioral science settings, including critical review and interpretation of published research.The course objectives are divided into three components: 1. To understand the process of conducting research. 2. To recognize types of methods for conducting research. 3. To interprete and review research in education. In order to achieve these overall objectives, the course involves readings of the text, an individual project that consists of a series of assignments to reinforce the central concepts, a group project, and three examinations.Research Process (Objective 1) The Nature of Educational Research The Research Problem Ethics and Research Variables and Hypotheses Reviewing the Literature Sampling Instrumentation Validity and Reliability Internal Validity Statistics Descriptive Statistics Inferential Statistics Statistics in Perspective Research Types (Objective 2) Experimental Research Single-Subject Research Correlational Research Causal-Comparative Research Survey Research Content Analysis Research Qualitative Research Historical Research Writing Research Proposals and Report (Objective 3) Proposal Presentation Individual Proposal Group Proposal Computer Lab Internet Literature Search SPSS
ERSH 4600/6600Applied Educational AssessmentDevelopment, administration, scoring, analysis, and interpretation of classroom educational assessments used in the service of instruction and accountability objectives. Traditional as well as current approaches (portfolios, performance assessments). Although classroom approaches are emphasized, standardized measures are also studied.The overall goal of the course is to provide information and practice on basic concepts of testing and measurement, from the perspective of a test development professional. The successful student will be able to: (Validity) define various types of validity. select the type of validity appropriate and required for a given purpose. discuss the effects of situational variables on validity. (Reliability) define various types of reliability. select the type of reliability appropriate and required for a given purpose. choose appropriate means to increase the reliability of a test. (Basic statistical concepts) interpret basic statistics. represent statistical concepts and values graphically. (Scaling, norming, types of scores) compare and contrast different types of tests. translate from one score scale to another, using common rules. describe the process of norming . generalize about a student's performance based on observed test scores. (Item and task creation) identify the parts of a test item. write assessment objectives and specifications. devise distractor strategies for test items. write test items to a specific objective and vice versa. create a valid and reliable performance assessment task. design a scoring rubric for a performance task. (Differential Item Functioning-DIF) define DIF and distinguish it from adverse impact and bias. describe means to reduce or eliminate DIF and bias. (Standard Setting) describe appropriate procedures for setting passing scores. (Test Preparation) describe appropriate and inappropriate activities in test preparation. (Performance Assessment) describe advantages and problems associated with performance assessments. design a simple performance assessment and scoring procedure. Students are expected to: Read the text and other materials. Participate in class lecture, discussion, hands-on work. Review a published test. Complete a take-home examination. Design a test.Introduction Overview of Measurement Validity Basic Statistical Concepts Reliability Scaling Norming Types of Scores Criterion-Referenced Test Norm-Referenced Test Test Construction Objectives Specifications Item Writing Performance Assessments Differential Item Functioning Standard Setting Program Evaluation and Accountability Measuring Affective Outcomes
ERSH 7250Educational Program and Project EvaluationInnovative or ongoing educational programs, projects, or curricula. Consideration is made of goal specification, data collection, standard setting, and reporting. Interdisciplinary points of view are stressed.Students should be able: 1. To create a comprehensive evaluation design for a project, program, or curriculum. 2. To porpose the outline and content of the evaluation design. The followings are specific objectives: 1. Recall the major activities in the evaluation process. 2. Contrast the similarities and differences betwen research and evaluation. 3. Identify obstacles to the conduct of evaluation studies. 4. Identify the role of evaluation. 5. contrast the similarities and differences in summative and formative evaluation. 6. Recall the roles of judgment in the conduct of evaluation studies. 7. Recognize the roles ethics plays in the conduct of evaluation studies. 8. Recall at least ten criterion categories useful in the conduct of metaevaluation. 9. Recall the major dimensions of the Joint Committee Program Evaluation Standards. 10. Write an evaluation question at three levels of specificity. 11. Recognize major issues in standard setting. 12. Identify the four major types of evaluation metaphors. 13. Recognize the advantages and disadvantages of each type of evaluation metaphor. 14. Identify major data collection designs. 15. Apply major data collection designs. 16. Recall major threats to internal validity. 17. Identify examples of threats to internal validity. 18. Define interpretive inquiry. 19. Identify the approaches to data collection in qualitative evaluation. 20. Recognize issues in the design/implementation of qualitative evaluation studies. 21. Recall the major approaches to qualitative data analysis. 22. Apply the six criteria of high quality data. 23. Identify the advantages and disadvantages of the opinionnaire methods. 24. Identify the major advantages and disadvantages of observational methods. 25. Recognize the dangers in using standardized achievement measures in evaluation. 26. Recall major advantages and disadvantages of rating scales. 27. Specify types of rating scale errors. 28. Be aware of major approaches and problems in assessing affective outcomes. 29. Locate sources of information about standardized measuring instruements. 30. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of internal and external evaluators. 31. Delineate the role of the evaluator. 32. Identify the elements and purposes in PERT. 33. Create a data management chart. 34. Identify the elements in conducting a cost-utility analysis. 35. Identify the elements in conducting a cost-effectiveness analysis. 36. Identify the elements in conducting a cost-benefit analysis. 37. Recognize the major steps in decision making using evaluation data. 38. Identify the characteristics of an effective evaluation report. 39. Assess the impact of relevant factors on the utilization of evaluation results. 40. Identify four characteristics used to evaluate instructional products. 41. Discuss the goals of evaluation.Introduction to Evaluation Definitions History of Evaluation Recent Trends Approaches to Program Evaluation Objective Oriented Management Oriented Consumer Oriented Expertise Oriented Adversary Oriented Participant Oriented Alternatives Guidelines for Planning Evaluation Clarification of Purposes Setting Boundaries Evaluation Questions and Criteria Evaluation Design Guidelines for Conducting and Using Evaluation Political, Ethical, Interpersonal Issues Quantitative Information Qualitative Information Reporting of Information Metaevaluation The Future of Program Evaluation Multiple Site Evaluation Evaluation of Various Settings
ERSH 8630Applications of Item Response TheoryApplications of item response theory (IRT) to practical testing problems, including test equating, differential item functioning, computerized adaptive testing, and test construction. Dichotomous and polytomous item response theory models with strong emphasis on computer applications.Specific objectives are: 1. To differentiate item response theory from classical test theory. 2. To become familiar with item response theory models for both dichotomous and polytomous item response data. 3. To know the fields of applications, for example, test construction, test equating/linking, differential item functioning, adaptive testing. 4. To be able to select/use different item response theory models for specific applications. 5. To be able to use various item response theroy computer programs to analyze test data for specific applications. 6. To evaluate current literature of item response theory and its application. 7. To write a research proposal in an application area.Introduction to Item Response Theory History Dichotomous Models Parameter Estimation Model-Data Fit The Ability Scale Information Function Applications Test Conctruction Equating/Linking Adaptive Testing Polytomous Models Nominal Categories Model Multiple Choice Model Rating Scale Model Graded Response Model Partial Credit Model Generalized Partial Credit Model Special Topics Multiple-Attempt, Single-Item Response Models Linear Logistic Rasch Model Multiple Group Model Computer Lab GENIRV BILOG WINSTEPS FACETS OPLM MULTILOG PARSCALE
ERSH 8750Introduction to Structural Equation ModelingIntroduction to structural equation modeling techniques, including path models, confirmatory factor analysis, and full structural models. Emphasis will be placed on conducting and interpreting computer analyses, critiquing SEM research, and current research on the methodology.1. Understand the assumptions underlying structural equation modeling (SEM) and how to assess them. 2. Correctly conduct and interpret path analyses. 3. Correctly conduct and interpret nonrecursive path analyses. 4. Correctly conduct and interpret confirmatory factor analyses. 5. Correctly conduct and interpret full structural model analyses. 6. Understand the differences among estimation methods and choose the correct method for a given application. 7. Understand the differences among fit indexes and make informed choices of these indexes. 8. Understand the issues involved in model modification and the factors that affect its use. 9. Understand how problems can arise in SEM analyses and know how to deal with these. 10. Know how to write up the results of SEM studies. 11. Know how to run multiple group CFA or path analyses. 12. Understand current issues in SEM and know how to obtain up-to-date information about recent developments in the field. 13. Be able to read and understand structural equation modeling (SEM) applications in student's area. 14. Be able to judge the technical quality of SEM applications in student's area. 15. Be able to critically review SEM articles for journals in student's area.Introduction to Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) Assumptions of SEM Path Models Non-recursive path analysis Confirmatory Factor Analysis Full structural models Estimation and testing Fit indices & nested models Model Modification Problems in SEM Writing about SEM Multiple group analyses
ERSH 8770Multilevel ModelingMultilevel models with linear, non-linear, and growth outcomes. Other topics include estimation, reliability, model building strategies, intra-class correlation, plausible values, fixed, and random effects. Focus is on conceptualizing, conducting, interpreting, and writing up multilevel analyses, as well as understanding relevant statistical and practical issues.Students will demonstrate their understanding of the topics listed below by completing a series of computer-based assignments, by presenting published studies that utilize a multilevel statistical model, and by participating in class discussions. Students will demonstrate their ability to carry out a study that employs a multilevel model by conducting their own study using a dataset of their choice. The focus of the study may be substantive or methodological in nature. Students will present the results of their study both orally in class and in the form of a research paper.Week 1: Introduction to multilevel models and their applications Week 2: Survey of Multilevel models, One-way Analysis of Variance with Random Effects and means-as-outcomes models, applications in organizational research. Week 3: Analysis of Covariance models and centering Week 4: Random-coefficient and slopes-as-outcomes models Week 5: Estimation and hypothesis testing Week 6: Model building and assessment Week 7: Individual growth models Week 8: Piecewise growth models Week 9: Three-level models Week 10: Non-linear models: Bernoulli outcome Week 11: Non-linear models: Multinomial outcome Week 12: Non-linear models: Order categories and count outcomes Week 13: Residual analysis: Using model residuals to answer research questions Week 14: Multilevel models for studying school effects and program evaluation Week 15: Cross-classified random effects models Week 16: Multilevel Structural Equation Models
ERSH 8780Multimethods ResearchExamination of the history, assumptions, and philosophy of multimethods research. In addition, the benefits of using multiple methods during the research process and how to design, implement, and write-up multimethods research are also discussed.Students will be expected to: 1) Examine and develop their own philosophy of science. 2) Develop a research proposal paper that includes: a)A discussion of the research problem(s) they intend to address. b)Develop useful research questions to investigate the problem(s) c)Develop the appropriate Multimethods research design, including, data collection and analysis methods 3) Present a research proposal to a class of their peers as preparation for other academic presentations.Course outline 1.World-view discussions including the nature of reality, the knower and knowledge and inquiry 2.Formulating research problems and questions 3.Multimethods research design 4.Multimethods data collection 5.Making “meaning” writing research proposals 6.Multimethod research in action, examining published multimethods research
ERSH 9210Quantitative Design in EducationPhilosophical, ethical, and procedural aspects of experimental and nonexperimental research in education. Synthesizing and integrating previous research studies, designing quantitative inquiries, measuring outcomes and analyzing data.1. To contribute to professional discussions about the issues in educational research. 2. To write a literature review on a topic of interest to the student. 3. To present the research idea and discuss the proposed methods. 4. To write a research proposal which includes the following: Statement of the Problem Brief review of the literature Research designOverview Scientific Inquiry Philosophical Basis Reviewing Literature Synthesizing the Literature Ethical issues in Educational Research Human subjects Experimental Research Research Desearch Measurement issues Analysis issues Cohen (1990) Correlation Research Student Research Presentation
ESCI 4100/6100Laboratory Teaching InternshipStudents will intern in the laboratory component of introductory science courses on the UGA campus. Students will co-teach laboratory sessions with a science laboratory assistant and perform duties related to instruction.The students will be able to: (1) describe inquiry-based teaching strategies in the science laboratory (2) implement appropriate instructional tasks (3) demonstrate skills such as lecturing, questioning, grading, assessing, and promoting progress in learning from laboratory Graduate student level (4) describe and analyze the role of the laboratory in science learning. (5) write a critical essay using current research literature.Topics for the Weekly Discussion Seminar (1) Orientation to the science laboratory and the internship experience. (2) Reflection on teaching the initial laboratory session. (3) Promoting effective questioning in laboratory instruction. (4) Determining factors that affect student motivation. (5) The nature of inquiry-based teaching and learning. (6) Understanding cognition of adult science students. (7) Preconceptions and their influence on science learners. (8) Students' understanding of lab activities. (9) The various skills and roles of a science teacher. (10) Ways to assess and grade students in lab. (11) Teaching learners with differing levels of ability. (12) Discussion of emerging teacher identity. (13) Program evaluation.
ESCI 4460/6460Methods of Science TeachingScience instructional strategies and classroom assessment for students in grades 7 through 12. Classroom management, lesson planning, and safety in the science classroom.ESCI 4460 1. Demonstrate knowledge of the foundational skills necessary for planning, teaching, and evaluation in the secondary classroom. 2. Show that you can effectively engage students in active science learning through multiple teaching strategies. 3. Plan, set up, manage, and assess laboratory activities. 4. Explain how students learn science and apply these ideas in lesson planning. 5. Demonstrate that you can teach science to diverse learners. 6. Show that you understand the cultural background of your students and that you can effectively communicate with them. ESCI 6460 1. Demonstrate knowledge of the foundational skills necessary for planning, teaching, and evaluation in the secondary classroom. 2. Show that you can effectively engage students in active science learning through multiple teaching strategies. 3. Plan, set up, manage, and assess laboratory activities. 4. Explain how students learn science and apply these ideas in lesson planning. 5. Demonstrate that you can teach science to diverse learners. 6. Show that you understand the cultural background of your students and that you can effectively communicate with them.ESCI 4460 1. Orientation and first day of school 2. Pre-assessment of students 3. Classroom and lab safety 4. Laboratory management 5. Planning for instruction 6. Learning objectives for science instruction 7. Children's science learning 8. Sequencing instruction into a learning cycle 9. Reading and writing strategies 10. Concept mapping strategies 11. Inquiry-based science 12. Assessment ESCI 6460 1. Orientation and first day of school 2. Pre-assessment of students 3. Classroom and lab safety 4. Laboratory management 5. Planning for instruction 6. Learning objectives for science instruction 7. Children's science learning 8. Sequencing instruction into a learning cycle 9. Reading and writing strategies 10. Concept mapping strategies 11. Inquiry-based science 12. Assessment
ESCI 4470/6470Special Topics in Science TeachingSelected modules on science teaching and learning on special topics such as applications of life science teaching; applications of physical science teaching; interdisciplinary science teaching; multimedia and computers in science teaching; reading, writing, and literacy in science. The purpose of the course is for current and future teachers to develop, through experiences, an understanding of contemporary interdisciplinary scientific inquiry with the goal of enhancing middle and secondary students’ communication and literacy skills in reading, writing, art, and mathematics. Participants will develop age appropriate science inquiry-based instructional activities and performance assessments consistent with inquiry learning. And, explore how inquiry can be woven into lessons that address national and state (including QCC, CRCT, and Stanford 9) science standards.The course includes integration of field-based / on-site visits to science laboratories, use of computer-based emergent technologies, and hands-on presentations by guest speakers. Topics and issues to be explored as modules include: ÿ Genetic engineering and cloning ÿ Geographic information systems, climate change, and geological history ÿ Gorilla behavior and modeling (includes a trip to Zoo Atlanta) ÿ Biological and cultural diversity / species and language extinction ÿ Space and solar system dynamics ÿ Applications of quark theory to everyday life
ESCI 7040Teaching Strategies for Middle and Secondary School Science TeachersImprovement of instructional competencies of teachers of science in middle and secondary schools. Includes preparation in the planning and implementation of instructional strategies.***The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary. By the end of the course, the learner should be able to: 1. Develop skills as a reflective practitioner and demonstrate these skills through the analysis of critical incidents, video cases, the writing/analysis of case narratives, and the examination of metaphors. 2. Demonstrate a variety of teaching strategies that incorporate the processes and content of middle and secondary school science. 3. Demonstrate an understanding of the nature of science and how this is evidenced in the science classroom. 4. Identify major controversial issues in science teaching and convey specific ways to deal with these issues in the science classroom. 5. Demonstrate knowledge in the provision of individual differences of learners (e.g., culturally, linguistically, the non-reader, generational poverty students). 6. Develop creative science teaching activities that use inquiry-based strategies. 7. Demonstrate an understanding of ways to use the laboratory and outdoor learning environment as vehicles for science teaching and learning. 8. Compare and contrast various traditional and nontraditional strategies of assessment of student learning in science.Nature of science Science/technology/society/environment strategies Controversial issues in science Science in the outdoor learning environment Multicultural science teaching and learning Alternative conceptions in science Teaching science BY inquiry Teaching science AS inquiry Using the laboratory to promote science inquiry Using computers and electronic technology to promote student inquiry Assessing students' work
ESCI 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.1. Progress in research, analysis, or writing related to individual thesis.Not applicable
ESCI 8120Science Writing and Literature RetrievalScientific writing and literature retrieval techniques in the sciences. Familiarization with library resources and their use through manual and automated retrieval systems and on practical aspects of oral and written communications of scientific information.1. Become familiar with library resources and facile with library retrieval systems. 2. Identify the most salient sources for science education literature. 3. Write an excellent critique of a research article in science education. 4. Write a synthesized literature review on a topic of interest, using at least 30 contenporary research articles. 5. Give an oral presentation of a synthesized literature review. 6. Create and write viable research questions.1. Orientation to science education literature. 2. Guest speaker onlibrary resources and retrieval systems I. 3. Guest speaker on library resources and retrieval systems II. 4. Practice using library resources and retrieval systems. 5. Characterizing excellent research. 6. Writing critiques of science education literture. 7. Critique presentations. 8. Identifying topics of interest and research questions. 9. Examining characteristics of a literature review. 10. Workshop on writing a leterature review. 11. Presentations of a literature review. 12. Preparing for comps and prospectus writing.
ESCI 8200Science SupervisionSupervision and evaluation of school science programs.1. Demonstrate the application of current research and successful practices concerning teaching, learning, and supervision. 2. Demonstrate the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for the supervision and support of student teachers, interns, and other professional laboratory participants, beginning teachers, and other teachers needing support. 3. Define the role of the science supervisor in terms of (a) clinical supervision, (b) curriculum development and utilization, and (c) staff development. 4. Plan and conduct a clinical supervision cycle to help a teacher improve a specific teaching competency. 5. Apply the theories and research pertaining to reflective teaching, mentoring, peer coaching, induction, observation and feedback techniques, evaluation techniques and instruments, and conferencing. 6. Describe the activities of the science supervisor related to (a) assuring adequate and safe instructional facilities, (b) securing extramural funding, (c) communicating with the public and state agencies about science teaching and learning, and (d) evaluating teacher performance.1. Engaging Students in Science Learning 2. Reflective Practice and Reflective Journal Writing 3. Science Teachers as Adult Learners and Teaching Career Cycle 4. Clinical Supervision Cycle and Conferencing Skills 5. Clinical Supervision and Teacher Evaluation 6. Staff Development and the Science Supervisor 7. National Science Standards and GSTEP Resource Framework 8. School Restructuring and the Supervisor's Role 9. Curriculum Development and the Supervisor's Role 10. Laboratory Safety and Extracurricular Science Experience 11. Public Relations and the Science Supervisor
ESCI 8990Research Seminar in Science EducationIntegration of theoretical construction in research design and analysis into practical application to science education research, both published and proposed. Topics for ESCI 8990 rotate every 4 semesters. Course objectives and outcomes are determined by the faculty instructor. Topics include: Scholarly Writing, Grant Writing, Program Evaluation, Multicultural Science Education Research, and Educatioanl Inquiry Example: The following objectives guide ESCI 8990: Scholarly Writing 1. Develop/refine the skills necessary to produce a quality piece of scholarly writing, including the ability to write quality: --research papers synopsize a study into an abstract frame researchable questions and articulate a problem statement, rationale and significance (introduction, purpose of study) coherently synthesize literature relevant to a particular topic (literature review) articulate and substantively support data patterns with evidence (findings section) develop a meaningful summary of a study and discuss reasonable discussion and implications accurately construct a reference list according to APA standards. (Time permitting, we also may examine and work on writing grants, theoretical papers, and/or research reviews.) 2. Develop/refine the skills to read and critically evaluate science education research.Topics for ESCI 8990 rotate every 4 semesters. For example, the specific topics addressed in ESCI 8990: Scholarly wiriting include: * Identifying parts of a research article * Framing a research question and writing a purpose statement * Writing an abstract * Writing an implications and conclusions section * Writing and presenting a literature review * Constructing an accurate reference list based on APA standards * Developing a findings section based on “ghost” data
ESCI 9080Science Curriculum Theory and PracticeHistoric and present day school science curricula. Literature, recent national reports, as well as national, state, and local standards, will be examined as a context which frames curriculum and its development. 1. Discuss and critique relevant contemporary issues in the science education curriculum. 2. Read and interpret science education literature. 3. Increase science education research skills. 4. Recognize important curriculum scholars and characterize their contributions. 5. Develop an argument for a curriculum position and articulate it in a scholarly paper. 6. Collect, analyze, and report on data relevant to an issue in science curriculum.1. Orientation to science education literature. 2. Guest speaker on library resources and retrieval systems I. 3. Guest speaker on library resources and retrieval systems II. 4. Practice using library resources and retrieval systems. 5. Characterizing excellent research. 6. Writing critiques of science education literature. 7. Critique presentations. 8. Identifying topics of interest and research questions. 9. Examining characteristics of a literature review. 10. Workshop on writing a literature review. 11. Presentations of a literature review. 12. Preparing for comps and prospectus writing
ESCI 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.1. Progress in research, analysis, or writing related to individual dissertation.Not applicable
ESCI 9630Critique of Educational Literature in Science EducationInterpretation and evaluation of selected research and theoretical writings in science education. --review and critique of the literature of science education --study of a specific area of literature in science education --in-depth examination of the specific area of research --production of short papers that discuss the significance of specific works within the research literature --general assessment of the literature across time, disciplines and sources --use of technological based systems for searching the literatureI. How to search, journals, index, computers II. Focusing on a search topic III. Literature of Theory Development in Science Education IV. Literature of Theory Development related to Science Education V. Literature of Research Methodology Development in Science Education VI. Literature of Research Practice: 1900 - 1929 VII. Literature of Research Practice: 1930 - 1959 VIII. Literature of Research Practice: 1960 - 1979 IX. Literature of Research Practice: 1980 - 1989 X. Literature of Research Practice: 1990 - 1999 XI. Literature of Research Practice: recent publication XII. Summary
ESOC 3420Early Childhood Social StudiesSocial studies curriculum and instruction for young children; content selection, lesson and unit planning, teaching methods, materials, and evaluation strategies.To provide students with knowledge of the social science and humanities learning goals of the Early Childhood Social Studies (ECSS) curriuclum. To develop skill in the use of instructional methods and technologies that are especially well suited to ECSS. To assist students in planning outstanding ECSS lessons for implementation in the field experience. To help the student develop a personal set of beliefs regarding ECSS instruction.The Nature and Mission of Social Studies I. The Social Studies Curriculum: Past and Present A. A Brief History of Elementary Social Studies B. Alternative Structures for K-6 Social Studies C. Official Position Statements D. The Status of K-6 Social Studies Instruction in Public Schools E. Issues in Selecting and Implementing Content II. Content in the Social Studies Curriculum A. Types of Social Studies Content a. Facts: Their Nature and Importance b. Concepts: Thought and Communication Essentials c. Main Ideas and Generalizations d. Skills e. Attitudes and Values III. Planning for Social Studies A. Lesson Plans B. Unit Teaching C. Using the Textbook D. Evaluation IV. Fostering Learner Involvement 1. Introduction 102 2. Classroom Atmosphere for Social Studies 102 3. Fostering Involvement through Activities 104 4. Involving the Family and Community 106 5. Effective Questioning Procedures 107 6. Simulations and Instructional Games 111 7. Developing Presentation and Persuasion Skills 115 8. Promoting Small Group Instruction 116 9. Individualizing Instruction Through Learning Centers 121 10. Using Computer Technology 122 11. Selected Readings 126 The Content Disciplines of Elementary Social Studies V. History: The Roots of Knowledge 1. The Discipline's Perspective 2. What K-6 Students Should Know 3. Alternative History VI . Geography: Making Sense of the Environment A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know C. Map and Globe Skills VII. Economics: Explaining Money and More A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know C. Micro-Society and Mini-Society VIII. Political Science: Government, Law, and Politics A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know C. Law-Related Education 212 IX. Psychology and Social Psychology: Understanding Ourselves A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know C. Methods for Teaching Psychology and Social Psychology X. Sociology: Exploring Contemporary Society A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know XI. Anthropology: Exploring Our Physical and Cultural Roots A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know XII. The Humanities: Artistic Interpretations of Society A. Religion in the Social Studies B. Music, Art, and Drama C. Literature in the Social Studies Special Topics and Methods XIII. Inquiry Instruction A. The Nature of Inquiry Instruction B. The Benefits of Inquiry Instruction C. Guidelines for Conducting Inquiry Lessons D. Other Forms of Inquiry XIV. Multicultural Education A. Our Multicultural Heritage and Future B. The Goals and Methods of Multicultural Education C. Racism and Sexism D. Social Class Differences E. Issues in Multicultural Education and How to Handle Them F. The Importance of Common Ground G. Guidelines for Teaching About Native Americans XV. Global Education A. World Trends Tie Us Together B. Bringing Global Education Into Your Classroom C. Global Education Resources XVI. Promoting Positive Democratic Values A. Nature of Values B. Values Education in Social Studies C. Approaches to Values Education XVII. Current Events A. The What and Why of Current Events B. Current Events in the Primary and Upper Elementary Grades C. Ways to Implement Current Events Instruction D. Problem Areas in Current Events Instruction E. Television News and Special Programs F. Specialized News Publications G. Copyright Guidelines H. Using Holidays As Current Events XVIII.Integrating Other Content Areas A. Music Activities B. Creative Art Activities C. Dramatic Activities D. Using Writing Skills E. Using Reading Skills F. Using Math Skills XIX. Resolving Differences of Opinion in the Classroom A. What Is A Difference of Opinion? B. Examples of Opinion Differences C. Why Differences of Opinion Belong In Your Room D. Guidelines for Discussing and Resolving Differences of Opinion
ESOC 5850/7850Education, Citizenship, and Culture in the United States and United KingdomAn examination of the P-12 education systems of the United States and United Kingdom in comparative perspective. Particular attention to the issue of education will be examined. In addition, the impact of national politics, culture, and society on public schooling will be explored.Students will acquire knowledge of the English educational system. Students will compare and contrast the US-UK educational systems. Students will focus on key features of the two systems (e.g., rationale, aims, curriculum, assessment, teacher preparation). Students will analyze and assess the influence of history, culture society, and politics on the two systems. Students will develop a focused portfolio on citizenship education in the two countries. Students will write a reflective essay on the merits and drawbacks of a national curriculum.1. Broad historical overview of education in USA and UK 2. Focused attention to the introduction of the national curriculum in England since 1988. 3. Examination of the structure of education in England. 4. Multiple and ongoing visits to English schools, guest speakers from Oxford University, and classroom teachers. 5. Comparative analysis of key features of education in England and the United States (selected states, including Georgia) 6. Focused attention to citizenship education in US-England 7. Attention to cultural and political influences on education. 8. Reflection on national goals for education, national curriculum, and societal support for public education
ESOC 6990Research Seminar in Social Science EducationFundamentals of research in social science education. --gain basic information needed to understand the research process, from idea formulation through data analysis and interpretation --develop the ability to read, understand, and critique educational research studies --design a successful course project that demonstrates a thorough knowledge of educational researchI. Introduction To Research A. The Nature of Educational Research II. The Basics Of Educational Research A. The Research Problem B. Ethics and Research C. Variables and Hypotheses D. Reviewing the Literature E. Sampling F. Instrumentation G. Validity and Reliability H. Internal Validity III. Data Analysis A. Descriptive Statistics B. Inferential Statistics C. Statistics in Perspective IV. Research Methodologies (I) A. Experimental Research B. Single-Subject Research C. Correlational Research D. Causal-Comparative Research E. Survey Research V. Research Methodologies (II) A. Content Analysis Research B. Qualitative Research (I) C. Qualitative Research (II) D. Historical Research VI. Preparing Research Proposals And Reports A. Writing Research Proposals and Reports VII. Research By Practitioners A. Doing Research in Schools
ESOC 7080Curriculum Planning in Social SciencesSelection, utilization, and evaluation of curricular content and materials in history and the social sciences appropriate to various ability levels of pupils.Students will be able to: 1. Discuss the history of social studies in the United States. 2. Identify current issues in education and social studies that affect the nature of social studies curriculum. 3. Explain the psychological and philosophical underpinnings of a social studies curriculum 4. Select appropriate content and learning experiences to achieve stated goals for social studies. 5. Explain the role of diversity in selecting a curriculum for social studies. 6. Compose a curriculum plan that reflects local and national standards for teaching social studies. 7. Present a rationale for teaching social studies that is consistent and comprehensive. 8. Develop a curriculum model consistent with a stated rationale for teaching social studies.I. Background on Nature of Social Studies Curriculum II. Current Issues in Education and Social Studies Education III. Psychological and Philosophical Orientations to teaching Social Studies IV. Role of Diversity in teaching Social Studies V. Writing Curriculum to reflect local and national standards for teaching social studies VI. Composing assessment procedures that validly and reliably evaluate a curriculum
ESOC 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.Student objectives based on individual research projects developed in consultation with professor.Not applicable.
ESOC 7420Social Studies for the Young ChildThis course engages practicing and preservice teachers in an exploration of the goals, content, and methodologies of elementary social studies.To provide the student with an overview of the potential goals and content of the Early Childhood SocialStudies (ECSS) curriculum. to critically examine and experience using instructional methods (such as role playing, inquiry, and values clarification) that have particular applicability to ECSS. To help the student develop a set of well-grounded, professional beliefs and preferences regarding ECSS instruction. To thoughtfully examine ECSS curriculum issues and research.The Nature and Mission of Social Studies I. The Social Studies Curriculum: Past and Present A. A Brief History of Elementary Social Studies B. Alternative Structures for K-6 Social Studies C. Official Position Statements D. The Status of K-6 Social Studies Instruction in Public Schools E. Issues in Selecting and Implementing Content II. Content in the Social Studies Curriculum A. Types of Social Studies Content a. Facts: Their Nature and Importance b. Concepts: Thought and Communication Essentials c. Main Ideas and Generalizations d. Skills e. Attitudes and Values III. Planning for Social Studies A. Lesson Plans B. Unit Teaching C. Using the Textbook D. Evaluation IV. Fostering Learner Involvement 1. Introduction 102 2. Classroom Atmosphere for Social Studies 102 3. Fostering Involvement through Activities 104 4. Involving the Family and Community 106 5. Effective Questioning Procedures 107 6. Simulations and Instructional Games 111 7. Developing Presentation and Persuasion Skills 115 8. Promoting Small Group Instruction 116 9. Individualizing Instruction Through Learning Centers 121 10. Using Computer Technology 122 11. Selected Readings 126 The Content Disciplines of Elementary Social Studies V. History: The Roots of Knowledge 1. The Discipline's Perspective 2. What K-6 Students Should Know 3. Alternative History VI. Geography: Making Sense of the Environment A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know C. Map and Globe Skills VII. Economics: Explaining Money and More A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know C. Micro-Society and Mini-Society VII. Political Science: Government, Law, and Politics A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know C. Law-Related Education 212 IX. Psychology and Social Psychology: Understanding Ourselves A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know C. Methods for Teaching Psychology and Social Psychology X. Sociology: Exploring Contemporary Society A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know XI. Anthropology: Exploring Our Physical and Cultural Roots A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know XII. The Humanities: Artistic Interpretations of Society A. Religion in the Social Studies B. Music, Art, and Drama C. Literature in the Social Studies Special Topics and Methods XII. Inquiry Instruction A. The Nature of Inquiry Instruction B. The Benefits of Inquiry Instruction C. Guidelines for Conducting Inquiry Lessons D. Other Forms of Inquiry XIV. Multicultural Education A. Our Multicultural Heritage and Future B. The Goals and Methods of Multicultural Education C. Racism and Sexism D. Social Class Differences E. Issues in Multicultural Education and How to Handle Them F. The Importance of Common Ground G. Guidelines for Teaching About Native Americans XV. Global Education A. World Trends Tie Us Together B. Bringing Global Education Into Your Classroom C. Global Education Resources XVI. Promoting Positive Democratic Values A. Nature of Values B. Values Education in Social Studies C. Approaches to Values Education XVII.Current Events A. The What and Why of Current Events B. Current Events in the Primary and Upper Elementary Grades C. Ways to Implement Current Events Instruction D. Problem Areas in Current Events Instruction E. Television News and Special Programs F. Specialized News Publications G. Copyright Guidelines H. Using Holidays As Current Events XVII.Integrating Other Content Areas A. Music Activities B. Creative Art Activities C. Dramatic Activities D. Using Writing Skills E. Using Reading Skills F. Using Math Skills XIX Resolving Differences of Opinion in the Classroom A. What Is A Difference of Opinion? B. Examples of Opinion Differences C. Why Differences of Opinion Belong In Your Room D. Guidelines for Discussing and Resolving Differences of Opinion
ESOC 8010History of Social Studies EducationMajor themes, ideas, and personalities in the historical development of curriculum and instruction in social studies in the United States since 1880, including comparisons to selected other nations.Students will gain an understanding of the historical structure, content, goals, issues, and trends regarding social studies curriculum paradigms and instructional practices. Students will demonstrate an understanding of issues, research, and resources relating to the history of the social studies. Students will become familiar with major personalities and their contributions to the history of the social studies. Students will develop knowledge and skills for the teaching and conduct of historical research in the social studies.Self as history The nature of history Study and writing about history, methodology The nature and role of oral history in the social studies Descriptions, definitions, and origins, beginnings of traditional history School reform, Committee of Seven, Toward social education reform Influence of social studies American Historical Association Commission on the Social Studies - 1930s, WW II Origins of the New Social Studies Another view of the social studies Historical parallels for the 1960s-1970s, primary sources and core curriculum revisited History of social studies research
ESOC 8990Research Seminar in Social Science EducationResearch design problems in social science education.Students will critique and write research reviews/syntheses in terms of given criteria. Students will analyze research in terms of conceptualization, design, operationalization, data collection and analysis, and interpretation. Students will learn to use databases to prepare research reviews/syntheses. Students will differentiate between the utilities of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. Students will identify and assess ethical issues in research methodology and data analysis.Finding the right context for one's research Reviewing research articles Utilizing research and literature data bases to locate research Critiquing individual research reports Reviewing a set of research studies Case studies of the research process Research methodology Qualitative research Measurement topics and issues Student research review/synthesis presentations
ESOC 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.Student objectives based on individual research projects developed in consultation with professor.Not applicable.
EXRS 4000Special Problems in Exercise and Sport ScienceIndependent study of selected topics in exercise and sport science.The student will be able to: 1. Identify an appropriate problem based on relevant scientific studies. 2. Identify sources of information pertaining to the special problem. 3. Compile the information identified pertaining to the special problem. 4. Synthesize the information compiled. 5. Write a final report based on the information compiled.Since this course is an independent study of some special problem in Exercise Science, the content of the course will vary with the problem. Students will work under the direction of faculty to: 1. Submit proposal to supervising faculty member for approval. 2. Identify relevant sources of information. 3. Compile and synthesize information. 4. Write a final report.
EXRS 4400/6400Exercise and Sport PsychologyEffects of participating in exercise and sport on psychological traits and states. Cognitive and neurobiological mechanisms and psychological limitations to athletic performance.1. To understand the role of research methods in exercise and sport psychology, and use research findings and/or psychological theories to reach logical conclusions. 2. To demonstrate basic knowledge about key content areas of exercise and sport psychology and be able to apply this knowledge appropriately in practical settings. 3. To understand and apply ethical principles, especially those adopted by the American Psychological Association. 4. To be aware of individual differences among people with regard to the psychological aspects of exercise and sport. 5. To write effectively using appropriate writing styles.1. History of the field of exercise and sport psychology. 2. Professional and ethical issues relevant to the practice of sport pscyhology. 3. Scientific methods used to understand and evaluate psychological aspects of sport performance. 4. Psychological interventions for performance enhancement (e.g., hypnosis). 5. Personality and sport success. 6. Pre-competitive states and athletic performance. 7. Cognitive, perceptual and pain processing during athletic performance. 8. Psychological monitoring of athletes to optimize training and performance. 9. Effects of exercise on anxiety, depression, self-esteem, sleep and anger. 10. Cognitive and neurobiological mechanisms underlying psychological consequences of exercise and physical activity. 11. Eating disorders and athletes.
EXRS 4960HUndergraduate Research in Exercise Science (Honors)Independent research by an honors student conducted under the supervision of an exercise science faculty member.The student will: 1. Identify a research problem 2. Review the literature related to the research topic 3. Collect data to test research hypotheses 4. Write a research report1. Identify a research problem 2. Review the literature related to the research topic 3. Collect data to test research hypotheses 4. Write a research report
EXRS 4970Research in Exercise ScienceIndependent research conducted under the supervision of an exercise science faculty member.The student will: 1. Identify a research problem 2. Review the literature related to the research topic 3. Collect data to test research hypotheses 4. Write a research report1. Identify a research problem 2. Review the literature related to the research topic 3. Collect data to test research hypotheses 4. Write a research report
EXRS 4970HUndergraduate Research in Exercise Science (Honors)Independent research by an honors student conducted under the supervision of an exercise science faculty member.The student will: 1. Identify a research problem 2. Review the literature related to the research topic 3. Collect data to test research hypotheses 4. Write a research report1. Identify a research problem 2. Review the literature related to the research topic 3. Collect data to test research hypotheses 4. Write a research report
EXRS 4980HUndergraduate Research in Exercise Science (Honors)Independent research by an honors student conducted under the supervision of an exercise science faculty member.The student will: 1. Identify a research problem 2. Review the literature related to the research topic 3. Collect data to test research hypotheses 4. Write a research report1. Identify a research problem 2. Review the literature related to the research topic 3. Collect data to test research hypotheses 4. Write a research report
EXRS 4990HHonors Thesis in Exercise ScienceIndependent research by an honors student supervised by an exercise science faculty member culminating in a thesis.The student will: 1. Identify a research problem 2. Review the literature related to the research topic 3. Collect data to test research hypotheses 4. Write a research report in the form of a thesis1. Identify a research problem 2. Review the literature related to the research topic 3. Collect data to test research hypotheses 4. Write a research report in the form of a thesis
EXRS 6000Problems in Exercise ScienceIndependent study in exercise science.The student will be able to: 1. Identify sources of information pertaining to the special problem or project. 2. Compile the information identified pertaining to the special problem or project. 3. Synthesize the information compiled or evaluate the findings. 4. Write a final report.Since this course is an independent study of some special problem in Exercise Science, the content of the course will vary with the problem. Students will work under the direction of faculty to: 1. Identify relevant sources of information or problem. 2. Compile and synthesize information or findings. 3. Write a final report.
EXRS 7000Master's ResearchResearch while enrolled for a master's degree under the direction of faculty members.The student will be able to: 1. Identify a topic to investigate. 2. Develop the procedures to conduct the investigation. 3. Conduct the investigation. 4. Analyze the data collected in the investigation. 5. Write a final report of the investigation.I. Problem identification and literature review. II. Procedure development, practice, planning data collection. III. Data collection. IV. Data reduction and analysis. V. Final report preparation.
EXRS 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.The student will be able to: 1. Identify a thesis research topic. 2. Develop the procedures to conduct the research. 3. Conduct the research. 4. Analyze the data collected in the research. 5. Write the thesis.I. Thesis research topic development. II. Conduct of research. III. Data analysis. IV. Writing the thesis.
EXRS 8340Seminar in Exercise PsychologyReading and discussion of current topics of investigation in the psychological and behavioral aspects of exercise and health-related physical fitness.Students will obtain in depth knowledge about theories, measurement tools and outcomes relevant to the seminar topic. Students will learn how to evaluate and critique published research articles. Students will read current research articles. Students will demonstrate knowledge by discussing the strengths and weaknesses of published research articles. Students also will demonstrate knowledge by writing research papers.The topics will vary depending on student demand and faculty availability. The topics include the determinants of participation in physical activity, and the effects of leisure-time physical activity on anxiety, cognition, depression, self-esteem, eating disorders, sleep, pain, psychobiological aspects of cardiovascular diseases, psychoneuroimmunology, and perceived exertion. Course outlines are not included because they will vary depending on topic.
EXRS 9000Doctoral ResearchResearch while enrolled for a doctoral degree under the direction of faculty.The student will be able to: 1. Identify a topic to investigate. 2. Develop the procedures to conduct the investigation. 3. Conduct the investigation. 4. Analyze the data collected in the investigation. 5. Write a final report of the investigation.I. Problem identification and literature review. II. Procedure development, practice, planning data collection. III. Data collection. IV. Data reduction and analysis. V. Final report preparation.
EXRS 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.The student will be able to: 1. Identify a dissertation research topic. 2. Develop the procedures to conduct the research. 3. Conduct the research. 4. Analyze the data collected in the research. 5. Write the dissertation.I. Dissertation research topic development. II. Conduct of research. III. Data analysis. IV. Writing the dissertation.
EXRS 9630Directed Reading in Exercise ScienceCritical evaluation of reported research on a specialized topic in exercise science.The student will be able to: 1. Identify a current topic in Exercise Scienct to study. 2. Develop the procedures to study the topic. 3. Conduct the study of the topic. 4. Summarize literature related to the topic. 5. Discuss practical and theoretical implications of the information on the topic. 6. Write a final report concerning the topic studied.Content will vary among students but will cover the following: 1. Identification of the current topic. 2. Strategies and approaches to address the topic. 3. Procedures for obtaining information on the topic. 4. Implications of the information on the topic for the present and future.
EXRS(HPRB)(PEDS)(RLST) 7150Research Methods in Health and Human PerformanceApplication of research to exercise science, health promotion and behavior, physical education, and recreation and leisure studies, with experience in developing techniques of gathering, analyzing, and reporting data.At the conclusion of the course the student should be able to: 1. Discuss the purpose of research in exercise science. 2. Describe the scientific method and the elements of the research process. 3. Discuss the importance of reviewing the literature in identifying and developing a research problem; use a computer to search available data bases to obtain published literature. 4. Demonstrate an understanding of selected basic statistical concepts. Given appropriate data, calculate basic statistics using available computer software for calculating fundamental statistics. Correctly interpret basic descriptive and inferential statistics. 5. Describe and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of typical descriptive, quasi- experimental and experimental designs used in exercise science research, including the major threats to internal and external validity. 6. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of exercise science research published in peer-reviewed journals. 7. Describe the format and main components of a scientific, peer-reviewed manuscript and thesis or dissertation.1. Nature and Purpose of Research 2. Reviewing the Literature 3. Elements of the Research Process 4. Experimental Research 5. Descriptive Research 6. Basic Statistical Concepts & Methods 7. Writing Research Reports 8. Research Article Critique
FDNS 3600Food PrinciplesFood selection, preparation, evaluation, and composition.To understand food preparation techniques To understand basic concepts of food preparation To know the terminology associated with food preparation To investigate basic changes that occur during food preparation To understand how each ingredient functions in a food product To be able to identify and evaluate food products To understand the principles of food preservation To learn technical writing skills To improve basic computer skillsIntroduction to 3600 Laboratory Procedures Food Composition Starches and Cereals Heating Methods Fruits and Vegetables Food Safety (Sanitation) Fats, Emulsions, and Salads Milk and Cheese Eggs Batters and Doughs Red Meat Food Preservation Poultry and Fish Meat Alternatives
FDNS 3600LFood Principles LaboratoryFood selection, preparation, evaluation, and composition.To understand food preparation techniques To understand basic concepts of food preparation To know the terminology associated with food preparation To investigate basic changes that occur during food preparation To understand how each ingredient functions in a food product To be able to identify and evaluate food products To understand the principles of food preservation To learn technical writing skills To improve basic computer skillsIntroduction to 3600 Laboratory Procedures Food Composition Starches and Cereals Heating Methods Fruits and Vegetables Food Safety (Sanitation) Fats, Emulsions, and Salads Milk and Cheese Eggs Batters and Doughs Red Meat Food Preservation Poultry and Fish Meat Alternatives
FDNS 3610Quantity Food ProductionPrinciples of food preparation in large quantities; institutional equipment and procedures.To recognize and evaluate the physical layout and organization of an institutional kitchen. To recognize and evaluate the organization of personnel in foodservice and healthcare facilities. To understand the need for a safe, sanitary environment and identify good and bad safety and sanitary practices. To plan and evaluate simple menus for a foodservice operation. To identify and use basic equipment used in an institutional foodservice. To use basic cost control procedures, including calculations related to cost control. To recognize and evaluate factors and skills involved in efficient food production. To identify factors relating to the serving of quality food. To become familiar with some management tools and techniques, including calculations used in foodservice operations. To develop team work skills. To use computers and relevant software to facilitate planning and decision-making in foodservice operations. To develop technical writing skills.Organization: Personnel, Physical Layout, and Food Flow. Computer Applications in Foodservice: WebCT, PowerPoint, word processing and grammar check programs; Food-Trak (a foodservice inventory accounting program); Page Composer and Web site construction in WebCT. Introduction to Food for Fifty Tables: Practice Production Problems. Storerooms and Inventory: Introduction to Yield, Storeroom and Inventory Terminology. Equipment Use. Recipe Conversion, Standardization, and Costing. Chemical Safety and UGA Food Service Computer Functions. Sanitation: Introduction to HACCP. Work Simplification: Process Chart Simulation; Time and Motion Simulation. Production Principles: Production Scheduling Soups, Stocks, Sauces. Salads, Presentation Principles.
FDNS 3610LQuantity Foods LaboratoryPrinciples of food preparation in large quantities; institutional equipment and procedures.To recognize and evaluate the physical layout and organization of an institutional kitchen. To recognize and evaluate the organization of personnel in foodservice and healthcare facilities. To understand the need for a safe, sanitary environment and identify good and bad safety and sanitary practices. To plan and evaluate simple menus for a foodservice operation. To identify and use basic equipment used in an institutional foodservice. To use basic cost control procedures, including calculations related to cost control. To recognize and evaluate factors and skills involved in efficient food production. To identify factors relating to the serving of quality food. To become familiar with some management tools and techniques, including calculations used in foodservice operations. To develop team work skills. To use computers and relevant software to facilitate planning and decision-making in foodservice operations. To develop technical writing skills.Organization: Personnel, Physical Layout, and Food Flow. Computer Applications in Foodservice: WebCT, PowerPoint, word processing and grammar check programs; Food-Trak (a foodservice inventory accounting program); Page Composer and Web site construction in WebCT. Introduction to Food for Fifty Tables: Practice Production Problems. Storerooms and Inventory: Introduction to Yield, Storeroom and Inventory Terminology. Equipment Use. Recipe Conversion, Standardization, and Costing. Chemical Safety and UGA Food Service Computer Functions. Sanitation: Introduction to HACCP. Work Simplification: Process Chart Simulation; Time and Motion Simulation. Production Principles: Production Scheduling Soups, Stocks, Sauces. Salads, Presentation Principles.
FDNS 4540/6540Public Health DieteticsNutrition in public health care and tools for successful management and delivery of nutrition services, including knowledge of community assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation as related to nutritional care.To relate the social, economic, psychological, behavioral and environmental factors to food availability and the health and nutritional status of populations. To recognize population groups at-risk and those with special needs. To understand the role and skills needed to work with diverse population groups. To define the roles and responsibilities of a public health nutritionist. To identify the components of successful delivery of quality nutrition services. To discuss public health programs and policies involved in the delivery of nutrition care for individuals throughout the life cycle. To learn effective nutrition interviewing and counseling strategies, demonstrate counseling skills and document and effective nutrition plan. To learn how to conduct a community nutrition assessment. To understand the role of the nutrition manager and components of successful nutrition services management. To understand public policy and legislation influencing nutrition programs and practice and how to shape that policy. To identify current know relationships between diet/health behavior and chronic disease, and health promotion and disease prevention theories and recommendations. To understand the importance of networking and working in groups for facilitating communication of nutrition programs. To discuss and demonstrate basic nutrition screening and nutrition assessment techniques used in community health settings through use of case studies and role playing. To learn techniques for assessing vital signs of clients and to demonstrate the use of these techniques in the classroom. To summarize educational theory and techniques and apply these theories to the development of educational materials and to presentations of an educational session. To understand the role of other allied health professionals and how these professionals interact with dietitians in interdisciplinary care of clients.Opportunities in Community Nutrition Policy Making The Health Care Industry Nutrition Policy and Monitoring Community Assessment Program Planning Designing Community Interventions Nutrition Education Marketing Nutrition Programs Program Management and Grant Writing Community Nutrition in the Life Cycle Domestic Hunger and Food Assistance Programs
FDNS 4580Undergraduate Special Topics in Foods and NutritionSelected topics from the field of foods and nutrition.Study in depth at least one topic in the area of foods and nutrition. Write a report on at least one topic in the area of foods and nutrition.Choosing an area to study Identifying references related to chosen area Organizing a paper Writing a paper based on references identified Edit paper after it has been critiqued by faculty advisor
FDNS 4610/6610Foodservice Procurement and Financial ManagementPurchasing methods, specifications, storage and issuing procedures, inventory systems. Cost control, budgets, and financial statements used in foodservice organizations.To familiarize students with principles and procedures of menu planning, purchasing and financial management in food and nutrition care services. To give students the opportunity to practice forecasting quantities of food to be purchased To introduce students to the foodservice purchasing market where buying and selling take place and familiarize them with factors that influence this market. To review the regulations and laws that affect market regulation. To allow students practice writing purchase specifications for foodservice. To familiarize students with purchasing methods, the purchasing process and record keeping To review procedures for proper receiving, storage and inventory control. To understand the use of purchasing records, To learn techniques of food quality assessment. To learn the basic principles of financial management.Menu planning Forecasting Quantity The Market and Market Regulation Specifications Purchasing Methods Process and Records Receiving Storage and Inventory Control Food Quality Assessment Financial Management
FDNS 4720/6720Menu Management and ServiceMeal planning and service styles for individuals, families, and institutions; cultural, nutritional, marketing, and social aspects of foods; government regulations related to meal planning.To understand the menu as the key to success in a foodservice operation To understand the menu in relation to the customers served To understand the role of proper service style and server behavior in foodservice successIntroduction to menu planning and menu writing Menus for special application: hotels, banquets, hospitals, and cafeterias Menus to meet specific cultural needs Service styles Nutritional calculations for menus Financial aspect of menu planning Government regulations Menu design to improve marketing
FDNS 5020Directed Research in Consumer FoodsIndependent research in consumer foods, including literature review, laboratory work, experimental design, and interpretation of the results.To apply the research process to a Consumer Food issue; To present, interpret and discuss the results from a research project in written and/or oral formatReviewing the professional literature and identification of a research problem Writing the project justification, stating the hypothesis and objectives Selecting the appropriate research methodology and designing the experiment Collecting, analyzing data and summarizing and interpreting the results Preparation and delivery of a written or oral report
FDNS 5300Senior ThesisResearch project and thesis writing.Write an undergraduate thesis on a topic related to foods and nutrition. Edit thesis according to faculty advisor's evaluation.Choosing area of study Identifying references Improving writing skills Writing thesis Editing thesis
FDNS 5300HHonors ThesisIndividual research in the major field or in a closely related field to write a thesis.
FDNS 6670Nutrition InterventionCritical examination of multiple nutrition intervention strategies used in clinical and community settings. Emphasis is placed on systematic analysis of nutrition-related health problems and interventions designed to address them. A major focus will be on developing a comprehensive nutrition intervention program for a selected target group.1. Identify basic nutrition intervention principles. 2. Discuss the philosophical, ethical and scientific issues in nutrition intervention. 3. Select and/or design interventions for individuals, groups and populations. 4. Provide defensible rationale, orally and in writing, for choosing strategies and making recommendations related to intervention principles.1) Nutrition Intervention: A Systems Approach. 2) Understanding Nutrition Intervention. 3) Community Asset Mapping. 4) Listening to the Client/Community. 5) Creating the Intervention. 6) Quality Assurance in Interventions Scientific Rationale. 7) Quality Assurance in Interventions Behavioral Rationale. 8) Projecting the Future. 9) Adapting Programs for Culturally Diverse Populations. 10)Evaluating Intervention Approaches: Clinical, Group, and Population Approaches.
FDNS 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.
FDNS 8560Dissertation/Thesis Proposal WritingProposal preparation and presentation for planning thesis/dissertation research.Development of a research project that may form the basis of a student's Thesis/ Dissertation research Step-wise construction of a written research proposal with class presentations and discussions of each section Presentation of a summary of the research proposal to the Department Development of critical thinking skills by learning the principles of effective experimental design and scientific writingDiscussion of the content of a research proposal Review of the principles of Scientific Writing Ethical issues associated with research proposals and papers Class presentations and discussions of each section of the research proposal Review of written proposals by Thesis/Dissertation committee members Department-wide presentation of the research proposals
FDNS 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
FDST 3910Food Science InternshipProvides a practical educational experience while working in an operational food industry plant or laboratory.The students should have the ability to get the following items after successful completion of this course: - to identify the processing flow or laboratory routines in food industry. (Knowledge) - to describe the technology and marketing aspects in the food industry. (Comprehension) - to implement the knowledge and skills learned from school in real world situation. (Application) - to compare the school pilot plant and production facilities in commercial scale. (Analysis) - to write an internship report with observation and hands-on experience. (Synthesis) - to appraise the working environment and technology used in food industry employed as an intern. (Evaluation)Non-traditional format for the course, but at least a semester of full time employment in a food processing plant or laboratory is required. A final written report is required for all enrolled students The course syllabus is a general plan for the course: deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary.
FDST 7100Culinary Essentials for the Food Scientist and TechnologistProvides an understanding of the role that culinary arts plays in effective new food product development. A combination of lecture and practical application of the basic skills and procedures required of a chef in the food processing and food product development environment.To enhance the success of the food scientist, technologist and professional through an increased understanding of the culinary arts. By fostering an increased awareness of the processes and techniques utilized by culinary professionals, the food technologist will have a better connection and understanding of the delivery of guest/consumer eating/dining satisfaction. This understanding will translate into a more balanced and probably more successful approach in the new food and beverage product development effort. Course Objectives: After completing this course, the student will be able to: • Explain the interrelationship of culinary arts and food science • Identify the basic equipment used in a professional kitchen • Explain the 12 methods of cooking and the end characteristics that impact the food and hence the target consumer • Understand the basic culinary skill sets required to develop safe, wholesome foods • Define and describe the process of culinary new product development • Demonstrate how to write a recipe • Demonstrate the principles of balance in food composition • Understand how food safety must be incorporated into the culinary experience • Explain how customer and distribution channels affect recipe development • Identify crucial steps in the development of a protocept; also, understand the role of the “Gold Standard” and their relationship to it • Identify key culinary action points in the iterative process • Understand the critical nature of the Scale Up phase and their role as guardian of the Gold Standard1. The interrelationship of culinary arts and food science and technology. The resource available to all for food and beverage product development. 2. The basic equipment used in a professional kitchen by professional chefs and their associates. 3. Five of the 12 methods of cooking and the end characteristics that impact the food and hence the target consumer. The physical and other sensory attributes and how they are achieved. 4. The next 5 of the 12 methods of cooking and the end characteristics that impact the food and hence the target consumer. The physical and other sensory attributes and how they are achieved. 5. The remaining 2 of the 12 methods of cooking and the end characteristics that impact the food and hence the target consumer. The physical and other sensory attributes and how they are achieved. The basic culinary skill sets required to develop safe, wholesome foods. 6. Customer and distribution channels affect recipe development. Term project progress. Shelf life of food products and how they are affected by formulation. 7. The process of culinary new food product development in the context of all new food and beverage product development. 8. How to write a recipe. Ingredients and components. The principles of balance in food composition to achieve quality, safety, nutritional value. The attributes that must be achieved in a recipe/formulation. 9. Crucial steps in the development of a protocept; the role of the “Gold Standard” and food scientists’ and technologists’ relationship to it. 10. Key culinary action points in the iterative process. 11. Scaling up the recipe and to a commercial process; the chef’s role. Food safety and its incorporation into the culinary experience. 12. The Scale Up phase and food scientist/technologist role as guardian of the Gold Standard.
FDST 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.
FDST 8020-8020LFlavor Chemistry and EvaluationSensory methods of evaluating flavor and physical or chemical methods of measuring flavor components; the flavor characteristics of various chemicals, especially as influenced by concentration and interaction with other compounds; flavor formulation; and the stability of flavor substances during processing and storage.Upon successful completion of this course students should have the ability to: summarize the critical issues in flavor chemistry and evaluation; describe the key principles relating to current research in flavor chemistry and evaluation; develop the next logical research objective for a published manuscript; distinguish the critical gaps in knowledge in research of different aspects of flavor chemistry and evaluation; design and conduct, as part of a team, a research project on flavor; write a short critical review that integrates at least two aspects of flavor chemistry and evaluation; and evaluate critically scientific journal articles. The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary.Overview - flavor chemistry and sensory evaluation; Biology - plant and animal physiology; Biotechnology - genetics and modification; Analytical - qualitative and quantitative; Chemistry - structure and function; Flavor changes - thermal modification and lipid oxidation; Physiology - olfactory and gustatory; Sensory evaluation - descriptive and affective; Electronic nose - sensing and interpreting; Consumer testing - exploratory and verification; Statistical analysis - design and interpretation; Flavor integration - theory and application; and Product quality - development and analysis.
FDST 8030Seafood TechnologyFishery resources and availability as food, nutritive composition, postharvest biochemical and microbial changes, fishing and handling technology, chilling and freezing, dehydration/smoking/salting, fermentation, canning, minced fish technology, aquaculture, quality and safety evaluation, distribution and marketing.The students should have the ability to get the following items after successful completion of this course: - to define key terms used in fishery resources and seafood technology. (Knowledge) - to recognize the fishing and postharvest handling techniques. (Knowledge) - to paraphrase the principles of food process technology used for fish and fishery products. (Comprehension) - to summarize the relationship among and integration of food processing, chemistry and microbiology, learned from the previous semesters, for more efficient utilization of fishery resources. (Comprehension) - to compare the distribution channel and marketing scheme for fishery industry (Analysis) - to distinguish the unique nutritional quality of fishery products from land animal and plant products. (Analysis) - to write Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) plans and Sanitation Standard Operating Procedures (SSOP) for seafood industry. (Synthesis) - to evaluate and critique quality and food safety concerns for aquatic food products (Evaluation)Overview the aquatic resources and their availability as food Postharvest biochemical and microbiological changes of fresh seafood Composition of major seafood groups and their nutritive values Quality improvement and evaluation Aquaculture species and practices Canning technology Smoking, drying and salting technology Fermentation technology Chilling and freezing technology Surimi technology Seafood Packaging Seafood safety (HACCP and SSOP) Seafood distribution and marketing channels Special term paper and field trip are required for all students The course syllabus is a general plan for the course: deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary.
FDST 8090Advanced Food MicrobiologyPhysiology and biochemistry of food-borne microorganisms; microbial control in food systems; advanced analytical techniques in food microbiology.1. Describe physiological aspects of food-borne microorganisms important for controlling their activity and growth in foods. 2. Describe the mechanisms of food preservation in terms of its impact on the physiology of spoilage microorganisms. 3. Develop model programs for the control of microorganisms in food processing environments. 4. Discuss in writing the principals of controlling human pathogens during animal production. 5. Describe in the use of genetic markers in food microbiology research. 6. Describe approaches to solving microbial food contamination problems relying on case history analysis. 7. Describe the underlying risk assessment basis for HACCP programs. 8. Develop model programs for the effective use of microbiological data in HACCP programs. 9. Evaluate the use of rapid methods in the application of HACCP.Physiology of lactic acid bacteria Physiology of pyschrotrophic bacteria found in food Stress and adaptation of food-borne pathogens Microbial attachment and biofilm formation in food processing environments Physiology of spore forming bacteria in food systems Chemical and natural antimicrobials Fungi and water activity Microbiological criteria and indicator microorganisms Control in animal production systems Control in the processing plant environment Genetic markers Genetic methods for detecting pathogens Detection of parasites Molecular epidemiology of food-borne illness Rapid and automated methods Risk assessment HACCP applications This course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary.
FDST 8110Food Research and the Scientific MethodResearch as a process that transforms ideas into accessible knowledge. Unit operations include idea generation, problem definition, critical evaluation of literature, method selection, experimental design, data collection, processing and analysis, and knowledge dissemination. Additional aspects include philosophy, grantsmanship, planning, laboratory set-up and management, and career development.Upon successful completion of this course students should have the ability to: outline and describe the unit operations of research; recognize the hallmarks of an achievable objective and an effective abstract; describe the thought style of a scientist they have observed; determine if a research objective in a published article has been achieved; generate a personal thought style; generate, as part of a team, a short grant proposal; design, as part of a team, a laboratory to conduct the research for their grant proposal; write a book review on a scientific book of their choosing; write an abstract for a completed manuscript; design a session for the class or lead a group discussion; evaluate the merits and limitations of the book they review; and evaluate critically scientific journal articles. The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary.Research as process; unit operations: knowledge dissemination, processing and analysis, data collection, experimental design, method selection, critical evaluation of literature, problem definition, and idea generation; science and philosophy; grantsmanship; research planning; laboratory setup & management; and career development
FDST 8910Food Science InternshipSupervised on-site, hands-on experience in the food industry or in governmental agencies that regulate food.Exposure to the food industry or government regulatory agency environment will enlighten the student's understanding of these operations and will allow them to use the skills and knowledge gained in previous courses under actual industry or agency situations. Students will develop resume preparation and interviewing skills. A student will also learn how to be a team player, as well as an independent worker. The intern experience will better prepare the student for the job market.Special Requirements: Students have to attend a resume writing and interview practice workshop sponsored by the University Career Center before applying for the internship program. An approval letter from the Center is required before registration for the course. Students are required to turn in a term paper regarding the experience of the intership. Students are required to give an oral presentation during a scheduled departmental seminar session describing their intern experience. The student's immediate supervisor during the internship will complete and submit a performance evaluation.
FDST 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
FINA 4920Computers in FinanceApplying computers to business applications especially using Excel in finance related work.The goal is for finance majors to apply the concepts of investments, small business finance, and corporate finance into an Excel framework. The student will also be able to write documents describing results created in Excel.Retirement planning; Mortgage Re-financing; Graphing in Excel; Cost of Equity; Beta; WACC; Cost of Debt; Financial forecasting; Project cash flows; Sales forecasts; Inventory management; Work scheduling; Portfolio optimization; Financial ratio analysis; Yield curve dynamics; Real options; Binomial option pricing; Project selection methods; Repeatable projects; Interest rate parity; and Monte Carlo simulations
FINA 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.Master's ThesisMaster's Thesis
FINA 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.Dissertation CreditsDissertation Credits
FORS 5250/7250International Issues in Wildlife ConservationAn overseas, field-based course that explores wildlife conservation and management topics and issues in the host country. Includes lectures and field projects related to sustainable use of wildlife and human conflicts with wildlife.Students enrolled in this course will be expected to obtain a working knowledge of wildlife management issues and problems in another country and how those problems are addressed. The students will also obtain some basic understanding of cultural differences in addressing wildlife management issues.1. Introduction to the culture of the country(ies) to be visited. 2. Basic wildlife management issues of that country. 3. Introduction to local ecosystems including plants and animals. 4. Identification of several key wildlife management problems. 5. American and local perspectives on ways to address problems. 6. Short-term field research project. 7. Collection of field data. 8. Write-up. 9. Presentation and class discussion of issues.
FORS 7300Master's ThesisThesis writing under the direction of the major professor.
FORS 8200Scientific Research in Forest ResourcesThe scientific method, standards for good scientific conduct, research proposal writing and reviewing skills are emphasized.
FORS 8210-8210LScientific Communication in Natural ResourcesPreparation of scientific manuscripts for publication and presentation of papers at scientific conferences. Preparation of individual manuscripts, figures, and tables; writing with clarity, brevity, and word economy; dealing with journal editors and reviewers; reviewing and editing manuscripts; preparing proposals for funding; presentation of oral and poster papers at scientific conferences; and preparation of visual aids. To enhance the scientific communication skills of students pursuing professional careers in environmental sciences.
FORS 8470Self-Referencing Modeling for Environmental SciencesApplication of statistical, mathematical, and computational, modeling concepts to the development of advanced self- referencing functions describing the dynamics of multi- dimensional systems affected by unobservable variables. Use of the generalized algebraic difference approach and stochastic parameter estimation to develop theory-based, base-age and path invariant, generalized, unbiased self-referencing models with base-age independent parameter estimates.At the end of the semester student will be able to derive advanced base-age invariant self-referencing equations with desirable algebraic and statistical properties describing accurately various dynamic trends according to set forth theories. Students will gain a firm grasp of the existing literature and various approaches to self-referencing modeling. They will master the generalized algebraic difference approach and the stochastic parameter estimation techniques for estimation of parameter values in self-referencing models.1. Introduction to the concepts of self-referencing modeling, review of its applications and relevant approaches, sample practical applications in forestry and other environmental sciences. Review of mathematical, statistical, and computational tools relevant to the subject. 2. The Generalized Algebraic Difference Approach and its advantages; a. Work on a simple practical example based on a published paper. The exercises will include: i. critical review of an example journal paper; ii. addressing problems identified in the paper; iii. analysis of model flexibility and its implications on modeled dynamics; iv. calibrating dynamic equations that can replace the published fixed- base-age equations and solve their limitations with respect to the unobservable variable solutions; v. preparation of a report summarizing the progress in class and demonstrating students’ work that improves on the studied models in terms of the applied algebra and model functionality. 3. The stochastic parameter estimation in the self- referencing functions; a. Following up on the above example but this time looking into the differences in curve shapes caused by different methods of parameter estimation. The exercises will include: i. fitting the same models as in the original paper to the original data from the example paper, using both the traditional base-age specific methods for different base ages and the advanced stochastic methods; ii. fitting to the above data the models from 1. using both fitting techniques; iii. discussing differences and considering the same points as in 1. iv. writing up a report on the results, which improves on the parameter estimation of the original work. 4. A model development using the two above methodologies. a. Time permitting students will work on a real example of complete model development using the studied equations as a starting point example, which would include: i. data preparation and screening; ii. fitting the models using stochastic regression analysis of different model forms and comparison of their performance; and iii. derivation of new model forms that would address the specific data characteristics.
FORS 9300Doctoral DissertationDissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
FREN 1001Elementary FrenchThe French language and French-speaking cultures. Open only to students who have fewer than two units of high school French. Emphasis is on conversational skills with attention to reading, writing, and listening comprehension. Work in the language laboratory. This course stresses the development of students' ability to speak French. Students will be able to describe people and familiar places and activitiess and ask questions seeking basic information. They will learn to read simple, expository texts with minimal use of a dictionary. They will write coherent descriptive paragraphs on familiar topics. They will be able to understand the teacher's verbal instructions and other students' verbal discourse. They will also learn about the daily lives of people in FRence and in other countries where French is spoken. Pronunciation: Vowels and consonants, silent consonants, rhythm, and intonation. Morphology: Regular verbs in -er, -ir, and -re Irregular verbs: ˆtre, avoir, faire, aller, prendre Adjectives: Postnomial and prenomial, posesssive, demonstrative Articles: Definite, indefinite, partitive Syntax: Declarative, interrogative, negative, and imperative sentences. Tenses: Present, past, futur proche Pronouns: Direct and indirect object (3rd person) Vocabulary: Numbers, place names, the clander, time, weather Culture: University life, family and friends, cooking and food, travel, the French-speaking world, transportation, communication.
FREN 1002Elementary FrenchA continuation of Elementary French. Emphasis is on conversational skills with attention to reading, writing, and listening comprehension. Work in the language laboratory. This course continues emphasis on the speaking skill begun in FR 101. Students will be able to engage in a dialogue on familiar topics. They will be able to initiate and respond to simple statements in the present, past, and future. they will be able to understand clear narrative descriptions by the instructor. They will read descriptive texts, chronological narrations, and dialogues. They will write compositions and narrations on familiar topics or printed texts. They will learn about the French-speaking world in greater variety of locations and more depth. Pronunciation: Vowels and consonants, intonation, mute e, liaisons Morphology: Irregular verbs: savoir, connaŒtire, venir, boire, mettre Reflexive pronouns and verbs Syntax: Declarative, interrogative, negative, and imperative sentences Tenses: Present, past, imperfect, future Pronouns: Direct and indirect object (1st and 2nd person), demonstrative, poss