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AAEC 3020I. Identifying researchable topics II. Drafting a research proposal and testable hypotheses III. Finding and downloading Internet data IV. Analyzing data to answer research questions V. Writing a research report VI. Preparing and giving a research presentation
ACAE(ENGL) 0097-Qualities of effective college-level writing -Invention and pre-writing strategies -Common modes of expository discourse -Achieving clarity: principles of unity and coherence -Achieving clarity: proofreading, mechanics, and grammar -Using secondary sources (paraphrasing and quoting) To practice these principles and skills, students will write a number of short essays (300-500 words) and/or extended paragraphs (125-300 words), some of which will be revised.
ACAE(ENGL) 0099-Pre-writing strategies -Quoting and paraphrasing -Proofreading, mechanics, and grammar, with a focus on the editorial failure errors of ENGL 1101 -Effective organization of an essay -Effective content (providing evidence, selecting evidence from reading) Students write six to eight essays (including revisions), applying the principles taught in the course.
ACAE(ENGL) 0099L-Review of Regents Developmental Studies Requirements -Collegiate Placement Exam instruction -Exit Writing Sample instruction -Testing (Collegiate Placement Exam and Exit Writing Sample)
ACAR(READ) 0099L· Type of questions on the Collegiate Placement Examination (CPE) · Developing an approach for taking the Collegiate Placement Examination CPE) · Scanning for information · Analyzing questions and linking the passage to the questions · Main ideas of a paragraph and a passage · Supporting details · Vocabulary · Literal and Inferential Comprehension · Analysis of author's writing style in paragraphs and passages · Increasing reading rate
ACCT 57101. How to succeed in the accounting program 2. Developing leadership skills 3. Developing professional writing skills (3-4 weeks) 4. Writing a resume 5. Preparing for interviewing 6. Learning about opportunities in accounting (6-7 guest speakers)
ACCT 57201. How to succeed in the accounting program 2. Developing leadership skills 3. Developing spreadsheet skills (3-4 weeks) 4. Writing a resume 5. Preparing for interviewing 6. Learning about opportunities in accounting (6-7 guest speakers)
ACCT 5800/78001. Developing teamwork and leadership skills 2. Developing professional writing skills 3. Participating in accounting in an actual business setting 4. Identifying accounting-related issues in actual business settings 5. Analyzing and proposing solutions to real-world issues
ACCT 9030The following list of topics, although not exhaustive, is indicative of ideas that will be covered in this course. ·The basics of the SAS data step. ·Using SAS data steps to read in data, merge data, and subset data. ·Using mainstream SAS procedures to manipulate and analyze data. ·Learning how to de-bug SAS source code. ·An introduction to the UNIX operating system. ·Communicating with UNIX based file servers using the SSH Secure Shell communications program. ·Using the SSH File Transfer program to explore, manipulate, upload and download files and directories on a UNIX file server. ·Installing and using X-Windowing software on a personal computer to communicate with SAS programming software residing on a UNIX based server using a windowing environment. ·Communicating with, and exploiting the resources on, the Wharton WRDS server. ·Selecting and downloading CRSP, COMPUSTAT, and IBES data from the Wharton WRDS server to a local server or PC. ·How to merge data extracted from the CRSP, COMPUSTAT, and IBES databases. ·Learning how to create visually pleasing, and informative, tables in a research study. ·How to organize, write, and present findings in a research report that meets the norms of publication in accounting research. ·Replication of a published empirical study in accounting research under the supervision of the instructor.
ADPR 3110What Does It Take to Make Good Advertising? Objectives vs Strategy vs Execution What Makes Up a Strategy? Ð Product, Consumer, Marketplace Researching Your Product; Knowing Your Brand Understanding the Consumer; Insight; Needs; Personality Evaluating the Marketplace; Segmentation Writing the Strategy Statement; Creative Briefs Kinds of Strategies, Using Strategies Headlines and Visuals Body Copy Graphic Design Elements; Layout Formats Writing for the Electronic Media-Television and Radio Writing for Direct Response, Outdoor and New Media Developing Successful Advertising Campaigns
ADPR 5790Emphasis placed on individual student portfolios. Class format: Primary independent student work, with individual conferences with each student weekly. Class also structured as an intensive hands on lab, with concentration on the high-end capabilities of the computer as a tool for writing, design, and image manipulation. Portfolio proposal plans: Students must submit and get approved portfolio proposal plans. This proposal must include a complete advertising platform for each project the student works on. Criteria for judgement: Student portfolios are judged by instructor for problem- solving and creative ability, professionalism, communication, and creative design execution and presentation of materials.
ADPR 5920Lecture with mandatory laboratories. Theory/fundamentals/principles of effective public relations communication Effective writing for plans and proposals, including preparing situation analyses, goal-and objective-setting Writing for research: Moderator's guides and Questionnaires Interview techniques Writing for news media: Press kits and fact sheets News announcements, media advisories for print media Feature pitches, feature articles Video news releases, Public service announcements Memo and report writing Writing for special events-- planning and sponsorships Writing direct communications: brochures and newsletters Writing other controlled communications: speeches New Technologies: writing for the World Wide Web Written evaluations Crisis response strategies
AESC 3910The student will be placed with an international university or company for 2-3 months. The student will work on a project and/or take a class with the host. At the end of the visit, the student will write a report of his/her experiences and share it with the host and the Office of International Agriculture.
AFAM 2000HThe Traditional West African Cultural Backgrounds of the Peoples Europeans Enslaved in the New World The Institution of Slavery The Slave Community Antebellum Free Black People Black Participation in the Civil War and Reconstruction Different Schools of Thought on Black Education The Twentieth Century: The First Fifty Years The Civil Rights Movement In addition to written papers and examinations, the instructor may assign oral presentations and/or group projects as course requirements. The small class size of Honors sections allows for greater student participation in class discussion than possible in standard sections. Furthermore, Honors students will write longer papers requiring more analysis, synthesis, and evaluation than students in the standard course. Finally, at the discretion of the instructor, the course may deviate from a general survey format to focus more narrowly on particular time periods or selected historical issues.
AGCM 1200(Note: The following topics will be related to agricultural and environmental sciences) - Introduction to the course - Concepts of logical and critical thinking in relation to clear writing and speaking (organization, types of delivery, adapting to one's audience) - Preparing to write, synthesizing topics, then writing - Writing projects - Memos - Reports - News stories - Persuasive written papers - Oral communication process - Organizing speeches, other oral presentations, and general communication - Evaluating speeches - Speech project: informative speech - Speech project: persuasive speech - Group communication and process - Small group communication - Large group communication - Functioning in an organization with effective communication skills and techniques - Effective business meetings - Parliamentary procedure in relation to group meetings - Preparing for interviews for professional positions - Interview projects - Making positive impressions via both written and oral communication techniques (including non-verbal communication)
AIRS 3001Day Lesson Topic 1 1 Introduction/AFOATS Training Guide 2 2 Assessing Leaders 3 3,4 Critical Thinking/AF Effective Writing 4 5,6 Writing Strategies/Editing 5 Labor Day Holiday 6 7A Basics of Briefing 7 7B Informative Briefing 8 8A,8B Problem Solving/Exercise 9 9 Management Functions and Principles 10 10 Power and Influence 11 11 Leadership Authority and Responsibility 12 Briefings 13 Briefings 14 12 Group Conflict Management 15 13 Counseling and Practicum 16 13 “ “ “ “ 17 Mid-term TEST 1 18 14 Corrective Supervision and Counseling 19 15 Situational Leadership 20 16 “12 O’Clock High”: Situational Ldrshp 21 16 “12 O’Clock High”: Situational Ldrshp 22 16 “12 O’Clock High”: Situational Ldrshp 23 Fall Break 24 17 Motivation 25 18 Effective Supervision 26 18 Effective Supervision 27 19 Profession of Arms 28 20 Team Building 29 20 Team Building 30 21 Civilian Personnel 31 Thanksgiving Break 32 Course Review 33 Final TEST 2 34 Finals Week
AIRS 3002Day Lesson Topic 1 -- Introduction 2 20 Effective Supervision 3 21 Profession of Arms 4 23 Leadership Accountability 5 23 Leadership Accountability 6 24 Leadership Accountability Case Study 7 25 Team Building 8 25 Team Building Exercises 9 26 Military Ethics 10 26 Military Ethics 11 27 Joint Ethics 12 28 Advanced Topics on Military Ethics 13 28 Advanced Topics on Military Ethics 14 28 Advanced Topics on Military Ethics 15 Midterm Exam 16 32 Professional Relations 17 Briefing 18 Briefing 19 Briefing 20 Spring Break 21 29 AF Effective Writing 22 30 Writing Strategies 23 31 Editing: An Essential Endeavor 24 22 Enlisted Evaluation System 25 22B EPR Assessment 26 33 Officer Evaluation System 27 34 Officer Professional Development 28 35 Caine Mutiny 29 35 Caine Mutiny 30 35 Caine Mutiny 31 36 Commander's In-Basket 32 Final Exam
ANNU 8340Lectures Analysis for proteins and amino acids Effects of processing on proteins and amino acids Protein and amino acid digestion Protein and amino acid absorption Protein and amino acid digestion and absorption: a comparison of species Lysine availability: a comparison of methods Amino acid deficiency Amino acid imbalance Amino acid excesses Dispensable and indispensable amino acids D amino acid utilization Braced chain amino acid interrelationships Methionine metabolism Use of methionine derivatives such as methionine hydroxy analog Protein and amino acid nutrition and its effect on body composition Methodology of amino acid availability studies Availability of amino acids-poultry Availability of amino acids-swine Availability of amino acids-numerous Feed efficiency and interpretation of amino acid requirement studies Literature Reviews Each student will write 2 literature reviews on current topics and give oral class reports on these assigned topics.
ANTH 35501. definition and history of forensic anthropology. 2. the basics of bone biology. 3. skull anatomy, sex and race assessment from the skull 4. thoracic osteoanatomy and aging 5. upper limb osteoanatomy,muscularity and handedness. 6. vertebral osteoanatomy and aging. 7. pelvic osteoanatomy and sex assessment. 8. lower limb osteoanatomy and stature assessment. 9. dental anatomy, age and race assessment. 10. evidence of disease and trama. 11. field methods in forensic anthropology. 12. evidence, custody, report writing and expert witness testimony. 13. expert witness testimony. 14. disaster applications. 15. historic applications. 16. human rights applications.
ANTH 4720/6720-4720L/6720L1. Definition and history of forensic anthropology 2. Osteologial basis for forensic anthropology 3. Skull anatomy 4. Thorax osteoanatomy 5. Vertebral column 6. Arm and hand osteoanatomy 7. Innominate anatomy 8. Leg and foot osteoanatomy 9. Odontology 10. Field recovery of human remains 11. Laboratory analysis of skeletal remains 12. Maintenance of evidence and chain of custody 13. Forensic report writing and courtroom testimony 14. Applications in criminal investigation, disasters and human rights 15. Appliations in historical and prehistorical archaeology
ANTH 86301. Thinking about the Research Problem Choosing a topic Effective reviews of the literature Formulating a preliminary research question 2. Developing the Research Question Stating the problem Justifying the study Making predictive statements Understanding causation Qualitative and quantitative epistemologies, approaches, distinctions, and mixes 3. Developing the Research Design How to select a study population or location How to select and justify the right methods Sampling How to select and justify the right method of analysis Common but deadly mistakes to avoid Important practicalities: ethics, documenting arrangements, budgeting and time management 4. Proposing the Research to Others The function of the proposal Layout, presentation, and writing clarity How proposals are reviewed and why they are funded (or not) The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary.
ANTH(AFST) 3460 Africa: Images and Inventions Africa and Us Africa in Contemporary Cultural Discourse Ethnographic Encounters with Africa Enduring Legacies of Colonial Domination Panafrican Identities and Nation States Africa Remembered: Narratives of the Slave Trade Writing Africa in Black and White Territories in Trouble and Transition Principles and Paradoxes of Social Organization Becoming Person and Belonging to Society (Naming) African Ways of Thinking and Knowing African Revelations: Cosmologies of a Continent Performance, Play, and Agency African Landscapes and Livelihoods Myths and Realities of African Lifeways Ecologies of Space in African Daily Life Anthropology in Action in Africa Eros Ethnography: Sexuality Research in Africa AIDS in Africa: Political Economy of an Epidemic Ethics and Enigmas of Eidlwork in Africa Trials and Tensions of Urban Life
ARED 3050The course is taught in both a seminar and studio format. Students will read, discuss and write about art education theory as it pertains to extending learning across the curriculum. They will practice art instruction and application through model lessons. Working in project teams with students from ARED 3350, they will develop and critique arts-based lessons that draw on knowledge and skill in art history, criticism, aesthetics and art making as well as connect to learning objectives from other subject areas as established by the Georgia Qaulity Core Curriculum. Students will develop their own teaching philosophy for incorporating the arts into their personal instruction, the creation and presentation of lessons of instruction, the development of a professional portfolio and the transfer and application of theoretical issues in art education to practical applications within the elementary classroom.
ARED 3350The course is taught in both a seminar and studio format. Students will read, discuss and write about art education theory. They will observe art instruction in elementary classrooms. They will practice art instruction and application through model lessons. As an upper level course in the School of Art, students will apply their knowledge and skill of art history, criticism, aesthetics and art making, obtained through their undergraduate sequence of study, in the development of a teaching philosophy for art education, the creation and presentation of lessons of instruction, the development of a professional portfolio and the transfer and application of theoretical issues in art education to practical applications. Working in teams with students from ARED3050, possibilities for extending learning through art education across the entire elementary curriculum are explored.
ARED 3360The course is taught in both a seminar and studio format. Students will read, discuss and write about art education theory. They will practice art instruction and application through a model unit of instruction. The student will apply their knowledge and skill of art history, criticism, aesthetics and art making in the development of a teaching philosophy for art education, the creation and presentation of units of instruction using computer and technology expertise, the development of a professional portfolio and the transfer and application of theoretical issues in art education to practical applications. The student will be expected to take their in-depth knowledge of art appreciation, history, criticism and art production and organize it into sequential learning experiences appropriate to students of middle and high school developmental levels.
ARED 5350/7350Course is the same as ARED3350. Graduate students should enroll under ARED7350. Students from the College of Education should enroll in ARED5350 with permission of the instructor. Expectations for graduate work are based on quality, not quantity. The course is taught in both a seminar and studio format. Students will read, discuss, and write about art education theory. They will observe art instruction in elementary classrooms. They will practice art instruction and application through model lessons. As an upper level course in the School of Art, students will apply their knowledge and skill of art history, criticism, aesthetics and art making, obtained through their undergraduate sequence of study, in the development of a teaching philosophy for art education, the creation and presentation of lessons of instruction, the development of a professional portfolio and the transfer and application of theoretical issues in art education to practical applications. Working in teams with students from ARED3050, possibilities for extending learning through art education across the entire elementary curriculum are explored.
ARED 5360/7360The course is taught in both a seminar and studio format. Students will read, discuss and write about art education theory. They will practice art instruction and application through a model unit of instruction. The student will apply their knowledge and skill of art history, criticism, aesthetics and art making in the development of a teaching philosophy for art education, the creation and presentation of units of instruction using computer and technology expertise, the development of a professional portfolio and the transfer and application of theoretical issues in art education to practical applications. The student will be expected to take their in-depth knowledge of art appreciation, history, criticism and art production and organize it into sequential learning experiences appropriate to students of middle and high school developmental levels.
ARED 7370The course is taught in a seminar format. Students will read, discuss, and write broadly across education theory as it pertains to curriculum and pedagogy. Through class presentations and peer discussion, students will develop skills in connecting theory to practice.
ARED 8990The course is taught in a seminar format. Students will read, discuss, and write broadly across educational research theory. Through class presentations and peer discussion, students will develop their own research topics, selection of research methods, and skills in connecting theory to the conduct of research.
ARGD 3050Illustration is not rendering, making facsimiles of people or objects. Illustration should help you learn to express your individual point of view with a variety of media. Illustrators, like writers, musicians or dancers interpret. To do that your tools need to be an expressive extension of your mind, eyes and hand. Mastering your craft is a necessary step towards achieving artistry.
ARGD 3320Scratch board a. animal and habit b. environmental landscape Watercolor a. sepia still-life with focal point b. herbarium sheet Business a. business card b. letterhead c. portfolio preparation d. letter writing e. project bid and proposal
ARGD 4050Using traditional steel, quill and reed square-nib pens students will become proficient in the 14th century Italian Humanist Hand, the 15th century Italian Chancery Hand as well as chosen hands from the rich tradition of Roman and northern-European uncials and northern-European gothic hands and scripts. Expressive use of these calligraphic styles result in 3-4 finished projects using literary material of all types, from folk wit to sacred texts. Students are expected to formulate these designs in personal and unique ways. Traditional marking tools, inks, paints and metallic leaf, paper, parchment and vellum are introduced and used. Experimentation is encouraged with more contemporary tools, mediums and supports including graphic computer programs. There are lectures on the evolvement of the letter form from pre-writing through modern typography. There are also lectures on the important figures in calligraphy.
ARHI 3000This course introduces the student to major monuments and art forms from the ancient era. The required materials begin with European and Near Eastern art of the Paleolithic, Mesolithic, Neolithic and Chalcolithic periods; then Egypt and the Greek world during the Bronze Age are examined. Next, Greece in the Iron Age, Etruscan art, and Roman art of the Late Republic and Empire are surveyed. Students must pass two non-cumulative midterms and one non-cumulative final, as well as writing a short descriptive paper on a monument of their choice. The midterms and final exam have both factual parts and an analytical essay.Myrt
ARHI 7040This course covers the history of art history from its birth in the sixteenth century through the modern period. Over the course of eight focused discussions students will be exposed to a variety of different methodologies ranging from Vasari's biographies to the newest theories of contemporary art. Each professor will work with one or two students to prepare the discussion that will be led by the students and will be based on readings taken from Art History and Its Methods: a critical anthology,ed. Eric Fernie (Phaidon, 1995) as well as articles chosen by the professor in consultation with the students working with him/her. 1. Introduction 2. Winckelmann and Ancient Art/Research Techniques 3. Iconography of Medieval Art 4. Renaissance and Connoisseurship 5. Wofflin. The Baroque and Periodization in Art History 6. Asian Art Historiography 7. Writers of/on Art 8. American Art and cultural History 9. Modernity and Modernism 10. Conclusion
ARHI 8870This course explores Asian art in relation to important conceptual models in art history. We will start from reading theoretical discussions on a certain conceptual model (i.e. word and image, representation, landscape, and icons and rituals). Then by observing examples in Chinese art, we will discuss how the conceptual model could enhance our understanding of Chinese art and also how the case in Chinese art could modify or change certain models. In the latter part of the course, students will make presentations and write an extensive research paper that combine their critical reading of theories and their ability to relate them with objects or works of art.
ARHI 8910Course outlines vary considerably depending on the topic chosen for the class. Generally, the professor presents an overview to the subject, related images, and the scholarly literature. The following six to eight sessions typically involve reading a text or texts, and discussing them in class in relation to images in slides that the professor has selected. After this material has helped to solidify the students' knowledge of the topic, its historical context, and its scholars, students then present their topics in one to one and one-half hour presentations with slides, followed by discussion of further avenues of inquiry and research. These presentations allow students to try out their ideas and to prepare for the writing of their seminar papers.
ARHI 8950A sample course: Week 1: Introduction: Masks of the "Orient" Week 2: Advertising the "Orient" Week 3: Reading Edward Said and Griselda Pollock Week 4: Stereotypes Week 5: Picturing the Body Week 6: Dance and Constructions of Identity Week 7: Cultural Signs and Signifiers: Introduction to Semiotics Week 8: Writing and Travel Theory Week 9: Greta Garbo in Mata Hari Week 10: Role Reversals: How does the "Orient" re-colonize? Week 11: Anna and the King of Siam Week 12: Mapping Landscape Week 13: Mapping Identity Week 14: Nationalism and Identity Week 15: The Mummy Week 16: Hollywood's constructions of the "Other"
ARID 3110I. Defining design: The development and practice of residential interior design. II. The design process a. Design statement b. Research and programming c. Writing a program d. Design development: Solving the problem Space planning Furniture arrangement and specification Materials and finishes specifications III. Design presentation a. Orthographic b. Scale drawing c. Perspective d. 3-dimensional e. Boards IV. The Building a. Systems b. Structural components c. Human factors
ARID 4350/6350A practicum experience might include, but would not be limited to, interior design services rendered to a client: 1. Meet with client to determine project goals and objectives. 2. Write letter of agreement for client and obtain client's signature. 3. Produce design documents as needed. 4. Produce construction documents as needed. 5. Conduct client follow-up evaluations.
ARID 7890I. Defining design: The development and practice of residential interior design. II. The design process: A. Design statement B. Research and programming C. Writing a program D. Design development: Solving the problem Space planning Furniture arrangement and specification Materials and finishes specifications. III. Design presentation A. Orthographic B. Scale drawing C. Perspective D. 3-dimensional E. Boards IV. The Building A. Systems B. Structural components C. Human factors
ARST 3210Color theory, color temperature and lighting lectures. Color films: lighting and shooting exercises. Color darkroom work in printing and color balancing. Regular in class assisted lab work time. Slide lectures, gallery visits and conceptual reading/writing on historical and contemporary trends in color photography. Portfolio development with regular critiques.
ARST 3220Handling the large format camera: working with sheet film, loading film holders, setting up the view camera (zero position), lens plane tilts and swings shifting plane of focus, film plane tilts and swings shifting perspective, bellows extension principle, scheimpflug principle, processing sheet film in trays and using the Jobo film processor. Printing large format negatives. Advanced exposure and development controls - the zone system. Medium format cameras, roll film, processing roll film. Regular in class assisted lab work time. Slide lectures, gallery visits and conceptual reading/writing on historical and contemporary trends in medium and large format photography. Portfolio development with regular critiques.
ARST 3240Contemporary practices. Conceptual readings and writing. Image capture: digital camera, digital video, flatbed scanner, drum scanner. Scanner as camera. Color calibration, profiles. Digital darkroom output, fine printing, black and white, color, papers and media. Straight image. Digital collage.
ARST 4200Personal portfolio development throughout the course. Special techniques including advanced lighting, non-traditional printing techniques, mixed media applications incorporating photography, shooting copy slides, print finishing and presentation, and writing an artist statement. Regular critiques on developing work. Regular in class assisted lab work. Slide lectures, gallery visits and conceptual reading/writing on contemporary practice.
ARST 4800/6800The course will begin with a brief two-week historical overview of this hybrid area. The next three weeks will be devoted to bringing everyone up to speed on the current technology in art. Students will then write proposals for three projects that they wish to carry out through out the semester. Group critiques will take place every other week. The final grade will be based on three completed works of art. A grading emphasis will be placed on effort.
ARST 48301) Survey of video techniques. 2) Review of contemporary art videos. 3) Scriptwriting 4) Storyboarding 5) Software tutorials a. Special effects b. Transitions c. Timing d. Projections and installations e. Interactivity 6) Final project
ARST 6210Color theory, color temperature and lighting lectures. Color films: lighting and shooting exercises. Color darkroom work in printing and color balancing. Regular in class assisted lab work time. Slide lectures, gallery visits and conceptual reading/writing on historical and contemporary trends in color photography. Portfolio development with regular critiques.
ARST 6220Handling the large format camera: working with sheet film, loading film holders, setting up the view camera (zero position), lens plane tilts and swings shifting plane of focus, film plane tilts and swings shifting perspective, bellows extension principle, scheimflug principle, processing sheet film in trays and using the Jobo film processor. Printing large format negatives. Advanced exposure and development controls - the zone system. Medium format cameras, roll film, processing roll film. Regular in class assisted lab work time. Slide lectures, gallery visits and conceptual reading/writing on historical and contemporary trends in medium and large format photography. Portfolio development with regular critiques.
ARST 6240Contemporary practices Conceptual readings and writing Image capture: digital camera, digital video, flatbead scanner, drum scanner Scanner as camera Color calibration, profiles Digital darkroom output, fine printing, black and white color, papers and media Straight image Digital collage
ARST 7200Personal portfolio development throughout the course. Special techniques including advanced lighting, non-traditional printing techniques, mixed media applications incorporating photography, shooting copy slides, print finishing and presentation, and writing an artist statement. Regular critiques on developing work. Regular in class assisted lab work. Slide lectures, gallery visits and conceptual reading/writing on contemporary practice.
ARTS 4900/6900Books Required - "How to Survive and Prosper as an Artist: Selling Yourself Without Selling Your Soul", by Caroll Michels "Art and Fear," by David Bayles & Ted Orland Week One - Introduction: "How I have survived and prospered as an artist" Overcoming Myths. Are you ready to market your work? Tools of communication - business cards, resume, cover letter. Assignment #1 - pg. 1-15 Michels. Prepare an up to date, professional resume. Week Two - Photographing Your Artwork, Guest speaker to be announced. Resume due. Assignment #2 - Prepare a slide portfolio of 10 slides, one (5"x7" or 8"x10")black and white photo of work and black and white photo of self. Week Three - Tools of Communication - Biographical Statement, Personal Statement. Press Reviews. Presentation Packages - Brochures, Videos, Press Releases, Invitations, Review of Resumes. Assignment #3 - Write Biographical Statement and Personl Statement. Week Four - Sources of Funding - Artist-In-Residence Programs, Grant writing in course objectives. Writing a Proposal Slides and Photos due. Assignment #4 - Write for application forms for residency programs or available grants, prepare a grant or residency proposal. Week Five - State Grants and Percent for Arts Programs, Guest Speaker to be announced. Biographical Statement and Personal Statement due. Week Six - Review of Bio's and Personal Statement Review of Slides. 2nd Draft of resume due. Open discussion. Assignment #5 - Write a press release. Week Seven - Artists and the Law. Guest Speaker to be announced. Record Keeping, Legal Guidelines, Obscenity laws, taxes. Residency or Grant Proposal due. Assignment #6 - Read Federal Tax Forms, set up system for all business records, send away for copyright forms. Week Eight - Exhibition Opportunities - Commercial Galleries, Museums, Art Centers, University Galleries, Co-operatives, Juried Exhibitions Non-profits, Alernative Spaces. Questions to ask your gallery. Assignment #7 - Written evaluation of 5 galleries or alternative spaces for potential exhibition of your work. Week Nine - Preparing Work for Exhibition - Pricing Work, Insurance, Contracts, Crating and Shipping. Guest Speakers to be announced. Assignment #8 - Contact insurance companies for an estimate on insuring your studio, exhibition, and fine art shipment. Week Ten - Guest Speaker to be announced. Written evaluation of potential exhibition spaces due. Open Discussion. Week Eleven - Taxes Guest Speaker to be announced. Assignment #9 - Prepare records for tax keeping. Week Twelve - Exhibiting in Museums and Art Centers. Guest Speaker to be announced. Tax preparation system due. Week Thirteen - How to Sell Artwork. Guest Speaker to be announced. Assignment #10 - Prepare for class slide presentations Week Fourteen - Public Relations. Class slide presentations. Peer Evaluation. Week Fifteen - Public Relations. Class slide presentations. Peer Evaluation. Assignments due for grading: Final slide portfolio (20 slides), slide list, resume, personal statement, press release, 5"x7" or 8" x10" black and white photo of work and photo of self. Week Sixteen - Final Grading. Presentation Packets returned.
ARTS 4920/6920This course is designed for upper level under-graduates and for graduate students in all departments of the Art School. Classroom activities include slide lectures, video viewing, critique and discussion. Each student is required to write six art reviews of six different artist projects on the World Wide Web, thus engaging the student in a relationship with the current technology being used by visual artists today. Each student is required to create three or more studio assignments based on the topics currently being discussed in the classroom. These projects help students expand their understanding of traditional object making. Lastly, each student is required to complete a final term project using research, development and writing, designing and planning, based on creating a group show of contemporary artists and contemporary thinking. Students are evaluated on the innovative interpretation and quality research of their projects, and the strength of their improvement in their ability to engage in meaningful contemporary art discourse. All of which develops a vocabulary essential to their development of professional artists.
ASTR 8110 Writing and reviewing research and observing proposals; writing and refereeing research papers; making oral presentations of their research and of journal articles; and writing brief newspaper and magazine summaries.
BCMB 3150Since the intent of this new offering is to provide a flexible course to accommodate diverse student and faculty interests and provide instruction in critical reading and analysis, oral communication, and scientific writing, where laboratory visits and off-campus field trips may also be included to view specialized instrumentation and experimental procedures, it is not possible to provide a fixed outline of the topics to be covered. One possible offering could, for example, focus on biotechnology and society. For such an offering students would have assigned readings in the basic scientific methodologies underlying biotechnology, e.g. cloning (gene, reproductive, and therapeutic), biomanufacturing (microbial and animal cell production), and current and potential applications in health and agriculture, as well as the moral and ethical concerns. Students would be asked to present the papers and defend or criticize the content; they would also have written assignments involving literature research. Visits to laboratories and facilities at UGA, as well as off-campus, will be scheduled as appropriate.
BCMB 3150HSince the intent of this new offering is to provide a flexible course to accommodate diverse Honors student and faculty interests and provide instruction in critical reading and analysis, oral communication, and scientific writing, where laboratory visits and off-campus field trips may also be included to view specialized instrumentation and experimental procedures, it is not possible to provide a fixed outline of the topics to be covered. One possible offering could, for example, focus on biotechnology and society. For such an offering Honors students would have assigned readings in the basic scientific methodologies underlying biotechnology, e.g. cloning (gene, reproductive, and therapeutic), biomanufacturing (microbial and animal cell production), and current and potential applications in health and agriculture, as well as the moral and ethical concerns. Students would be asked to present the papers and defend or criticize the content; they would also have written assignments involving literature research. Visits to laboratories and facilities at UGA, as well as off-campus, will be scheduled as appropriate.
BCMB 4121HThis course features lectures by a variety of MCG faculty speaking on contemporary research, basic and clinical, in the biomedical field. These lectures will extend and augment the parent course, Human Biochemistry and Disease. Students are expected to engage in discussion with the instructors and will write a paper each week.
BCMB 4960HStudents will perform laboratory-based research with a faculty mentor and receive training in critical analysis of the literature, applications of the scientific method, and scientific writing.
BCMB 4990HStudents will study with faculty mentors to develop their skills in laboratory research and scientific writing. They are also encouraged to present and defend their data at the Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunity Annual Symposium and/or publish their work in The Undergraduate Science Bulletin.
BCMB 8005An outline of the syllabus follows. Typically, this course will be taken concurrently with either BCMB 7000 (Master's Research), BCMB 8035 (Laboratory Rotations), or BCMB 9000 (Doctoral Research). Two hours of discussion will minimally be devoted to each topic, with certain topics being discussed over three hours. 1. Overview of the BCMB Graduate Program a) Outline of program expectations b) Introduction to University culture and organization c) Discussion of keys to success 2. Safe Laboratory Practices a) Official UGA Safety policy and training b) Right-to-Know, chemical, hazardous waste, training c) Discussion of improper safety practices and assigned readings 3. Ethics Training a) Official UGA Responsible Conduct and Computer Use policies b) Scientific Integrity and examples of Scientific Misconduct c) Grievance Procedures d) Discussion of assigned readings 4. Development of Research Skills a) The Scientific method and hypothesis driven research b) Scientific research resources c) Data recording practices, notebook organization, and duplicating results d) Discussion of assigned readings 5. Career exploration a) Discussion of career opportunities b) Grant writing basics c) Identification of funding sources d) Discussion of assigned readings 6. Career development - student project a) Description of hypotheses b) Outline of research project/idea c) Identification of suitable extramural funding process d) Knowledge of administrative details 7. Scientific communication and networking a) Review of ongoing departmental research b) Importance of networking c) Discussion of assigned readings
BHSI 9300Students will be exptected to write original ideas, problems addressed, and answers found to specific questions through research conducted with guidance of the instructor and assistance of a graduate committee. Students are expected to properly organize and present thoughts including proper references to germane literature, methods, data obtained, appropriate statistical analyses, and conclusions. All or part of the dissertation may be completed within the semester. Writings may consist of manuscripts for publication or drafts of material to be incorporated in the dissertation. Frequent communication with the major professor, drafts, manuscripts, and/or the complete dissertation will provide the basis for evaluating student performance by the major professor.
CBIO 8080The weekly schedule of activities is outlined below in the following format: Week # (#.1) Didactic Material (#.2) Writing/Speaking/Discussion Session Week 1. (1.1) Introduction to Scientific Communication Skills: Organizational Meeting. (1.2) Guided discussion of the ethics of scientific writing and speaking Week 2. (2.1) Major Writing Assignments: Steady Progress with Organization and Technical Skill. (2.2) Using outlines as tools to organize and integrate ideas. Write an outline for an autobiography. Week 3. (3.1) Reference Management Programs: EndNote and Reference Manager. (3.2) Use the Reference Manager Program to begin to catalog, organize, and file your papers. Week 4. (4.1) Preparation of Figures and Tables: Describing an experiment in the terms of the “Scientific Method”. (4.2) Write a description of a figure or table using the terms “hypothesis”, “approach”, “result”, and “conclusion”. What are the implications or significance of the results? Week 5. (5.1) Writing Peer Reviewed Manuscripts. (5.2) Read a Published Paper: Work backwards to write an outline of the manuscript. Week 6. (6.1) Manuscript Reviews: Giving and Receiving. (6.2) Read a Published Paper: Write a review of the work as if you were assigned the work as a submitted manuscript. Week 7. (7.1) Departmental Policy for Written/Oral Admission to Candidacy. (7.2) NIH Grant Format, NIH Review Criteria, and NIH Tips for Grant Preparation. Week 8. (8.1) Annotated NIH Sample Grant. (8.2) Discussion of Grant Preparation with Invited Guest Faculty Week 9. (9.1). Writing Thesis/Dissertation. (9.2) Discussion of Written and Oral Admission to Candidacy and Writing Dissertation with Invited Senior Graduate Students Week 10. (10.1). Scientific Meeting Presentations, Published Abstracts. (10.2) Methods for preparation of an effective poster presentation Week 11. (11.1) Elements of Effective Public Speaking. (11.2) All Students Give 5 minute Talk on an effective tip for use of Power Point Week 12. (12.1) Short (20 minute) Research Talk. (12.2) Assigned Student Talks: “20 minute Journal Club” Week 13 (13.1) Research Lecture/Job Talk/Dissertation Defense. (13.2) Assigned Student Talks: “20 minute Journal Club” Week 14. (14.1) Preparing a 50 minute talk to a class. (14.2) Assigned Student Talks: “20 minute Journal Club” Week 15 (15.1) CV Formats; Job Search; Professional Correspondence. (15.2) Assigned Student Talks: “20 minute Journal Club
CBIO 8100Current literature in immunology will be presented by the students and discussed. About 7 current themes in immunology will be selected for discussion. Each topic will start with an introduction (1 hr lecture) and paper presentation (1 hr) by the instructor. Five students (1/2 hr each) will present 5 different preselected papers from current liteature on the same topic, followed by 1/2 to 1 hr of discussion. The students will be graded for their comprehension of the literature on the topic, presentation and writing a grant proposal (4 pages).
CHEM 1311L1. Separation of Components of Mixtures 2. Identifying metals by determining their specific heat. 3. Indirect gravimetric determination of the composition of a mixture. 4. Determining the formula weight of a compound. 5. Application of Hess’s Law 6. Identifying Inorganic Compounds by their inter-chemical reactions. 7. Identifying metals via flame emission analysis. 8. Acid-base titrations. 9. Self Directed-Skills Analysis Experiments (Student write procedures to solve a complex problem).
CHEM 1411L1. Separation of Components of Mixtures 2. Identifying metals by determining their specific heat. 3. Indirect gravimetric determination of the composition of a mixture. 4. Determining the formula weight of a compound. 5. Application of Hess’s Law 6. Identifying Inorganic Compounds by their inter-chemical reactions. 7. Identifying metals via flame emission analysis. 8. Acid-base titrations. 9. Self Directed-Skills Analysis Experiments (Student write procedures to solve a complex problem).
CHEM 2600The specifics of the research experience will vary depending upon the nature of the research project and the erequirements of the faculty mentor. Each student is required to write a comprehensive research report at the end of the semester in which research is performed.
CHEM 45001. Introduction 1.1. Information acquisition, organization, and dissemination 1.2. Information is the most important currency of the 21st century 1.3. Communication skills are important for every professional career 2. Information Technology, the tools of the information age 2.1. The information superhighway (infrastructure) 2.2. The internet; information transfer protocols, TCP/IP, domains 2.3. The World Wide Web; hyperlinked information, HTML, URLs 3. Information formats 3.1. Textual; ASCII, RTF, font size/style, markup languages 3.2. Tabular; spreadsheet, database 3.3. 2d Graphical; Bitmap (TIFF, bmp), vector (PICT, .), page description languages (pdf, PostScript) 3.4. 3d Graphical; QuickDraw 3d, vrml 3.5. Animation 3.6. Sound 4. Information acquisition 4.1. Searching the scientific literature 4.2. Electronic publishing, BioMedNet, MedLine, Galileo, . 4.3. Searching chemical databases, ChemWeb, . 4.4. Searching sequence databases, nucleotide, peptide 4.5. Searching structural databases, CSD, PDB 5. Information transduction 5.1. Data analysis; plotting, digitizing, charts, histograms 5.2. Translating and converting graphics formats 5.3. Scanning; bitmaps, bit depth 6. Information dissemination 6.1. Word processors; Typefaces, fonts, styles, formatting, spell-checking 6.2. Citation/reference/bibliography databases 6.3. Chemical structure drawing programs (2d/3d) 6.4. Graphics programs (painting vs. drawing) 6.5. Spreadsheets; charts, graphs 6.6. Database programs; flat file, relational 6.7. Presentation programs; PowerPoint, Persuasion, etc. 6.8. Presentation hardware; slidemakers (instrument cameras), LCD panels, projectors 6.9. E-mail; servers/clients, protocols, attachment formats 6.10. Webservers, homepages 7. Communication skills, written and verbal 7.1. How to write a scientific/technical paper 7.2. Case study (bad vs. good writing) 7.3. How to organize an oral presentation 7.4. Organization of information 7.5. Information vs. decoration 7.6. Slide/transparency design 7.7. Case study (bad vs. good presentation) 8. Class writing projects 9. Class presentations 10. Class homepages
CHEM 4600The specifics of the research experience will vary depending upon the nature of the research project and the erequirements of the faculty mentor. Each student is required to write a comprehensive research report at the end of the semester in which research is performed.
CHEM 4960HThe specifics of the research experience will vary depending upon the nature of the research project and the erequirements of the faculty mentor. Each student is required to write a comprehensive research report at the end of the semester in which research is performed.
CHFD 5110Discussion of syllabus and class assignments, Introductions Introduction to WebCT, PsycINFO, Why take a research methods course Foundations of Research Institutional Review Boards and Human Subjects Sampling: The importance of Participants Sampling Examples Theory of Measurement: Reliability and Validity Reliability and Validity Survey Research and Scaling: How You Measure What You Are Studying Measuring Variables Qualitative and Unobtrusive Measures: Other Methods of Measurement Measurement Examples Design: Internal Validity Experimental Design Quasi-Experimental Design Advanced Design Topics Design Examples Analysis: Conclusion Validity Analysis: Data Preparation and Descriptive Statistics Analysis for Research Design: Basic Statistics Analysis for Research Design: More on Statistics Writing Up Research Analysis Examples
CHFD 5901I. Introduction to Legislative Aide Expectations and Duties - Project 1: Conduct a Policy Scan II. Overview of the Legislative Aide Experience III. Using the Internet to Search Bills and Laws - Project 2 Select a Bill to Summarize IV. Policy Concepts and Principles V. The Policy-Making Cycle VI. Writing a Policy Briefing Paper - Project 3: Write a Policy Briefing Paper Based on Georgia Bill VII. Relating FACS Research to Policy Issues - Project 4: Summarize Implications of a FACS Faculty Research Paper for Policy Makers VIII. Georgia Government - Project 5: Profile a Senate or House Committee IX. The Legislative Culture and Legislative Etiquette - Project 6. Write a Letter of Introduction to Assigned Legislator - Project 7 Plan a Class Skills Presentation Related to the Legislative Culture X The Legislative Field Project (to be determined by student and his/her department advisor) XI. FACS Leadership Retreat XII. Visit to State Capitol XIII. Class Presentations: Project 3 XIV. Class Presentations: Project 6 XV. Guest Speaker(s)
CHFD 88101. Introduction 2. Epistemological and Paradigmatic Foundations and Ethical Issues 3. Forms of Data, Topics and Designs 4. Developing Research Questions 5. Data Collection 6. Methods 7. Participants (who, why, how, when?) 8. Improvisation 9. Organizing Data 10. Interpretation and Analysis 11. Quality Control: Evaluation, Trustworthiness, and Ethics 12. Writing up Research 13. Feminism, Gender Studies and Postmodernism
CHNS 1001Week 1: Introduction to Chinese Pronunciation and the Chinese Writing System Classroom Expressions and Other Simple Useful Expressions Week 2: Meeting People simple verbs for being and naming Week 3: Greetings and Introductions simple negatives and simple questions Week 4: Introducing Family measure words, question pronouns, verb “to have” Week 5: Dates and Times numbers, modification of nouns Week 6: Talking About Hobbies alternative and affirmative/negative questions Week 7: Visiting Friends predicate adjectives, moderating tone in speech Week 8: Making Appointments complex sentence connectives Week 9: Waiting for a Telephone Call auxiliary verbs, directional complements Week 10:Studying Chinese descriptive complements, ordinal numbers Week 11:Life at School word order, serial verbs, double objects Week 12:Going Shopping amounts of money, more measure words Week 13:Talking About the Weather comparative sentences, sentence final particle “le” Week 14:Going Places topic-comments sentences, sequence in time Week 15:Review
CHNS 2002Week 1: Boyfriends and Girlfriends directional complements indicating result Week 2: Meeting the Family comparison of time phrases Week 3: Going to the Movies simultaneous actions, conditional forms Week 4: Discussing the News rhetorical phrases, expressions of inevitability Week 5: Debating the Social Effects of Movies and Television Grammar: contrastive forms Week 6: Planning a Trip to China verb aspects indicating experience and completion Week 7: Passports and Plane Tickets review of word order Week 8: At the Post Office proposed object structure, continuation of an actions Week 9: Mailing a Package verb aspect, describing the repetition of an action Week 10: Writing a Letter complex sentence connectives Week 11: Visiting Scenic and Historic Sites describing the difficulty or ease of an action Week 12: Chinese Dragon Boat Festival prepositions Week 13: Qu Yuan Banished to Chu potential complements, optatives Week 14: Chinese Holidays indefinite uses of interrogative pronouns, cohesion Week 15: Review
CHNS 4190Week 1: The beginning of Chinese writing Week 2: Oracle Bone Inscriptions Week 3: Inscriptions in metal and bamboo Week 4: Bronze Inscriptions or jin wen Week 5: da zhuan or Big Seal Week 6: xiao zhuan Small Seal Week 7: li shu , Administrative Style Week 8: kai shu or Exemplar Style Week 9: cao shu or Cursive Week 10: The language of the Buddhist texts Week 11: Modern Chinese Week 12: Chinese Characters in Japanese Week 13: Chinese Characters in Korean Week 14: Chinese Characters in Vietnamese Week 15: The disappearance of Tru Nom
CHNS 4500/6500wk1 The Confucian Classics: LUNYU, DAXUE,& ZHONGYONG Selections from READINGS IN CHINESE LITERARY THOUGHT (RCLT-- The Early Period WK2 The Daoist Classics: DAODEJING & ZHUANGZI RCLT--DAXU (The "Great Preface") wk3 A Buddhist Classic: TANJING RCLT--LUNWEN ("A Discourse on Literature") wk4 SHIJING ("THE CLASSIC OF POETRY") RCLT--WENFU ("The Poetic Expression on Literature") wk5 CHUCI ("Lyrics of Chu") RCLT--WENXIN DIAOLONG wk6 YUEFU ("Music Bureau Poetry"),GUSHI ("Classic Poetry")& Tao Qian RCLT--WENXIN DIAOLONG wk7 Tang Poetry: Wang Wei, Li Bo, & Du Fu RCLT--SHIHUA ("Remarks on Poetry") wk8 Tang Poetry: Hanshan, Li He & Li Shangyin RCLT--CANGLANG SHIHUA ("Canglang's Remarks on Poetry") wk9 CHUANQI ("Tang Tales") RCLT--Popular Poetics: Southern Song and Yuan wk10 Song Lyric/Yuan Song: Li Qingzhao, Su Shi, Li Yu, & Ma Zhiyuan RCLT--Critical writings of Wang Fuzhi wk11 HUABEN XIAOSHUO ("Vernacular Stories") RCLT--YUANSHI ("The Origins of Poetry") wk12 Yuan Variety Play: DOU E YUAN ("Injustice to Dou E") SANGUO YANYI ("Romance of Three Kingdoms") wk13 XIYOU JI ("Journey to the West") SHITOU JI ("The Story of the Stone") wk14 SHITOU JI ("The Story of the Stone") RULIN WAISHI ("The Scholars") wk15 LIAOZHAI ZHI YI ("Liaozhai's Tales of Wonders") LAOCAN YOUJI ("The Travels of Laocan") Lu Xun, "Kuangren riji" ("A Madman's Diary")
CHNS 4600/6600Week 1: “Discourse on Making Things Equal” (from Zhuangzi) Anecdotes in Zhou Philosophical Discourse Week 2: “Collected Biographies of Jesters” (from Records of the Grand Historian) Historical Writing in Han China Week 3: “Peach Blossom Spring” (Tao Qian, 365-427) Six Dynasties Prose Week 4: Selections from Gan Bao’s (fl. 320) Soushenji Six Dynasties “Tales of the Strange” zhiguai Week 5: Selections from Liu Yiqing’s (403-444) A New Account of Tales of the World Literary Anecdotes, Jokes and Humorous Tales Week 6: “The Story of Ying Ying” (Yuan Zhen, 779-831) Tang Dynasty Classical Tales Week 7: “Discussion of Jia Yi” (Su Shi, 1037-1101) Selections of Song Prose and Essays Week 8: “Sharp-Tongued Cui Lian” (Anon.) Song Vernacular Fiction Week 9: “The Jade Guanyin” (from Feng Menglong’s Penetrating Tales to Startle the World) Ming Vernacular Stories Week 10:“The Daoist from Lao Mountain” (Pu Songling, 1640-1715) Qing Classical Tales of the Strange Week 11:“The Great Bright Lake” (Liu E, 1857-1909) Qing Dynasty Essays Week 12:“View of the Back” (Zhu Ziqing, 1898-1948) Early Twentieth Century Prose Essays Week 13:“Kong Yiji” (Lu Xun, 1881-1936) Early Twentieth Century Vernacular Literature Week 14:“Fish” (Huang Chunming) Stories from Taiwan Week 15:“Chess King” (A Cheng) Twentieth Century Chinese Fiction
CLAS 1030I. MEDICAL TERMS DERIVED FROM GREEK A. NOUNS AND ADJECTIVES B. VERBS C. VOCABULARY II. GENERAL MEDICAL VOCABULARY III. MEDICAL TERMS DERIVED FROM LATIN A. NOUNS AND ADJECTIVES B. VERBS C. VOCABULARY IV. TERMS FOR MEDICAL SPECIALTIES A. THE CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM B. THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM C. THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM D. HEMATOLOGY, THE LYMPHATIC SYSTEM E. OPHTHALMOLOGY F. GYNECOLOGY G. UROLOGY V. ANCIENT MEDICINE A. DEVELOPMENT B. ANCIENT MEDICAL WRITERS C. ANCIENT MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE AND PRACTICE
CLAS 4040/6040I. THE MACEDONIAN HOUSE AND THE RISE OF ALEXANDER. II. ALEXANDER'S SUCCESSORS AND THE DIVISION OF HIS EMPIRE. III. THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF MACEDONIA -- THE PALACE AT PELLA AND THE RECENTLY DISCOVERED TOMBS. IV. THE ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE HELLENISTIC CAPITALS -- SELEUICA, ANTIOCH, AND ALEXANDRIA. V. HELLENISTIC ATHENS AND HELLENISTIC KINGS IN GREEK SANCTUARIES. VI. PERGAMON AND THE RISE OF ROME. GRADUATE STUDENTS ARE EXPECTED TO WRITE A MORE COMPREHENSIVE AND SYNTHETIC RESEARCH PAPER AND TO GIVE AT LEAST ONE ORAL PRESENTATION IN CLASS.
CLAS 4110/6110BRONZE AGE CULTURES OF THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN BRONZE AGE EXPLORATION OF ITALY THE LEVANT AND MESOPOTAMIA AFTER 1000 BC THE VILLANOVANS EARLY GREEK COLONIES IN ITALY & SICILY ORIENTALIZING: THE CONTACT BETWEEN GREEKS AND ETRUSCANS CAERE TARQUINIA AND WALL PAINTING VEII CHIUSI POPULONIA AND THE NORTHERN COAST MURLO BOLOGNA AND OTHER POINTS NORTH OF THE ARNO WRITING AND RELITION EARLY ROME - BEGINNINGS EARLY ROME - THE ETRUSCAN CONTRIBUTION
CLAS 4990HTHE ADVISING PROFESSOR OVERSEEING THE RESEARCH AND WRITING OF THE UNDERGRADUATE HONORS THESIS WILL DETERMINE THE OUTLINE AND CONTENTS OF THE COURSE.
CMLT 2111The typical course consists of a series of readings in world literature up to the 17th century. The topics considered are generated by the specific work under analysis. (The question of writing systems and the preservation of literary works, for example, is germane to the study of Gilgamesh.) The works treated will vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Gilgamesh Homer. The Iliad (selections) Confucius. Analects (selections) Ramayana (selections) Virgil. The Aeneid (selections) Murasaki. The Tale of Genji (selections) Ishaq. The Biography of the Prophet (selections) Boccaccio. The Decameron (selections) Cervantes. Don Quijote (selections) Milton. Paradise Lost (selections)
CMLT 2270HThe typical course consists of a series of readings in world literature up to the 17th century. The topics considered are generated by the specific work under analysis. (The question of writing systems and the preservation of literary works, for example, is germane to the study of Gilgamesh.) The works treated will vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Gilgamesh Homer. The Iliad (selections) Confucius. Analects (selections) Ramayana (selections) Virgil. The Aeneid (selections) Murasaki. The Tale of Genji (selections) Ishaq. The Biography of the Prophet (selections) Boccaccio. The Decameron (selections) Cervantes. Don Quijote (selections) Milton. Paradise Lost (selections)
CMLT 3140The course is structured through a chronological series of readings of works by women writers from around the world. The topics considered are specific to the works studied, with issues commonly treated in the course including gender and the institution of writing, women's writing and education, style and gender, sexual identity and interpretation, etc. The works treated vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Sappho. Selected Poems Sei Shonagon. The Pillow Book Murasaki Shikibu. The Tale of Genji (selections) Hrosvit of Gandersheim. Dramas Marie de France. Lais Hildegard of Bingen. Selected writings Christine de Pizan. The Book of the City of Ladies Marguerite de Navarre. Heptameron Gaspara Stampa. Selected Poems Madame de Lafayette. The Princess of Cleves
CMLT 3170The course generally consists of a series of readings in detective fiction, with examples selected to provide an overview of the historical development of the genre in various countries. The works treated will vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Heta Pyrhonen. Mayhem and Murder Edgar Allan Poe. The Fall of the House of Usher and other writings. Arthur Conan Doyle. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes Elizabeth George. A Great Deliverance Agatha Christie. Evil Under the Sun Colin Dexter. The Jewel That Was Ours Ruth Rendell. Wolf to the Slaughter Dashiell Hammett. The Maltese Falcon Raymond Chandler. The Long Goodbye Ross MacDonald. The Moving target Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo. The Laughing Policeman Batya Gur. Literary Murder Vladimir Nabokov. The Real Life of Sebastian Knight
CMLT 3220Topics to be explored in CMLT 3220 include, among others: Women's role in East Asian family life Women's status as a labor force in East Asian society Women, education, and women's movement in East Asia Representation and self-representation of women in East Asian film "Feminine" writing in East Asia Women and belief systems in East Asia
CMLT 4080/6080The course is organized around a series of readings of majors works of Romantic literature. The topics and works selected vary with the instructor, but generally the following issues are considered: the relation of romanticism to classicism and the European Enlightenment; romanticism and revolution; the distinctions between national (and regional) romanticisms and romanticism as a global phenomenon; poetic perceptions of and critical reflections on nature and its relation to art; the romantic interest in dreams and death; and the formal features of romantic writing. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Isaiah Berlin and Henry Hardy. The Roots of Romanticism Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Reveries of the Solitary Walker Novalis. Henry von Ofterndingen Wordsworth. The Prelude Penelope Fitzgerald. The Blue Flower Heinrich von Kleist. The Marquise of O and Other Stories Gerard de Nerval. Aurelia and Other Writings Lermentov. A Hero of Our Times J-K Huysmans. Against Nature
CMLT 4081/6081The course is organized around a series of readings of significant works of literature from the early to middle period of Romanticism, as well as representative works from painting, sculpture and music. The topics and works selected vary with the individual instructor, but generally the following issues are considered: the relation of Romanticism to Classicism and the European Enlightenment; Romanticism and revolution; the distinctions between national (and regional) Romanticisms and Romanticism as a global phenomenon; paradigm shifts in ideas of aesthetics and personal identity; poetic perceptions of and critical reflections on nature and its relation to art; the Romantic interest in dreams and death; the relation of the sublime and the grotesque to Romanticism; horror and the Gothic in Romanticism, and the formal features of Romantic writing. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Friedrich von Schiller, Naïve and Sentimental Poetry Jean-Jacques Rousseau Reveries of a Solitary Walker William Blake: Letter to Dr. Trussler; Songs of Innocence and Experience; Marriage of Heaven and Hell Heinrich von Kleist: The Broken Jug Madame de Staël, On Literature Johann Wolfgang von Goethe: Sorrows of Young Werther; Faust Clemens Brentano and Achim von Arnim: The Boy’s Magic Horn (folk- song collection 18o6-08) Friedrich Schlegel: Lucinde, Athenaeum Fragments William Wordsworth, Preface to the Lyrical Ballads; The Prelude selected poems (1798- 1820) Sir Walter Scott, The Heart of Midlothian S. T. Coleridge: Rime of the Ancient Mariner; selected poems
CMLT 4082/6082The course is organized around a series of readings of significant works of literature from the middle to the late periods of Romanticism, as well as representative works from painting, sculpture and music. The topics and works selected vary with the individual instructor, but generally the following issues are considered: the relation of Romanticism to Classicism and the European Enlightenment; Romanticism and revolution; the distinctions between national (and regional) Romanticisms and Romanticism as a global phenomenon; paradigm shifts in ideas of aesthetics and personal identity; poetic perceptions of and critical reflections on nature and its relation to art; the romantic interest in dreams and death; the romantic interest in the self; the relation of the sublime and the grotesque to Romanticism; horror and the Gothic in Romanticism, and the formal features of Romantic writing. The following is a sample syllabus for a single semester: Thomas Love Peacock: Headlong Hall, Nightmare Abbey, "The Four Ages of Poetry" Percy Bysshe Shelley, Prometheus Unbound (1820); A Defense of Poetry;selected poems Mary Wollstoncraft Shelley, Frankenstein John Keats: letters, Eve of St. Agnes, Fall of Hyperion; the Great Odes; selected poems George Gordon, Lord Byron; Childe Harold, Don Juan, selected poems Stendahl(Henri Beyle): Racine and Shakespeare(1823-5); The Red and the Black Gerard de Nerval: Aurélia Alfred de Vigny, Chatterton Victor Hugo: "Preface to Cromwell"; Hernani Alexander Pushkin, Eugene Onegin, selected poems Mikhail Yurevich Lermontov, A Hero of Our Time Thomas Carlyle: Sartor Resartus Baudelaire, "In Praise of Cosmetics" Oscar Wilde, “The Decay of Lying” Joris Karl Huysmans, Against Nature
CMLT 4610/6610The course is organized around a series of readings of literary works by 19th- and 20th-century Chinese and Japanese writers. The topics covered are specific to the works under analysis. The works studied vary with the instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Cao Xueqin. The Story of the Stone (volume 1) Shen Fu. Six Records of a Floating Life Liu E. Travels of Lao Can Enchin Fumiko. The Waiting Years Kobo Abe. The Woman in the Dunes Xingjian Gao. The Other Shore Yasunari Kawabata. Snow Country Yukio Mishima. The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea Tsao Yu. Thunderstorm
CMLT 4875/6875a. Survey of the domains of African cultural productions in the Western World; b. Survey of African culture producers in the Western World, and their institutions (primarily writers); c. Literature/Culture and Nationality/Nationalism/Identity: literary/fictional discourse and meta-discourse; d. Relevant topics in 'diasporaic' literatures; e. Relationship between 'diasporaic' culture producers and Western cultural institutions; their relationship with Africa. f. Detailed literary analysis of (3-5) selected novels/works.
CMLT 8310The specific topics covered will vary with the instructor. Issues addressed will include: legacies of communism and the formation of new political structures; the role of the writer in post-communist societies; ethnicity and the conception of the nation; minorities and dissent in the arts; popular culture and regional identity.
CMLT(AFST) 3150The course is structured through a series of readings in contemporary African literature. The topics covered are specific to the works under analysis; however, certain issues often recur, such as questions of ethnicity, gender and class; the use of indigenous languages vs European languages; the status of the writer in postcolonial society; the question of audience, etc. The works treated vary with the individual instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Chinua Achebe. Things Fall Apart Camara Laye. The Dark Child Ferdinand Oyono. Houseboy Alex LaGuma. In the Fog of the Seasons' End Mariama Ba. So Long a Letter Okot p'Bitek. Song of Lawino Mongo Beti. Mission to Kala
CMLT(AFST) 4890/6890The course is organized around a series of readings of African literary works written since the independence of African countries in the 1960s. Topics of emphasis include the portrayal of neo-colonialism, the betrayal of independence and the aspirations of the masses, the need for social and political justice, as well as the search for African aesthetics by African writers. The works treated vary with the individual instructor. The following is a sample syllabus of readings for a single semester: Chinua Achebe. Anthills of the Savannah Sembene Ousmane. Xala Ngugi wa Thiong'o. Petals of Blood Mariama Ba. So Long a Letter Buchi Emecheta. The Bride Price Okot p'Bitek. Song of Lawino and Song of Ocol Wole Soyinka. Death and the King's Horseman
CMLT(ANTH) 3180The focus of the course varies with the individual instructor, but the following is a list of the topics typically covered in a single semester: China: geography and history Confucius. Analects Tao Te Ching Film: Woman Wang Korea: geography and history writing system shamanism arts and literature Buddhism Japan: geography and history Shinto The Tale of Genji Tanizaki. In Praise of Shadows Vietnam: geography and history war and culture--the future
CMSD 30201. Language definition 2. Brain and language 3. Phonology 4. Syntax 5. Morphology 6. Semantics and pragmatics 7. Language development 8. Cognitive processes 9. Evolution of language 10. Reading and writing
CMSD 5000Introduction to course Expectations, grading, academic honesty, etc. Observation hours requirement for graduate school Professionalism/confidentiality, HIPPA (privacy law), ethics AHSA Code of Ethics ASHA's Certificate of Clinical Competence SLP/AUD Credentialing GA Board of Examiners in Speech/Language Pathology and Audiology GA Professional Standards Commission (public school) AHSA Writing behavioral objectives/results of treatment Chronological age - How, why, and when Guided video observations - write behavioral treatment objectives Collect data Write treatment results
CMSD 6700· The Diagnostic Process · Professional Report Writing/Professional Correspondence · Psychometric Considerations · Test Interpretation · Multicultural Considerations in Assessment · Alternate Assessment Methods · PPVT-III Administration · Pre-assessment Information and Interviews · Oral-Facial Mechanism Exam · Assessment of Articulation/Phonology Overview · Assessment of Language Overview · Observation and Informal Assessment · Screening and Prevention · Hearing Screening Procedures and Reporting · Summary and Interpretations, Recommendations, Prognosis: Analysis, Synthesis, and Reporting · Exit Interviews: Interpreting Results and Counseling Considerations · Syndrome Identification · Diagnostic Planning
CMSD 6750* Voice Assessment and Evaluation * Anatomy/Physiology/ Neurophysiology of the Normal Voice * Aerodynamic Assessment * Source Filter Theory * Formants * Functional and Organic Voice Disorders * Introduction to the Computerized Speech Lab * How to manage the laryngectomy patient * What is the Passy Muir speaking valve and how does it relate to voice? * Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease * Resonance * Treatment of voice disorders and goal writing * The professional voice and age related issues * Multicultural issues relating to voice production and care of the voice
CMSD 6850· Introduction and overview of aphasia · Overview of normal aging and information processing · History of aphasia · Causes of aphasia · Nature of aphasia · Characteristics and types of aphasia · Assessment and diagnosis of aphasia · Prognosis of aphasia · Differential diagnosis · Treatment of aphasia · Acquired reading and writing disorders · Group Treatment of aphasia
CMSD 6870A. Overview of normal anatomy 1. Overview of the cranial nerves B. Bedside evaluation 1. Oral stage dysphagia and goal writing 2. Pharyngeal stage dysphagia and goal writing C. Treatment of oral and pharyngeal dysphagia 1. Issues relating to trachs and ventilators 2. Multicultural issues relating to swallowing 3. How drugs affect swallowing D. Pediatric issues in swallowing E. Dysphagia in the neurogenic population F. Dietary issues 1. How gastroesophageal reflux affects swallowing G. Dysphagia in the geriatric population 1.Medicare issues relating to dysphagia
CRSS(ECOL) 8650I. Review of Important Concepts A. Soil Concepts B. Mathematical Concepts II. Systems Science and Models A. Definition of System B. Systems versus Non-systems Science C. Models D. Terminology III. Model Development A. Methods for mapping relationships between variables B. Steps in model development IV. Numerical Solutions to Partial Differential Equations A. Writing differential equations B. Numerical methods V. Visual Software Tools for Model Development A. Stella Research B. Other tools (ModelMaker, Vensim, Powersim, etc.) VI. Modeling Carbon and Nitrogen Processes A. Common kinetic models for mineralization of a single organic compound B. Temperature and Moisture Factors in Simulation Models C. Carbon and N mineralization/immobilization D. Modeling other N processes VII. Modeling Phosphorus Processes A. Mineralization/Immobilization B. Adsorption/Precipitation C. Phosphorus in Runoff
CSCI 8730Writing Parallel Programs Synchronization Distributed Shared Memory Parallelizing Compilers Data Distribution Processor Assignment Performance Analysis Grid Computing Current Research Topics
DANC 2300The class will consist of improvisation studies, informal performances, observation, research and reflective writing. A wide variety of exploratory movement studies will develop both leadership, following and collaborative abilities as commonly used in the dance making process. The course will provide adequate lab time for the practice of fundamental skills in improvisation such as immediacy; intrapersonal contact; spontaneous reaction; sensory response; movement recall; reformation and performance.
DANC 2900Attendance to auditions Write descriptive proposal for dance piece (choreographers) Attendance to weekly rehearsals Attendance to Technical and Dress rehearsals, production responsibilities Written reflection of process (choreographers)
DANC 3900Attendance to auditions Write descriptive proposal for dance piece (choreographers) Attendance to weekly rehearsals Attendance to Technical and Dress rehearsals, production responsibilities Written reflection of process (choreographers)
DRAM 2000A. Theatre Spaces: A look at the theoretical aesthetic and physical architecture of entertainment. B. Comedy: The history and theory of what makes us laugh. C. Dramatic Structure; The mechanics of the script. D. Writing on Theatre: How to write a basic theatrical review. E. Acting: Techniques, theories, and history of the primary dramatic agent. F. Direction: Techniques, theories and history of the director as artist. G. The Playwright: Methods, theories and the people who write the script. H. Multimedia: The current trends involving live performers and technology. I. Lighting Design: The art of lighting in entertainment. J. Costume Design: The aesthetics and practical aspects of what the actor wears. K. Scenic Design: The physical environment of the entertainment experience. L. The Craftspeople: Technicians, trade unions and the profession of technical production. M. Today's Theatre: Current trends in live theatre.
DRAM 2040The topics in this course are varied, but will include some of the following: -construction of costumes, scenery, or properties -scheduling of tasks/rehearsal time for production -time management and cooperative effort; all students work together to read production goals by opening night -operation of specialized equipment which may include power tools, light boards, sound equipment, computers, sewing machines, editing beds, video and projection equipment -specialized production tasks such as painting and decorating skills, interviewing, copy writing and editing, timing and calling of performance cues, shifting of scenery and scenic units, rigging, hairdressing, photography, and craft work.
DRAM 2050The topics of this course are varied, but will include some of the following: -construction of costumes, scenery, or properties -scheduling of tasks/rehearsal time for production -time management and copperative effort; all students work together to read production goals by opening night -operation of specialized equipment which may include power tools, light boards, sound equipment, computers, sewing machines, editing beds, video and projection equipment -specialized production tasks such as painting and decorating skills, interviewing, copy writing and editing, timing and calling of performance cues, shifting of scenery and scenic units, rigging, hair dressing, photography, and craft work.
DRAM 2060The topics in this course are varied, but will include some of the following: -construction of costumes, scenery or properties -scheduling of tasks/rehearsal time for production -time management and cooperative effort; all students work together to read production goals by opening night -operation of specialized equipment which may include power tools, light boards, sound equipment, computers, sewing machines, editing beds, video and projection equipment -specialized production tasks such as painting and decorating skills, interviewing, copy writing and editing, timing and calling of performance cues, shifting of scenery and scenic units, rigging, hair dressing, photography, and craft work.
DRAM 2100HI. Elements of theatre a. Definitions: Drama vs. Theatre b. Theatrical spaces: where theatre takes place 1) Arena; 2) Thrust; 3) Proscenium; 4) Black Box c. Theatre Practitioners 1) The Playwright; 2) Designers and Technicians; 3) The Director; 4) The Critics II. Types of Drama a. How to read a play b. Genres (tragedy, comedy, tragicomedy) c. How to see and hear a play III. Historical contexts a. Classical Greece and Rome b. Medieval Europe c. Major Asian theatres d. Renaissance e. Age of Modernism 1) Realism; 2) Anti-realism f. Post-modernism IV. Writing about theatre a. Reviews b. Research and anlaysis
DRAM 2110I. What is American theatre? a. Why are constituency theatres necessary? b. Historical contexts for constituency theatres II. African American drama and theatre a. Working definition b. Representative plays III. Native American drama and theatre a. Working definition b. Representative plays IV. Asian-American Theatre a. Working definition b. Representative plays V. Hispanic American Theatre a. Working definition b. Representative plays VI. Research and Writing
DRAM 3020Month one: Modes of brainstorming a script. Comic strip. Verbal "pitching" as a creative form. "Exquisite corpse" style exercises for creative juxtaposition of ideas and characters. Collaborative exercises in creating stories with characters from two sources. Getting used to telling the story over and over: actually, on paper, in outline form, purely via dialogue, purely via description as if describing a finished movie or play and in numerous other modes. Absurd text's ideas; evolve two or more ways of "reaching" the story. Learn to tell stories from each character's viewpoint, both as a means of learning how to evolve conflict and as a way of finding whether one's main characters are the most advantageous. Month two: continue writing the story, over at least four "drafts". Turn in the "first acceptable" draft. Month three: rewrite the first story until you are happy with the grade. Each rewrite offers the chance for a better story, hence a better grade. Meanwhile, start (and draft at least twice) the second story. Put the first story into industry format. Month four: finish the second story. Multiple drafts, plus final formatting will be involved. Final exam as scheduled: stories will be read and "pitched" as if for sale.
DRAM 4000/6000I. Basic principles of dramatic writing. II. Writing for the stage. III. Writing for the screen. IV. Maintaining of the writer's notebook. V. Exercises in dramatic writing. VI. Review of the first draft. VII. Review of second, third and fourth drafts.
DRAM 5051The topics in this course are varied, but will include some of the following: -construction of costumes, scenery or properties -scheduling of tasks/rehearsal time for production -time management and cooperative effort; all students work together to read production goals by opening night -operation of specialized equipment which include power tools, light boards, sound equipment, computers, sewing machines, editing beds, video and projection equipment -specialized production tasks such as painting and decorating skills, interviewing, copy writing and editing, timing and calling of performance cues, shifting of scenery and scenic units, rigging, hair dressing, photography, and craft work.
DRAM 5052The topics in this course are varied, but will include some of the following: -construction of costumes, scenery, or properties -scheduling of tasks/rehearsl time for production -time management and cooperative effort; all students work together to read production goals by opening night -operation of specialized equipment which may include power tools, light boards, sound equipment, computers, sewing machines, editing beds, video and projection equipment -specialized production tasks such as painting and decorating skills, interviewing, copy writing and editing, timing and calling of performance cues, shifting of scenery and scenic units, rigging, hair dressing, photography, and craft work.
DRAM 5053I. The nature of employment in the dramatic art. II. Preparing resumes. III. Making contacts. IV. Portfolios, writing samples, audition pieces. V. National organizations, publications, and services. VI. State of the arts of theatre and film.
DRAM 5620/7620Month one: identify and analyze, from a writer's perspective, a dozen to twenty works (cinema, cable, TV, stage) that might serve in one respect or another as potential models for the work to be attempted. Go to the library or do other research to get sufficient background on the topic to begin writing. Write backstories, collect information, tell the basic story a dozen or hundred different ways until the story, from each major (and supporting) character's perspective, becomes completely familiar, as familiar as if one were talking about family secrets and legends. Months two, three, and four: write, rewrite, cope with critiques, rewrite some more, do trial readings, and finally do a draft that's for the semester.
DRAM 5630/7630A. New plays and their importance to theatre artists B. Director-writer relationship C. Actor-playwright relationship D. Groundplan E. Mock stagings F. Cold readings G. Casting a new play H. Oral research assignments I. Design approach J. Stagings of new plays for public viewing K. Graduate research paper
DRAM 5680/7680Week 1: Early forms of play scripts. Remnants from the Greco-Roman and Medieval periods. Styles of writing in Spain, France, and England. Week 2: Elizabethan and Jacobean Scripts. Built-in assumptions about the relationship between companies of players and the script. The question of what a playing script was. How the scripts we now regard as "authoritative" came about. Week 3: The script as a work for performance versus as a work of "dramatic literature" as plays have been passed down to us: the case of 16th through 19th century plays. Week 4: Plays NOT meant to be read: the curious example of the melodramatic play from Pixerecourt onward, and the evolution of scenarios for spectacle theatre in the 19th century. Week 5: Forms of realist play scripts in the 19th and early 20th centuries: the well-made play, Ibsen, et al. Week 6: Scripts for expressionistic and "non-realistic" forms of theatre. Week 7: Vaudeville, popular performance, and the script (or lack thereof) Week 8: The early film script. Week 9: Adaptations from literature and theatre during the silent film period. Week 10: The script as outlined for performance versus as blueprint for production: D. W. Griffith vs. William Inge. Week 11: The evolution of the "Continuity" script in Hollywood from 1927 through the early 1950s. Week 12: Variations on the continuity script: French and English examples. Week 13: The shift to "Master Scene" format. This format's variations, virtures, and problems. Week 14: Variant forms reflecting different realities: TV series, etc. Week 15: Current European script forms. Week 16: Scripting for New Media
DRAM 7524A. Getting Started 1. What is the voice over? B. Character Vocal Extremes 1. Bioenergetics 2. Transactional Analysis 3. Voice Over Aerobics 4. Development of Personal Character Voices 5. Development of Voices for Previously Animated Characters C. Copy Basics 1. Hiding the sell 2. Making it mine 3. Copywriter’s Intention 4. Believing what you Say D. Layering Techniques E. Tags, Donuts, Promos F. Announcer G. Spokesperson H. Real-Person Spots I. Industrial Narrations, Multimedia and Audio Books H. Radio Drama I. Getting a Foot in the Door 1. Unions 2. Agents 3. Auditions J. Making the Demo Reel 1..Microphone techniques K. Marketing Your Talent
DRAM 7660I. Creation of a series of writing assignments. II. Working toward presentable pieces. III. Organizing public readings. IV. Review of pertinent literature.
EADU 9602How Epistemology Underpins the Research Process Conceptualizing the Research Problem Traditional and Non-traditional Research Designs in Adult Education Sample Selection and Data Collection Data Analysis Writing up the Research Results Dissemination of Research Results
EADU 9630- Beginning to define your topic/problem area - Strategies for starting and finishing your dissertation - What and why of the literature review - Constructing the literature review: issues and strategies - Purposes and structure of “free-standing” reviews - Purposes and structure of “embedded” reviews - The social practice of research and writing - Format styles and APA - Issues and strategies for managing the literature - Writing and re-writing - Defending of your dissertation topic - Working effectively with your Major Professor
EADU 9640- Overview of the structure of the dissertation - Structure of the problem statement and purpose statement - Problem statement components - Writing styles and grammatical issues - Introduction/Background to the Problem - Components and transitional flow of introduction/background - APA style of writing - Significance of the study - Definitions of the study - Overview of Methods chapter - Defending the Prospectus
EBUS 4010/6010The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary. 1. Introduction; establishing a Framework for Business Communications 2. Establishing a Framework for Business Communications 3. Valuing Diversity 4. Organizing and Composing Messages 5. Revising and Proofreading Messages 6. Understanding the Report Process and Research Methods 7. Managing Data and Using Graphics 8. Organizing and Preparing Reports and Proposals 9. Preparing Résumés and Application Letters 10. Interviewing for a Job and Preparing Employment Messages 11. Writing About Good News, Routine, and Goodwill Letters 12. Writing Memos and Electronic Communications 13. Writing Bad News Messages
ECHD 6000Basic research methodology terms and constructs Program development models and strategies Research methodologies Literature review and evaluation approaches Information acquisition and processing skills Analytical, writing, and editing skills Integration and synthesis
ECHD 7300Identifying problems of interest and determining significance of problem to discipline Research designs, literature review methodology, and hypothesis-related statistics APA style manual guidelines Committee development Proposal writing Implementation of study and write-up Oral defense
ECHD 7400Team oral and written history objective Student services functional area objective panel presentation and discussion Student service functional area objective written report Read fellow students' functional area papers Select a journal article from selected journals and write a review
ECHD 7410Team Assignments: Program Development Consultation Project World Wide Web Page dyads Defining Developmental Intervention Approaches WWW Page training Developmental Interventions: Process Models Developmental Interventions: Assessment Models Developmental Interventions: Design and Practice Intentional Programming Models Writing for Publication Intervention Team Presentation
ECHD 7700Intake interviewing Intake/Report Writing Suicide/Homicide Assessment Beginning Therapists Questions/Answers Client Fears Therapist Fears Ethical/Legal Issues Difficulty Clients Diagnosis Debate Termination Multicultural Issues
ECHD 79201. Research questions 2. Research designs 3. Statistical and evaluation constructs 4. Significant differences 5. Applications of traditional qualitative and quantitative designs to counseling and psychotherapy research questions 6. Guidelines for proposal writing
ECHD 7940I. Types of research used in college student affairs II. Similarities and differences in qualitative and quantitative research methods III. Selection of a problem IV. Review the literature V. Construction of research questions and/or hypotheses VI. Identifying and labeling variables VII. Constructing operational definitions VIII. Qualitative research methodologies IX. Quantitative research methodologies X. Mixed research designs XI. Basic statistics XII. Writing a research prospectus XIII. Writing the final report
ECHD 79901. Classic studies in counseling and human development services 2. Traditional research designs 3. Unanswered and emerging questions 4. Qualitative and quantitative methodologies 5. Proposal writing 6. Challenges of assessment and evaluation
ECHD 80001. Researchable questions of significance 2. Literature review approaches 3. Research design and methodology 4. Style manual guidelines for writing 5. Data processing and analysis 6. Guidelines for writing a variety of documents
ECHD 8130Visual Arts Children's Literature Mask-making Creative writing Dance and movement Music Clay Processing Practicum Experiences Closure Exam
ECHD 90001. Research Teams: Types, Roles, and Functions 2. Research products 3. Quality and quantity issues and concerns 4. Qualitative and quantitative research designs 5. Professional writing guidelines 6. Professional presentations 7. Editorial service contributions to the profession
ECHD 92201. Role and function of rehabilitation education 2. Developmental curriculum in rehabilitation education 3.Direct and indirect targets for rehabilitation education 4. Grant writing 5. Clinical supervision in rehabilitation education 6. Administrative supervision in rehabilitation education 7. Assessment and evaluation of education, training, and services
ECHD 9600Important Article Assignment. Each student will examine all of the articles written in The Journal of Counseling Psychology and The Counseling Psychologist between 1996 and the present. The student will select an article from each journal that s/he deems as “most important,” and then present the articles and the argument for “most important” to the class. The student will summarize the presentation on one overhead per article with corresponding handout. The student will bring one copy of each article for the class presentation. Annotated Historical Timeline Activity. The class as a whole will review and annotate a historical timeline of Counseling Psychology. The class will take a creative and cooperative approach for the project. Multimodal, multimedia approaches will be encouraged. As part of the activity, each student will contact two leaders in the field of counseling psychology regarding their perspectives of a chosen issue. Book Review. Each student will select a recently published book to review. The student will read the book and then compose a book review for submission to a journal. Annotated Bibliography. Each student will conduct a search for empirically based journal articles on a topic of interest to the student. The student will select a minimum of six such articles and then prepare an annotated bibliography. The student will summarize each study and then critically examine each study for methodological strengths and weaknesses. In addition to internal and external validity, the implications of each study will be discussed. The student will present his/her findings in class. Division 17 Service Project. The class will develop and implement a service project for Division 17. Art and Psychology. Students will read selections on art and psychology. Students will then participate in an interactive tour/lecture of the Georgia Museum of Art under the guidance of the museum curator. Final Examination. Students will write answers to comprehensive final examination questions.
ECHD 96701. Professional Identity Issues and Concerns 2. Personal Career Plans 3. Licensure, Professional Liability Insurance, and Continuing Education Guidelines 4. Cutting-Edge Topics (emerging ethical and legal issues, new psychodiagnostic issues, projectives, etc.) 5. Presentations and Writings
ECOL 3910Students will choose 8 seminars out of approximately 30 offered each semester and attend them. Afterwards they will write a review of the lecture and present it to the undergrauate coordinator, who will grade each review.
ECOL 4100/6100-4100L/6100LLecture 1: Introduction to ecosystems as biocomplex systems - students write out their initial definitions and conceptions of biocomplexity. Present the philosophy of course: students build understanding through experiential learning by constructing models and making empirical measurements incorporated into a model framework. Learning by exploration of biocomplexity through simulation modeling and systems analysis - compare initial conceptions of biocomplexity with conceptions after completing the course. Lecture 2: Informal and formal conceptual models of biocomplexity: 3 C's of conceptual modeling: Compartments, Connections, Controls. Field task 1: Informal description of systems: what's there: fouling community succession on artificial substrates: organisms, succession, biotic interactions, abiotic conditions. Teams of 2-4 students will be chosen so different components or aspects of the fouling community may be investigated during the course. Each team will be responsible for building a conceptual model, Stella model, and steady-state model for systems analysis in Matlab. Field task 2: Implement the 3 C's in the field using observations in the field and lab with the formal modeling framework learned in lecture. Lecture 3: Dynamic models - concepts and methods of implementation in Stella. Lab task 1: Build initial Stella model of chosen ecosystem. Field task 3: Initial measurements of chosen ecosystem parameters. Lecture 4: Dynamic models - Unexpected and indirect effects in dynamic models: "I didn't expect it to do THAT!" Lab task 2: Perform sensitivity analysis on Stella models: change initial conditions or parameters to determine the resultant dynamic behavior of the model - What was expected vs. actual model behavior? Why are they different, and what does this tell about biocomplexity? Lecture 5: What do dynamic simulation models tell us about biocomplexity? Field task 4: Begin time-series measurements of chosen parameters. Lecture 6: Using models as repositories of information and understanding of system processes - how to incorporate empirical data into the developing Stella models. Lab task 3: Provide place-holders for incorporating empirical data into the developing Stella models. Lecture 7: Dynamics: transient response and steady state. Lab task 4: Explore the transient response and approach to steady state of the developing Stella models. Field task 5: Continue time-series measurements of chosen parameters. Lecture 8: Dual concept of environment: Input and output perspective. Lecture 9: Environ theory: An implementation of the dual or input/output perspective on environment Lab task 5: Produce a steady state flow matrix version of the Stella model and use this to conduct initial environ analysis in Matlab. Lecture 10: What does environ analysis tell us about biocomplexity? Describe and discuss some of the relevant cardinal hypotheses: a. network path proliferation b. network nonlocality c. network homogenization d. network amplification. Lab task 6: Conduct further environ analysis in Matlab. Field task 6: Continue time-series measurements of chosen parameters. Lecture 11: Synthesis with student discussion: How has your conception of biocomplexity changed? Why? Has your conception of what approaches scientists should use to study biocomplexity changed after participating in this course? Lab task 7: Students prepare a synthesis of the results of their simulation modeling work and systems analysis work. What concepts did they discover about their focal system that gave them insight into the implications of biocomplexity? What did the analyses demonstrate about how their biocomplex system works. What are the larger implications for the study of ecosystems and other complex systems (e.g. the internet, economies, social systems)? Class presentations of synthesis of field and modeling work and end of Maymester oyster roast.
ECOL 4130LIntroduction to conceptual and empirical aspects of ecological methodology in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The course builds on the ideas presented in ECOL 3500. In both lecture and lab, students will be exposed to a variety of sampling and experimental methods employed by field ecologists. Emphasis will be placed on hypothesis testing and on the design, execution, analysis, and presentation of ecological experiments. Students will be involved in class exercises, group projects, and individual projects throughout the course of the semester. Course Requirements: Text Book (required): Southwood, T. R. E. and P. A. Henderson. 2000. Ecological Methods. Blackwell Science, Oxford. Optional Text: Cody, R. P. and J. K. Smith. 1997. Applied statistics and the SAS programming language, 4th Edition. Prentice Hall, NJ. Optional Text: Scheiner, S. M. and J. Gurevitch. 2001. Design and analysis of ecological experiments. Oxford University Press, Oxford. Exams/Grading Points Final Exam 75 Writing assignments 200 Grant Proposal 75 Final Project 150 Total 500 Grant Proposal: Due 1 March, 2004 Subject of your choice written in the form of a graduate student Dissertation Improvement Grant to the National Science Foundation. See attached handout for specific requirements and grant review process. You will then conduct the experiments proposed in your grant proposal for your independent final projects. Independent Final Project: In your final project, you will conduct the experiment(s) that you proposed in your grant proposal. You will then write your work up in the form of a scientific paper. This paper will go through the "review process". Stay tuned for details. ECOL 4120 - ECOLOGICAL METHODOLOGY SYLLABUS This course will have 1 hour lecture and 4 hour lab per week. Lecture will cover conceptual aspects associated with each topic. Labs will provide hands-on experience concerning the appropriate methodological tools needed for each topic, including field methods, modeling, and statistical analyses. WEEK # TOPIC 1 Introduction: Theories, hypotheses, and statistics 2 Species richness and diversity (terrestrial) 3 Species richness and diversity (aquatic) 4 Wildlife population estimates 5 Observational vs. experimental methods 6 Experiments in controlled environments (greenhouse) 7 Experiments in controlled environments (field) 8 Large-scale spatial and temporal study and habitat classification 9 Life tables 10 Mark-recapture (invertebrates) 11 Estimation of productivity and the construction of energy budgets 12 Behavioral estimates 13 Independent projects 14 Independent projects 15 Independent projects ECOLOGICAL METHODOLOGY ECOL 4120 Writing Assignments For 3 experiments conducted in class (NOT including the final project), you must write up the work in the form of a Scientific paper. For all other experiments, you will only need to hand in Methods and Results Sections. All assignments must be TYPED and handed in 1 week after termination of the experiment. For the Scientific Paper, you should include the following sections: Title Abstract Introduction Materials and Methods (including Study System, Experimental Protocol, Data Analyses) Results (including Tables and Figures) Discussion Literature Cited. Writing is a creative process and there is no right or wrong way to present your work. The writing in this course is meant to be used as a learning tool so (1) you better understand the experiments you did, and (2) you learn how to write a scientific paper. Below I give you tips on how to write a Scientific Paper. In addition, I strongly encourage you to read current published articles in journals such as the American Journal of Botany or Ecology for further stylistic guidance. Title and Abstract - Should be clear and concise and describe the study you conducted. Introduction - Give brief background on the history of the problem. Why did you conduct the study you did? What new insights does your study bring (i.e., why is it different)? Clearly state the question you addressed. Methods 1. Write in the 1st person (I or we) and/or 3rd person (i.e., The observations were conducted from 7 AM to 6 PM). Mix it up - don't write exclusively in one voice. AVOID 2nd person (i.e., you)! 2. Give enough detail that someone can go back and redo your experiments. This detail may include: study organisms and sites used, sample sizes, measurements made, etc…. 3. Any information concerning the types of data analysis that you did (described below). Prior to writing your Results, you will enter your data into the computer (using Excel, notepad, or JMP) and statistically analyze your data using SAS. Your results section will include what you found written in words as well as any figures or tables that you feel are needed to present your results. Pointers for writing Results: 1. See (1) above. 2. All results should be written in the text even if there is a figure or table to describe them as well (i.e., We found that plants with more flowers received more pollinator visits (Figure 1).). 3. All Figures and Tables should have a title describing them. Discussion - Interpret your results in light of what is known in the literature on this subject. What is the next step in this system? Literature Cited - Only cite literature that was also cited in the text. Use standard citation format as in Ecology. ECOLOGICAL METHODOLOGY ECOL 4120 Grant Proposal February 1st - Topic due April 20th - Last day to hand in rough draft March 1st - Proposal due (no late proposals accepted) Grant writing is an integral part of ecological research - most research projects would be impossible to support without some funding source. This is true for graduate students as well as professors. You are assigned the task of writing a mock proposal to the National Science Foundation for a Dissertation Improvement Grant (DIG). DIGs are awards to graduate students. You must come up with a set of hypotheses that broadly fall under the category of plant-animal interactions, find a study system to address your hypotheses, design experiments to test these hypotheses, and persuasively explain the significance of your proposed work. The outline below will help you structure your proposal. Proposals will be handed in, assigned a number (so no one sees your name), and then sent out 'for review'. Each student in the class will be randomly given 3 proposals to read and comment on. You will be graded both on your proposal (100 points) as well as your constructive reviews of three other proposals (25 points). On the last two days of class, we will discuss the merits of each proposal. Grant Outline Cover Page - Include your name and date on this page only. DO NOT PUT YOUR NAME ON ANY OTHER PART OF THE PROPOSAL. Abstract - Not to exceed 1 page. Should include a title, statement of objectives and methods to be employed, the intellectual merit of the proposed work, and broader impacts of the resulting work. Project Description - Not to exceed 8 pages. This is the main body of your proposal. Include the following subsections: Introduction with objectives and hypotheses/questions clearly stated. Literature review (i.e., where do your hypotheses fit into the broader knowledge of what is already known; this may be combined with the Introduction). Study system - describe the system. Why is this system appropriate to address the proposed hypotheses? Experimental design. Propose experiments to address each of your hypotheses. Your designs should include sample sizes and detailed methods such that someone could go out and do your proposed experiments. Significance of proposed work. Timeline of proposed work (how long is it going to take you and when will each experiment be accomplished). Literature Cited - cite literature as in Ecology. Note - write your proposal in the active voice.
ECOL(PBIO) 4520/6520Weekly Discussions: Each week we will discuss a paper from the primary literature. Papers will include both classic works as well as the most recent findings in this field. Each student must lead one discussion and all students are expected to participate in discussion. Grant Proposal Writing/Review: Subject of student's choice written to the National Science Foundation. Students will write a mock proposal to the National Science Foundation using a set of hypotheses that broadly fall under the category of plant-animal interactions, in the form of a graduate student Dissertation Improvement Grant, find a study system to address the hypotheses, design experiments to test these hypotheses, and persuasively explain the significance of the proposed work. Proposals will be assigned numbers and each student will be randomly given 3 proposals to read and comment on. Students will be graded on both their proposals as well as constructive reviews of 3 other proposals. On the last two days of class, the class will discuss the merits of each proposal. Week 1 Monday Introduction to Plant-Animal Interactions Wednesday Review of natural selection,species interactions Friday Developing hypotheses; experimental design Week 2 Monday Plant Defenses Wednesday Theories of Plant Defense Friday Discussion 1 - Theories of Plant Defense Week 3 Monday Induced Defenses and Costs of Defense Wednesday Herbivore as a Benefit Friday Discussion 2 - Induced Defenses Week 4 Monday Community-Level Interactions Wednesday Ecosystem-Level Responses Friday Discussion 3 - Ecosystem-Level Responses Week 5 Monday Herbivore Offense - adaptation vs. exaptation Wednesday Evolution of Herbivore Diet Breadth Friday Discussion 4 - Herbivore Offense Monday Herbivore Population Growth Wednesday Herbivore and Metapopulation Dynamics Friday EXAM 1 Monday Marine Herbivore I - associational resistance Wednesday Marine Herbivore II - tri-trophic interactions Friday Discussion 5 - Associational Resistance Monday Freshwater Herbivore I - path analysis Wednesday Freshwater Herbivore II - trophic cascades Friday Discussion 6 - Trophic Cascades Monday Theories of Coevolution Wednesday Pollination I - plant perspective Friday Discussion 7 - Theories of Coevolution Monday Pollination II - pollinator perspective Wednesday Seed dispersal and plant population genetic structure Friday Movie - Sexual Encounters of the Floral Kind Monday Spring Break Wednesday Spring Break Friday Spring Break Monday Seed predation as a benefit Wednesday Cheating - Mutualists Friday EXAM 2 Monday Ant-Plant Interactions Wednesday Endophytic Fungi Friday Discussion 8 - Cheating - Mutualists Monday GM Plants I Wednesday GM Plants II Friday Discussion 9 - GM Plants Monday Species Invasions Wednesday Biological Control Friday Discussion 10 - Species Invasions Monday Global Environmental Change and Plant-Animal Int's Wednesday Grant Proposal Review Friday Grant Proposal Review FINAL EXAM
ECON 5900I. Course Goals and Policies II. Choosing a Topic and Choosing an Advisor III. Thesis Statements IV. Note-Taking and Rules of Good Writing V. Preliminary Research VI. Writing the Proposal VII. Writing the Paper A. Plagiarism B. Quotation and Paraphrase C. Ellipsis Marks and In-Text Citations D. Synthesis E. Paper Format F. Abstracts, Introductions and Conclusions G. Tables and Diagrams
ECON 5900HI. Course Goals and Policies II. Choosing a Topic and Choosing an Advisor III. Thesis Statements IV. Note-Taking and Rules of Good Writing V. Preliminary Research VI. Writing the Proposal VII. Writing the Paper A. Plagiarism B. Quotation and Paraphrase C. Ellipsis Marks and In-Text Citations D. Synthesis E. Paper Format F. Abstracts, Introductions and Conclusions G. Tables and Diagrams
EDEC 7200Age appropriate indicators of cognitive competence Readiness skills for basic reading writing, and calculating Classroom environments that support language and literacy skills Age appropriate indicators of social/emotional competence Learning to get along with age-mates and adults Building positive attitudes towards oneself Learning masculine and feminine social roles Developmental concerns for character education Age appropriate indicators of physical competence Achieving personal independence Emerging physical skills Physical maturation Assessing classroom and school practices that support development Role of the teacher Classroom environment Extracurricular and community activities
EDEC 9630Purposes and components of a literature review; identifying, storing, and critiquing the literature; organizing, writing, and revising a literature review
EDEL 9300Dissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
EDEL 9630Purposes and components of a literature review Identifying, storing, and critiquing the literature Organizing, writing, and revising a literature review
EDHI 8500Course topics addressed in detail will include, but may not be limited to, the following: 1. Definitions of terms and historical background - This concentration of the course will examine the meaning of public service in the U.S. college and university as manifested in such terms as outreach, extension, service, engagement and other terms. The historical basis for these concepts and their incorporation into the tripartite mission of the modern, comprehensive institution as the third element in that mission will be analyzed through assigned readings and the "oral histories" of faculty who have participated in such activities. Sample questions addressed will be: Is all applied research outreach? Are university clinical activities outreach? Are university profit centers outreach? 2. The land-grant concept - From the historical background, a detailed examination of the legislation (Morrill Act)that led to the land-grant college will be conducted. The philosophical underpinnings of the concept, democratic access and utilitarianism, will be explored to help students understand the modern political pressures on universities to be attuned to matters of "economic development" that hinge on concepts of a "relevant" curriculum which leads to an employed workforce in the minds of many politicians. 3. Agriculture and Cooperative Extension To understand outreach and public service in the modern university requires a full understanding of the role of Cooperative Extension and the "appropriation" of the term "extension." Related to this will be for the student to see the relationship among funding agencies at the local, state, and federal levels. This background will provide understanding for why politicians and ordinary citizens expect "services" from "their" colleges and universities. This will be contrasted with the classical approach of the European university. 4. University public service and government - This topic will explore the relationship between academic technical assistance and local and state governments. 5. Economic development, community development, technology transfer - The focus of this thematic concentration will be to examine relationships of the university to society in transfering the benefits of applied and basic research to applied formats in society. This will include incubator programs and their ability to enhance entrepreneurial initiatives and to stimulate small business development, as well as those projects which have more sweeping applications. Also included will be examples of international outreach and the benefits which can accrue from these activities to advance democratic principles while offering opportunities for economic improvement and educational development. 6. Continuing education in the modern university - This manifestation of outreach and service will be examined as to philosophy in a lifelong learning society as well as internal university issues related to mission, funding, and organizational structure. 7. The faculty and public service: qualifications, evaluation, career path, and university culture - This topic seeks to outline issues related to the faculty reward system, faculty preparation for service assignments, faculty career paths, and the impact of the research university's culture on fulfiling the service mission. 8. Financial and Budgetary Issues Related to Public Service Funding strategies, practices, and models for the future will be examined with an eye to how one "pays for" the service mission when formulas won't work and dollars aren't attracted, as with research. What degree of self support must/should be employed? What are the accountability measures that can and should be employed? 9. Scholarship in the field of university outreach and public service - The approach to this topic will be to help the student examine outlets for scholarly writing in the arena of outreach and public service while also exploring areas for research and study in the field of outreach and public service.
EDHI(HIST) 8000The course will be conducted as a topics seminar with students taking active parts. Each session will focus upon discussion and analysis of assigned reading or upon research problems. From time to time, brief supplementary lectures will be given and documentary readings supplied. A substantial portion of the course will be devoted to the research and writing of the paper.
EDIT 4170/6170 Introduction to the systems approach to instructional design (objs. 1 and 3) Instructional congruency Macro- vs. micro-instructional design Constructivism and instructional design Instructional analysis: Learning context (situation) (objs. 2a and 2b) Describing the learning environment Determining resources and constraints Instructional analysis: Learner (obj. 2c) Learner characteristics Similarities and differences among learners from different cultures Prior learning Instructional analysis: Task (objs. 2c, 2d, 2e) Identifying instructional goals Identifying learning outcomes Learning hierarchies Elaboration theory Developing and writing instructional objectives (obj. 2d) Designing and developing assessment measures (obj. 2j) Designing and developing instructional strategies (objs. 2f and 2g) Events of instruction ARCS Model of motivational instructional design Designing education and training for cross-cultural settings Production of instruction (objs. 2h and 2i) Formative and summative evaluation (obj. 2k, 2l, 2m) Rapid prototyping Diffusion, dissemination, and implementation
EDIT 4500/6500I. Introduction to Instructional Television A. History B. Purpopses C. Media literacy II. Basic TV equipment A. Studio cameras B. Lighting C. Staging III. Principles of TV Equipment A. Key definitions B. Implications IV. Production Planning and scripting A. Audience Analysis B. Reading Scripts C. Writing Scripts V. TV Graphics VI. Production Laboratory VII. TV Audio techniques VIII.Studio TV Production IX. Editing - Analog and Digital A. Planning Edited Production B. Production Laboratory XI. Evaluation
EDIT 6320This course is taught as an asynchronous online course depending on community building through the WebCT bulletin board and chat room tools. We will be creating a technology plan for a school of your choosing. 1.Brainstorm and collect information on the community where your school is located. Write this date into report form for inclusion in your technology report. Readers of your technology plan will refer to this report for demographic information to understand the school setting. 2.Devise a technology needs assessment instrument that you could use for teachers, administrators, students, and parents. Include these instruments in the appendix of your technology plan. The needs assessment instruments should reflect some of what you have learned about the community and its perspective of the importance of technology in its schools. 3. Create a curriculum map of your school to find out what are each month's main units for each teacher.
EDIT 7320What is a researchable problem? --Narrowing a topic --Preliminary exploration of topic --Writing the proposal Using the literature --Selecting search terms --Selecting multicultural resources and databases --Trial and error method --Summarizing and evaluating search strategies Appropriate methodology --Quantitative --Qualitative --Combinations --Finding and using examples Instrumentation --What is a good instrument? --Does it help answer the question? Piloting the instrument Writing the first draft --Organizing the content --Selecting a bibliographic style Final product --Paper --Presentation --Combination Evaluating the process
EDMS 7650Purposes and Components of a Literature Review Organizing, Writing, and Revising A Literature Review
EDMS 9630Identify sources; critique research; write literature review
EDMS(EDEC)(QUAL) 7500Participants' conceptions of action research; history of action research and teachers' involvement in research; examples of teachers reporting their research studies; asking research questions and designing a teacher action research study; doing school-wide research; students and action research; presenting and writing up what we learn from action research
EDUC 6000a. Professional development standards b. Grounded and a priority theory c. Research questions d. Data sources e. Teacher research as professional development f. Assessment g. Action research methods h. Writing strategies
EDUC 6010a. Standards-based professional development b. Grounded and a priority theory c. Culturally appropriate teaching d. Classroom-based, student-involved assessment practices e. Writing critically about teaching practices and teacher research f. Peer Coaching and Critical Friends processes and strategies g. Professional learning communities as sites for construction of new knowledge
EFND 80601. Students will cover philosophies from ancient to modern, and examine the societal and political contexts that have shaped these philosophies. 2. Students will take their knowledge of various philosophies and analyze the thinking and actions of an educational leader/thinker. 3. Students will also develop and write their own philosophy of education, which may or may not emanate from the social and political experiences that they consider influential. 4. Readings include: Aristotle, Plato, Emile Durkheim, Paulo Freire, bell hooks, John Dewey, and W.E.B. Du Bois
EFND(HIST) 4010/6010I. Setting the Context of Hip-Hop as a social movement A. Blues Ideology and the Blues Tradition-Late 1800s and Early 1900s B. Art, Music, and Culture during the Harlem Renaissance-The 1920s C. The Jazz Era and Bebop, 1940s- 1960s D. Music and the Civil Rights Movement, 1954-1968 E. The Black Arts Movement, 1960s-early 1970s F. The Funk and Disco Eras, 1970s G. The Rise of Hip-Hop, 1970s to Present II. Intellectual Foundations of Socially Conscious Hip-Hop (1900-1950) A. Malcolm X B. Martin Luther King, Jr. C. Angela Davis D. Harriet Tubman E. Frantz Fanon F. Marcus Garvey G. Sonia Sanchez H. Amiri Baraka I. Gil Scot-Heron J. The Last Poets III. Time Frame of Social and Educational Ideas in Hip-Hop Music and Film A. The 1970s Blaixploitation films B. The Origins of Hip-Hop (Break dancing, Graffiti Writing, MCing, and DJing (1975-1985) C. The Golden Age of Hip-Hop Nationalism (late 1980s and early 1900s) D. Gangster Rap (mid 1980s to mid 1990s) E. Neo-Soul and Politically Conscious Hip-Hop (mid 1990s- Present) IV. A Study of Ideas in Socially and Politically Conscious Hip- Hop A. Black Self-Determination B. Black Nationalism C. Liberatory Education D. Resistance Pedagogy E. Pan-Africanism F. Economic Independence and Interdependence V. Areas of Contention in Hip-Hop A. Race and Racism B. Class and Economics C. Gender and Feminism D. Sexuality VI. Toward Hip-Hop as a Radical Pedagogy in History A. Freedom Schools B. Curricular changes in public schools C. Black Studies Programs D. Blacks in Higher Education E. Hip-Hop artists and education
ELAN 3461a) adolescents as readers, writers, and users of language b) adolescents in families, communities, and public schools c) issues of race, class, and gender in public schools d) history, organization, and status of public schools e) history, organization, and status of teaching English f) why teaching English?
ELAN 3461Ha) adolescents as readers, writers, and users of language b) adolescents in families, communities, and public schools c) issues of race, class, and gender in public schools d) history, organization, and status of public schools e) history, organization, and status of teaching English f) why teaching English?
ELAN 4120Life stories, whole language and literacy Cultural/personal Funds of Knowledge Writing processes, writing workshop Writing workshop, direct instruction Writing development, primary Writing development, intermediate Writing conferences Reading/writing connections Editing for readability, and publishing Inclusive language arts instruction (learners with physical disabilities, ADD/ADHD or cocaine-exposure, learning disabilities) Spelling development and assessment Spelling instruction and communication Internship Language diversity Culturally relevant teaching Genre: Poetry Genre: Memoir Genre: Nonfiction Theme studies: Prejudice Drama as culturally relevant teaching Georgia Writing Assessment, informal assessment Family connections Family connections Sharing of letters: you as a teacher, cultural influences
ELAN 4401Defining teacher research/collaborative inquiry Research designs and methods Participant-observation Research questions in the classroom focusing on students as readers, writers, and language users Data collection, analysis, and interpretation Theorizing and representation: Shaping presentations for other professionals
ELAN 44501. Introduction to general process model 2. Identification of principles of writing instruction (e.g., identifying goals/objectives, conducting task analysis, designing task-related activities, developing criteria for rubrics) 3. Designing instruction for various tasks (e.g., argumentation, narrative, description, comparison/contrast, parody, etc.) that includes both general and task-specific processes. 4. Attention to language issues, e.g., questions about standard forms of language, politics and linguists of language variation, etc.
ELAN 45301. Characteristics of the FL (foreign language) learner from preschool to the 8th grade 2. First language development and its relation to second language learning in children 3. The elementary school curriculum and how different areas in the curriculum can be taught in a foreign language 4. Techniques for teaching and evaluating oral language skills in the second language 5. Techniques for teaching and evaluating reading and writing in the target language
ELAN 45311. Contextualized FL instruction in secondary schools 2. National Standard for FL Learning and Teaching 3. Behavior management 4. Effective résumé writing 5. Observing and analyzing effective FL teaching practices
ELAN 52201. Course Introduction 2. Recalling Writing, Journal Writing 3. Portfolio Keeping 4. Portfolio Keeping 5. Developing and Clarifying, Letter Writing 6. Reading, Revising, Responding, Teaching Fiction Writing 7. Teaching Poetry 8. Reading a Writer's Audience, Teaching Non-Fiction Writing 9. Grammar and Editing 10. Grammar and Editing 11. Language Assessment 12. Language Assessment 13. Being Reflective
ELAN 5312/7312Poetry immersion Reading poetry Starting points Writing poetry Teaching young poets Building a community of poetry readers; Love poems Poetic Environments Building a community of poets Important subjects and words How Poetry Works Poetry across the curriculum Poetry of social issues Poetry through art Nature Poetry Celebration
ELAN 5332/7332I. Drama in Education A. Educational Objectives B. Value C. Definitions D. Drama as a Way of Learning E. Research F. Mantle of the Expert G. Process Drama II. Drama and Oral Language Arts A. Imagination B. Play C. Movement D. Pantomime E. Puppetry F. Choral Speaking G. Readers Theatre III. Drama and Oral Tradition A. Storytelling B. Folk Lore C. Legends/Myths IV. Drama and Children's Literature A. Stories B. Poetry C. Informational Books V. Improvisation A. Situation B. Objects C. Characters D. Group E. Stories F. Role Playing VI. Process Drama A. Engagement with the Event B. Role Taking C. Encounters D. Structuring the Drama Experience VII. Drama as a Teaching Tool A. Integrated Projects B. Art Form C. Learning Medium D. Curriculum Development Texts: McCaslin, N. (1990). CREATIVE DRAMA IN THE CLASSROOM. White Plains, NY: Longman. O'Neill, C. (1995). DRAMA WORLDS: A FRAMEWORK FOR PROCESS DRAMA. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Heathcote, D., & Bolton, G. (1995). DRAMA FOR LEARNING: DORTHY HEATHCOTE'S MANTLE OF THE EXPERT APPROACH TO EDUCATION. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. O'Neill, C., Lampert, A., Linnell, R., & Warr-Wood, J. (1977). DRAMA GUIDELINES. London: Heinemann. O'Neill, C., & Lambert, A. (1982). DRAMA STRUCTURES. London: Hutchinson. Krogness, M. M. (1995). Acting out: Improvised classroom drama. In JUST TEACH ME, MRS. K.: TALKING, READING, AND WRITING WITH RESISTANT ADOLESCENT LEARNERS. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Rogers, T., & O'Neill, C. (1993). Creating multiple worlds: Drama, language, and literary response. In G. Newell & R. Durst (Eds.), EXPLORING TEXT: THE ROLE OF DISCUSSION AND WRITING IN THE TEACHING AND LEARNING OF LITERATURE (pp. 175-190). Norwood, MA: Christopher-Gordon. Golub, J., & Reid, L. (1989). Activities for an
ELAN 5390/7390Identifying and owning the problems Culturally engaged teaching Language diversity Teaching across cultures Teaching across cultures Reading Poverty Connecting home, school, & community Improving reading developmen Improving reading development Improving writing development Teaching second language learners Issues of disenfranchisement Teaching for social justice Assessment issues
ELAN 55551. Methods for teaching the receptive skills, listening and reading 2. Methods for teaching the productive skills, speaking and writing 3. Methods for teaching for cultural understanding 4. Techniques for testing and evaluating the acquisition of second language skills 5. Preparing lesson plans for instructional units 6. Techniques for effective classroom management
ELAN 5630/7630Approaches to language acquisition Language competence Multiple intelligences in TESOL; Lesson planning TPR Music, chants, poetry, drama Listening and Speaking C.A.L.L. and Multimedia Literacy development: Writing in L2; Reading in L2 Content-Area teaching ESOL students in the mainstream class Grammar instruction Vocabulary learning and instruction Language Learning through Games Assessment
ELAN 70301. Factors in oral intelligibility 2. Listening comprehension for lectures 3. Listening comprehension for meetings and conversation 4. Discourse strategies for meetings and conversation 5. Genre analysis for disciplinary and professional speaking and writing 6. Engagement in disciplinary and professional speaking and writing
ELAN 7070Introduction to WebCT Quantitative & qualitative approaches to inquiry Research vocabulary & jargon Designing a Research Project Ethics, Human Subjects Protocols Reading critically The investigatory mindset Quantitative Research tools Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Studies Surveys Classroom Discourse Qualitative Traditions and their Philosophical Basis Standards of Quality in Qualitative vs. Quantitative Research Data collection in Qualitative Research Components of a Research Write-up Writing the Introduction and Lit Review Qualitative & Quantitative Data Analysis Writing the Study Presentation and publication Funding classroom research
ELAN 73201. Course Introduction 2. Recalling Writing Journal Writing 3. Portfolio Keeping 4. Portfolio Keeping 5. Developing and Clarifying, Letter Writing 6. Reading, Revising, Responding, Teaching Fiction Writing 7. Teaching Poetry 8. Reading a Writer's Audience, Teaching Non-Fiction Writing 9. Grammar and Editing 10. Grammar and Editing 11. Language Assessment 12. Language Assessment 13. Being Reflective
ELAN 7420-History of writing instruction in schools -Theories that inform writing instruction -Examination of current practice -Examination of self as writer
ELAN 7655Working with a peer response group Archiving and transcribing audio/video data Entering survey data into spreadsheet software Methods of inductive and qualitative analysis Generating descriptive and inferential statistics Forms of research writing and reports Identifying journal venues for publication of work and the review process Scholarly presentations
ELAN 8032Myths and Legends: Gita Bygodskaya remembering her father Vygotsky in Historical Context Tool and Symbol Higher Psychological Functions Research Methods Interaction of Learning and Development Play and Writing Wertsch on Vygotsky's Semiotic Analysis Sociohistorical Approach Roots and Relationships of Thought and Speech Concept Development Concept Development in the ZPD Thought and Word Sociocultural Approach to Mediated Action Sociocultural Approach to Mediated Action
ELAN 80401. Definitions of text and literacy 2. Writing, speech, and cognition 3. Writing and speech in linguistic perspective 4. Ethnography and the study of literacy 5. Bakhtin and the social genesis of genre 6. Literacy and power: Critical perspectives 7. Literacy and power: Post-structuralisms 8. Literacy, culture, and identity 9. Literacy, (post)colonialism, and language policy 10. Literacy in diverse classrooms: The contact zone 11. Research methodologies for investigating literacy as social practice
ELAN(QUAL) 8550Crisis of representation Grounded and a priori theory Coding and categorizing data Computer assisted data analysis Authority and authorship Writing strategies Exploring alternative representations
ELAN(QUAL) 85901. Traditions and Imaginations: the history of arts-based and poetic scholarship in social science research a. Arts in Sciences: creating scholarship with aesthetic impact b. Science in Art: Creating art with social meaning c. Taking Risk: Transforming old forms for new possibilities 2. What is Poetry? Examining the technique and craft for poetic methods of inquiry a. rhythm and form b. image and metaphor c. understanding chiasmus and contradiction 3. Literary, Visual, and Performing Arts in data collection a. Creative writing in the field notebook b. Visual images and multimedia c. Augusto Boal and Street Theater 4. Production, Evaluation and Assessment of Arts-based scholarship a. Craft, revision, and sharing b. Creating criteria: examining lower-and upper- case "truth/Truth" in research c. Educating a tough critical community of arts-based scholars d. Exploring literary and scholarly sites for publication and dissemination
EMAT 4200/6200Technological Resources Email: Students will be given email accounts and will learn how to use email as a required medium of communication in this course. Internet: Students will learn how to use the Internet (in particular, the World Wide Web) to find resources for their teaching activities, to participate in electronic discussions relevant to their own learning, and as a global resource for children’s learning CD-ROM: Students will have opportunities to review and explore CD-ROM resources maintained by OIT and other departments in the College. Mathematics Education is developing a collection of CD-ROM resources for mathematics teaching and learning. Computer Software Tools for Teachers: Students will learn how to use a word processor and will be required to prepare all written assignments using a word processor. They will also learn how to use integrated software packages that provide spreadsheets, data bases and graphics programs together with word processing. They will learn how to use the spreadsheet and data base to maintain typical school records, such as grade sheets, attendance roles, lunchroom and other student data. They will learn how to use the graphics software to prepare attractive and interesting information and activity sheets. Computer Software Tools for Children: Students will learn how children can use the above tools to do mathematical explorations and to present results of their explorations. In addition, specific software for children’s learning of mathematics will be used by the students to explore children’s mathematics. Such software will include, but not be limited to, the microworlds that are being developed by the Fractions Project. Other mathematics software for young children will include: Turtle Math, LogoWriter, Logo Microworlds, Number Connections, and the Geometer’s Sketchpad. Calculators: Students will learn how they can use calculators as tools for developing and exploring number concepts at the elementary level. Video: Video will be used as a resource in this course to introduce students to teachers and children using technology in their teaching and learning of mathematics and other related subjects. Students will also learn how they can use video as a medium for feedback and reflection on their own teaching activities and interactions with children. Local teachers and children will share with students how video is being used in local elementary schools as a tool for learning and a medium of communication. Learning Children’s Mathematics Topics to be covered will include: - Typical counting activities of pre-numerical children - Typical activities associated with the development of an Initial Number Sequence (e.g. counting on, enactive addition) - Typical activities associated with the development of a Tacitly Nested Number Sequence (e.g. double counting, additive problem solving, enactive multiplication, enactive quotitive division, initial measurement activities) - Typical activities associated with the development of an Explicitly Nested Number Sequence (e.g. multiplicative problem solving, partitive division, part-whole reasoning, simple fraction problems, measurement problems) - Typical activities associated with the development of a Generalized Number Sequence (e.g. Operations on fractions, fraction families, simplifying fractions, ratio and proportional reasoning, measurement in 2 and 3 dimensions, exponential reasoning) - Typical activities associated with children’s spatial development (e.g., walking out pathways for open and closed figures, recognition of special shapes and solids, classification of shapes and solids, exploring properties of shapes and solids through dynamic software as well as concrete objects) - Typical activities associated with children’s logical development (e.g. sorting and classifying, order relations, difference relations, equivalence relations, transitive reasoning).
EMAT 5310/7310Learning teaching skills: lesson planning, assessment, class management, working in groups, integrating technology Working in schools: observation & reflection, working with a mentor teacher, teach an enrichment lesson, discussing, and assessing Project: define an area of interest, investigate your area Developing an electronic portfolio: materials for employment, materials for teaching, materials for professional growth Using technology: learning mathematics, teaching mathematics, designing lessons, preparing reports, writing journals, communicating Reading: NCTM's Curriculum and Evaluation Standards, NCTM's Professional and Assessment Standards, class handouts, Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School and other reading materials in area of interest.
EMAT 80101. The course begins with a general discussion of curriculum. It then looks at some issues of curriculum change and innovation. An attempt is made to provide a more theoretical orientation than is taken in the corresponding master’s course EMAT 7080. 2. During the course, students read and discuss in class a variety of articles on curriculum issues, including articles on international comparisons of curriculum. They also read and discuss a reprinted version of Howson, G., Keitel, C., & Kilpatrick, J., (1981), Curriculum development in mathematics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. They write short papers dealing with the readings. 3. Students select a curriculum development project from a country other than the one with which they are most familiar; obtain information about the project, including materials it has produced, using the university libraries and the Internet; and write a paper, due near the end of the semester, in which they first give a brief description of the project and its activities and then analyze the project from the perspective of any of various issues discussed during the course. They are given assistance in locating information about projects, and each student checks his or her selection with the instructor for its appropriateness. 4. At the end of the semester, each student makes a class presentation in which he or she describes the project chosen for the paper and then leads the class through an activity or two based on materials produced by the project. The student serves as the teacher, with the other students serving as the class; the purpose is to give a sense of how mathematics is treated in the project. Students presenting a project provide a brief handout with details on the project and how to obtain more information about it.
EMAT 96301. The course begins with a general discussion of research in mathematics education— its history, nature, and current status. Students are asked to write one or two pages on their research interests, identifying a likely dissertation topic if possible. These interests are discussed with students over the semester and are also used in selecting literature for class sessions. Depending on their background and preparation, they may be given articles to read and discuss in class that deal with research methods. 2. For each session of the class, students are expected to read a research study selected by the instructor and come to class prepared to offer comments and critique on both the study and how it has been reported. In some cases, they are asked to write an abstract for the study. The studies are selected both to give students an overview of the field and to acquaint them with recent studies of interest to them collectively. The selections change each time the course is offered; there is no textbook for the course. 3. Students are also given a handout with information about resources available through campus libraries and the Internet. During the semester, they are expected to use these resources in identifying literature relevant to their research interests. 4. The main project is a paper, due at the end of the semester, for which each student selects two research studies relevant to his or her interests. In the paper, the students are to describe and critique each study and its report, and then compare the two studies along dimensions discussed in class. They are assisted during the semester in identifying two closely related studies (often reported in dissertations but sometimes in journals) and in obtaining copies to read, analyze, describe, and critique.
ENGL 1050HThe choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Students will write critical papers in response to the readings.
ENGL 1060HThe choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Students will write critical papers in response to the readings.
ENGL 1101ENGL 1101 is centered around expository writing and argumentation. The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. Course requirements policies that apply to all sections of this course will be determined by the current Freshman English Handbook. A possible series of topics might look something like this: A. Topics for Reading 1. Reading and Thinking Critically 2 Learning to Read and Evaluate Arguments 3. Ethos, Pathos, and Logos 4. Other Methods for Analyzing Argument 5. Visual Arguments B. Topics for Writing 6. Learning to write Critically 7. Content: Thesis, Logic, and Support 8. Organization and Development 9. Style and Syntax 10. Diction 11. Grammar, Mechanics, and Citation Format
ENGL 1102English 1102 is centered around writing critically about literature. The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. Course requirements andpolicies that apply to all sections of this course will be determined by the current Freshman English Handbook. A possible series of topics might look something like this: A. Literary Topics 1. Learning to Read and Evaluate Poetry, the Short Story, the Novel, and Drama 2. Selected works of Poetry 3. Selected works of Drama 4. Selected works of Fiction B. Rhetorical Topics 7. Learning to write Critically about Literature 8. Content: Thesis, Logic, and Support 9. Organization and Development 10. Style and Syntax 11. Diction 12. Grammar, Mechanics, and Citation Format
ENGL 1102MStudents taking English 1030 will have the same writing requirements and goals as students taking English 1102, but will study the literature representative of the following cultures: African American, Hispanic American, Asian American, and Native American. The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. Course requirements policies that apply to all sections of this course will be determined by the current Freshman English Handbook. A possible series of topics might look something like this: A. Literary Topics 1. Learning to Read and Evaluate Poetry, the Short Story, the Novel, and Drama 2. Selected works by African American Writers 3. Selected works by Hispanic American Writers 4. Selected works by Asian American Writers 5. Selected works by Hispanic American Writers 6. Selected Works by writers from other groups B. Rhetorical Topics 7. Learning to write Critically about Literature 8. Content: Thesis, Logic, and Support 9. Organization and Development 10. Style and Syntax 11. Diction 12. Grammar, Mechanics, and Citation Format
ENGL 2320The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of readings might resemble this: --Pope, Essay on Man --essays by Swift and Johnson --selected poems by Blake, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats --selected poems by Tennyson, Browning, Barrett Browning, Arnold --selected poems from Yeats --one novel and several short stories by twentieth-century fiction writers, such as Woolf, Forster, Joyce, Hardy, etc.
ENGL 2360HThe choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of readings might resemble this: --Pope, Essay on Man --essays by Swift and Johnson --selected poems by Blake, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats --selected poems by Tennyson, Browning, Barrett Browning, Arnold --selected poems from Yeats --one novel and several short stories by twentieth-century fiction writers, such as Woolf, Forster, Joyce, Hardy, etc.
ENGL 3000The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors to be read outside of class and discussed in class and to be examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics might look something like this: 1. What is Literature?: Some Criteria 2. Intertextuality and the Nature of Narrative 3. Introduction to Literary Theory 4. Literary Explication and Close Reading 5. Ordinary Language, Figuration, and Rhetorical Analysis 6. Kinds of Criticism: Formalistic, Textual, Cultural, Psychoanalytic, Historicist, Deconstructive, Postcolonial, Feminist, etc. 7. Research and Bibliography 8. Explicating Poetry: Close Reading, Scansion, Tropology, Poetic Form and Genre 9. Kinds of Writing: Novel, Poetry, Short Story, Drama, Creative Non-Fiction 10. Writing Critical Essays: From Thesis to Prose Style and Documentation
ENGL 3010Topical outline: The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of primary materials in both oral and printed forms and secondary writings to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively with consideration of their function, genre identification, and socio-historic context. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks including some combination of tests, out-of-class papers, and fieldwork. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Recognition of Folklore: Readings in Jan H. Brunvand, Study of American Folklore; Readings in Elliott Oring, Folk Groups and Folklore Genres: An Introduction Proverbs and Riddles: F.A. de Caro, "Riddles and Proverbs" Jokes: Robert Cochran, "'What Courage!': Romanian 'Our Leader' Jokes" Legends: Jack Santino, "Occupational Ghostlore" Personal Experience Narratives: Barbara Allen, "Personal Experience Narratives: Use and Meaning in Interaction" Foodways: C. Paige Gutierrez, "The Social and Symbolic Uses of Ethnic/Regional Foodways" Festivals and Celebrations: Robert Jerome Smith, "Festivals and Celebrations" Belief: Anders Salomonsson, "Milk and Folk Belief: with Examples from Sweden" Folktales: Carl Lindahl, Swapping Stories
ENGL 3400A possible reading list might look this: Golding, The Inheritors (1955) Aeschylus (525-456 BCE), Prometheus Bound E. Darwin, The Temple of Nature, Cantos I & II (1803) Shelley, Frankenstein, or, The Modern Prometheus (1818) C. Darwin, The Origin of Species (1859) Wells, The Island of Dr. Moreau (1896) (w./ Kenton, dir.) Island of Lost Souls (1933) Mawer, Mendel's Dwarf (1999) Huxley, Brave New World (1932) Lawrence and Lee, Inherit the Wind (1955/1960) Watson, The Double Helix (1968) Powers, The Gold Bug Variations (1991) Atwood, Oryx and Crake (2003) writing: 3 essays and a final research paper or project
ENGL 3600The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary. The focus and coverage will vary from semester to semester and instructor to instructor, but topics of examination will include: The Writing Habit The Rhetorical Situation/Audience Awareness/Argumentation Invention and Drafting Strategies Revising: Global Changes Editing: Local Changes Popular Writing Discourse Conventions in the Disciplines
ENGL 3800The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the intstructor may be necessary. The focus and coverage will vary from semester to semester and instructor to instructor, but topics of study can include: Reading and Writing Poetry Reading and Writing Fiction Reading and Writing Creative Nonfiction Reading and Writing Prose Poetry Reading and Writing Memoir Reading and Writing Micro Fiction Reading and Writing Performative Writing Invention Editing Revising
ENGL 3800HThe course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the intstructor may be necessary. The focus and coverage will vary from semester to semester and instructor to instructor, but topics of study can include: Reading and Writing Poetry Reading and Writing Fiction Reading and Writing Creative Nonfiction Reading and Writing Prose Poetry Reading and Writing Memoir Reading and Writing Micro Fiction Reading and Writing Performative Writing Invention Editing Revising
ENGL 3801The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary. The focus and coverage will vary from semester to semester and instructor to instructor, but topics of study can include: Reading and Writing Poetry Reading and Writing Fiction Reading and Writing Creative Nonfiction Reading and Writing Prose Poetry Reading and Writing Memoir Reading and Writing Micro Fiction Reading, Writing and Performing Performative Writing Invention Editing Revising
ENGL 4225/6225The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The literature will be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics might resemble the following: Weeks 1-2: Exemplum to Fabliau: Jacobus De Voragine, Legenda Aurea; Robert Mannyng, Handlyng Synne (selections); Boccaccio, Decameron (selections); Chaucer, Canterbury Tales (selections); Benson and Andersson, The Literary Context of Chaucer's Fabliaux (selections). Week 3-4: Allegory and Satire: Romance of the Rose (Jean de Lorris), DeGuileville, Pilgrimage of the Life of Man (selections); William Langland, Piers Plowman (selections). Weeks 5-6: Writing Medieval, Reading Medieval: Augustine, On Christian Doctrine; Geoffrey of Vinsauf, Poetria Nova; Dante, On the Eloquence of the Vernacular; selections from Minnis and Scot, Medieval Literary Criticism and Theory, and from Watson et al., The Idea of the Vernacular: An Anthology of Middle English Literary Theory, 1280-1520. Weeks 7-8: Cathedral Culture: Lewis, Discarded Image; Duby, The Ages of Cathedrals; Gordon Leff, Paris and Oxford Universities in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries; selections from University Records and Life in the Middle Ages (ed. Lynn Thorndike); Abbot Suger on the Abbey Church of St.-Denis and its art Treasures (Panofsky, ed.). Weeks 9-10: The Individual: Selections from Colin Morris, The Discovery of the Individual, 1050-1200; Robert Hanning, Individual in Twelfth-Century Romance; C. W. Bynum, "Did the Twelfth Century Discover the Individual?," in Jesus as Mother. Chrétien de Troyes and Petrarch. Weeks 11-12: Medieval Studies: Norman Cantor, Inventing the Middle Ages; Lee Patterson, Negotiating the Past (selections); David Matthews, The Making of Middle English, 1765-1910 (selections). Weeks 13-14: Resources: Discussion of major databases; Patrologia Latina, CETA-DOC, Middle English Compendium, International Medieval Bibliography; Online Medieval Source; Labyrinth; discussion of printed serial and descriptive catalogues, and indices such as Index of Middle English Prose; Index of Printed Middle English Prose; Index of Middle English Verse; Manual of Writings in Middle English; Middle English Dictionary; Records in Early English Drama; Stith-Thompson, Motif-Index of Folk Literature. Week 15: The Archive: Work in Middle English book hands and abbreviations; assignments in transcription from facsimiles and online editions. Introduction to major archival sources, and access to them.
ENGL 4240/6240The choice and sequence of topics will vary every semester depending on the instructor. The topics will consist of selected primary and secondary texts to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their production as well as in the light of recent scholarly opinion. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks that may include, but is not restricted to, tests, out-of-class papers, and class examinations. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Chaucer and English inheritance: Derek Pearsall, The Life of Geoffrey Chaucer; Essays in Idea of the Vernacular, ed. Jocelyn Wogan-Browne et al.; Christopher Cannon, The Making of Chaucer's English; Laura Hibbard Loomis, "Chaucer and the Breton Lays of the Auchinleck MS"; "Chaucer and the Auchinleck Manuscript: Thopas and Guy of Warwick." Chaucer and Continental inheritance: Piero Boitani, Chaucer and Boccaccio; Chaucer's Imaginary World of Fame; Chaucer and the Italian Trecento; Nicholas Haveley, Chaucer's Boccaccio; Charles Muscatine, Chaucer and the French Tradition; David Wallace, Chaucer and the Early Writings of Boccaccio; James Wimsatt, Chaucer and his French Contemporaries. Chaucerian Polity: Barbara A. Hanawalt (ed.), Chaucer's England; David Wallace, Chaucerian Polity; David Aers, Chaucer, Langland, and the Creative; Lee Patterson, Chaucer and the Subject of History; Paul Strohm, Social Chaucer Boethius, Neo-Platonism: Boethius, Consolation of Philosophy; Seth Lerer, Boethius and Dialogue; A.J. Minnis, Medieval Literary Theory and Criticism; Medieval Boethius; Chaucer's Boece and the medieval tradition of Boethius; Winthrop (Pete) Whetherbee, Chaucer and the Poets. Chaucer's Sources: Larry Benson and T.M. Andersson, Literary Context of Chaucer's Fabliaux; Germaine Dempster, W.F. Bryan et al, Sources and Analogues of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales; Barry Windeatt, Chaucer's Dream Poetry: Sources and Analogues. Chaucer's Readers: Seth Lerer, Chaucer's Readers; Ruth Morse & Barry Windeatt (ed.), Chaucer Traditions.
ENGL 4290The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: English Literature in the Age of Columbus (including Skelton, Henryson, and other late-fifteenth-century writers). Middle English Romance (including Malory, the Gawain poet, and other writers of Middle English romances). Middle English Religious Writing (including the Ancrene Wisse, the Agenbyt of Inwit, and other Middle English religious writings). Middle English Literature and Classical Tradition (including Middle English mythographers, translations of classical works like Douglas' Aeneid, and other relevant works). Paleography of Medieval English Writings (including Old and Middle English texts).
ENGL 4300/6300The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: > Early Tudor verse: Thomas More, John Skelton, Thomas Wyatt, Henry Howard (Earl of Surrey), others > Later Tudor writers of short poems: Walter Raleigh, Christopher Marlowe, Edmund Spenser, Philip Sidney, Thomas Campion, Samuel Daniel, Michael Drayton, William Shakespeare, Fulke Greville, others > Longer Tudor poems: Thomas Sackville (and other authors of The Mirror for Magistrates), Marlowe (“Hero and Leander”), Shakespeare (“The Rape of Lucrece” and “Venus and Adonis”), Drayton (“Poly-Olbion”), others > The epic: Spenser’s Faerie Queene
ENGL 4400/6400The selection of plays read and discussed will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. However, major dramas of the period will be read and analyzed using critical skills of various kinds (e.g., historical, close reading, comparative, structural). In addition to being examined on the material, students will moreover write critically on one or more of the plays. Research projects (particularly in 6400) may also be assigned. A sample syllabus might include Dryden's ALL FOR LOVE, Etherege's MAN OF MODE, Wycherley's THE COUNRTY WIFE, Behn's THE ROVER, Otway's VENICE PRESERVED, Congreve's WAY OF THE WORLD, Goldsmith's SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER, and Sheridan's SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL.
ENGL 4430The selection of novels read and discussed will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. However, the novels will be read and analyzed using critical skills of various kinds (e.g., historical, close reading, comparative, structural, psychoanalytical, feminist, etc.) In addition to being examined on the material, students will write critical on one or more of the novels. Research projects may also be assigned. A sample syllabus might include Aphra Behn's OROONOKO, Daniel Defoe's MOLL FLANDERS, Samuel Richardson's PAMELA or CLARISSA, Henry Fielding's TOM JONES or JOSEPH ANDREWS, Sarah Fielding's DAVID SIMPLE, Laurence Sterne's TRISTRAM SHANDY, Tobias Smollett's HUMPHREY CLINKER, Frances Burney's EVELINA and Charlotte Smith's THE YOUNG PHILOSOPHER.
ENGL 4440/6440Topical Outline: The selection of plays read and discussed will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. However, major dramas of the period will be read and analyzed using critical skills of various kinds (e.g., historical, close reading, comparative, structural). In addition to being examined on the material, students will moreover write critically on one or more of the plays. Research projects (particularly in 6400) may also be assigned. A sample syllabus might include Dryden's ALL FOR LOVE, Etherege's MAN OF MODE, Wycherley's THE COUNRTY WIFE, Behn's THE ROVER, Otway's VENICE PRESERVED, Congreve's WAY OF THE WORLD, Goldsmith's SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER, and Sheridan's SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL.
ENGL 4490The selection of works will vary from instructor to instructor and topic to topic. Some topics offered in recent years are: Eighteenth-century women writers; the works of Henry Fielding; the works of William Blake; Sentimentalism; Ethical Theory and Women's Fiction. Topics courses are subject to the approval of the undergraduate and committee.
ENGL 4500The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Because the course will change from semester to semester, students are encouraged to refer to the English Department website for information concerning the course content for a specific semester. A possible series of texts, topics and assignments might resemble this: Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France and/or other works Mary Wollstonecraft, Vindication of the Rights of Woman and/or other works William Blake, Selected poetry and prose William Wordsworth, Selected poetry and prose Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Selected poetry and prose Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility, Mansfield Park, and/or other novels George Gordon, Lord Byron, Selected poetry and prose Thomas De Quincey, Confessions of an English Opium-Eater and/or other works Percy Bysshe Shelley, Selected poetry and prose Mary Shelley, Frankenstein and/or other texts John Keats, Selected poetry and prose Felicia Hemans, Selected poetry and prose Selected Romantic-era Drama (including the works of Joanna Baillie, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and Felicia Hemans) Selected correspondence of the period (for example, the letters of John Keats) Possible topics could include: the Revolution Controversy, the development of the Gothic, the development of the lyric, and/or innovations in the novel. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests, critical essays, and in-class writing assignments.
ENGL 4510Instructors are free to structure the course as they see fit. The focus of the course will be works by writers such as those listed in the course description above. In most cases, attention will be paid to contextualizing the works within the chronology of the period as well as within its major literary, historical, cultural, and political movements.
ENGL 4540Instructors are free to structure the course as they see fit. The focus of the course will be works by writers such as those listed in the course description above. In most cases, attention will be paid to contextualizing the works within the chronology of the period as well as within its major literary, historical, cultural, and political movements.
ENGL 4590The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Because the course will change from semester to semester, students are encouraged to refer to the English Department website for information concerning the course content for a specific semester. Topics in the past have included: Byron, the Shelleys and their Circle Celluloid and Cyberspace: Jane Austen in and out of her time From Caleb to Frankenstein: Novels of the Romantic Period Romantic Opera Research in Victorian Literature and Culture: the 1850s Literature, Technology, and Science in the Nineteenth Century Hawthorne, James, Hardy, and Eliot Victorian Gothic The Victorian New Woman Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests, critical essays, and in-class writing assignments.
ENGL 4800The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the intstructor may be necessary. The focus and coverage will vary from semester to semester and instructor to instructor, but topics of study can include: Reading and Writing Poetry Reading and Writing Fiction Reading and Writing Creative Nonfiction Reading and Writing Prose Poetry Reading and Writing Memoir Reading and Writing Micro Fiction Reading and Writing Performative Writing Craft Lectures Invention Editing Revising
ENGL 4810While assignments and course structure may vary according to professor, in general students will be expected to: Read and evaluate journal submissions weekly and maintain written reports. Research and give a presentation on a literary magazine. Write a review of a recent book and submit it for publication. Perform one production-related task (for example, copy editing, layout, subscription management, advertising, preparing a bid, organizing a promotional event). Attend class regularly, participate actively, lead one weekly editorial meeting.
ENGL 4830Since this is a topics course, its subject varies very much from semester to semester and from teacher to teacher. Some of the topics that might be addressed in this class include: 1. Advanced studies in Technical Communication 2. Writing for the World Wide Web 3. Ecological Writing 4. Hypertext and Hypertextuality 5. Autobiography and Personal Writing
ENGL 4835Given the breadth of the subject and the wealth of available textual materials, the topical outline for specific instantiations of the course may vary considerably. For example, the course could be organized as the exploration of diverse writings by a single author such as John Muir, Barbara Kingsolver, Scott Sanders, Edward Abbey, Annie Dillard, or Wendell Berry; it could address environmental themes arising in a single genre such as poetry, short fiction, novels, or non-fiction essays; it could be divided along national lines to highlight environmental issues in traditional authors and genres in English or American literature; the course could focus on recent contributions in the contemporary genre of Nature Writing. A sample outline for a reasonable offering of this course is as follows: Environmental Literature I. Definitions and Distinctions. A. Ecology vs. Environmentalism B. Ecocriticism vs. Nature Writing C. Environmental literature vs. the literature of advocacy II. The Concept of "Nature." A. Ancient Greece B. Medieval Europe C. Modern science D. Contemporary/postmodern III. Nature as subject and the natural world as background. A. Wilderness: conservation vs. preservation B. Agrarianism: "Wise Use" and environmental ethics C. Urbanism/New Urbanism: responsible dwelling on the land D. Domains of devastation: pollution, war, natural disaster IV. Environmental awareness and the construction of character. A. Poetic characters and personae B. The narrators and characters of short fiction C. Character and persona in the novel D. The personae of an essay V. Environmental domains in literary fiction. A. Wilderness: untamed nature B. Rural/Agrarian: nature harnessed C. Suburban: nature subdued D. Urban: nature obliterated E. Domains of devastation Available texts for use in the course might include, e.g., Robert Finch and John Elder, eds., _Nature Writing: The Tradition in English_ (2002); Lorraine Anderson, Scott Slovic, and John P. O'Grady, eds., _Literature and the Environment: A Reader on Nature and Culture_ (1999); John Elder, _Imagining the Earth: Poetry and the Vision of Nature_ (1996); Cheryl Glotfelty, and Harold Fromm, eds., _The Ecocriticism Reader: Landmarks in Literary Ecology_ (1996). Authors and their works could include, among many others too numerous to list, Edward Abbey, Joseph Conrad, Charles Darwin, Annie Dillard, William Faulkner, Wes Jackson, Barbara Kingsolver, Aldo Leopold, John Muir, Sigurd Olson, Scott Sanders, Gary Snyder, Henry David Thoreau, Walt Whitman, and William Wordsworth.
ENGL 4840Specific topics will be determined by the professor of record in partnership with the student's on-site internship advisor. Topics may include: History of publishing History of alternative presses History of small and minority presses Fundamentals of editing Literary arts administration Grant writing Academic publication marketing Manuscript preparation and review Professional communication
ENGL 4995The focus and coverage will vary from each semester and by each professor, but topics of study can include: specific literary movements or schools of thought focused look at an author or authors lectures on research methods instruction in writing a research paper
ENGL 6260The choice and sequence of topics will vary every semester depending on the instructor. The topics will consist of selected primary and secondary texts to be read outside of class discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of time and circumstances of their production as well as in the light of recent scholarly opinion. Periodically, during the semester, students will perform a combination of graded tasks which may include, but is not restricted to, tests, out-of-class papers, and class examinations. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: Ancrene Wisse and the Katherine Group: Bella Millet & Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, Medieval English Prose for Women; Nicholas Watson et al, Anchoritic Spirituality. Romance/Hagiography/Chronicles: Studies in the Auchinleck and Thornton MSS; Donald Sands, ed, Middle English Verse Romances; Chandos Herald, Life of the Black Prince; Froissart, Les enseignements Edouard III; Eve Salisbury & Anne Laskaya, ed., Breton Lays. The Pearl-Poet: Andrew and Waldron, ed., Poems of the Pearl Manuscript; Brewer & Gibson, ed., Companion to the Gawain Poet. The Mystics--Rolle, Hilton, Julian, and the Cloud-Author: Barry Windeatt, ed., English Mystics of the Middle Ages; Karen Armstorng, Visions of God; Phyllis Hodgson, ed., Three 14th Century English Mystics. Heresy and Apoclaptycism: James Dean, ed., Medieval English Political Writings; James Dean, ed., Six Ecclesiastical Satires; Wimbledon's Sermon; The Poems of Laurence Minot; Wyclif, Extant English Works; Anne Hudson, The Pre-mature Reformation. Langland: E.V.C. Schmidt, ed., B Version; D. Pearsall, ed., C Text; John Alford, ed., Companion to Piers Plowman; Charlotte Brewer, Editing Piers Plowman. Texts, Manuscripts, and Contexts: Siegfried Wenzel & S. Nicholls, ed., The Whole Book; A.J. Minnis, Crux and Controversy; R. Hanna, Pursuing History; Anne Hudson, The Lollards and their Books. Scribes, Scripts, and Readers: Malcolm Parkes, English Cursive Book Hands; Scribes, scripts, and readers; P.N.R. Robinson & Rivkah Zim, ed., Of the making of books. The Scottish Chaucerians: Persall, ed., Chaucer to Spenser, An Anthology; Henryson, Poems & Fables; Gavin Douglas, Palice of Honoure; Dunbar, Selections. The Fifteenth-Century: Malory, Morte Darthur; Derek Pearsall, Chaucer to Spenser, An Anthology. The Late-Medieval Lyric: religious and secular: Rosemary Woolf, English Religious Lyrics in the Middle Ages; Douglas Gray, ed., English Medieval Religious Lyrics; Themes and Images in the Medieval English Lyric; G.L. Brook, ed., The Harley Lyrics; Daniel Ransom, Irony and Parody in the Harley Lyrics; Charles d'Orleans, Lyrics and Ballads.
ENGL 6290Topics will be determined by the faculty-member offering the course in any given semester and therefore cannot be outlined here. However, the traditional topical outlines by chronological period within the medieval period (Old English and Middle English), by genre (epic, romance, lyric, drama, prose narrative), or author (Chaucer, Skelton, Aelfric, Wulfstan, etc.) would naturally occur as faculty propose offerings of the course. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and readings might resemble this: English Literature in the Age of Columbus (including Skelton, Henryson, and other late-fifteenth-century writers). Middle English Romance (including Malory, the Gawain poet, and other writers of Middle English romances). Middle English Religious Writing (including the Ancrene Wisse, the Agenbyt of Inwit, and other Middle English religious writings). Middle English Literature and Classical Tradition (including Middle English mythographers, translations of classical works like Douglas' Aeneid, and other relevant works). Paleography of Medieval English Writings (including Old and Middle English texts).
ENGL 6430The selection of novels read and discussed will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. However, the novels will be read and analyzed using critical skills of various kinds (e.g., historical, close reading, comparative, structural, psychoanalytical, feminist, etc.) In addition to being examined on the material, students will write critical on one or more of the novels. Research projects may also be assigned. A sample syllabus might include Aphra Behn's OROONOKO, Daniel Defoe's MOLL FLANDERS, Samuel Richardson's PAMELA or CLARISSA, Henry Fielding's TOM JONES or JOSEPH ANDREWS, Sarah Fielding's DAVID SIMPLE, Laurence Sterne's TRISTRAM SHANDY, Tobias Smollett's HUMPHREY CLINKER, Frances Burney's EVELINA and Charlotte Smith's THE YOUNG PHILOSOPHER.
ENGL 6500The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Because the course will change from semester to semester, students are encouraged to refer to the English Department website for information concerning the course content for a specific semester. A possible series of texts, topics and assignments might resemble this: Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France and/or other works Mary Wollstonecraft, Vindication of the Rights of Woman and/or other works William Blake, Selected poetry and prose Charlotte Smith, Selected poetry and prose William Wordsworth, Selected poetry and prose Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Selected poetry and prose Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility and/or other novels Readings in literary theory and literary analysis Selected correspondence of the period (for example, the letters of Mary Wollstonecraft) Possible topics could include: the Revolution Controversy, the development of the Gothic, Romantic Drama, the development of the lyric, and/or innovations in the novel. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests, in-class writing assignments, and a long sophisticated and substantial essay informed by an understanding of the critical history of the texts and period.
ENGL 6510The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Because the course will change from semester to semester, students are encouraged to refer to the English Department website for information concerning the course content for a specific semester. A possible series of texts, topics and assignments might resemble this: George Gordon, Lord Byron, Selected poetry and prose Thomas De Quincey, Confessions of an English Opium-Eater and/or other works Percy Bysshe Shelley, Selected poetry and prose Mary Shelley, Frankenstein and/or other texts John Keats, Selected poetry and prose Felicia Hemans, Selected poetry and prose Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Selected poetry and prose Readings in literary theory and literary analysis Selected Romantic-era Drama (including the works of Joanna Baillie, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and Felicia Hemans) Selected Correspondence of the period (for example, the letters of John Keats) Possible topics could include: the Revolution Controversy, the development of the Gothic, the development of the lyric, and/or innovations in the novel. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests, in-class writing assignments, and a long sophisticated and substantial essay informed by an understanding of the critical history of the texts and period.
ENGL 6580Example 1: "The Empire Writes Back" Ashcroft, Griffiths, Tiffin, The Empire Writes Back Frantz Fanon, Blake Faces, White Masks Euripides, The Bacchae Wole Soyinka. The Bacchae of Euripides Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness Tayib Saleh, A Season of Migration to the North excerpts from the Koran Salman Rushdie, Satanic Verses "Song of Solomon" from the Bible Toni Morrison, Song of Solomon Charlotte Bront‰ Jane Eyre Jean Rhys, Sargasso Sea excerpts from Homer's Odyssey Derek Walcott, Omeros Example 2: "The Multicultural Origins of Georgia" Introduction: Guest Lecturer, Hugh Ruppersburg, editor, Georgia Voices Tour to Native American archeological site, Guest Lecturer Charles Hudson, Anthropology The Spanish Influence in Georgia; Guest Lecturer: Carmen Tesser, Romance Languages The African Influence in Georgia; film: Julie Dash, Daughters of the Dust, Guest Lecturer: Josie Beoku-Betts, Sociology Antebellum Georgia and the Civil War, Guest Lecturer: Emory Thomas, History Flannery O'Connor: Guest Lecturer, Jim Kibler, English Alice Walker; Guest Lecturer: Barbara McCaskill, English Appalachian Culture: Foxfire and Deliverance; Guest Lecturer: John Inscoe, History Conclusion Example 3: "The Native American Renaissance" Louis Owens, Other Destinies N. Scott Momaday, The Way to Rainy Mountain N. Scott Momaday, House Made of Dawn James Welch, Fools Crow Gerald Vizenor, Shadow Distance Paula Gunn Allen, The Sacred Hoop Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony Louise Erdrich, Tracks Joy Harjo, The Woman Who Fell from the Sky Thoams King, Green Grass, Running Water
ENGL 6840Topical outline: The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of primary materials in both oral and printed forms and secondary writings to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively with consideration of their function, genre identification, and socio-historic context. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks including some combination of tests, out-of-class papers, and fieldwork. A possible series of topics and assignments for the topic "Folk Narrative" might resemble this: Structure and taxonomy: David Pace, "Beyond Morphology: Levi Strauss and the Analysis of Folktales" Role of the individual tale-teller: Ilhan Basgoz, "The Tale-Singer and His Audience" Role of folktales in society: Carl Lindahl, "Jacks: The Name, the Tales, the American Tradition" Gender issues in folktales: Marcia K. Lieberman, "'Some Day My Prince Will Come': Female Acculturation through the Fairy Tale" Introduction to legend: Linda Degh and Andrew Vazsonyi, "Legend and Belief" Historical legend: Elissa R. Henken, National Redeemer Supernatural legend: Patricia Lysaght, "Women, Milk and Magic at the Boundary Festival of May" Contemporary Legend: Patricia A. Turner, I Heard It through the Grapevine
ENGL 6860This course will emphasize different historical periods of rhetoric from antiquity to the present, emphasizing the development of writing and textuality. Topics might include 1. Classical rhetoric and its influence on the development of Western rhetoric and textuality. 2. Rhetoric and textuality in the English and/or American traditions. 3. The development of modern rhetoric and composition theory and practice.
ENGL 6880The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. But a sequence of topics might look something like this: 1. The Nature of Teaching and of the Writer 2. Pedagogical Schools: e.g., Expressivist, Cognitive, Social Epistemic, and postmodern 3. Invention 4. Issues of Race, Class, Gender 5. Writing and the Electronic Text 6. Revision and Response 7. Responding to and Evaluating Student Writing 8. Varieties of Textuality 9. Kinds of Literacy 10. Error, Grammar, and Writer's Block 11. Basic Writers 12. Ecologies of Writing
ENGL 6911The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester, but a possible set of topics might look something like this: 1. Understanding the Composing Process 2. Teaching Invention Strategies 3. Teaching Organization 4. Teaching Revision 5. Teaching Grammar 6. Teaching Style 7. Evaluating Student Work 8. Teaching Writing through Argumentation 9. Approaches to Writing about Literature 10. Teaching with Technology 11. Student Conferences 12. Peer Editing and Workshops 13. Basic Writers 14. Strategies for teaching ESL students 15. Adapting your pedagogy to individual needs 16. Philosophies of Teaching
ENGL 8200Topics will be determined by the faculty-member offering the course in any given semester and therefore cannot be outlined here. However, the traditional topical outlines by chronological period within the medieval period (Old English and Middle English), by genre (epic, romance, lyric, drama, prose narrative), or author (Chaucer, Skelton, Aelfric, Wulfstan, etc.) would naturally occur as faculty propose offerings of the course. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests and out-of-class papers. A possible series of topics and assignments might resemble this: English Literature in the Age of Columbus (including Skelton, Henryson, and other late-fifteenth-century writers). Middle English Romance (including Malory, the Gawain poet, and other writers of Middle English romances). Middle English Religious Writing (including the Ancrene Wisse, the Agenbyt of Inwit, and other Middle English religious writings). Middle English Literature and Classical Tradition (including Middle English mythographers, translations of classical works like Douglas' Aeneid, and other relevant works). Paleography of Medieval English Writings (including Old and Middle English texts).
ENGL 8500The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected works by various authors, to be read outside of class and discussed in class, examined individually and comparatively in the context of the times and the circumstances of their composition. Because the course will change from semester to semester, students are encouraged to refer to the English Department website for information concerning the course content for a specific semester. Authors or topics to be covered may include: William Blake, Mary Wollstonecraft, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Jane Austen, Lord Byron, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Mary Shelley, John Keats, and Felicia Hemans Romantic Opera Romantic-Era Women Writers The Gothic Experiments in Form: the Novel, Poetry, and Romantic Writing Romanticism: readings in literary theory and literary analysis Periodically during the semester, students will perform a number of graded tasks, including some combination of tests, in-class writing assignments, and a long sophisticated and substantial essay informed by an understanding of the critical history of the texts and period.
ENGL 8730This course will be taught by professors with a wide variety of specialities within the field of Multicultural American Literature, thus texts and cultural contexts will vary from semester to semester. One course that will be offered is "The Origins of Native American Literature." This course will include: 1) A study of the cultural influences on contemporary Native writers. 2) A broader understanding of Native American "literature" (e.g. oral tradition, dances, rock art, pictographic histories, pottery, myths, etc.). 3) Contemporary theoretical issues in both the academic and Native American communities. 4) A detailed historical background (e.g. legal decisions, treaties, Native American representations of history, tribal origin myths, etc.)
ENGL 8900Because this is a graduate seminar, topics will vary by instructor. The following general list offers insight into the kinds of topics the could be covered: 1. Relations between traditional and modern rhetorical and literary theory, and its relation to literary criticism and/or composition. 2. Application of recent theories of rhetoric to modern literature. 3. Implications of modern rhetorical theory for the study of writing, specifically the processes of composing and revising. 4. History of rhetorical movements.
ENGL(AFAM) 8720Topics will vary; one recent offering was titled: “Even After I Was Dead: Langston Hughes and the Short Story Tradition" and studied the following texts: Chesnutt, Charles. _The Wife of His Youth and Other Stories_ Hughes, Langston. _The Best Short Stories by Negro Writers_ ______________, Handouts of Seven Stories, from _Short Stories: The Collected Works_ 15 (2001) ______________, _Ways of White Folks_ Walker, Alice. _In Love and Trouble_
ENGL(LING) 4110/6110The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and from semester to semester. Topics will consist of readings done in the areas of grammati- cal analysis and will include morphology, syntax, the relationships between grammar and semantics, the differences between prescriptive and descriptive grammars, peda- gocial applications of modern grammatical analysis, and the several theories under- lying different models of grammatical analysis. A number of graded tasks will be assigned, such as quizzes, tests, and various writing assignments done either in or outside of class.
ENGL(LING) 4170/6170The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and from semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected readings on the major perspectives on second language acquisition, both in formal and informal environ- ments, morphophonemic and syntactic/semantic theories of language acquisition orders, social factors affecting second language acquisition, including the processes of pidginization and creolization, and cognitive science theories relating to second language acquistion, including neurolinguisitic and information processing models. A number of graded tasks will be assigned, such as quizzes, tests, and various writing assignments done either in or outside of class.
ENGL(LING) 4180/6180The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and from semester to semester. The topics will consist of readings about the theories and methodologies of linguistic error analysis, including contrastive analysis hypo- theses, interlanguage hypotheses, the application of phonological, morphological, syntactic, lexical, and semantic principles to error analysis, and several discourse theories including spoken/written discourse, foreigner-talk discourse, and specific- purpose discourse. A number of graded tasks will be assigned, such as quizzes, tests, and various writing assignments done either in or outside of class.
ENGR 6910 Philosophy of engineering research, statement of problem, reviewing literature, scientific method, design of experiment, analysis of data, report writing and presentation.
ENTO 3000Students will choose 8 seminars out of approximately 15 offered each semester and attend them. Afterwards they will write a review of the lecture and present it to the undergrauate coordinator, who will grade each review.
EOCS 9300Dissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
EPSY 2020HScientific method and statistics (mean, standard deviation, t-test, correlation) Analyzing data, Writing the research report Attention Short term memory, characteristics and coding strategies How words are read, organized, and learned Reading Comprehension Metacognition and Strategy Use Mathematical Problem Solving Motivation in the classroom Expertise - what happens as we become more knowledgeable people Standardized testing Classroom Assessment and Grading
EPSY 48011. Introduction to Cognitive Psychology 2. Sensory, Short-Term, and Working Memory 3. Long-Term Memory: Structures and Models 4. Encoding Processes 5. Retrieval Processes 6. Beliefs About Self 7. Beliefs About Intelligence and Knowledge 8. Problem Solving and Critical Thinking 9. Building Knowledge and Reflective Thought 10. Learning to Read and Reading to Learn 11. Writing 12. Cognition in the Content Areas 13. Cognition and Technology 14. Future Directions
EPSY 68001. Students will learn about the impact of cognition and particularly the learning process. 2. Students will learn how cultural and learner differences influence cognition and the educational process. 3. Students will be introduced to the Behavioral, Cognitive, and Constructivist views of learning. 4. Students will learn about the issues related to motivating students. 5. Students will learn cognitive teaching strategies for creating interesting learning environments. 6. Students will be introduced to issues related to cognition, intelligence, and classroom assessment. 7. Students will refine their own philosophy of teaching and use cognitive principles in evaluating a unit of instruction. 8. Students will apply the cognition concepts they have learned in the course to answer questions about educational issues. 9. Students will present empirical research and write a paper in APA style. 10. Students will use a variety of their computer skills, including PowerPoint presentation software. 11. Students will comprehend relationships between cognition and technology. 12. Students will apply cognition concepts to real world problem solving, and learning educational skills (including reading, writing) and content areas (including mathematics, science, and social studies).
EPSY 7100History/Theory Theory and Research Findings Measurement, Practice issues Practice Standards/Guidelines/Culture Interpretation and Report writing Mental Retardation Learning Disabilities/Achievement Testing Nonverbal and Preschool tests Neuropsychological interpretation Professional Issues/testing Latino children
ERSH 4200/6200Research Process (Objective 1) The Nature of Educational Research The Research Problem Ethics and Research Variables and Hypotheses Reviewing the Literature Sampling Instrumentation Validity and Reliability Internal Validity Statistics Descriptive Statistics Inferential Statistics Statistics in Perspective Research Types (Objective 2) Experimental Research Single-Subject Research Correlational Research Causal-Comparative Research Survey Research Content Analysis Research Qualitative Research Historical Research Writing Research Proposals and Report (Objective 3) Proposal Presentation Individual Proposal Group Proposal Computer Lab Internet Literature Search SPSS
ERSH 4600/6600Introduction Overview of Measurement Validity Basic Statistical Concepts Reliability Scaling Norming Types of Scores Criterion-Referenced Test Norm-Referenced Test Test Construction Objectives Specifications Item Writing Performance Assessments Differential Item Functioning Standard Setting Program Evaluation and Accountability Measuring Affective Outcomes
ERSH 8750Introduction to Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) Assumptions of SEM Path Models Non-recursive path analysis Confirmatory Factor Analysis Full structural models Estimation and testing Fit indices & nested models Model Modification Problems in SEM Writing about SEM Multiple group analyses
ERSH 8780Course outline 1.World-view discussions including the nature of reality, the knower and knowledge and inquiry 2.Formulating research problems and questions 3.Multimethods research design 4.Multimethods data collection 5.Making “meaning” writing research proposals 6.Multimethod research in action, examining published multimethods research
ESCI 4460/6460ESCI 4460 1. Orientation and first day of school 2. Pre-assessment of students 3. Classroom and lab safety 4. Laboratory management 5. Planning for instruction 6. Learning objectives for science instruction 7. Children's science learning 8. Sequencing instruction into a learning cycle 9. Reading and writing strategies 10. Concept mapping strategies 11. Inquiry-based science 12. Assessment ESCI 6460 1. Orientation and first day of school 2. Pre-assessment of students 3. Classroom and lab safety 4. Laboratory management 5. Planning for instruction 6. Learning objectives for science instruction 7. Children's science learning 8. Sequencing instruction into a learning cycle 9. Reading and writing strategies 10. Concept mapping strategies 11. Inquiry-based science 12. Assessment
ESCI 81201. Orientation to science education literature. 2. Guest speaker onlibrary resources and retrieval systems I. 3. Guest speaker on library resources and retrieval systems II. 4. Practice using library resources and retrieval systems. 5. Characterizing excellent research. 6. Writing critiques of science education literture. 7. Critique presentations. 8. Identifying topics of interest and research questions. 9. Examining characteristics of a literature review. 10. Workshop on writing a leterature review. 11. Presentations of a literature review. 12. Preparing for comps and prospectus writing.
ESCI 82001. Engaging Students in Science Learning 2. Reflective Practice and Reflective Journal Writing 3. Science Teachers as Adult Learners and Teaching Career Cycle 4. Clinical Supervision Cycle and Conferencing Skills 5. Clinical Supervision and Teacher Evaluation 6. Staff Development and the Science Supervisor 7. National Science Standards and GSTEP Resource Framework 8. School Restructuring and the Supervisor's Role 9. Curriculum Development and the Supervisor's Role 10. Laboratory Safety and Extracurricular Science Experience 11. Public Relations and the Science Supervisor
ESCI 8990Topics for ESCI 8990 rotate every 4 semesters. For example, the specific topics addressed in ESCI 8990: Scholarly wiriting include: * Identifying parts of a research article * Framing a research question and writing a purpose statement * Writing an abstract * Writing an implications and conclusions section * Writing and presenting a literature review * Constructing an accurate reference list based on APA standards * Developing a findings section based on “ghost” data
ESCI 90801. Orientation to science education literature. 2. Guest speaker on library resources and retrieval systems I. 3. Guest speaker on library resources and retrieval systems II. 4. Practice using library resources and retrieval systems. 5. Characterizing excellent research. 6. Writing critiques of science education literature. 7. Critique presentations. 8. Identifying topics of interest and research questions. 9. Examining characteristics of a literature review. 10. Workshop on writing a literature review. 11. Presentations of a literature review. 12. Preparing for comps and prospectus writing
ESOC 3420The Nature and Mission of Social Studies I. The Social Studies Curriculum: Past and Present A. A Brief History of Elementary Social Studies B. Alternative Structures for K-6 Social Studies C. Official Position Statements D. The Status of K-6 Social Studies Instruction in Public Schools E. Issues in Selecting and Implementing Content II. Content in the Social Studies Curriculum A. Types of Social Studies Content a. Facts: Their Nature and Importance b. Concepts: Thought and Communication Essentials c. Main Ideas and Generalizations d. Skills e. Attitudes and Values III. Planning for Social Studies A. Lesson Plans B. Unit Teaching C. Using the Textbook D. Evaluation IV. Fostering Learner Involvement 1. Introduction 102 2. Classroom Atmosphere for Social Studies 102 3. Fostering Involvement through Activities 104 4. Involving the Family and Community 106 5. Effective Questioning Procedures 107 6. Simulations and Instructional Games 111 7. Developing Presentation and Persuasion Skills 115 8. Promoting Small Group Instruction 116 9. Individualizing Instruction Through Learning Centers 121 10. Using Computer Technology 122 11. Selected Readings 126 The Content Disciplines of Elementary Social Studies V. History: The Roots of Knowledge 1. The Discipline's Perspective 2. What K-6 Students Should Know 3. Alternative History VI . Geography: Making Sense of the Environment A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know C. Map and Globe Skills VII. Economics: Explaining Money and More A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know C. Micro-Society and Mini-Society VIII. Political Science: Government, Law, and Politics A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know C. Law-Related Education 212 IX. Psychology and Social Psychology: Understanding Ourselves A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know C. Methods for Teaching Psychology and Social Psychology X. Sociology: Exploring Contemporary Society A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know XI. Anthropology: Exploring Our Physical and Cultural Roots A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know XII. The Humanities: Artistic Interpretations of Society A. Religion in the Social Studies B. Music, Art, and Drama C. Literature in the Social Studies Special Topics and Methods XIII. Inquiry Instruction A. The Nature of Inquiry Instruction B. The Benefits of Inquiry Instruction C. Guidelines for Conducting Inquiry Lessons D. Other Forms of Inquiry XIV. Multicultural Education A. Our Multicultural Heritage and Future B. The Goals and Methods of Multicultural Education C. Racism and Sexism D. Social Class Differences E. Issues in Multicultural Education and How to Handle Them F. The Importance of Common Ground G. Guidelines for Teaching About Native Americans XV. Global Education A. World Trends Tie Us Together B. Bringing Global Education Into Your Classroom C. Global Education Resources XVI. Promoting Positive Democratic Values A. Nature of Values B. Values Education in Social Studies C. Approaches to Values Education XVII. Current Events A. The What and Why of Current Events B. Current Events in the Primary and Upper Elementary Grades C. Ways to Implement Current Events Instruction D. Problem Areas in Current Events Instruction E. Television News and Special Programs F. Specialized News Publications G. Copyright Guidelines H. Using Holidays As Current Events XVIII.Integrating Other Content Areas A. Music Activities B. Creative Art Activities C. Dramatic Activities D. Using Writing Skills E. Using Reading Skills F. Using Math Skills XIX. Resolving Differences of Opinion in the Classroom A. What Is A Difference of Opinion? B. Examples of Opinion Differences C. Why Differences of Opinion Belong In Your Room D. Guidelines for Discussing and Resolving Differences of Opinion
ESOC 6990I. Introduction To Research A. The Nature of Educational Research II. The Basics Of Educational Research A. The Research Problem B. Ethics and Research C. Variables and Hypotheses D. Reviewing the Literature E. Sampling F. Instrumentation G. Validity and Reliability H. Internal Validity III. Data Analysis A. Descriptive Statistics B. Inferential Statistics C. Statistics in Perspective IV. Research Methodologies (I) A. Experimental Research B. Single-Subject Research C. Correlational Research D. Causal-Comparative Research E. Survey Research V. Research Methodologies (II) A. Content Analysis Research B. Qualitative Research (I) C. Qualitative Research (II) D. Historical Research VI. Preparing Research Proposals And Reports A. Writing Research Proposals and Reports VII. Research By Practitioners A. Doing Research in Schools
ESOC 7080I. Background on Nature of Social Studies Curriculum II. Current Issues in Education and Social Studies Education III. Psychological and Philosophical Orientations to teaching Social Studies IV. Role of Diversity in teaching Social Studies V. Writing Curriculum to reflect local and national standards for teaching social studies VI. Composing assessment procedures that validly and reliably evaluate a curriculum
ESOC 7420The Nature and Mission of Social Studies I. The Social Studies Curriculum: Past and Present A. A Brief History of Elementary Social Studies B. Alternative Structures for K-6 Social Studies C. Official Position Statements D. The Status of K-6 Social Studies Instruction in Public Schools E. Issues in Selecting and Implementing Content II. Content in the Social Studies Curriculum A. Types of Social Studies Content a. Facts: Their Nature and Importance b. Concepts: Thought and Communication Essentials c. Main Ideas and Generalizations d. Skills e. Attitudes and Values III. Planning for Social Studies A. Lesson Plans B. Unit Teaching C. Using the Textbook D. Evaluation IV. Fostering Learner Involvement 1. Introduction 102 2. Classroom Atmosphere for Social Studies 102 3. Fostering Involvement through Activities 104 4. Involving the Family and Community 106 5. Effective Questioning Procedures 107 6. Simulations and Instructional Games 111 7. Developing Presentation and Persuasion Skills 115 8. Promoting Small Group Instruction 116 9. Individualizing Instruction Through Learning Centers 121 10. Using Computer Technology 122 11. Selected Readings 126 The Content Disciplines of Elementary Social Studies V. History: The Roots of Knowledge 1. The Discipline's Perspective 2. What K-6 Students Should Know 3. Alternative History VI. Geography: Making Sense of the Environment A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know C. Map and Globe Skills VII. Economics: Explaining Money and More A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know C. Micro-Society and Mini-Society VII. Political Science: Government, Law, and Politics A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know C. Law-Related Education 212 IX. Psychology and Social Psychology: Understanding Ourselves A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know C. Methods for Teaching Psychology and Social Psychology X. Sociology: Exploring Contemporary Society A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know XI. Anthropology: Exploring Our Physical and Cultural Roots A. The Discipline's Perspective B. What K-6 Students Should Know XII. The Humanities: Artistic Interpretations of Society A. Religion in the Social Studies B. Music, Art, and Drama C. Literature in the Social Studies Special Topics and Methods XII. Inquiry Instruction A. The Nature of Inquiry Instruction B. The Benefits of Inquiry Instruction C. Guidelines for Conducting Inquiry Lessons D. Other Forms of Inquiry XIV. Multicultural Education A. Our Multicultural Heritage and Future B. The Goals and Methods of Multicultural Education C. Racism and Sexism D. Social Class Differences E. Issues in Multicultural Education and How to Handle Them F. The Importance of Common Ground G. Guidelines for Teaching About Native Americans XV. Global Education A. World Trends Tie Us Together B. Bringing Global Education Into Your Classroom C. Global Education Resources XVI. Promoting Positive Democratic Values A. Nature of Values B. Values Education in Social Studies C. Approaches to Values Education XVII.Current Events A. The What and Why of Current Events B. Current Events in the Primary and Upper Elementary Grades C. Ways to Implement Current Events Instruction D. Problem Areas in Current Events Instruction E. Television News and Special Programs F. Specialized News Publications G. Copyright Guidelines H. Using Holidays As Current Events XVII.Integrating Other Content Areas A. Music Activities B. Creative Art Activities C. Dramatic Activities D. Using Writing Skills E. Using Reading Skills F. Using Math Skills XIX Resolving Differences of Opinion in the Classroom A. What Is A Difference of Opinion? B. Examples of Opinion Differences C. Why Differences of Opinion Belong In Your Room D. Guidelines for Discussing and Resolving Differences of Opinion
ESOC 8010Self as history The nature of history Study and writing about history, methodology The nature and role of oral history in the social studies Descriptions, definitions, and origins, beginnings of traditional history School reform, Committee of Seven, Toward social education reform Influence of social studies American Historical Association Commission on the Social Studies - 1930s, WW II Origins of the New Social Studies Another view of the social studies Historical parallels for the 1960s-1970s, primary sources and core curriculum revisited History of social studies research
EXRS 4000Since this course is an independent study of some special problem in Exercise Science, the content of the course will vary with the problem. Students will work under the direction of faculty to: 1. Submit proposal to supervising faculty member for approval. 2. Identify relevant sources of information. 3. Compile and synthesize information. 4. Write a final report.
EXRS 4960H1. Identify a research problem 2. Review the literature related to the research topic 3. Collect data to test research hypotheses 4. Write a research report
EXRS 49701. Identify a research problem 2. Review the literature related to the research topic 3. Collect data to test research hypotheses 4. Write a research report
EXRS 4970H1. Identify a research problem 2. Review the literature related to the research topic 3. Collect data to test research hypotheses 4. Write a research report
EXRS 4980H1. Identify a research problem 2. Review the literature related to the research topic 3. Collect data to test research hypotheses 4. Write a research report
EXRS 4990H1. Identify a research problem 2. Review the literature related to the research topic 3. Collect data to test research hypotheses 4. Write a research report in the form of a thesis
EXRS 6000Since this course is an independent study of some special problem in Exercise Science, the content of the course will vary with the problem. Students will work under the direction of faculty to: 1. Identify relevant sources of information or problem. 2. Compile and synthesize information or findings. 3. Write a final report.
EXRS 7300I. Thesis research topic development. II. Conduct of research. III. Data analysis. IV. Writing the thesis.
EXRS 9300I. Dissertation research topic development. II. Conduct of research. III. Data analysis. IV. Writing the dissertation.
EXRS(HPRB)(PEDS)(RLST) 71501. Nature and Purpose of Research 2. Reviewing the Literature 3. Elements of the Research Process 4. Experimental Research 5. Descriptive Research 6. Basic Statistical Concepts & Methods 7. Writing Research Reports 8. Research Article Critique
FDNS 4540/6540Opportunities in Community Nutrition Policy Making The Health Care Industry Nutrition Policy and Monitoring Community Assessment Program Planning Designing Community Interventions Nutrition Education Marketing Nutrition Programs Program Management and Grant Writing Community Nutrition in the Life Cycle Domestic Hunger and Food Assistance Programs
FDNS 4580Choosing an area to study Identifying references related to chosen area Organizing a paper Writing a paper based on references identified Edit paper after it has been critiqued by faculty advisor
FDNS 4720/6720Introduction to menu planning and menu writing Menus for special application: hotels, banquets, hospitals, and cafeterias Menus to meet specific cultural needs Service styles Nutritional calculations for menus Financial aspect of menu planning Government regulations Menu design to improve marketing
FDNS 5020Reviewing the professional literature and identification of a research problem Writing the project justification, stating the hypothesis and objectives Selecting the appropriate research methodology and designing the experiment Collecting, analyzing data and summarizing and interpreting the results Preparation and delivery of a written or oral report
FDNS 5300Choosing area of study Identifying references Improving writing skills Writing thesis Editing thesis
FDNS 8560Discussion of the content of a research proposal Review of the principles of Scientific Writing Ethical issues associated with research proposals and papers Class presentations and discussions of each section of the research proposal Review of written proposals by Thesis/Dissertation committee members Department-wide presentation of the research proposals
FDST 71001. The interrelationship of culinary arts and food science and technology. The resource available to all for food and beverage product development. 2. The basic equipment used in a professional kitchen by professional chefs and their associates. 3. Five of the 12 methods of cooking and the end characteristics that impact the food and hence the target consumer. The physical and other sensory attributes and how they are achieved. 4. The next 5 of the 12 methods of cooking and the end characteristics that impact the food and hence the target consumer. The physical and other sensory attributes and how they are achieved. 5. The remaining 2 of the 12 methods of cooking and the end characteristics that impact the food and hence the target consumer. The physical and other sensory attributes and how they are achieved. The basic culinary skill sets required to develop safe, wholesome foods. 6. Customer and distribution channels affect recipe development. Term project progress. Shelf life of food products and how they are affected by formulation. 7. The process of culinary new food product development in the context of all new food and beverage product development. 8. How to write a recipe. Ingredients and components. The principles of balance in food composition to achieve quality, safety, nutritional value. The attributes that must be achieved in a recipe/formulation. 9. Crucial steps in the development of a protocept; the role of the “Gold Standard” and food scientists’ and technologists’ relationship to it. 10. Key culinary action points in the iterative process. 11. Scaling up the recipe and to a commercial process; the chef’s role. Food safety and its incorporation into the culinary experience. 12. The Scale Up phase and food scientist/technologist role as guardian of the Gold Standard.
FDST 8910Special Requirements: Students have to attend a resume writing and interview practice workshop sponsored by the University Career Center before applying for the internship program. An approval letter from the Center is required before registration for the course. Students are required to turn in a term paper regarding the experience of the intership. Students are required to give an oral presentation during a scheduled departmental seminar session describing their intern experience. The student's immediate supervisor during the internship will complete and submit a performance evaluation.
FORS 5250/72501. Introduction to the culture of the country(ies) to be visited. 2. Basic wildlife management issues of that country. 3. Introduction to local ecosystems including plants and animals. 4. Identification of several key wildlife management problems. 5. American and local perspectives on ways to address problems. 6. Short-term field research project. 7. Collection of field data. 8. Write-up. 9. Presentation and class discussion of issues.
FORS 84701. Introduction to the concepts of self-referencing modeling, review of its applications and relevant approaches, sample practical applications in forestry and other environmental sciences. Review of mathematical, statistical, and computational tools relevant to the subject. 2. The Generalized Algebraic Difference Approach and its advantages; a. Work on a simple practical example based on a published paper. The exercises will include: i. critical review of an example journal paper; ii. addressing problems identified in the paper; iii. analysis of model flexibility and its implications on modeled dynamics; iv. calibrating dynamic equations that can replace the published fixed- base-age equations and solve their limitations with respect to the unobservable variable solutions; v. preparation of a report summarizing the progress in class and demonstrating students’ work that improves on the studied models in terms of the applied algebra and model functionality. 3. The stochastic parameter estimation in the self- referencing functions; a. Following up on the above example but this time looking into the differences in curve shapes caused by different methods of parameter estimation. The exercises will include: i. fitting the same models as in the original paper to the original data from the example paper, using both the traditional base-age specific methods for different base ages and the advanced stochastic methods; ii. fitting to the above data the models from 1. using both fitting techniques; iii. discussing differences and considering the same points as in 1. iv. writing up a report on the results, which improves on the parameter estimation of the original work. 4. A model development using the two above methodologies. a. Time permitting students will work on a real example of complete model development using the studied equations as a starting point example, which would include: i. data preparation and screening; ii. fitting the models using stochastic regression analysis of different model forms and comparison of their performance; and iii. derivation of new model forms that would address the specific data characteristics.
FREN 2001 In-class conversation and discussions to develop strategies of communication in speaking and listening. Readings from magazines, literary works, and a variety of sources on a variety of topics to provide students with information for in-class discussions and compositions. Writing in French to further knowledge of oneself and one's culture and of French speakers and their cultures. Review of principles of French grammar.
FREN 2002In-class conversation and discussion to develop strategies of communication in speaking and listening. Readings from magazines, literary works, and a variety of sources on a variety of topics to provide students with information for in-class discussions and compositions. Writing in French to further knowledge of oneself and one's culture and of French speakers and their cultures. Review of principles of French grammar.
FREN 8300Topics will vary within period. Some major topics and/or authors will be: The Baroque, Classicism, Mysticism, Theatre, the Novel, Religious writing, Libertinism, Feminine thought and writing, etc... All the major 17th century authors are eligible to be included in the seminar: Malherbe, Regnier, d'Urfe, Scudery, Viau, St-Amant, Malherbe, Scarron, Cyrano, Descartes, Pascal, Mme de Lafayette, Mme de Villedieu, Corneille, Racine, Moliere, Boileau, Boussuet, Fenelon, Mme d'Aulnoy, and many more.
FREN 8400Topics will vary within period. Some major topics and/or authors will be: Genres: the novel, theatre, poetry The Philosophes, the Enlightenment, Feminine thought and writing, Sentimentalism, etc. Marivaux, Lesage, Montesquieu, Diderot, Voltaire, Rousseau, Laclos, Sade, B. de Saint-Pierre, Buffon, Mme de Graffigny, Mme Riccoboni, Mme de Charriere.
FREN 8700 Topics will vary depending on which area of francophone culture will be studied. Topics for such a course could be: Women writers in Martinique since the Second World War, or it could be a monographic course on one author like Maryse Cond‚.
FREN(LING) 3090 I. Chronological survey of the history of the French language organized according to ten time periods: before the Indo-Europeans, the time of the Gauls, the time of the Barbarian invasions, the Christian period, the Viking incursions, the growth of dialects, the rise of francien, the period of codification, the rise of public instruction, and the rise of the media. II. Structure of the French language: sounds and spelling, forms in speaking and writing, vocabulary. III. Linguistic Variation: regional languages within France, regional varieties of French within France, francophone areas outside of France, and ongoing changes in the French language.
FRES 1010 First-year seminars will introduce freshmen to senior faculty, to academic programs, and to higher education at the University of Georgia. They will give interested first-year students an opportunity to meet directly with senior faculty on a regular basis to learn about their interests and research. In turn, faculty will be able to meet informally with students new to the university and to discuss with them their particular fields of interest. We would seek to offer a diverse range of topics taught by faculty from across the College, and because enrollment in seminars would be voluntary, and because students would select topics that interested them, we hope would that those who enroll in each class would be attentive and motivated. For some students these seminars might serve as an entry to the major. Seminars will meet one hour per week on the semester system. Class size will be limited to 15 students. Classes will involve at least one significant writing assignment and a reading, research, or creative project. They will be taught primarily by senior tenure-track faculty on a seminar basis, especially as informal discussion groups. Enrollment will be open to freshmen only. Seminars will count towards the required number of graduation hours but will not satisfy other requirements. Grading will be on a Pass/Fail basis. Faculty who volunteer to teach these one-hour seminars will do so in addition to their normal teaching load. Seminar teaching will be evaluated as instruction when raises are determined at the end of each year. Distinguished researchers who are also distinguished teachers will be especially encouraged to offer seminars. Faculty will propose seminar topics to department heads or directors during the fall preceding the academic year when the seminar will be taught. Department heads or directors will forward recommended topics to a faculty Freshman Seminar Committee, which will evaluate proposals. The committee will approve a list of seminar topics that will be published in descriptive form and made available to advisors and to freshmen at orientation. The committee will approve topics that are innovative, stimulating, creative, significant in substance, and directly related to the faculty member's areas of expertise and interest--though they may also relate to a developing area of interest rather than a previously established one. Interdisciplinary topics will be especially encouraged, and team-teaching will be permissible. The committee will not approve topics that seem "dumbed" down for a freshman audience. Preference will be given to seminar topics proposed by faculty with both distinguished teaching and research records.
FRES 1020 FRES 1020 is parallel to FRES 1010, the only difference being that FRES 1020 will be taught as a traditionally graded, A through F course. First-year seminars will introduce freshmen to senior faculty, to academic programs, and to higher education at the University of Georgia. They will give interested first-year students an opportunity to meet directly with senior faculty on a regular basis to learn about their interests and research. In turn, faculty will be able to meet informally with students new to the university and to discuss with them their particular fields of interest. We would seek to offer a diverse range of topics taught by faculty from across the College, and because enrollment in seminars would be voluntary, and because students would select topics that interested them, we hope would that those who enroll in each class would be attentive and motivated. For some students these seminars might serve as an entry to the major. Seminars will meet one hour per week on the semester system. Class size will be limited to 15 students. Classes will involve at least one significant writing assignment and a reading, research, or creative project. They will be taught primarily by senior tenure-track faculty on a seminar basis, especially as informal discussion groups. Enrollment will be open to freshmen only. Seminars will count towards the required number of graduation hours but will not satisfy other requirements. Grading will be on an A/F basis. Faculty who volunteer to teach these one-hour seminars will do so in addition to their normal teaching load. Seminar teaching will be evaluated as instruction when raises are determined at the end of each year. Distinguished researchers who are also distinguished teachers will be especially encouraged to offer seminars. Faculty will propose seminar topics to department heads or directors during the fall preceding the academic year when the seminar will be taught. Department heads or directors will forward recommended topics to a faculty Freshman Seminar Committee, which will evaluate proposals. The committee will approve a list of seminar topics that will be published in descriptive form and made available to advisors and to freshmen at orientation. The committee will approve topics that are innovative, stimulating, creative, significant in substance, and directly related to the faculty member's areas of expertise and interest--though they may also relate to a developing area of interest rather than a previously established one. Interdisciplinary topics will be especially encouraged, and team-teaching will be permissible. The committee will not approve topics that seem "dumbed" down for a freshman audience. Preference will be given to seminar topics proposed by faculty with both distinguished teaching and research records.
GEOG 6910Week 1. Introduction; University and departmental degree requirements; Departmental and university resources; and UGA's electronic thesis and dissertation requirement. Week 2. Research design: Elements of inquiry; Approaches to research; and Research conceptualization. Week 3. Developing the research problem; Ethical issues to anticipate; Case studies in ethics; and use of human subjects (IRB requirements). Week 4. Problem identification: Literature sources; Dissertation Abstracts; Social Science Index; Science Citation Index and Web- based resources. Weeks 5/6. Developing the statement of purpose; Critical thinking in evaluating the literature of geography. Weeks 7/8/9. Selecting the appropriate methodology: qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods. Week 10. Relevancy: How will this project make a contribution to the discipline of geography? An examination of current trends in geographic research. Week 11. Sources of funding: Where the money is? Grant writing and the application process. The grant review process. Week 12. Developing the biographical sketch, professional curriculum vitae, and other forms of communication documents. Week 13. The professional interview: an examination of what goes right and what goes wrong. Preparation and guidelines for developing the research proposal. Weeks 14/15. Research proposal: writing and evaluation; Formal presentation of proposal.
GEOL 8100Components and design of the JEOL 8600 Superprobe. Generation and columnation of an electron beam. SEM, Secondary Electron, and Chemical Map images. Generation of characteristics X-ray spectra. Diffraction of X-rays by crystalline structures. Roland circle geometry. X-ray detectors, WDS and EDS systems. Analysis of X-ray spectra. Background, overlap, and matrix effects correction algorithms. Development of analytical routines. Quantitative analysis of various minerals. Qualitative identification and characterization of minerals. Two dimensional X-ray imaging and chemical mapping. Image analysis and digital layering of chemical and image data. Student research projects. Ion probe and micro-isotopic and trace element analysis. Laser probe techniques. Week 1. Components of the JEOL 8600. Start up and operation of the 8600. Week 2. Columnation of the electron beam. Control of beam voltage, beam current, beam size, position and intensity. Stigmation controls. Week 3. Generation of characteristic X-ray spectrum. Observation of X-ray spectrum using the Si(Li) detector and EDS system. Qualitative identification of elements from their characteristic X-ray spectrum. Week 4. Diffraction of X-rays by crystallanine structures. The Bragg equation. Use of analyzing crystals to disperse characteristic X-ray patterns. Week 5. Quantitative measurement of characteristic X-rays using WDS spectrometers with scintilation and gas-flow detectors. The geometry of the Roland focusing geometry. Design and care of WDS systems. Week 6. Quantitative correction of X-ray spectra. Background and interference corrections. Bence-Albee, ZAF, and Phi-Rho-Zi correction algorithms. Week 7. Special correction procedures. Internal reference standards. Analysis of light elements. Volatilization versus element migration within the sample. Variations in elment diffusion rates with crystal structure. Week 8. Development of analytic standards. End-member element and oxide standards. Procedures for developing natural mineral standards. Design of synthetic standards. Choice of standards for various analytical scenarios. Week 9. Writing of analytical routines on the JEOL 8600 software system. Determining order of elemental analyses. Choosing crystal and detector systems for optimum analytical accuracy and precision. Week 10. Analysis of various geologic materials from feldspar to amphibole. Special problems. Week 11. Generation of X-ray maps. Use of X-ray maps to choose quantitative analysis positions. Use of chemical maps for navigation. Colorizing systems and their optimization. Imaging of zoned minerals. Week 12. Other microchemical techniques. Laser probe for isotopic analysis. Ion probe for light element, trace element, and isotopic analysis. Week 13 through 15. Independent research on term project of the students own design. Weekly meetings to discuss progress and solve analytical problems encountered.
GRMN 35501. Germany after the fall of the wall: issues of reunification 2. Germany and the EU in the 21st century 3. Political parties: platforms, issues and elections 4. Higher education in Germany: Recent reforms and repercussions 5. Mass media in Germany: trends and issues 6. The German cinema: historical background and recent developments 7. Contemporary authors: women and minority writers
GRMN 36251. Gender and Representation 2. What is "women's writing"? 3. Literature and Politics after WWII 4. The New Women's Movement 5. Women, peace, and environmentalism 6. Body politics 7. Coming to terms with German history 8. Gender, literature, and politics in unified Germany
GRMN 43101. Survey of political developments; the French Revolution 2. Writings of the German Storm and Stress 3. Pre-revolutionary political writings 4. A case study in absolutism: the state of Württemberg 5. Travel writings about the French Revolution 6. The Mainz Republic (Georg Forster) and the Siege of Mainz (J. W. Goethe) 7. Friedrich Schiller's post-revolutionary aesthetics 8. German nationalism and the "Kulturnation" 9. Political and literary alternatives to German Classicism
GRMN 4710Introduction to Austria: geography, population, the Austrian language, major historical periods and achievements Franz Joseph I: readings by Joseph Roth The imperial culture: the Viennese Waltz and the Radetzy- Marsch Arthur Schnitzler: fin-de-siecle writer (Liebelei) Hugo von Hofmannsthal: selected poems and short prose Kaffeehaus literature: Peter Altenberg and Polgar Viennese Impressionism: Leopold Andrian The rise of psychoanalysis: Sigmund Freud Viennese music culture: 1.Viennese classical music (Mozart, Schubert, Beethoven, the Strauss dynasty) 2. the second Viennese School under Schoenberg The rise and fall of the Austrian empire (1918) Schnitzler, Leutnant Gustl Anti-Semitism and the founding of Zionism: Theodor Herzl Expressionist Literature: the poetry of Georg Trakl Aphorisms and the work of Karl Kraus Stefan Zweig and the rise of National Socialism
GRMN(CMLT) 8490Beginnings: Historical roots of the Frankfurt School, main representatives Importance of the Frankfurt School for literary studies and German studies Defining traditional theory vs. Critical Theory Literary interpretation before the Frankfurt School Rewriting genre: The essay Homelessness and the novel The dialectic between reason and myth: From Homer to the Frankfurt School Literature, culture, and society The fate of modernity: Techonology and the culture industry Interdisciplinarity: Image and text in the Weimar Republic The response to Fascism The Frankfurt School in exile The second- and third-generation Frankfurt School The legacy of Critical Theory today
GRMN(LING) 75001. National Standards 2. Teaching for communication 3. Teaching the spoken language 4. Teaching grammar 5. Theories and methods 6. Textbooks 7. Texts and contexts: listening and reading 8. Audio and video 9. The World Wide Web 10. Stories and discourses 11. Teaching literature 12. Teaching culture 13. Writing and composing 14. Assessment
GRMN(LING) 84001. Germanic / Old High German 2. History of the term deutsch 3. Socio-cultural background of early MHG period 4. Early MHG texts 5. Phonology 6. Morphology 7. Text samples, manuscripts, critical editions and writing conventions 8. Socio-cultural background of classic MHG courtly literature. 9. Syntax 10. Semantics and Vocabulary 11. Poetics and Aesthetics 12. Prose, scholasticism and mysticism.
HACE 8050Proposal writing process Advanced topics in research design in housing and consumer economics Experimental designs Quasi-experimental designs Ex post facto designs Cross-sectional Panel designs Advanced measurement issues in research in housing and consumer economics Applications of data analysis in conjunction with research design and measurement Putting it all together--the research proposal
HIPR 6025Determing Your career: Your career priorities: professional expertise in your field financial rewards: salary, bonus,etc friendship with co-workers training and continued development pragmatism, practice knowledge health care, retirement other benefits status and prominence of reputation dedicated hard working colleagues ethics and social responsibility of employer spirituality pace of work, neatness, georgraphic location variety of activities, duration of projects autonomy vs. teamwork personal integrity willingness to take direction vs. empowerment practical, tangible interpretations tradeoffs and paradoxes vs. unifying concepts Occupational interests: sales, law, public service, teaching, writing, science and engineering, finance, management, accounting, merchandising, social service, health services, art and music, public performance, skilled trades, programming Lessons from experience: key decisions behind career moves people who were major influences cuases of prior setbacks sources of resilience from setbacks criteria defining past successes
HIPR 6510Lecture, research, demonstrations and large group disucssion and debate will form the core of the instructional method. These will be supplemented by assignments in funding proposal development and economic data research. Class Topic- overview, economic factors, benefits of historic preservation, economics research, preservation partnership, non-profit management, development, grantsmanship,grantwriting, how its done, and why preserve: Week 1-15: Introduction evolution of Planning Trends and the Impact upon Preservation Economics Overall Economic Benefits of Historic Preservation Historical Preservation as an Economic Development tool. Economics of Rehabilitation vs new construction Case study rehabilitation vs new construction Base valuation techniques, discussion of assignment and group presentaiton assisgnment Historic Preservation and building economics, Community benefits of historic preservation, impact on retail sales, property values and employment, revolving funds Adaptive reuse. Historic preservation vs urban sprawl. new urbanism Guest speakers - Presentations on recovery preservation and fund raising efforts Grant proposals Heritage tourism-economic and physical factors Construction schedules, budgets and financing options for adaptive use projects Preparation for group presentations Group presentations "Opportunities and Issues in the 21st century with Preservation Economics"
HIPR 7300Students are expected to develop reserach objectives and to fulfill these objectives wtih the help of a working outline and writing calendar. The student will be responsible for the majority of the work on an individual, self-driven basis, with the major professor providing guidance and direction as required. The outline of the writing calendar will be determined by the student and major professor in consultation.
HIST 4020/6020Part I: The Fruits of Nature 1. Food and History 2. Consuming Food, Consuming Colonies 3. Cultivating the American Garden 4. California Land of Sunshine, Land of Empire 5. Hunting Subsistence or Sport? 6. Conservation and "Crimes against Nature" Part II: Feeding the City 1. Market Gardening, or, Why New Jersey Is Called the "Garden State" 2. Food and Identity in Industrial America 3. Beef - Why Is It for Dinner? 4. Industrial Steers and the Modern Beef Empire 5. Writing 101 6. "Woman Slaps Butcher with Beefsteak" 7. "Putting the Babies above the Bordens" 8. How Frozen Orange Juice Became America's Breakfast Drink 9. Convenience Foods and "Modern-Day Living" Part III: Industrial Landscapes at Home and Abroad 1. "Every Farm a Factory" 2. The "Chicken of Tomorrow" 3. Class in the Countryside 4. The Politics of Industrial Health 5. The Green Revolution: Exporting the Industrial Ideal 6. Food Power in the Global Economy 7. Biotechnology and the New Food Regime 8. Organic Foods and the Supermarket Pastoral 9. Wal-Mart vs. Whole Foods
HIST 4040/6040Here are the assigned books and a course outline from a previous installation fo this class. The readings and films will change every semester, but the information below still provides a glimpse of what we will do in Working Class America. Bryant Simon Course Schedule: Week One: -- Introduction to Film and Labor History 9/15 -- Course Introduction -- Go Over the Syllabus 9/16 -- What is History? 9/17 -- Reading Day -- Read Sinclair, The Jungle 9/18 -- Film and History Reading: Rosenstone, "Like Writing History Like Lightening" (CP) 9/19 -- Film Workshop -- Watch Paterson in Class Week Two: -- Industrialization and the American Working Class 9/22 -- Film and History Workshop -- Watch 1877: Grand Army of Starvation 9/23 -- Overview of American Industrialization 9/24 -- Immigration and the Formation of the American Working-Class 9/25 -- Reading Day 9/26 -- Reading Day -- Finish Sinclair, The Jungle Week Three: -- Shop Floor Lives (View Modern Times) 9/29 -- Discuss The Jungle *MEMO IDEA* Imagine that you are making a film of the Jungle? How would you film the opening scene? Literally what would be the first thing that the viewer sees or hears? Remember film is a multi-dimensional medium. (Note opening scenes are crucial. They often set the tone for the whole film.) 9/30 -- Set up Modern Times: Scientific Management Reading: B & L, 318-23. 10/1 -- Set up Modern Times: Fordism Reading: B & L, 333-44. 10/2 -- Film Lab -- Begin reading BELL!!!! 10/3 -- Film Lab Week Four: Union Building -- A Difficult Task (View Matewan) 10/6 -- Discuss Modern Times *MEMO IDEA* Think about how the film portrays the relationships between science and labor, and workers and management? Is this a pro-labor film? If so, how? What are the politics of this film? 10/7 -- What is a Union? What does it do? Reading: B & L, 231-32, 234-35, 236-39. 10/8 -- Why Strike? 10/9 -- Film Lab -- Read BELL!!!! 10/10 -- Discussion of Matewan -- Why the Union Failed? Readings: Brier, "A History Film Without Much History" (CP) Sayles, "Thinking in Pictures" (CP) Week Five: -- There is Power in the Union: The Growth American Unions -- (View Salt of the Earth) 10/13 -- Unions, 1919-1935 Reading: B & L, 236-39 10/14 -- Unions, 1935-1950 Reading: Wehrle, "Labor Comes Into is Own" (CP) B & L, 362-69, 415-23, 428-49 10/15 -- Discuss Bell No memo, but think about what roles that work, family, and the union play in the lives of each generation in Out of This Furnace. How is the book structured? Do you think the generational approach is a useful one to understanding the past? If so, why? If not, why not? 10/16 -- Film Lab 10/17 -- Discuss Salt of the Earth Readings: NYT 15 March 1954; 1 February 1980 (CP) Miller, "Salt of the Earth Revisited" (CP) *MEMO IDEA* Compare the results of the strike in Matewan with the one portrayed in Salt of the Earth. How do the trade unionists in Salt of the Earth win their strike? What makes a strike successful? What role do the family members of strikers play in strikes? Can you have a successful strike without community involvement? Also how do these films deal with gender and race. Week Six: -- The Union and Power: Postwar Labor History (On the Waterfront) 10/20 -- The American Standard of Living: Postwar Working-Class History Readings: B & L, 423-28 10/21 -- Union Corruption? Much to do About What? Readings: Raskin, "Why they Cheer for Hoffa?" (CP) PROPOSAL FOR FINAL PROJECT DUE 10/22 -- Film Lab -- START READING HAMPER, RIVETHEAD 10/23 -- Film Lab 10/24 -- Discuss On the Waterfront *MEMO IDEA* Read Biskind. Is On the Waterfront about labor or McCartyism or both? Explain. What does it say about the relationship between workers and their unions? What is the relationship between corruption and unions? Why is this an attractive subject to film-makers? Readings: Biskind, "The Politics of Power in On the Waterfront" (CP) B & L, 497-99, 506-10 Week Seven -- The Southern Story (Norma Rae) 10/27 -- Is the South different from the rest of the country? Reading: Simon, "Why Are There So Few Unions in the South?" (CP) 10/28 --"Uprising of ‘34" Reading: Hall, Korstad, and Leloudis, "Cotton Mill People" (CP) 10/29 -- Film Lab -- Read Hamper, Rivethead 10/30 -- Film Lab 10/31 -- Discuss Norma Rae Readings: Goldfarb and Iiyashov, "Working-Class Hero" (CP) *MEMO IDEA* How is the South portrayed in the film? How are southern attitudes towards unions depicted? Why does the union succeed in Norma Rae? How does this film relate to your own experiences? If you are southern were you raised to be suspicious of unions? If you grew up outside the South were you raised to be suspicious of the South? Week Eight -- Representations of Race and Class in Postwar America (View Blue Collar) -- Note -- This week we will watch the film on Tuesday night at the screening room on the seventh floor of the library. 11/3 -- The American Dream? 11/4 -- Blue Collar Blues -- Discuss Rivethead 11/5 -- Discuss Blue Collar *MEMO IDEA* How does class shape the relationships in the film? How does race shape the relationships in the film? Which one is more important? Race or class? Can these two things be separated? 11/6 -- Film Lab 11/7 -- Film Lab Week Eight: -- Women at Work (View 9 to 5) 11/10 -- A History of Women at Work 11/11 -- Gender Issue at Work: Women’s Work Culture Reading: B & L, 258-73, 546-53, 567-78, 11/12 -- Pink Collar and Homework 11/13 -- Film Lab 11/14 -- Discuss 9 to 5 Reading: NYT, 12/19/80 (CP) *MEMO IDEA* Think about the ending of the film. What does this say about the issues of gender and work raised by the story? Does this cut against the grain of the rest of the film? Week Ten: -- De-Industrialization (American Dream) 11/17 -- Archie Bunker and Working-Class Conservatism 11/18 -- Bruce Springsteen and Rust Belt America Reading: Lyrics to "My Hometown" and "Youngstown" (CP) B & L, 587-90, 594-96, 648-51 11/19 -- Roger and Me 11/20 -- Film Lab 11/21 -- Discuss American Dream Reading: Gary Crowdus and Richard Porton, "American Dream: An Interview with Barbara Kopple" (CP) Roger Horowitz, Review of American Dream, AHR, (CP) *MEMO IDEA* -- What is the American Dream? Which way for organized labor? What is the future of organized labor in America? Should it have a future? Have unions outlived their usefulness? Why? Why not?
HIST 4070/6070- Jeffersonian-Hamiltonian Politics - War of 1812 - Era of Good Feelings - Jacksonian Democracr - Slavery and Abolitionism - Morthern Urbanization/Industrialism - Manifest Destiny/Westward Expansion - Mexican War - Sectional Crisis COURSE REQUIREMENTS - Two exams: midterm and final - Quizes and in-class writing assignments based on assigned readings - Research paper (12 to 15 pp.) - Attendance and class participation ASSIGNED READINGS (subject to change) McCoy, "The Elusive Republic" Watson, "Liberty and Power" Perdue, "Cherokee Removal" Stowe, "Uncle Tom's Cabin" Lerda, "The Grimke Sisters"
HIST 4070H- Emergence of First party system - Jeffersonian republicanism, Hamiltonian economic system - Role of the Judiciary - War of 1812 - Jacksonian Democracy - Slavery and Abolitionism - Urbanization, Immigration, Industrialism - Reform movements - Manifest Destiny/Westward Expansion - Mexican War - Sectional Crisis COURSE REQUIREMENTS - Two exams: midterm and final - Research paper (12 to 15 pp.) - short writing assignments based on readings - Attendance and class participation ASSIGNED READINGS (subject to change) McCoy, "The Elusive Republic" Ellis, "Founding Brothers" Ulrich, "Midwife's Tale" Watson, "Liberty and Power" Mintz, "Moralists and Modernizers" Perdue, "Cherokee Removal" Packet with primary sources
HIST 4376HTopic 1. Theories of Origins Before Darwin I. People think, and as such have always wondered about how the universe and things in it originated, particularly themselves. A. The earliest stories, myths and writings contain accounts of gods creating the world, the heavens, people, animals and plants. B. The account set forth in Genesis carries particular importance to Jews, Christians and Moslems because they accept that account as gospel – the revealed word of God. C. Science began with the ancient Greeks, and Greek natural philosophers speculated about evolution.. II. Notions of evolution, or creation by natural law, revived during the Enlightenment. III. French naturalist Georges Cuvier founded modern comparative anatomy, paleontology and historical geology based on empirical research during the early 1800s. Cuvier’s theories allowed Christians to reconcile the fossil record with the Genesis account by equating the days of creation with geological ages, with God recreating life after each catastrophe. The intelligent design of each species proved God’s existence and goodness. Topic 2: Evolution in the Air I. The idea of organic evolution was in the air by the early 1800s. Many factor contributed to this development within Western science. A. The emerging fossil record played a major role in this development. B. Widespread acceptance of Pierre Simon Laplace’s nebular hypothesis established an evolutionary view of cosmic origins as early as the late 1700s. II. In 1802, a French naturalists, the chevalier de Lamarck, outlined the first comprehensive theory of organic evolution. A. A strict materialist, Lamarck believed in the ongoing spontaneous generation of simple living organisms through the active invention of a natural life force corresponding to electricity or the nervous fluids. B. This natural life force or energy continues to act in organism after they were formed, driving them to develop ever complex forms. C. The current array of species was not fixed, Lamarck maintained, but rather a snapshot of development over time, with less complex organisms being younger and more complex ones older. D. Overshadowed by Cuvier, Lamarck’s superior within the French natural history museum, the Lamarckian theory of evolution gained little attention and even less acceptance. Cuvier saw sharp breaks in the fossil record, not gradual development; no evidence of species changing over time; and the impermanence of acquired characteristics. III. In 1844, British writer Robert Chambers popularized the idea of organic evolution in an anonymously published treatise. The scientific reaction to Chamber’s theory drove Charles Darwin, who was already privately at work on his theory of evolution, to tighten and improve his ideas before announcing them. IV. The acceptance of a Uniformitarian view of geologic history provided further critical foundation for the emergence of scientific theories of organic evolution. A. Neptunism dominated geological thought during the early 1800s. B. In 1795, Scottish naturalist James Hutton published his rival theory of steady-state Vucanism. C. Beginning in the 1830s, the gentleman-naturalist Charles Lyell reworked Hutton’s theory into modern uniformitarianism. Topic 3: Darwin’s Inspiration I. Charles Darwin entered the scientific debate over origins inconspicuously. His experience about the Beagle changed the course of intellectual history. II. Returning to England in 1836, Darwin assumed the life of a gentleman naturalist, living first in Cambridge and London, and then at a country home with his growing family. Although his research seemingly dealt with various topics, it all related to his obsession to understand how evolution worked. III. Darwin’s breakthrough came in 1838, while reading Thomas Malthus’s well-known 1798 essay on population. A. Malthus was a gloomy Anglican cleric who maintained that the human population far outstripped the food supply, so that only the fittest can or should survive. His social thinking was popular among rising Whig capitalists of Darwin’s class. B. Applying Malthus’s theory to all living things, Darwin struck upon a purely materialistic mechanism that he believed capable of driving the evolutionary process: natural selection. C. Darwin composed a first draft of his theory in 1842 and a second in 1844, yet he kept his idea secret from virtually everyone. He published seven book of basic science during the years from 1842 to 1857, but nothing about evolution. IV. Darwin was shocked out his self-impose intellectual exile by he receipt in 1858 of an essay from Alfred Russel Wallace outlining the theory of natural selection. A. From a poor family in rural England, Wallace had developed a passion for natural history, particularly the study of beetles. He became a paid collector of natural-history specimen in the Amazon valley and East Indies. B. Driven to get his evidence for evolution by natural selection before scientists and other educated readers as soon as possible, Darwin worked furiously to complete his classic book, On the Origin of Species, in 1859. This book revolutionized biological thought. Topic 4: An Intellectual Revolution I. Darwin wrote his 1859 masterpiece, On the Origin of Species, to persuade scientists and educated readers that evolution was a better explanation for the origin of species than creation, and that natural selection was a plausible mechanism for driving the process. II. Darwin’s theory dealt a body blow to traditional Western religious thought. A. Darwin’s chronology and outline of for the origin of species differed on its face from that set forth in the Genesis account. B. Darwin’s exceeded Cuvier and Lyell in dispensing with the need for a creator to fashion individual species. C. Darwin’s theory undermined natural theology, which had become a mainstay of Protestant Christianity. D. Although Darwin consciously avoided the issue of human origins in Origin of Species, to the extent that his theory of evolution applied to man, it also threatened deeply entrenched religious and philosophical opinions on human uniqueness and dignity. III. Scientific, religious and popular debate swirled over the applicability of evolution to the origin of humans. A. The central issue concerned the origin of man’s mental and moral attributes, not whether his physical body had evolved. B. Darwin equivocated on the matter in Origin of Species but announce for the materialistic origins of humans from simian ancestors in his 1871 book, Descent of Man. C. Even such loyal supporters as Charles Lyell and Alfred Russel Wallace broke with Darwin over the evolution of man. Both maintained that humans were simply too different from other animals for those differences to have evolved by chance variations. Topic 5: Debates over Mechanisms I. The theory of organic evolution (i.e., that species descend from prior species) quickly found near universal acceptance among American and European scientists. II. The theory of evolution raised a host of interesting new questions that quickly came to dominate the research agenda of field naturalists and laboratory biologists. A. The best scientific evidence for evolution came from highly technical studies of morphological relationships among species. B. Microscopists, particularly in Germany, sought evidence of evolution in the study of animal embryos. C. Bio-geographers followed Alfred Russel Wallace in giving an evolutionary interpretation to the geographic distribution of species. D. With limited success, paleontologists began filling out the evolutionary tree of life with discoveries from the fossil record. Pointing to these finds, American paleontologist Edward Drinker Cope in 1872 declared evolution an “ascertained fact.” III. Even as the theory of evolution gained acceptance during the 1860s and 1870s, doubts grew as to the sufficiency of natural selection alone to drive the process. A. Evidence and interpretations mounted against natural selection. B. Four main alternatives to classical Darwinism emerged. C. These alternatives potentially fit the scientific evidence for the occurrence of evolution without all the religious and philosophical consequences of natural selection. Theistic evolution and orthogenesis were particularly compatible with a spiritual view. D. By 1900, natural selection had been so discredited that few scientists accepted it as the mechanism of evolution. By all accounts, however, they all accepted the so-called “fact” that species evolve. Topic 6: Missing Links I. Fossil have long been both a principle basis for and barrier against belief in evolution. A. Georges Cuvier’s early work with fossils suggested that species generally remain constant throughout their life and are replaced quite suddenly by significantly different forms. Ever since, this pattern has been used as evidence against evolution. B. In arguing for uniformitarianism in geology, Charles Lyell countered that fossils were only laid down intermittently – so that discontinuities proved nothing. To him, the progressive order of the fossil record suggested gradual change rather than catastrophes. C. Building on Lyell, Darwin devoted a chapter in Origin of Species to showing that (despite notable gaps) the overall outline of the fossil record supports his theory. D. During the late 1800s, paleontologists culled the fossil record for evidence of evolutionary development. E. To the extent that some scientists and many non-scientists continued to reject the theory of evolution in the 1890s, their opposition focused on the issue of human evolution. The absence of hominid fossils became a stumbling block to popular acceptance of evolution. II. Darwin and other evolutionists never claimed that humans descended from apes. Rather, they believed that modern humans and modern apes had a common ancestor. III. Dutch physician Eugene Dubois set out to “prove” evolution by finding fossil evidence of the missing link between apes and humans. He abandoned a promising academic career and, with his young family in tow, became an army physician in the Dutch East Indies, where he found the first know hominid fossils, which became known as “Java Man.” IV. Beginning in the 1920s and increasingly in the last half of the 20th century, fossil evidence of human evolution captured the popular imagination. A. At first, these fossils came from South Africa. B. Beginning in 1929, more fossils like those from Java were found in China, with the group later re-classified as Homo erectus, an early human type. C. Beginning in the 1950s, East Africa became the primary source of early hominid fossils. D. The evolutionary tree for humans is now as complete as for any type of animals, and it fits a Darwinian pattern. Upright posture came first, presumably because it had survival value in a changing environment, then bigger brains and tool use. E. New finds of hominid fossils still generate front-page news around the world. As DuBois predicted, these fossils now serve as the best-known evidence for evolution. Topic 7: Genetics Enters the Picture I. By 1900, divisions among evolutionists over how evolution operated seemed irreconcilable. A. classic Darwinism, which envisioned the natural selection of minute, random, inborn variations of an essentially continuous nature, was widely dismissed as leading nowhere. B. Lamarckism, the principle alternative, encountered increasing objections. C. Around 1900, Dutch botanist Hugo De Vries offered mutation theory as a possible compromise explanation for the evolution of new species. II. Mendelian genetics would provide the basis for reviving Darwinian theories of evolution. A. During the 1860s, Gregor Mendel (an Austrian monk with an interest in natural history) experimented with the idea of new species as hybrids of old ones. He tested this by crossing distinctly different varieties of pea plants. B. Although Mendel’s laws were initially associated with major discontinuous variations (or mutations) rather than small continuous ones, their critical significance for salvaging Darwinism ultimately became clear. C. Although Mendelian geneticists at first operated in isolation from Darwinian naturalists, their ideas would come together in the neo-Darwinian synthesis of the 1930s. Topic 8: Social Darwinism and Eugenics I. Coined by its critics, the term “Social Darwinism” gained currency during the Victorian Era as a catch-all phrase to identify various utilitarian philosophies and policies that attributed human progress to unfettered competition among individuals. II. For many late 19th century Europeans and Americans, the most important area of competition was between races and among nations. Social Darwinism was invoked to justify Western imperialism, colonialism, militarism and scientific racism. III. Combined with Mendelian genetics, social Darwinism led to the eugenics movement. A. Shortly after Darwin published Origin of Species, his cousin, Francis Galton, conceived of applying its teachings to human development. B. Eugenics attracted widespread interest after the 1900 rediscovery of Mendelian genetics. C. Except for the Catholic Church, opposition to eugenics was disorganized and ineffective until the late 1930s, when Nazi practices discredited all such efforts. Topic 9: America’s Anti-Evolution Crusade I. Conservative Christians had never liked the Darwinian theory of human evolution. Their long-simmering concern boiled over during the 1920s into a crusade against teaching it in public schools. II. Beginning in 1922, William Jennings Bryan transformed this religious dispute into a national political battle, leading to the 1925 Tennessee law against teaching evolution. III. The initial attention attracted by the new Tennessee statute expanded into a media frenzy when, six weeks after it became law, John Scopes was indicted for violating it. A. From its bazaar beginnings to its inconclusive conclusion, the Scopes trial was never a normal criminal prosecution. B. Both sides in the larger controversy saw the pending trial as an opportunity to make their case to the general public. It became a show trial for all concerned. C. The eight-day trial was largely anticlimactic as each side made its familiar arguments. Neither side disputed that Scopes had violated the law and the court foreclosed other issues as irrelevant to the case. D. The trial left a bitter legacy of deep division over the teaching of evolution in public school. Each side had persuaded their followers of the critical importance of the issue. Topic 10: The Neo-Darwinian Synthesis I. During the first quarter of the 20th century, scientists remained deeply divided over how evolution operated. None of them saw a significant role for natural selection in the process. A. Field naturalists tended to follow Alfred Russel Wallace in stressing the role of geographical isolation and environmental adaption in evolution but favored Lamarckian mechanisms as the cause of variation. B. Paleontologists interpreted the fossil record to show linear evolutionary development over time as expected under Lamarckism, orthogenesis or theistic evolution. C. Geneticists and other laboratory biologists rejected Lamarckism in favor of discontinuous Mendelian mutations feeding evolution with little role for the adaptive value of mutations or the selection of the fittest. This worked in laboratories but not the wild. II. Aspects of each view merging into a neo-Darwinian synthesis as scientists gained greater understanding of genetic and geographic factors. A. The first steps toward the neo-Darwinian synthesis were taken during the 1920s as geneticists began appreciating complexity in the genetics of large populations. B. Theories about the evolution of large populations did not interest field naturalists, who saw speciation in the wild occurring mostly in small populations isolated on the fringe of a larger populations. During the 1920s, geneticist Sewall Wright addressed this issue. C. Led by Ernst Mayr in 1942, field naturalists agreed that the new genetics could explain the evolution of isolated populations without the need for invoking Lamarckism. D. Led by George Gaylord Simpson in 1944, paleontologists concluded that this neo-Darwinian view of the origin of species did not conflict with the fossil record. Its gaps could be due to rapid evolution in small populations, which would leave few fossils. III. Evidence for the neo-Darwinian synthesis was largely theoretical and mathematical. Using the theory to account for large scale “macro-evolution” required extrapolation. Topic 11: Scientific Creationism I. The centenary of Origins of Species in 1959 marked a triumphant moment in evolutionism. Publications and ceremonies hailed Darwin’s contribution in shaping the modern world. II. Evolutionists ignored societal shifts that by 1959 had closed large segments of the American population to the theory of evolution. Darwinism’s public revival triggered a strong and enduring reaction among conservative Christians. III. Mid-20th-century intellectual developments had driven conservative American Protestantism and evolutionary science even further apart than they had been during the 1920s. A. On the science side, the materialism of neo-Darwinism was less amiable to reconciliation with religion than earlier neo-Lamarckian or theistic theories of evolution. Further, scientists cared less about reconciling science and religion. B. On the religion side, expansion of conservative churches coupled with erosion of liberal churches had shifted American Protestantism toward Biblical literalism. C. Baptist engineering professor Henry M. Morris revived Price’s “flood geology” in 1961 and began spreading it widely. Under the name “scientific creationism,” Morris’s theory effectively co-opted the creationist banner within two decades. IV. The battle over scientific creationism (or “creation science”) in public education began with the legal argument that it was as scientific as evolution science and ended with the judicial conclusion that it was simply religious dogma. Topic 12: Selfish Genes and Intelligent Design I. The American debate over organic origins continues at many levels. Evolutionary biologists debate how evolution works; social scientists debate its implications for human nature; the public debates if it works at all. II. Virtually all biologists agree that species evolve from pre-existing species and many acknowledge only materialistic factors in the process. Disagreements are in its details. A. Failing to see sufficient gradualism in the fossil record, paleontologists Stephen Jay Gould and Niles Eldredge offer a punctuated equilibrium model for evolution. B. The evolution of seemingly altruistic behavior has long been a source of disagreement among Darwinists and a refuge for theists. C. Due to the incorporation of genetics into the neo-Darwinian synthesis, modern Darwinists enjoyed an advantage over Darwin in explaining altruistic behavior. He could reduce selection no lower than the individual level; they could focus on genes. D. Carrying gene selection to its logical conclusion, Richard Dawkins sees “selfish genes” as the basic units of selection for all evolution. III. Continuing controversy surrounds the extension of neo-Darwinian theories to the social sciences.
HIST 6376Topic 1. Theories of Origins Before Darwin I. People think, and as such have always wondered about how the universe and things in it originated, particularly themselves. A. The earliest stories, myths and writings contain accounts of gods creating the world, the heavens, people, animals and plants. B. The account set forth in Genesis carries particular importance to Jews, Christians and Moslems because they accept that account as gospel – the revealed word of God. C. Science began with the ancient Greeks, and Greek natural philosophers speculated about evolution.. II. Notions of evolution, or creation by natural law, revived during the Enlightenment. III. French naturalist Georges Cuvier founded modern comparative anatomy, paleontology and historical geology based on empirical research during the early 1800s. Cuvier’s theories allowed Christians to reconcile the fossil record with the Genesis account by equating the days of creation with geological ages, with God recreating life after each catastrophe. The intelligent design of each species proved God’s existence and goodness. Topic 2: Evolution in the Air I. The idea of organic evolution was in the air by the early 1800s. Many factor contributed to this development within Western science. A. The emerging fossil record played a major role in this development. B. Widespread acceptance of Pierre Simon Laplace’s nebular hypothesis established an evolutionary view of cosmic origins as early as the late 1700s. II. In 1802, a French naturalists, the chevalier de Lamarck, outlined the first comprehensive theory of organic evolution. A. A strict materialist, Lamarck believed in the ongoing spontaneous generation of simple living organisms through the active invention of a natural life force corresponding to electricity or the nervous fluids. B. This natural life force or energy continues to act in organism after they were formed, driving them to develop ever complex forms. C. The current array of species was not fixed, Lamarck maintained, but rather a snapshot of development over time, with less complex organisms being younger and more complex ones older. D. Overshadowed by Cuvier, Lamarck’s superior within the French natural history museum, the Lamarckian theory of evolution gained little attention and even less acceptance. Cuvier saw sharp breaks in the fossil record, not gradual development; no evidence of species changing over time; and the impermanence of acquired characteristics. III. In 1844, British writer Robert Chambers popularized the idea of organic evolution in an anonymously published treatise. The scientific reaction to Chamber’s theory drove Charles Darwin, who was already privately at work on his theory of evolution, to tighten and improve his ideas before announcing them. IV. The acceptance of a Uniformitarian view of geologic history provided further critical foundation for the emergence of scientific theories of organic evolution. A. Neptunism dominated geological thought during the early 1800s. B. In 1795, Scottish naturalist James Hutton published his rival theory of steady-state Vucanism. C. Beginning in the 1830s, the gentleman-naturalist Charles Lyell reworked Hutton’s theory into modern uniformitarianism. Topic 3: Darwin’s Inspiration I. Charles Darwin entered the scientific debate over origins inconspicuously. His experience about the Beagle changed the course of intellectual history. II. Returning to England in 1836, Darwin assumed the life of a gentleman naturalist, living first in Cambridge and London, and then at a country home with his growing family. Although his research seemingly dealt with various topics, it all related to his obsession to understand how evolution worked. III. Darwin’s breakthrough came in 1838, while reading Thomas Malthus’s well-known 1798 essay on population. A. Malthus was a gloomy Anglican cleric who maintained that the human population far outstripped the food supply, so that only the fittest can or should survive. His social thinking was popular among rising Whig capitalists of Darwin’s class. B. Applying Malthus’s theory to all living things, Darwin struck upon a purely materialistic mechanism that he believed capable of driving the evolutionary process: natural selection. C. Darwin composed a first draft of his theory in 1842 and a second in 1844, yet he kept his idea secret from virtually everyone. He published seven book of basic science during the years from 1842 to 1857, but nothing about evolution. IV. Darwin was shocked out his self-impose intellectual exile by he receipt in 1858 of an essay from Alfred Russel Wallace outlining the theory of natural selection. A. From a poor family in rural England, Wallace had developed a passion for natural history, particularly the study of beetles. He became a paid collector of natural-history specimen in the Amazon valley and East Indies. B. Driven to get his evidence for evolution by natural selection before scientists and other educated readers as soon as possible, Darwin worked furiously to complete his classic book, On the Origin of Species, in 1859. This book revolutionized biological thought. Topic 4: An Intellectual Revolution I. Darwin wrote his 1859 masterpiece, On the Origin of Species, to persuade scientists and educated readers that evolution was a better explanation for the origin of species than creation, and that natural selection was a plausible mechanism for driving the process. II. Darwin’s theory dealt a body blow to traditional Western religious thought. A. Darwin’s chronology and outline of for the origin of species differed on its face from that set forth in the Genesis account. B. Darwin’s exceeded Cuvier and Lyell in dispensing with the need for a creator to fashion individual species. C. Darwin’s theory undermined natural theology, which had become a mainstay of Protestant Christianity. D. Although Darwin consciously avoided the issue of human origins in Origin of Species, to the extent that his theory of evolution applied to man, it also threatened deeply entrenched religious and philosophical opinions on human uniqueness and dignity. III. Scientific, religious and popular debate swirled over the applicability of evolution to the origin of humans. A. The central issue concerned the origin of man’s mental and moral attributes, not whether his physical body had evolved. B. Darwin equivocated on the matter in Origin of Species but announce for the materialistic origins of humans from simian ancestors in his 1871 book, Descent of Man. C. Even such loyal supporters as Charles Lyell and Alfred Russel Wallace broke with Darwin over the evolution of man. Both maintained that humans were simply too different from other animals for those differences to have evolved by chance variations. Topic 5: Debates over Mechanisms I. The theory of organic evolution (i.e., that species descend from prior species) quickly found near universal acceptance among American and European scientists. II. The theory of evolution raised a host of interesting new questions that quickly came to dominate the research agenda of field naturalists and laboratory biologists. A. The best scientific evidence for evolution came from highly technical studies of morphological relationships among species. B. Microscopists, particularly in Germany, sought evidence of evolution in the study of animal embryos. C. Bio-geographers followed Alfred Russel Wallace in giving an evolutionary interpretation to the geographic distribution of species. D. With limited success, paleontologists began filling out the evolutionary tree of life with discoveries from the fossil record. Pointing to these finds, American paleontologist Edward Drinker Cope in 1872 declared evolution an “ascertained fact.” III. Even as the theory of evolution gained acceptance during the 1860s and 1870s, doubts grew as to the sufficiency of natural selection alone to drive the process. A. Evidence and interpretations mounted against natural selection. B. Four main alternatives to classical Darwinism emerged. C. These alternatives potentially fit the scientific evidence for the occurrence of evolution without all the religious and philosophical consequences of natural selection. Theistic evolution and orthogenesis were particularly compatible with a spiritual view. D. By 1900, natural selection had been so discredited that few scientists accepted it as the mechanism of evolution. By all accounts, however, they all accepted the so-called “fact” that species evolve. Topic 6: Missing Links I. Fossil have long been both a principle basis for and barrier against belief in evolution. A. Georges Cuvier’s early work with fossils suggested that species generally remain constant throughout their life and are replaced quite suddenly by significantly different forms. Ever since, this pattern has been used as evidence against evolution. B. In arguing for uniformitarianism in geology, Charles Lyell countered that fossils were only laid down intermittently – so that discontinuities proved nothing. To him, the progressive order of the fossil record suggested gradual change rather than catastrophes. C. Building on Lyell, Darwin devoted a chapter inOrigin of Species to showing that (despite notable gaps) the overall outline of the fossil record supports his theory. D. During the late 1800s, paleontologists culled the fossil record for evidence of evolutionary development. E. To the extent that some scientists and many non- scientists continued to reject the theory of evolution in the 1890s, their opposition focused on the issue of human evolution. The absence of hominid fossils became a stumbling block to popular acceptance of evolution. II. Darwin and other evolutionists never claimed that humans descended from apes. Rather, they believed that modern humans and modern apes had a common ancestor. III. Dutch physician Eugene Dubois set out to “prove” evolution by finding fossil evidence of the missing link between apes and humans. He abandoned a promising academic career and, with his young family in tow, became an army physician in the Dutch East Indies, where he found the first know hominid fossils, which became known as “Java Man.” IV. Beginning in the 1920s and increasingly in the last half of the 20th century, fossil evidence of human evolution captured the popular imagination. A. At first, these fossils came from South Africa. B. Beginning in 1929, more fossils like those from Java were found in China, with the group later re-classified as Homo erectus, an early human type. C. Beginning in the 1950s, East Africa became the primary source of early hominid fossils. D. The evolutionary tree for humans is now as complete as for any type of animals, and it fits a Darwinian pattern. Upright posture came first, presumably because it had survival value in a changing environment, then bigger brains and tool use. E. New finds of hominid fossils still generate front- page news around the world. As DuBois predicted, these fossils now serve as the best-known evidence for evolution. Topic 7: Genetics Enters the Picture I. By 1900, divisions among evolutionists over how evolution operated seemed irreconcilable. A. classic Darwinism, which envisioned the natural selection of minute, random, inborn variations of an essentially continuous nature, was widely dismissed as leading nowhere. B. Lamarckism, the principle alternative, encountered increasing objections. C. Around 1900, Dutch botanist Hugo De Vries offered mutation theory as a possible compromise explanation for the evolution of new species. II. Mendelian genetics would provide the basis for reviving Darwinian theories of evolution. A. During the 1860s, Gregor Mendel (an Austrian monk with an interest in natural history) experimented with the idea of new species as hybrids of old ones. He tested this by crossing distinctly different varieties of pea plants. B. Although Mendel’s laws were initially associated with major discontinuous variations (or mutations) rather than small continuous ones, their critical significance for salvaging Darwinism ultimately became clear. C. Although Mendelian geneticists at first operated in isolation from Darwinian naturalists, their ideas would come together in the neo-Darwinian synthesis of the 1930s. Topic 8: Social Darwinism and Eugenics I. Coined by its critics, the term “Social Darwinism” gained currency during the Victorian Era as a catch-all phrase to identify various utilitarian philosophies and policies that attributed human progress to unfettered competition among individuals. II. For many late 19th century Europeans and Americans, the most important area of competition was between races and among nations. Social Darwinism was invoked to justify Western imperialism, colonialism, militarism and scientific racism. III. Combined with Mendelian genetics, social Darwinism led to the eugenics movement. A. Shortly after Darwin published Origin of Species, his cousin, Francis Galton, conceived of applying its teachings to human development. B. Eugenics attracted widespread interest after the 1900 rediscovery of Mendelian genetics. C. Except for the Catholic Church, opposition to eugenics was disorganized and ineffective until the late 1930s, when Nazi practices discredited all such efforts. Topic 9: America’s Anti-Evolution Crusade I. Conservative Christians had never liked the Darwinian theory of human evolution. Their long-simmering concern boiled over during the 1920s into a crusade against teaching it in public schools. II. Beginning in 1922, William Jennings Bryan transformed this religious dispute into a national political battle, leading to the 1925 Tennessee law against teaching evolution. III. The initial attention attracted by the new Tennessee statute expanded into a media frenzy when, six weeks after it became law, John Scopes was indicted for violating it. A. From its bazaar beginnings to its inconclusive conclusion, the Scopes trial was never a normal criminal prosecution. B. Both sides in the larger controversy saw the pending trial as an opportunity to make their case to the general public. It became a show trial for all concerned. C. The eight-day trial was largely anticlimactic as each side made its familiar arguments. Neither side disputed that Scopes had violated the law and the court foreclosed other issues as irrelevant to the case. D. The trial left a bitter legacy of deep division over the teaching of evolution in public school. Each side had persuaded their followers of the critical importance of the issue. Topic 10: The Neo-Darwinian Synthesis I. During the first quarter of the 20th century, scientists remained deeply divided over how evolution operated. None of them saw a significant role for natural selection in the process. A. Field naturalists tended to follow Alfred Russel Wallace in stressing the role of geographical isolation and environmental adaption in evolution but favored Lamarckian mechanisms as the cause of variation. B. Paleontologists interpreted the fossil record to show linear evolutionary development over time as expected under Lamarckism, orthogenesis or theistic evolution. C. Geneticists and other laboratory biologists rejected Lamarckism in favor of discontinuous Mendelian mutations feeding evolution with little role for the adaptive value of mutations or the selection of the fittest. This worked in laboratories but not the wild. II. Aspects of each view merging into a neo-Darwinian synthesis as scientists gained greater understanding of genetic and geographic factors. A. The first steps toward the neo-Darwinian synthesis were taken during the 1920s as geneticists began appreciating complexity in the genetics of large populations. B. Theories about the evolution of large populations did not interest field naturalists, who saw speciation in the wild occurring mostly in small populations isolated on the fringe of a larger populations. During the 1920s, geneticist Sewall Wright addressed this issue. C. Led by Ernst Mayr in 1942, field naturalists agreed that the new genetics could explain the evolution of isolated populations without the need for invoking Lamarckism. D. Led by George Gaylord Simpson in 1944, paleontologists concluded that this neo-Darwinian view of the origin of species did not conflict with the fossil record. Its gaps could be due to rapid evolution in small populations, which would leave few fossils. III. Evidence for the neo-Darwinian synthesis was largely theoretical and mathematical. Using the theory to account for large scale “macro-evolution” required extrapolation. Topic 11: Scientific Creationism I. The centenary of Origins of Species in 1959 marked a triumphant moment in evolutionism. Publications and ceremonies hailed Darwin’s contribution in shaping the modern world. II. Evolutionists ignored societal shifts that by 1959 had closed large segments of the American population to the theory of evolution. Darwinism’s public revival triggered a strong and enduring reaction among conservative Christians. III. Mid-20th-century intellectual developments had driven conservative American Protestantism and evolutionary science even further apart than they had been during the 1920s. A. On the science side, the materialism of neo- Darwinism was less amiable to reconciliation with religion than earlier neo-Lamarckian or theistic theories of evolution. Further, scientists cared less about reconciling science and religion. B. On the religion side, expansion of conservative churches has shifted American Protestantism toward Biblical literalism. C. Baptist engineering professor Henry M. Morris revived Price’s “flood geology” in 1961 and began spreading it widely. Under the name “scientific creationism,” Morris’s theory effectively co-opted the creationist banner within two decades. IV. The battle over scientific creationism (or “creation science”) in public education began with the legal argument that it was as scientific as evolution science and ended with the judicial conclusion that it was simply religious dogma. Topic 12: Selfish Genes and Intelligent Design I. The American debate over organic origins continues at many levels. Evolutionary biologists debate how evolution works; social scientists debate its implications for human nature; the public debates if it works at all. II. Virtually all biologists agree that species evolve from pre-existing species and many acknowledge only materialistic factors in the process. Disagreements are in its details. A. Failing to see sufficient gradualism in the fossil record, paleontologists Stephen Jay Gould and Niles Eldredge offer a punctuated equilibrium model for evolution. B. The evolution of seemingly altruistic behavior has long been a source of disagreement among Darwinists and a refuge for theists. C. Due to the incorporation of genetics into the neo- Darwinian synthesis, modern Darwinists enjoyed an advantage over Darwin in explaining altruistic behavior. He could reduce selection no lower than the individual level; they could focus on genes. D. Carrying gene selection to its logical conclusion, Richard Dawkins sees “selfish genes” as the basic units of selection for all evolution. III. Continuing controversy surrounds the extension of neo-Darwinism to the social s
HIST 8001Note this is from a previous course, and will be changed, but does give you a sense of how the course will be organized. Course Schedule: Week One -- August 23 -- Some Ideas About Teaching Reading: Blackey, pp. 1-25. Simon, "Self-Defense for the Mind," www.uga.edu/gm/399/FeatDef.html From Ganschow Reader: Ganschow, "A Few Ideas About Teachers and Teaching," "Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Teaching," Eble, "Seven Deadly Sins of Teaching," and Myer, "The Aims of the Teacher" Week Two -- August 30 -- Getting Ready Reading: Brinkley, Chapter 1 McKeachie, Chapters, 2-3 From Ganschow Reader: "Ten Tips for First-Time Teachers" Week Three -- September 6 -- The Syllabus Reading: Ganschow Reader: Rubin, "Professors, Students, and the Syllabus" Assignment: Create a syllabus for the course you plan to teach. Pass this out to everyone in the class the night before we meet. Please come to class prepare to make construction suggestions on everyone's syllabus. Week Four -- September 13 -- The First Class Reading: Brinkley, Chapter 2 McKeachie, Chapter 4 Ganscho Reader: "Planning the First Class Period" Week Five -- September 20 -- The Lecture Reading: Brinkley, Chapter 4 McKeachie, Chapter 6 Norman L. Christensen, "The Nuts and Bolts of Running a Lecture Course" (handout) Ganschow Reader, "Suggestions for Improving Lectures," "Some Concrete Suggestions for History Teachers" Assignment: Arrange to visit a large -- more than 50 students -- lecture class. Observe what the teacher does. Take notes on the style and content of the lecture. Report back to the class. Week Six -- September 27 -- Your Lecture Assignment: Everyone will do a brief -- 15 minutes -- lecture. We will critique and comment on the content, style, and organization of your presentation. (If you are TAing for a class where you are doing a lecture, we can all try to come to that lecture as well.) Week Seven -- October 4 -- The Discussion Reading: Brinkley, Chapter 3 McKeachie, Chapter 5 Scott, "Why I Teach By Discussion" Ganschow Reader: "Classroom Structures Which Encourage Student Participation" Week Eight -- October 11 -- Our Discussion Reading: Miller, The Crucible Blackley, pp. 43-50 Assignment: Prepare a class discussion -- a lesson plan if you will -- for The Crucible. Come to class prepared to discuss how you plan to teach the book. Week Nine -- NO CLASS Week Ten -- October 25 -- Web-Based Teaching Assignment: Create a class or a discussion using the web. Ideally this assignment will get students to actively engage in their own learning -- for example, you could set up a research project on, for examples, the Civil War or the 1960s. Come to class with several useful websites to share with everyone. Week Eleven -- November 1 -- The Multicultural Classroom Reading: Brinkley, Chapter 9 McKeachie, Chapter 20 Bernice R. Sandler, "The Classroom Climate for Women" Week Twelve -- November 8 -- No Class -- Go to the Southern Week Thirteen -- November 15 -- Testing and Evaluation Reading: Brinkley, Chapter 6 McKeachie, Chapter 7 Blackey, Chapter 4 Assignment: Write a mock midterm exam for your course. Remember to consider if your class is a MWF class or a T/Th class. In addition, please create a writing assignment for your class. Pass both your test and writing assignments out to everyone in our class the night before we meet. Week Fourteen -- November 22 -- NO CLASS -- Thanksgiving Week Fifteen -- November 29 -- Evaluating Your Teaching Reading, Brinkley, Chapter 6 McKeachie, Chapter 23 Ganschow Reader: "Documenting Excellence in Teaching" Assignment-- Design your own evaluation for your class. Think perhaps of doing a midterm evaluation. Week Sixteen -- December 6 -- Problem Solving and Problem Students Reading: McKeachie, Chapter 23
HIST(CLAS) 4329/6329Topics will vary and may include Society and Culture in Lante Antiquity, the Roman Economy, Hellenistic and Roman Egypt, Slavery in Antiquity, or Ancient Historiography. A sample topical outline (for Hellenistic and Roman Egypt)would be: -Geographical background -Cultural background (native Egyptian culture before the Ptolemies) -Political history (the Ptolemic Dynast, the Roman Conquest) -Administration -Taxes -Literacy, education and writing -Women in Greco-Roman Egypt -Farming and village society -the army and its interactions with the civilian population -Medical science in Alexandria -Jewish culture in Alexandria -Religion etc.
HORT 8110Week 1: The Scientific Method General overview The ethics of science Approaching a problem Week 2: Developing an Idea Sources of ideas/problems University Resources Evaluating Literature Week 3: The Hypothesis Writing a testable hypothesis Developing a research plan Identifying resources Week 4: Collecting and manipulating data Simplicity in experimental design The journal Importance of data back-up Week 5: Data Interpretation Knowing how to stay within the bounds of your data
HPRB 2420Course orientation Introduction to Heatlh Education for ECE Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Content for ECE/QCC's/National Standards Comprehensive School Health/Health Services Health Instruction/Growing Healthy Domains of Learning and Health Education Safety and Accident Prevention Writing Health Concepts and Objectives Values Education Mandate Alcohol and Other Drugs (Georgia Mandate) Project Discussion/Topics Selected Project Work Sexuality Education (Georgia Mandate) HIV/AIDS Prevention Course Review Project Presentations
HPRB 3400Course Orientation Philosophy of Health Education Targets for Health Education Coordinated School Health Program/Mini Teach Health Defined/Health Promotion/Disease Prevention Health Education Reform/National Standards Standards con't/Developmental Characteristics of Youth Health Behavior of Youth Project Topics/Health Instruction/Domains of Learning Writing Concepts and Objectives Teaching Methods/Presentation Discussion Planning Lessons Presentations Evaluation Methods Teaching Sensitive Subject Matter Drug Mandate/Sexuality Mandate Values Mandate/Violence Prevention Presentations Class Management
HPRB 4400Introduction Intervention Plan Overview Health Education/Promotion Ethics Models Theory Planning Process Mission Statement; Rationale Goals/Objectives Media Information Needs Assessment Data Collection Grant Writing Budget Marketing Timeline Development Implementation Strategies Coalitions/Work Groups Resource Management/Time Management Information Management/Personnel Management Power Leadership Data Analysis Data Reporting Final Report Writing
HPRB 7270Introduction to Course Discussion/Overview of Intervention Mapping Review of Precede/Proceed Review of Needs Assessment Student Presentations Class Discussion Theory: Applications/Uses Writing Objectives: who, what, when, where, how much Selecting Intervention Strategies Program Design, creation, message, special populations Program Implementation, adoption, implementation, sustainability Program Evaluation Case Studey Presentations Instructional Techniques Organizational Culture/Dynamics Team Management Coalition Building
HPRB 7470Health Promotion Program Evaluation Overview: * The place of measurement and evaluation in health promotion practice. * Assuming the role of evaluator. * Meeting the agency's need for information and feedback. * Stakeholders and gatekeepers. * Tailoring evaluations to meet the needs of underserved populations. * Formative evaluation and measures of behavioral health. * Writing and editing health objectives for use in evaluation. * Conceptual models for program measurement and evaluation; biomedical, public health, biobehavioral, community, and worksite model. * Community needs assessment: participatory methods and action research approaches. * Process Evaluation * Impact Evaluation. * Outcome Evaluation. * Human Subjects Issues. * Quality controls and standards in health education. * Ethical issues in health promotion evaluation
HPRB 7650Determined by student/faculty negiotiated proposal, conducive to individual credit hours and course/research focus: Project proposal Project implementation. Project write up Project oral presentation.
HPRB 8420Course Preview and Introduction Theory in Research and Practice Research Proposal Writing
HPRB 9300Doctoral Dissertation writing, developed by student/faculty negotiated proposal. Conducive to individual credit hours and dissertation research focus.
ILAD 5000Module 1: Career Center Orientation Module 2: Resume Writing Module 3: Job Search Correspondence Module 4: Interview Skills Module 5: Business Etiquette and Ethics Module 6: Skills, Interests, Personality Types, Values, and Career Choice Module 7: Career Profiles Module 8: Networking
ITAL 2001 In-class conversation and discussions to develop speaking and listening skills. Readings from magazine articles, literary works, and a variety of other sources on a variety of topics which will provide students with information for in-class discussions and compositions. Writing in Italian to further knowledge of oneself, one's culture, and of Italian speakers and their cultures. Review of principles of Italian grammar.
ITAL 2002 In-class conversation and discussions to develop speaking and listening skills. Reading from magazine articles, literary works, and a variety of other sources on a variety of topics which will provide students with information for in-class discussions and compositions. Writing in Italian to further knowledge of oneself, one's culture, and of Italian speakers and their culture. Review of principles of Italian grammar.
ITAL 4030/6030Topics would vary, depending on who is teaching what. A list of possible topics are: the intellectual history of Italy; Dante's "Divine Comedy"; Italian Lyric Poetry; Italian theater; the Nineteenth Century Italian Novel; Boccaccio's "Decameron" and its influence on European narrative prose fiction; Petrarch and Petarchism; Contemporary Italian Writers; Italian Women Writers; etc. The following questions (or situations) will be addressed for each work: linguistic and geographical context; historical importance; the author's bio-bibliography; thematic and stylistic analysis of the work. The following outcomes are expected: students will demonstrate an ability to articulate, in prose and in discussion, the complex interrelationships that exist between issues of language, literature and the arts, and the social sciences, as manifest in the works in question. Students' writing skills will be measurable in terms of organization, content and style. Tests and exams will quantify the acquisition of the knowledge mentioned above. Class participation will be measured in terms of accuracy of recall, cogency and general responsiveness and collaboration in discussions and other activities.
ITAL 4060/6060Renaissance Italy: Humanism and the birth of modern literary scholarship. Lyric poetry and the Petrarchan mode (selected poetry by Chariteo, Tebaldeo, Serafino, Lorenzo, Tasso, Ariosto, Michelangelo, Marino, Vittoria Colonna, Gaspara Stampa, Veronica Franco, Isabella di Morra). Bembo and the "Questione della lingua." Burchiello. Neoplatonism and the figurative arts: Poliziano's Stanze per la giostra. Myth, art, and literature: Giambattista Marino's Adone. Marinismo. From sacred to profane theater: Poliziano's Fabula di Orfeo; Niccolo' Machiavelli's Mandragola; Commedia dell'arte. The return to Arcadia: Sannazaro's Arcadia, Tasso's Aminta. Love, madness, women warriors and the fantastic in epic texts: Ariosto's Orlando furioso, Boiardo's Orlando innamorato. Life at court and society: treatise of the perfect courtier and ideal love: Castiglione's Libro del Cortegiano. Selections from: political treatises (Machiavelli's Principe, Guicciardini), and treatises on feminine beauty (Firenzuola), epistolary texts, biographies, and autobiographies (Strozzi, Vasari, Cellini), family and pedagogical writings (Alberti), philosophical or philological writings (Ficino, Pico, Valla), scientific prose (Leonardo da Vinci, Galileo, Cristoforo Colombo, Vespucci), and novelle by Bandello, Da Porto, Giraldi).
ITAL 4070/6070Works by Vico, Beccaria, Parini, Alfieri, Foscolo, Leopardi, Manzoni, Carducci, Verga, D'Annunzio, Pascoli; selected poetry and prose of the 20th Century, including Italian women writers.
ITAL 4120/6120 Topics will vary with each instructor. The following are examples of possible topics: 1) Dante's Divine Comedy 2) Italian Lyric Poetry 3) Italian Culture and Civilization 4) Italian Theatre 5) The Nineteenth Century Italian Novel 6) Boccaccio's Decameron and its influence on European narrative 7) Petrarch and Petrarchism 8) Contemporary Italian Writers
JOUR 3410The nature of news Importance of good writing Writing the news lead Interviewing and quotes Sources and searches News releases, speeches, news conferences, meetings Crime and courts Computer-assisted reporting Advances and follows Alternatives to inverted pyramid Profiles and feature writing Specialty reporting Investigative reporting Law and ethics
JOUR 3410HThe nature of news; The importance of good writing; Writing the lead; Interviewing and quotation; Sources and search methods; writing speeches, news conferences, meeting stories, crime stories, court stories and appraising public relations submissions; technology and reporting; advances and follows; alternative writing structures; writing profiles; specialized and ivestigative writing and reporting; critical issues in news journalism: ethics, social responsibility, legal protection for the journalist.
JOUR 5300The nature of news; Methods of reporting; Methods of writing the news; Covering meetings and local government; Covering crime: police and the courts; The news feature story; Medicine and science; Education; Religion; Campaigns and elections; Business and economic news; Private and public information; Computer-assisted searches and reporting; Legal and ethical concerns
JOUR 5530/7530Roles and functions of editorials and editorial pages Historical perspectives Finding ideas and sources for editorials Analyzing issues Organizing editorials Writing editorials Developing and maintaining editorial policies Editors and editorial writers Cartoons and cartoonists Letters to the editor Columns and special features Typography and technology Editorials in other media Trends and outlook
JOUR 5600/7600Definition of terms History of investigative journalism Development of story ideas Planning reporting and research Ethical issues Understanding and use of computer-assisted reporting Team reporting and writing Narrative structure for long stories
JOUR 5660/7660Recognition and gathering of news; Function, freedoms, and reponsibilities of newspapers; News leads; basic news stories; special types of news stories; The business of newspapers; Features and photographs; Editorials; In-depth reporting and writing; Copy editing; Typography and layout; Desktop publishing; Other media of mass communication
JOUR 5700/7700The Legacy of New Journalism Prize-winning articles Types of markets and their audiences Advanced research techniques Honing interview skills Innovative writing styles and formats Ideas and Queries that work Trends in the magazine industry
JOUR 5800/7800Computers in journalism Story strategies Spreadsheets Database managers Numbers and statistics Electronic Searches Interviewing, organizing and writing Information policy and netiquette Reporting projects
JOUR 5850/7850Overview of visual journalism, including theory, concepts in the visual presentation of information for the news media. Thinking graphics: how and when to present news stories visually--how and why content drives visual design. Introduction to Information graphics: whent to use which types. Visual editing: presenting graphic material accurately and fairly. The aesthetics of information graphic (composition, color, fonts). Introduction to Freehand software. Students create a statistically driven graphic (pie, bar, fever charts). Introduction to Quark X-Press software. Students research, write and create a process graphic (e.g., a timeline). Introduction to page design. Effective packaging of information, story formats, use of fonts and color. Choosing art for the page design. Final project (bringing it all together): students incorporate previously created graphics into a page design with stories and other illustrations. Students are evaluated for clarity, effectiveness, interest and attractiveness of visual presentations. Clarity is the key. Students are expected to copy edit and write headlines for all of their work.
JPNS 3990Topics will vary with the instructor. Typically, the student and supervising faculty member will develop a list of readings focused on a single area of interest, such as Heian fiction, lyric poetry, the fiction of an individual writer, etc.
JURI 4160/6160Appellate procedure and practice Appellate jurisdiction Error preservation Appeals from interlocutory and final orders Standards of review Brief writing Oral argument
JURI 4800/6800Students will work between 10 and 20 hours per week in the clinic office to gain practical experience in land use planning and land use law. The weekly class meetings will combine substantive instruction with staff law and in materials on planning, environmental design and ecology. It will also use materials on transactional practice and develop student understanding of common practice challenges. During staff meetings, students will review the status of pending cases, and discuss the use and development of lawyering approaches to their cases. In their clinic work, students will work on comprehensive growth management issues identified at the beginning of each semester by clients and by the clinic's supervisors. Students will engage in at least one substantial piece of research and writing, either as client work or through clinical development. Finally, students will engage in traditional clinical reflection, through periodic journals and focused personal interviews with clinicians.
KREN 3002Week I: Lesson 14 (folk tale) Discussion: marriage customs described in Korean folk tales Composition: pros and cons of arranged and "love" marriages Week II: Lesson 15 (friendship) Discussion: intercultural friendship Composition: a letter to a pen-pal in Korea Week III: Lesson 16 (lifestyles) Screening & discussion: a Korean film on a generation gap Composition: lifestyles and a generation gap Week IV: Lesson 17 (professionalism) Discussion: professional attitudes Composition: a brief biography of a role model in the student's future profession Week V: Lesson 18 (landscape) Screening & discussion: Korean landscape Interview & composition: description of a city in Korea Week VI: Lesson 19 (folk songs) Discussion: various origins of "Arirang" Listening and recording: different versions of "Arirang" Week VII: review of Lessons 14-19 & midterm Week VIII: Lesson 20 (geography) Discussion: Kim Jong-ho, a pioneering land surveyor & cartographer Composition: pioneers Week IX: Lesson 21 (speech levels) Discussion: slang Interview and report: popular slang used by Korean college students Week X: Lesson 22 (literature) Discussion: Whang Jinyi, a 16th-century poetess Composition: response to Whang Jinyi's poems Week XI: Lesson 23 (advertisement) Screening & discussion: Korean TV commercials Composition: comparison of Korean and American commercials Week XII: Lesson 24 (religion) Discussion: Han yong-un, a Buddhist writer Composition: response to Han's prose poem Week XIII: Lesson 25 (traditional performing arts) Screening & discussion: p'ansori Week XIV: Lesson 26 (newspaper editorial) Discussion: the impact of a newspaper editorial Translation: an editorial from Red & Black Week XV: review of Lessons 20-26 presentation
KREN 4001Weekly activities will be organized around a specific theme suggested by the textbook. Each lesson includes: 1. Linguistic element; 2.Business related topic; 3. Culture related topic; and 4. Weekly composition. Week 1: L: Korean speech levels (Honorifics) B: Brief summary of Korean history and politics C: Land and cities of Korea W: Letter of self introduction Week 2: L: Formal greetings and small talk B: Business organizations C: Korean holidays and traditions W: Importance of maintaining a cultural tradition Week 3: L: Asking/understanding directions B: Travel tips (how to use a taxi) C: Korean geography/means of transportation/road signs W: Driving direction to your place from ATL airport Week 4: L: Telephone conversation B: Making an appointment/reservation C: Interpersonal communication in Korean W: Write a personal letter to a Korean business partner Week 5: L: Abbreviations, Business terminology B: E-mail, fax, other types of correspondence C: Korean popular culture W: E-mail to a Korean friend (Get the response) Week 6: L: Compliment/criticism B: Social engagement C: Drinking culture W: Gather information about "Choo Sok" from the Internet and summarize it Week 7: L: Units of measures/numbers B: Money and banking in Korea C: Shopping tips W: Produce advertisements and TV commercials Week 8: L: Negotiation skills B: When yes means no, and no means yes C: Korean modesty W: A letter soliciting donations for abused children (typed) Week 9: L: Expressing disagreement/withholding comment B: Export/import related documents (L/C, agreement letter) C: Metaphors/Proverbs W: Episodes related with idiomatic expressions Week 10: L: Essential Chinese characters B: Age awareness/seniority C: Government information W: Read a Korean news article on the Internet and summarize it Week 11: L: Making a suggestion/proposal B: Meeting related topics: agenda, minutes, report C: Korean modesty W: A letter of apology for rescheduling a meeting (typed) Week 12: L: Refusing a request in a polite manner B: Korean office culture C: Attitude toward money matters W: A letter declining someone’s offer Week 13: L: Explanations/Excuses B: Interview skills C: How to dress in Korea W: Job application letter (typed) Week 14: L: Useful expressions for presentation B: Report and presentation skills C: Individual vs. group identity W: Draft of final presentation Week 15: Review and Final Presentation
KREN 4002Week 1: L: Business vocabulary I B: Current issues in Korean economy C: History of Korean economy (before the 1960's) W: Instruction to formal writing Week 2: L: Business vocabulary II (Continued) B: Types of business correspondence C: History of Korean economy (after the 1960's) W: Introduction to business letter writing Week 3: L: Situational practice: Asking for assistance B: Current issues in Korean politics C: How to get assistance in case of emergency W: Filling out a police report Week 4: L: Situational practice: At a restaurant B: Understanding Chae-bol (conglomerate) culture C: Korean family culture W: Making an initial offer Week 5: L: Situational practice: At a hospital B: An overview of Korean industry structure C: Korean popular culture W: Filling out a hospital registration form Week 6: L: Situational practice: At a bar B: Social engagement C: Drinking culture W: Writing an invitation for a social gathering Week 7: L: Situational practice: At a Bank B: Money and banking in Korea C: Korean banking system W: Filling out a bank account request form Week 8: L: Situational practice: When invited to a Korean family B: How to find business resource on the Internet C: Holidays and traditions in Korea W: Business correspondence: Initial proposal Week 9: L: Reading Korean newspaper B: Korean stock market C: Proverbs and idioms W: Episodes related with idiomatic expressions Week 10: L: Essential Chinese characters B: Korean companies in the US C: General government information and regulations W: Write a resume Week 11: L: Situational practice: At a business meeting B: Meeting related topics: agenda, minutes, report C: How to properly address Korean business partners W: Letter of Credit Week 12: L: Reading Korean business magazines B: Korean office culture C: Attitude toward money matters W: Business claim Week 13: L: Interview skills B: Interview skills C: How to properly dress in Korea W: Writing a business contract Week 14: L: Presentation skills B: Report and presentation skills C: Traditional concepts in Korean culture W: Draft of final presentation Week 15: Review and Final Presentation
LAND 4710/6710Course Content: Business/Professional relations Resume writing/writing skills Private/Public contract procedures Litigation/U.S. Court System Real Property Construction Documents Specification writing Professionald ethics/Personal morals Registsration/ASLA Job interviews Contract Law Bonds, Liens & Insurance Torts Text: 'Business Law for Landscape Architects' Lectures or Readings: Introduction Resume/Cover letter/writing skills Business and professional relationships Asigned Reading - Chapter 3 Resolution of Disputes State and Federal court system Resoultion of disputes Assigned Reading - Chapter 5 The Law of Property Real property Assigned Reading - Chapter 6 Law of Contracts Law of contracts - Law of Contracts Mid term review Mid Term Construction contracts Torts Bonds/liens/Insurance Ethics/Morals Business organizations Specifications Job Interviews Registration law and introductin to the ASLA Landscape Architecture Registration Exam
LAND 6030Site analysis is the collection and organization of data about landscape sites and the use of the data in solving landscape problems. It is a general-purpose tool providing a foundation for understanding, caring for, and working with landscapes anywhere at any scale and for any purpose. This is a skill based course. The course is given structure by specific studio projects that integrate technical methodological, and theoretical data around the thematic issue of sustainability. An applied project gives urgent practical relevance to the material being studied. At the same time, a specific project is a means of penetrating into the scientific, methodological, and ethical questions that join all projects and are at the heart of landscape architectural practice. Sequence of steps to accomplish the projects Establish issues- general introduction to site analysis and its purposes Literature review on issues in restorative redevelopment Establish technologies - literature review on technologies of restorative redevelopment Analyze site - establish site-specific resources and constraints for development Design alternative scenarios for redevelopment - community particpation Alternative designs for development Zone and system design - detailed design of selected restorative systems, or geographic zones within the given site plans Evaluation - design for all scenarios are evaluated using the same sets of criteria Make concluding generalizations - each student writes a short concluding paper, synthesizing and making recommendations from the issues and possibilities discovered in the class.
LAND 7300Meetings between the student and major professor to be determined at the beginning of the semester through the establishment of an outline for the writing calendar. The student will be responsible for the majority of the wrok on an individual self- driven basis with the major professor providing guidance and direction as required. Students are expected to develop research objectives and to fulfill these objectives with the help of a working outline and writing calendar.
LATN 4020/6020I. HISTORY AND BACKGROUND OF ROMAN EPIC A. ITS PREDECESSORS IN GREEK EPIC B. ARCHAIC ROMAN EPIC C. CLASSICAL ROMAN EPIC D. BAROQUE ROMAN EPIC II. LIVES AND WRITINGS OF THE PRINCIPAL LATIN EPIC POETS A. ENNIUS B. VERGIL C. LUCAN D. OTHERS III. DETAILED STUDY OF ONE OR MORE OF THE ANCIENT LATIN EPIC POEMS A. READING, TRANSLATION, AND SCANNING PRACTICE B. HISTORICAL IMPORTANCE C. THE POET'S STYLE AND PURPOSE IV. STUDENT REPORTS (ESPECIALLY IMPORTANT FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS)
LATN 4030/6030I. ANCIENT HISTORIOGRAPHICAL TRADITION II. FEATURES OF ROMAN HISTORICAL WRITING III. LIFE AND WORKS OF ONE OR MORE ANCIENT ROMAN HISTORIANS IV. CLOSE ANALYSIS OF HISTORICAL TEXTS IN THE ORIGINAL LATIN AND DISCUSSION OF SECONDARY LITERATURE.
LATN 4050/6050I. HISTORY AND BACKGROUND OF ROMAN EPISTLES A. PRIVATE LETTERS NOT INTENDED FOR PUBLICATION B. EPISTLES AS LITERARY EXERCISES C. ACTUAL LETTERS RE-WORKED FOR PUBLICATION II. LIVES AND WRITINGS OF THE PRINCIPAL ROMAN EPISTLERS A. CICERO B. SENECA C. PLINY THE YOUNGER D. OTHERS III. DETAILED STUDY OF THE LETTERS OF ONE OR MORE ROMAN EPISTLERS A. READING AND TRANSLATION PRACTICE B. HISTORICAL IMPORTANCE C. THE WRITER'S STYLE AND PURPOSE IV. STUDENT REPORTS (ESPECIALLY IMPORTANT FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS)
LEGL 7200Introduction and Conflict Analysis Review Negotiate Appleton-Baker and Debrief Negotiation Methods -- Distributive or Integrative? Negotiate Bullard Houses and Debrief Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument Negotiation Styles Debrief Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument Money Game Exercise Negotiate Checking In/Checking Out Communication/Interpersonal Skills Negotiate P&T Grass v. Carter Nursery, Inc. and Debrief Relationships Writing an Agreement Teamwork and Multiparty Agreement Negotiate and debrief Harborco Conflict Management Systems Design Negotiate To Sign or Not to Sign Post Settlement Settlements Mediation Process Negotiate and debrief MAPO Summarize
LING 2100The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and from semester to semester. The topics will consist of writings about various linguistic matters including phonetics/phonology, morphology, syntax, lexicon, and semantics as they relate to the general fields of sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, language acquisition, cognitive linguistics, and language variation. A number of graded tasks will be assigned, such as quizzes, tests, and various writing assignments done either in or outside of class.
LING 3060Articulation, phonemic organization of speech, generative phonology, structure of phonological systems, prosodic systems, non-linear phonology, representations for non-segmental phenomena, autosegmental phonology. A number of graded tasks will be assigned, such as quizzes, tests, and various writing assignments done either in or outside of class.
LING 4210/6210The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and from semester to semester. Topics will consist of readings about comparative/historical linguistics, the theory of genetic relationships between languages, and the develop- ment of Indo-European studies. They will include analysis of specific texts from early recorded Indo-European languages and exercises in reconstructing earlier stages of these languages. A number of graded tasks will be assigned, such as quizzes, tests, and various writing assignments done either in or outside of class.
LING 4690/6690The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and from semester to semester. The topics will consist of works on the origins and develop ment of historical linguistic theory and methods, on specific applications of those methods in the analysis of several languages, and the status and most important focuses of contemporary historical linguistic research. A number of graded tasks will be assigned, such as quizzes, tests, and various writing assignments done either in or outside of class.
LING 4900/6900The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and from semester to semester in terms of the particular Indo-European language(s) investi- gated. Topics will consist of the theory of and evidence for Indo-European and the comparative/historical linguistic field in general; phonological, morphological, syntactic, and lexical features of Proto-Indo-European and their developments in one or more Indo-European languages; reconstruction methods and techniques; current problems in Indo-European research. A number of graded tasks will be assigned, such as quizzes, tests, and various writing assignments done either in or outside of class.
LING 4910Topics will vary widely depending on the particular focus of each offering of LING 4910. A number of graded tasks will be assigned, such as quizzes, tests, and various writing assignments done either in or outside of class.
LING 7300Specific topics cannot be listed. They will consist of research and writing in the area or areas of the student's primary interests and concentrations.
LING 8060Articulation, phonemic organization of speech, generative phonology, structure of phonological systems, prosodic systems, non-linear phonology, representations for non-segmental phenomena, autosegmental phonology. A number of graded tasks will be assigned, such as quizzes, tests, and various writing assignments done either in or outside of class.
LING 8070Speech sounds, distinctive features, natural classes, formulation of phonological rules and representations, evidence and motivation for rules, simplicity and generality, naturalness, abstractness, rule interactions, the syllable and syllabi- fication, stress, autosegmental phonology, feature geometry, lexical phonology and lexical diffusion, laboratory phonology, and optimality theory. A number of graded tasks will be assigned, such as quizzes, tests, and various writing assignments done either in or outside of class.
LING 8120Topics will vary, but will consist of readings and lectures on morphemes, grammati- cal categories, morphosyntax, structuralist theory, early generative approaches, autosegmental phonology, prosodic morphology, and the interfaces between morphology, phonology, and syntax. A number of graded tasks will be assigned, such as quizzes, tests, and various writing assignments done either in or outside of class.
LING 8250The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and from semester to semester. The topics will consist of works on pedagogical theory, on the theories of second language acquisition in adults, on language transference problems, on error analysis, and the practicalities of course planning and organization. A number of graded tasks will be assigned, such as quizzes, tests, and various writing assignments done either in or outside of class. Practice teaching may also be required.
LING 8980The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and from semester to semester. The topics will consist of selected research from various fields in language variation and sociolinguistics. A number of graded tasks will be assigned, such as quizzes, tests, and various writing assignments done either in or outside of class.
LING 9010Specific topics cannot be listed. They will consist of research and writing in the area or areas of the course as defined by the student and the faculty member giving the course, and will be related to the student's particular area of concentration.
LING 9300Specific topics cannot be listed. They will consist of research and writing in the area or areas of the student's primary interests and concentrations.
LING(ANTH) 4860/6860General topics covered include language and social identities; language and social constructs; language socialization. Theoretical topics include the formal, the interpretive/situated, and the sociohistorical/dialogic. Methodological topics include correlational analyses and ethnography of communication. A number of graded tasks will be assigned, such as quizzes, tests, and various writing assignments done either in or outside of class.
LING(CLAS) 4610/6610Nominal, verbal, and pronominal paradigms of Sanskrit, and the historical bases for the development of these paradigms. A number of graded tasks will be assigned, such as quizzes, tests, and various writing assignments done either in or outside of class.
LING(CLAS) 4620/6620Topics will include additional attention to the grammatical paradigms of Sanskrit and their historical development and the basic lexicon of Sanskrit. A number of graded tasks will be assigned, such as quizzes, tests, and various writing assignments done either in or outside of class.
LING(CMLT) 4870/6870The choice and sequence of topics will vary from instructor to instructor and from semester to semester. Topics will consist of readings on basic structural principles of human language, on the ways in which language influences social structures and vice versa, on a range of gender-specific variations found in a number of human languages, and on the diversity of gender roles and valuations found in human societies and the expression thereof through language. A number of graded tasks will be assigned, such as quizzes, tests, and various writing assignments done either in or outside of class.
MARK 7250Identify research problem Design research project Analysis plan Project report writing Presentation
MARK 7350Identify research problem Design research project Analysis plan Project report writing Presentation
MARK 7750Focus groups Observations Experiments Surveys Practical applications of data analysis tools Report writing Presentations
MARS 4960THE STUDENTS WILL CONDUCT RESEARCH UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF A FACULTY MEMBER. THE TOPICS COVERED WILL BE UNIQUE FOR EACH STUDENT. DURING THE COURSE, THE STUDENT WILL BE EXPOSED TO THE FOLLOWING ACTIVITIES: THE USE OF PEER-REVIEWED JOURNALS AT THE LIBRARY, INCLUDING RESOURCES SUCH AS CURRENT CONTENTS PERTINENT LABORATORY PROTOCOLS THE USE OF A COMPUTER IN DATA ANALYSIS THE WRITING OF A RESEARCH REPORT OF THEIR RESULTS THE USE OF THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM'S COASTAL MARINE FACILITIES, SUCH AS THE MARINE EXTENSION LABORATORY AT BRUNSWICK OR THE MARINE EDUCATION CENTER ON SKIDAWAY ISLAND, SKIDAWAY INSTITUTE OF OCEANOGRAPHY, SAPELO ISLAND MARINE INSTITUTE, OR THE SCHOOL OF MARINE PROGRAM'S FACILITY AT MISTLETOE STATE PARK.
MBUS 51001. Overview of the industry (1877 to the present) 2. Songwriting 3. Desktop studio production 4. Public relations 5. Legal aspects 6. Audio engineering and recording techniques 7. Film scoring 8. Entrepreneurship
MGMT 7800Part I: The Essentials of Consulting Relationships (Modules 1-2) Module 1. The Nature of Consulting -Types of Consultants -Consulting skill checklist -The nature of consulting projects -Building a relationship with the client -Balance of responsibility between client and consultant -Confidentiality and Ethics Module 2. Consulting Team Relationships -Getting to know on another (strengths and weaknesses) -Managing conflict -Dealing with stress -Dealing with social loafing Part II: Managing the Consulting Project (Module 3-9) Module 3: Entry and Contracting -Preparing an agenda for the contracting meeting -Defining the issues -Statement of purpose/objectives -Determining the deliverables -Scheduling -Budget/Resources -Constraints -Ground Rules -Liaison Arrangements -Closing the contracting meeting -Writing the document of understanding/contract Module 4: Project Management -Planning and organizing the project -Developing & maintaining a work plan -Keeping on schedule -Keeping track of hours and expenses -Status updates Module 5: Planning the Data Collection -Starting with the Presenting Problem -Determining what information is relevant -Deciding who will be involved -Determining data collection methods Module 6: Data Collection Methods -Interviews -Focus Groups -Questionnaires -Observation -Archival information Module 7: Dealing with Project Politics -When politics emerge -Likely reasons for politics -Recognizing politics -Dealing with politics Module 8: Analyzing the Data/Diagnosis of Information -Qualitative diagnosis -Quantitative diagnosis -Checking accuracy of data -Determining which data/results are most relevant -Drawing conclusions from data analysis Module 9: Designing Interventions/Recommendations -Research -Cost/Benefit analysis -Prioritizing recommendations Part III: Completion of Consulting Project (Modules 10-11) Module 10: Writing a Feedback Report -Content of report -Report structure -Writing style Module 11: Preparing an Oral Feedback Report -Content of presentation -Characteristics of effective feedback -Logistics of presentation -audience -meeting room -agenda -visuals/handouts -Making the presentation
MGMT(SPCM) 5960Course Topics Include: - Overview of communication in business - Communication and cultural diversity - Characteristics of effective business writing - Situational business letters - Short reports and proposals - Developing policies and procedures - Listening and perceptual acuity - Business presentations - Small group communication formats
MIBO 3510H1. Safety and Lab Procedures 2. Sterility and Aseptic Technique 3. Biology and Taxonomy of Bacteria 4. Survey of Major Groups of Micoorganisms 5. Isolation of Pure Cultures by Streak Plates 6. Bacterial and Fungal Colonial Morphology 7. Bacterial and Fungal Cellular Morphology 8. Brightfield and Phase Contrast Microscopy 9. Slide Preparation and Simple Staining 10. Special Bacterial Stains 11. Acid Fast Staining 12. The Gram Reaction 12. Bacterial Biochemical Properties 13. Bacterial Biochemical properties 14. Types of Media 15. Bacterial Classification Procedures 16. Rapid Identification Procedures 17. Bacterial Physiology 18. Growth and Environmental Requirements 19. Microbial Ecology & Winogradsky Columns 20. Enumeration & Data Graphing and Analyses 21. Isolation and Enumeration of Bacterial Cultures by Spread Plates 22. Growth of Microorganisms 23. Control of Microorganisms 24. Molecular Biology and Assays 25. Bacteriophage Lambda, Beta-galactosidase, and Antibiotic Resistance Markers. 26. Mutagenesis (prototroph to auxotroph) 27. Transformation (antibiotic resistance markers). 28. MIC, Beta-galactosidase, restriction, and plasmid assays 29. Biology and Taxonomy of Bacteria 30. The Logic of Microbial Identification 31. Isolation and Identification Project 32. The Logic of Scientific Data Analyses 33. The Logic of Communicating Scientific Results 34. Lab Experiment Project 35. Scientific Communication: bibliographic, writing, graphics/visualization, and presentation skills. Week - 1 Lab Period 1 Safety and Lab Procedures; Sterility and Aseptic Technique; & Introduction to Microbiology Computational Resources. Lab Period 2 Survey of Major Groups of Microorganisms (Colonial Morphology)-1; Isolation of Bacterial Cultures by Streaking; & Set-Up Winogradsky Column. LEC 1 Biology and Taxonomy of Bacteria Week - 2 Lab Period 3 Unknown Project-1; Microscopy (Bright Field); & Introduction of the Microbiological Literature. Lab Period 4 Unknown Project-2; Survey of Major Groups of Microorganisms (Cellular Morphology)-2; Microscopy (Phase Contrast); & Simple Staining. LEC 2 Isolation and Identification of Bacteria: Water Quality Week 3 Lab Period 5 Unknown Project-3; Survey of Major Groups of Microorganisms (Staining)-3; Microscopy; & Advanced Staining. Lab Period 6 Unknown Project-4; Survey of Major Groups of Microorganisms (Staining)-4; Microscopy; & Advanced Staining. LEC 3 Isolation and Identification of Bacteria: Water Quality Week 4 Lab Period 7 Lab Practical over Section I and Check Winogradsky Column Lab Period 8 Introduction to Types of Microbiological Media and Environmental Requirements. LEC 4 Isolation and Identification of Bacteria: Clinical Microbiology & Case Study Report 1 due on Friday. Week 5 Lab Period 9 Survey of Major Groups of Microorganisms (Biochemical Properties)-5; & Biochemical Tests-1. Lab Period 10 Unknown Project-5; Survey of Major Groups of Micoorganisms (Biochemical Properties)-6; & Biochemical Tests-2. LEC 5 Bacterial Physiology Week 6 Lab Period 11 Unknown Project-6 & Survey of Major Groups of Microorganisms (Bioichemical Properties)-7. Lab Period 12 Unknown Project-7; Survey of Major Groups of Microorganisms (Environmental Properties)-8; & Determination of Environmental Requiremnts-1. LEC 6 Bacterial Growth: Description and Enumeration. Week 7 Lab Period 13 Unknown Project-8; Survey of Major Groups of Microorganisms (Environmental Properties)-9; & Determination of Environmental Requirements-2 Lab Period 14 Introduction to Enumeration & Data Graphing and Analyses LEC 7 Bacterial Growth: Study of Increase. Week 8 Lab Period 15 Application of Enumeration (Growth of Microorganisms) Lab Period 16 Application of Enumeration (Control of Microorganisms) LEC 8 Bacterial Growth: Study of Control Week 9 Lab Period 17 Application of Enumeration (Bacteriophage Lambda) Lab Period 18 Unknown Project-9 LEC 9 The Logic of Microbial Identification Week 10 Lab Period 19 Unknown Project-10 (Report due after this period) Lab Period 20 Lab Practical over Section II & Check Winogradsky Column LEC 10 Microbial Ecology Week 11 Lab Period 21 Mutagenesis (prototroph to auxotroph) & Transformation (antibiotic resistance marker). Lab Period 22 Characterization of Mutants: Growth Requirements-1 & Characterization of Transformants: GEL-1 assay. LEC 11 Molecular Biology Week 12 Lab Period 21 Characterization of Mutants: Growth Requirements-2 & Characterization of Transformants: MIC and GEL-2 assays. Lab Period 22 Characterization of Transformants: Beta-galactosidase assay. LEC 12 Molecular Biology Week 13 Lab Period 23 Characterization of Transformants: MIC, Beta-galactosidase, and plasmid assays. Lab Period 24 Project Lab Work LEC 13 Molecular Biology Week 14 Lab Period 25 Project Lab Work Lab Period 26 Project Lab Work & Final Check of Winogradsky Column LEC 14 The Logic of Scientific Data Analyses Week 15 Lab Period 27 Finish Project Lab Work & Final Project Report due on Friday Lab Period 28 Lab Practical over Section III LEC 15 The Logic of Communication Scientific Results & Final Case Study Report due on Friday.
MIBO 7300Writing, presentation, defense, and revision of thesis under the direction of the student's major professor in consultation with the advisory committee.
MIBO 9300Writing, presentation, defense, and revision of dissertation carried out under the direction of the student's major professor in consultation with the advisory committee.
MILS 2020Analyze leadership models in relation to current military operations. Analyze situations to determine the effect of leadership styles on outcomes. Effectively write operation orders using standard Army procedures. Explain the LDP evaluation process. Describe effective team building and communication techniques. Apply technical skills in military operations. Use navigation techniques to move from one point to another. Analyze terrain using OCOKA. Conduct battle drills in specific situations. Improve self-awareness and discipline. Evaluate personal goal achievement.
MILS 4020Effective Writing Principles of War Fundamentals of Army Operations Supply Maintenance Officer-NCO Relationships Installation Support Services Ethics Introduction to BOLC II and III Battle Analysis Brief Financial Management I: Pay & Allowances Alumni Officer Forum War LTs Military Writing Case Study Terrorism Awareness Supply Maintenance Senior NCO Forum AFTB Family Advocacy Case Study: Ethics Non-Govt Organizations / Civilians On the Battlefield / Host Nation Support Financial Management II: Budgeting & Planning
MNPO(SOWK) 70601. Motivations for working and giving in the nonprofit field 2. Brief history of philanthropy 3. The organizational and tax aspects of nonprofits 4. The sectors of the nonprofit field (arts and culture, social and human services, health care, education, religion, environmental, others) 5. Skills needed to function in each of these sectors (public relations, grant writing, prospect research, special events, communications) 6. Types of fund raising (annual funds, volunteer projects, gift planning, capital and endowment campaigns, others) 7. Use of data bases for research and planning 8. Budgeting 9. Building understanding and passion for organizational mission 10. Recruiting, motivating, and retaining members and volunteers 11. Obtaining resources to implement organizational goals 12. Building a case for support 13. Identifying donor constituencies and prospect research 14. Marketing 15. Relating to the public and media 16. Soliciting annual support, capital funds, planned gifts 17. Grant writing 18. How to ask for a gift 19. How gifts fit into estate planning 20. How pooled income funds work 21. Giving through retirement plans, life insurance, tax planning, trusts 22. Implementing and managing campaigns 23. Accountability and reporting on finances 24. Resources for professional development
MUSI 11001. Fundamentals of Music (scales, keys, triads, chords) 2. Elementary part-writing and voice-leading 3. Composition of music in small forms for a single melodic line 4. Simple analysis of diatonic musical excerpts
MUSI 1120* Diatonic part-writing and analysis. * Introduction to chromatic harmony and analysis (secondary dominant functions). * Small form composition for piano and/or piano and instrument using diatonic and simple chromatic harmonic language.
MUSI 28121. Study of significant works written by major contemporary composers, 2. Writing of original compositions in a variety of formats, 3. Execution of compositional studies at the discretion of the instructor.
MUSI 28221. Study of significant works written by major contemporary composers, 2. Writing of original compositions in a variety of formats, 3. Execution of compositional studies at the discretion of the instructor.
MUSI 3550 1. Fundamentals of Music (scales, keys, triads, intervals, chords), 2. Part-writing in two and four parts in a key, 3. Comoposition of short works in a variety of musical styles.
MUSI 38121. Study of significant works written by major contemporary composers, 2. Writing of original compositions in a variety of formats, 3. Execution of compositional studies at the discretion of the instructor.
MUSI 38221. Study of significant works written by major contemporary composers, 2. Writing of original compositions in a variety of formats, 3. Execution of compositional studies at the discretion of the instructor.
MUSI 40501. Fundamentals of Music 2. Aspects of part writing and voice leading 3. Harmonic analysis 4. Melodic and harmonic dictation 5. Phrase, period, and small form structures
MUSI 48121. Study of significant works written by major contemporary composers, 2. Writing of original compositions in a variety of formats, 3. Execution of compositional studies at the discretion of the instructor.
MUSI 48221. Study of significant works written by major contemporary composers, 2. Writing of original compositions in a variety of formats, 3. Execution of compositional studies at the discretion of the instructor.
MUSI 6300 Main topics of the course: areas of musical research; bibliographic tools; use of a music research collection; use of electronic media; musical editions; compilation of a working bibliography; writing about music.
PADP 7150Week 1 Organization of course and student groups. Week 2-4 Initial meetings with government agencies and consideration of the policy/management problem. Week 5-10 Analysis of the problem; weekly group student meetings and meetings with the agency. Week 11-15 Writing of the final report. Week 16 Presentation of the final report to the agency.
PBIO 4930What is science writing? Good writing, revising and editing, layout, query letters, newspaper science writing, essays, radio, writing of own pieces. The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary.
PBIO 88001. To read about the most current developments in Plant Systematics and evolution. 2. To encourage discussion of quality content and scientific impact of the recent literature. 3. To require the student to research, write about and orally present a specialized aspect of one of these topic areas practicing organization, competent writing, adequate sources from literature and internet sources. 4. To present the topic is a clear, concise and convincing manner to a public audience and to be exposed to critical review by graduate student peers.
PEDS 4300/6300-4300L/6300L1. Effective Teaching and Appropriate Practices 2. (In the Gym) Movement Concepts and Management 3. Physical Fitness for Children and Reflective Teaching 4. Determining Generic Levels of Skill Proficiency and Planning 5. (In the Gym) Traveling 6. Organizing for Learning and Establishing an Environment for Learning 7. Maintaining Appropriate Behavior and Observation 8. (In the Gym) Chasing, Fleeing, and Dodging 9. Developing the Content and Instructional Approaches 10. (In the Gym) Throwing, Catching 11. Writing Lesson Plans and Appropriate Teaching Behaviors 12. Assessing Student Learning and ASsessing Your Own Teaching Performance 13. (In the Gym) Kicking, Punting 14. Generic Teaching Strategies and Maintaining and Improving Your Effectiveness 15. Ethics and Morals in the Gym 16. (In the Gym) Cooperative Games 17. Hellison's Model 18. The Art of Teaching 19. (In the Gym) Pre-School Lab 20. Sport Education Model in the Elementary School 21. (In the Gym) Rhythms 22. Teach at Your School
PEDS 4360A. Curriculum/Instruction in Physical Education 1. Conceptions of Curriculum and Teaching B. Education 1. Purposes of Education and Physical Education (historical, current, and future) C. Curriculum Design in Physical Education 1. What Constitutes Curriculum 2. Basic Principles of Curriculum Design D. Scope, Sequence, and Scheduling in Physical Education E. Program Evaluation F. Student Differences and Learning in Physical Education 1. Understanding Student Differences that Affect Teaching 2. Understanding Teaching in Physical Education G. Subject Preparation in Physical Education 1. Unit and Lesson Planning 2. Writing Program Objectives 3. Selecting Program Activities and Materials 4. Evaluating Student Performance H. Instructional Styles and Strategies in Physical Education 1. Teaching Styles 2. Teaching Strategies I. Organization and Management of Instruction in Physical Education
PEDS 5210/7210Week 1 Introduction to the mediated experiences and various forms of the media Week 2 & 3 The symbiotic relationship between sport and the media Does sport depend on the media? Does the media depend on sport? Week 4 & 5 Media Coverage and Sport Consumers The use of sport and sport figures in advertisement Week 6 & 7 Ideological Issues (Race, class, gender, etc) and media representations Week 8 Sport Commentators and Sportswriters and the filtering of sporting events Week 9 Print media and sport coverage Is there a decline in the need for this service? Week 10 & 12 Screening mediated coverage of sporting events Screening Internet services and sports Week 13 & 14 Screening sport films and sport fiction and its accuracy in representation of the sporting experience in the U.S. Week 15 & 16 Presentations and collection of book reviews
PEDS 80401. The History of Educational Research 2. Research in Physical Education 3. Scholarly Writing 4. Anthropology 5. Research in Expertise 6. Autoethnography 7. Games for Understanding Research
PHAR 6120A survey of controls for processes in pharmaceutical, biotechnology, biodevice including, production economics, plant layouts, economic considerations, material management. Provides overview for identifying, writing and performing validation processes for manufacturing specific dosage forms, including FDA rationale, and documentation requirements
PHIL 4010/6010The outline will include such topics as: I. Pre-Socratic, Socratic, and Platonic influences on Aristotle II. The style and method of Aristotle's writings III. The development of the syllogistic logic IV. The theory of substance in Aristotle V. Aristotle's analysis of causes VI. Aristotle's' criticism of Plato's Theory of Forms VII. Aristotle's teleological ethics VIII. Aristotle's political theory IX. Aristotle's aesthetics X. Importance of Aristotle's work for contemporary philosophy
PHIL 4030/6030The course will cover figures such as (but not limited to): I. Descartes II. Spinoza III. Leibniz IV. Writing during the sixteenth through the eighteenth century on the European continent.
PHIL 4070/6070The course will examine some of the principal philosophical debates of 19th century European philosophy, as presented in the writing of its seminal representatives.
PHIL 4080/6080The course will cover figures such as (but not limited to): I. James II. Peirce III. Dewey IV. Writing on the American continent from colonial times to the twentieth century, and their influence on the development of contemporary philosophy.
PHIL 4900The topical outline will depend upon the philosophical problem or group of related problems chosen by the instructor. The course will include extensive reading in primary sources and may include both class presentations and the writing of research papers.
PHIL 8700The topical outline will depend upon the philosophical problem or group of related problems chosen by the instructor. The seminar will include extensive reading in primary sources and may include both class presentations and the writing of research papers.
PHIL(RELI) 8630This course focuses on the works of one major writer in the area of philosophy of religion and/or theology. The specific topics introduced will be determined by the author being studied.
PHRM 4200/6200Instructors: James Price, Ph.D., Professor, Room 202, 542-5334, jprice@rx.uga.edu H. Won Jun, Ph.D., Professor, Room 214, 542-5759, wjun@rx.uga.edu Tony Capomacchia, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Room 203, 542-5339, tcapomac@rx.uga.edu Class Schedule: Tuesday 12:30 - 1:45 pm Thursday 12:30 - 1:45 pm Textbook: Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms and Drug Delivery Systems by Ansel, Popovich and Allen, Publisher - Williams and Wilkins Suggested Reference Books: Modern Pharmaceutics by Banker and Rhodes Remington's the Science and Practice of Pharmacy Physical Pharmacy by Alfred Martin Examination and Grading: Exam I September 24 (Tuesday), 40% Exam II November 5 (Tuesday, 40% Exam III December 5 (Thursday), 20% FINAL EXAM Basis for Grade: 90-100% = A 80-89% = B 70-79% = C 60-69% = D 0-59% = F Class Attendance: Regular attendance at classes is a student's obligation, and students MUST give reason for their absence in writing. Makeup Exams: Given only at the option of the instructor and would generally require a written statement from a physician. (Dr. Price) Preformulation Considerations in Dosage Form Design Dosage Form Objectives/Requirements Particle Size - Micromeritics Pharmaceutical and Therapeutic Reasons for Particle Size Control Concepts of Particle Size and Powder Fineness Particle Size Measurements; Methods and Sampling Data Analysis Powder Properties; Effects of Size and Shape of Particles Pharmaceutical Exicipients Definitions Categories and Uses Biopharmaceutical Considerations Solid Dosage Forms Powders, Charts and Effervescent Dosage Forms Capsules Types of Capsules and their Manufacture Pharmaceutical Consideration Bioavailability Tablet Dosage Forms Types of Tablets Formulation and Manufacturing Procedures Compressed Tablet Additives Physics of Tablet Compression Tablet Testing and Quality Control Coated Dosage Forms Reasons for Coating Types of Coating and Coating Materials Dissolution and Availability of Drugs from Solid Oral Dosage Forms Theories of Dissolution USP and Other Dissolution Testing Techniques Physicochemical Factors Affecting Dissolution Rate Influence of Formulation and Processing (Dr. Jun) Drug Delivery and Biopharmaceutics Terms and Definitions Various Disciplines in Pharmaceutics Historical Review of Drug Delivery Drug Delivery Systems Why Different Delivery Systems? Physicochemical and Pharmaceutical Priniciples Effects of Delivery on Therapeutic Efficacy Successful Drug Therapy Accurate Diagnosis Choice of Drugs Dosage Regimens Dosage Forms Release and Dissolution of Drugs from Delivery System Kinetic Principles Factors Affecting Release and Dissolution In Vitro and In Vivo Dissolution Absorption and Membrane Transport Why Different Routes? Mechanisms of Absorption Factors Affecting Absorption Reasons for Incomplete Absorption Gastrointestinal Conditions and Dosing Times Bioavailability and Bioequivalence Definitions Biopharmaceutical Parameters Methods for Determining BA/BE Experimental Design and Protocols FDA Requirements for Generic Drug Approval Drug Product Substitution Brand Versus Generic Product Versus Product (Capsule or Tablet) Immediate Release Versus Controlled Release One Route Versus Another Salts, Esters, Opitcal Isomers General Guidelines for Product Selection Which Drug, Formulation, Route, and Patient? Cost Factors Supporting Data Company Reputation Past Experience Factors Affecting the Concentration/Time Profiles Routes of Administration Single Dose or Multiple Doses Effects of Release ADME Controlled-Release Drug Delivery Systems (CR/DDS) Definition Types and Manufacturing Advantages/Disadvantage QC Tests for CR/DDS Considerations for Choosing CR/DDS Transdermal and Topical Formulations (Dr. Capomacchia) Nutrapharmaceuticals Background Formulations Approvals Use and Warnings
PHRM 5950I. History and Careers A. Review of the origins of drug information practice and how the first drug information center was justified. B. Review of the career opportunities in the field of drug information including required credentials and training. II. Resources A. Description of primary, secondary, tertiary, and on- line drug information resources. B. Evaluation of these resources and recommendations for choices based on questions received. III. Medical Writing A. Discussion of communication avenues for drug information B. Discussion of common writing errors with an emphasis on medical communications IV. Formulary Systems A. Overview of contemporary formulary systems and where they are used. B. Formulary management C. Pharmacy & Therapeutics Committees V. Adverse Medical Events A. Prevention, management, and reporting of adverse drug reactions B. Prevention, management, and reporting of drug interactions C. Prevention, management, and reporting of medication errors VI. Medication Use Evaluation A. Principles B. Application
PHRM 8080I. Hypothesis Writing II. Specific Aims III.Background and Significance IV. Preliminary Data V. Methods VI. Study Sections VII.Funding Agencies VIII.Budgets IX. Review of Grants X. Rebutting Reviews
PHRM 8170Unix commands Script writing for Unix Fortran and C programming Awk, Sed, and other languages Crystallization of soluble protein Crystallization of membrane proteins Data collection and reduction Heavy atom Phasing MAD-Phasing Direct methods Molecular Replacement Molecular Averaging Molecular Modelling Automated methods in modelling Refinement of structures Interpretation of structures Presentation graphics and figure preparation
PHRM(HADM) 5350/7350Disaster Training for Health Care Professionals Basics on infrastructure for detecting & managing events Command, Control and Communications Writing Exercises and Drill Basics Basic First Aid Basic Triage Training Disaster Kit Basic Disaster Life Support Training Overview of the DISASTER Paradigm Natural & Accidental/Manmade Disasters Traumatic and Explosive Events Nuclear and Radiological Events Biological Events Infectious Agents: Signs and symptoms, diagnosis, treatment plans, Spread of disease Anthrax Smallpox Pneumonic Plague Tularemia Botulism Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers Chemical Events Chemical Agents-signs and symptoms, diagnosis, treatment plans, Spread of Agent Sarin Gas Nerve Gas Ricin Blood Agents Blister Agents Heavy metals Pulmonary Agents Pesticides Other Chemicals Psychological Aspects of Terrorism Disasters Agricultural Terrorism (taught in conjunction with the Vet School) Acting as a member of a disaster response team (speakers from Fire Dept, Police Dept, GBI, FBI, FEMA, etc) Responding to a WMD site Role of the pharmacist How to protect yourself ' How to protect bystanders I Disaster Training Information from the American Red Cross Case Study Exercise Assignment (work on outside of class and discussion in class) Bioterrorism & Natural Disaster Events Medical Syatems Planning, Response, Recovery Exercise Scenario Assignment & After Action Report Mass Casualty Simulation (small scale in building)
PHYS 7300Thesis writing under the direction of the major professor.
PHYS 9300Dissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.
POLS 2000Part 1. Introduction & Overview Overview of theoretical perspectives utilized in political science Overview of substantive areas of research in political science Introduction to research questions and the process of social science research How to conceptualize/formulate testable hypotheses Part 2. Empirical Research Moving from conceptualization to measurement Introduction to the "idea" of probability sampling Issues in measurement General overview of "methods" of collecting observations: experiments, surveys, field research, content analysis, etc. Part 3. Addressing Research Questions The nature of causation--how to draw conclusions about causal relationships Introduction to data analysis (nothing beyond cross tabs) How to access secondary data sources and use the library How to write up results
POLS 2000HPart 1. Introduction and Overview Overview of theoretical perspectives utilized in political science Overview of substantive areas of research in political science Introduction to research questions and the process of social science research How to conceptualize/formulate testable hypotheses Part 2. Empirical Research Moving from conceptualization to measurement Issues in measurement General overview of methods of collecting observations: experiments, surveys, field research, content analysis, and so forth Part 3. Addressing Research Questions The nature of causation--how to draw conclusions about causal relationships Introduction to data analysis (nothing beyond cross tabs) How to access secondary data sources and use the library How to write up results
POLS 4150HPart 1. Introduction & Overview Role of theory in political research How to develop testable research questions How to access secondary data sources and the library Overview of the deductive model of social science Part 1. Introduction & Overview Role of theory in political research How to develop testable research questions How to access secondary data sources and the library Overview of the deductive model of social science How to conceptualize/formulate testable hypotheses Part 2. Empirical Research Issues of Causation Assessing the validity and reliability of measures Secondary data collection Methods of collecting observations: experiments, surveys, field research, content analysis, and so forth Part 3. Addressing Research Questions Univariate data analysis Bivariate data analysis - discrete variables Bivariate data analysis - continuous variables Multivariate data analysis How to write up results
POPH 5449This will vary with the student’s goals but may include investigation of a production problem on a farm, data collection, defining the problem, determining an appropriate course of action, using diagnostic testing to further define the problem, independent study and literature review, developing a plan of action to address the problem, developing an economic model of the problem and the approach to the solution, writing a report to be presented to the producer, and developing a follow-up strategy to insure the plan is working.
POPH 8160A thorough literature search should be completed using the UGA library system or other appropriate means to obtain information previously reported on the subject matter. Using data collected during "Problems in Poultry Diseases and Parasites" or other case studies or scientific research projects, analyze data using statistical analysis where appropriate and formulate appropriate figures or tables to present data in an understandable fashion. Resulting data should be used to write a manuscript suitable for peer reviewed publication in a scientific journal. This will include title, author(s), abstract, introduction, objectives, materials and methods, results, discussion, conclusions, and references.
PORT 2002 Language Issues: Writing as process, reading for meaning, contrastive cultural topics. The global village and the environment, censorship and freedom, indigenous civilizations, discovery or encounter toward a definition of culture.
PORT 3010 Representative literature including chronicles, short stories, novels, plays, poetry and newspapers. Portuguese colonial influences in Brazil and Lusophone Africa. The role of the media in popular culture. Language similarities and differences between the cultures. Fundamentals of writing research papers. The Function of literary history.
POUL 8120I. Why publish? How writing and publishing builds your career. II. What are the types of scientific literature? III. Where does the publication process begin? Literature review Research plans Protocols Standard operating procedures IV. Getting ready to write: Is your work ready to publish? V. Write an effective title. VI. The form of a manuscript: Write the paper from beginning to end. VII. Cited references: Bibliographic style. VIII. Hints for better writing: Polish your style. IX. Submitting the manuscript: The review process for scientific papers. X. Writing for the popular press on technical subjects. XI. Oral presentations: Form of scientific presentation Tools for presentation XII. Ethics? A discussion of plagiarism, data falsification, and multiple submissions, as well as proper animal care and treatment of human subjects.
PSYC 2990Covered topics may include the following: Theory of Measurement and Quantitative Analysis: Descriptive Analysis Frequency distributions Measures of central tendency Measures of variability Properties of the normal distribution Correlation and regression Inferential Statistics Null hypothesis testing Tests using quantitative variables (e.g., z, t, F, post-hocs and nonparametrics) Tests using qualitative variables Multivariate analysis Report Writing Using APA Guidelines
PSYC 8980Students in this course will read literary cases which have been carefully selected by faculty and by other scholars as especially pertinent to leadership. In addition, they will be expected to discuss these cases in class and to relate them to what they have learned in other University of Georgia courses or in personal leadership experiences, as well as to write short reaction papers, and one personal literary text in which they can be as inventive and imaginative as they like. The cases selected represent a wide spectrum of leadership themes and examples, and they encompass thousands of years of literary history, both fiction and non-fiction, and several literary genres -- e.g., letter, novel, drama, poetry, autobiography. Moreover, they focus on both men and women organizations, political systems, social movements, and community organizations. They also include perspectives that are directly relevant to leadership theories (charisma, transformational theory, situational leadership, servant leadership, "post-industrial" leadership), to critical thinking, to ethics, and to leading groups. In short, they provide a way of surveying the broad spectrum that is organizational leadership. The course is broadly organized around the four "integrative themes": 1. Communication 2. Critical Thinking 3. Values and Imagination 4. Social and Individual Differences
QUAL 84101. Introductions and research interests 2. Interviewing as Research 3. Interview Design and Interpretation 4. Interview Validity and Representation 5. Ethnography and Participant Observation 6. Ethnographic Traditions and Practices 7. Issues in Ethnography 8. Representing Ethnographic Inquiry 9. Documents, Archives, and Artifacts 10. Writing Qualitative Research 11. Research Workshop 12. Narrative Inquiry 13. Research Workshop 14. Research Workshop 15. Class presentations
QUAL 84201. Course overview 2. Getting into data analysis 3. Data analysis: An overview 4. Inductive analysis 5. The role of description in meaning making/Data analysis groups 6. The role of analysis in meaning-making/Data analysis groups 7. Theory and analysis/Data analysis groups 8. Phenomenological approaches to data analysis/Data analysis groups 9. Computer Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis Software 10. Narrative analysis/Data Analysis Groups 11. Ethnomethodological & conversation analytic approaches 12. Writing it up/Data analysis groups 13. Representation of data/Data analysis groups 14. Small Group Presentations
QUAL 85201. Introduction to course and research interviewing 2. Analyzing interviews 3. Your theoretical framework and research design for interview study 4. Overview of research approaches 5. Subjectivities/Bracketing Interview 6. Considerations in research design for interview studies/ 7. Designing Your Individual Interview 8. Kinds of respondents (age, gender, race and ethnicity, sexual orientation, socioeconomic class, nativity, disability, etc.) and their skills and predispositions 9. Interview structures (sequencing, pacing, probing, interpreting) 10. Recording interview data: videotaping, audiotaping, fieldnotes, electronic records 11. In-depth Phenomenological Interviews/Individual Interview Practice 12. Feminist Interviewing 13. Considering transciption conventions 14. Ethnographic Interviews/Introduction to Focus Group Design 15. Focus Group Interview s/ Ethical Issues in Interview Research/Analysis of Interview Data 16. Ethical issues in interviewing 17. Analyzing interview data: emic and etic coding; taxonomies; domains and structures; meanings; componential analysis; themes and patterns 18. Oral History Interviewing 19. Oral History Interviewing/Oral History Interview Practice 20. Oral History Interviewing/Writing It Up 21. Styles of reporting interview research 22. Oral History Interviewing 23. Oral History Project Due (transcription required)
QUAL 85301. Case studies as qualitative research 2. Collecting data in case studies 3. Conducting effective interviews 4. Being a careful observer 5. Mining data from documents 6. Analytic techniques and data management 7. Levels of analysis 8. Dealing with validity, reliability, and trustworthiness of data management 9. Dealing with ethics in case study research 10. Writing reports and case studies
QUAL 8540§ Course Overview § Definitions: What is participant observation? A field study? An ethnography? § Emic and Etic Perspectives § How do you select a site for an ethnography? § What are some things to think about in site selection? § What are the ethical issues involved in choice of sites? § What is the role of culture in ethnographic research? § Levels of participation in the field § What components of culture might we explore in our studies? § Getting Started/Selecting Your Site § Roles and Strategies § What are the possible roles you could play in the site? § How do you determine what role to play? § Can you play different roles in different situations? § What ethical issues might arise in connection with your role as ethnographer? § What data collection strategies are available to you? § What are some ways to write good fieldnotes? § Interpretation and Representation of fieldwork
QUAL 94001. Course introduction and Project Outcome statement due 2. Teaching qualitative research 3. Conference presentations/applying for jobs/vitas: What you need to know Small group bibliographies of methodological readings due 4. Writing proposals Small group bibliographies of theoretical readings due 5. Final Session December Small group lists of key terms, concepts and useful definitions relevant to the research process & research design due 6. Mini-Conference Presentation of this semester’s work Final project due
READ 3530The importance of using reading as a learning tool to further all content The importance of teaching content specific ways to read A general sense of sound literacy theory for working with adolescents Reading practices that work in content areas The range of adolescent readers The ways the cognitive, affective, and sociocultural domains transact The ways curriculum, pedagogy, and assessment transact The ways decoding, comprehension, and meaning making transact The ways culture and prior experience transact with literacy The reading/writing connection Working with struggling readers Rethinking the concept of text Multiliteracies. Critical inquiry pedagogy Technology and adolescent reading
REAL 7300Thesis writing.
REAL 7830I. Background Material Introduction Instructions on how to use the TI BA II Plus calculator Instructions on how to logon to the computer topics Present Value and Mortgage Cash Flow 1.Computer Topic 1-Cash Flow and Present Value 2.Computer Topic 2-Annuities 3.Computer Topic 3-Yield and IRR II. Mortgages Fixed Rate Mortgages, 1.Computer Topic 4-Fixed Rate Mortgages Adjustable Rate Mortgages, 1.Computer Topic 5-Pricing Adjustable Rate Mortgages III. Creative Financing Creative Financing- 1.Computer Topic 6-Refinancing 2.Computer Topic 7-Junior Financing 3.Computer Topic 8-Builder Buy Downs and ZIMs IV. Mortgages on Wall Street Mortgages on Wall Street- 1.Computer Topic 9-Fixed Rate Mortgage Securities 2.Computer Topic 10-Synthetic Securities-IOs and POs 3.Computer Topic 11-Collateralized Mortgage Obligations(CMOs) V. Commercial Mortgages Commercial Mortgages- 1.Computer Topic 12-Commercial Mortgage Analysis and Underwriting 2.Computer Topic 13-Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities Final: Exam is accumulative.
RELI 4001/60011. Introduction: Class logistics (Syllabus, requirements, attendance, etc.) Bible Translations; The Academic Study of Religion 2. The Religions of the Ancient Near East Ethnicity in the Ancient Near East 3. Egyptian Religion 4. Mesopotamian Religion 5. Canaanite Religion 6. Israelite Religion 7. Introduction to the Hebrew Bible Canon & Canonization 8. Modern Approaches to Biblical Study Texts & Versions; The Historical Critical Method (2 principles of interpretation); Source Criticism (Anachronisms in the Pentateuch & the JEDP Hypothesis); Various Critical Methodologies 9. Israel's Ancestors: The Patriarchal Narratives & Backgrounds The Historicity of the Patriarchs?; Patriarchal Religion 10. The Exodus and the Figure of Moses 11. Covenant 12. Joshua and the Emergence of Israel (The "Conquest"/Settlement Question) 13. The Formation of an All-Israelite Epic 14. The Tribal Confederacy: The Book of Judges 15. Samuel and the Transition to Kingship; Saul 16. David 17. The Royal Psalms and the Ideology of Kingship 18 Solomon; The Court History/Succession Narrative 19. The Divided Kingdom; What was the "Sin" of Jeroboam? 20. The Omride Dynasty; Elijah and Elisha 21. The Office of Prophecy 22. Amos 23. Hosea 24. Isaiah; Who is Isaiah’s Immanuel? 25. Micah 26. The Deuteronomistic History (and vaticinia ex eventu) 27. Jeremiah and "The Doom of the Nation" 28. Ezekiel 29. The Priestly Writer 30. Second Isaiah 31. The "Suffering Servant" 32. The Chronicler 33. Haggai and Zechariah 1-8 34. Obadiah, Malachi 35. Joel, Third Isaiah Zechariah 9-14, Protest Literature, and the Beginnings of Apocalyptic 36. Psalms and Poetry 37. Wisdom Literature Proverbs, Ecclesiastes 38. The Book of Job 39. Jonah, Esther & the Hellenistic Period 40. Apocalyptic Literature; The Book of Daniel
RELI 4083/6083I. Socio-historical overview of the Eastern Mediterranean from Alexander to Marcus Aurelius II. Greek and Hellenistic philosophies and religions III. Greco-Roman philosophies and religions IV. Jewish appropriations of Hellenistic and Greco-Roman motifs & concepts A. Philo, Platonic Jewish Philosopher-Apologist B. Josephus, Jewish Historiographer-Apologist C. Stoic motifs in Jewish writings D. Platonic motifs in Jewish writings E. Examples of Jewish Wisdom traditions F. Examples of Jewish Apocalyptic traditions V. Influences upon Early Christianity VI. Course summation and conclusion
RELI 4600/6600I. Gods and Monsters: The Enlightenement Challenge to Belief Figural Imagination, the "Death of God," and Religious Meaning In this section, we discuss the Enlightenment's focus on science and reason and what those mean for religious meaning. We read such texts as Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" or Poe's short stories II. Journey into the Self What constitutes a self? What does it mean to develop the self in the modern world? In this section, we look at modernist and postmodern notions of self. We think about the motif of journey as a way to develop self, and we ask what the challenges to that model of self development in the modern. Ideas of conversion, particularly Augustinian notions of conversion as "turning," and what conversion means are introduced. Texts include such works as Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby" or Toni Morrison's works ("Sula," "Song of Solomon," or "Jaxz." III. The Problematics of Community Community is perhaps the most difficult topic of the course. We look at the West, how one creates community in a postcolonial, post-slavery world. We ask such questions as: What does it take to convert altered space to altared space? What happens when such ritual fails? The texts might include Lee's "To Kill A Mockingbird," Watson's "Montana 1948" or one of Morrison's texts, like "Paradise." IV. Belief in the Modern World. This section looks at a traditional or orthodox thinker/author like Flannery O'Connor and a "non-traditional" thinker like Alice Walker. It is helpful to use writers--like O'Connor and Walker--who are from the same area but who have come to understand what it means to be religious in radically different ways. Such a contrast opens a discussion of what it means to be a religious person in the modern world and how the writer represents faith.
RELI 4615/6615I. Introduction a. The history of Sanskrit b. The place of Sanskrit among the world?s languages II. The writing system a. Writing devanagari b. Reading devanagari III. Grammar and reading This will comprise the rest of the course. Topics include the numerous grammatical features of the language coupled with appropriate reading exercises. Examples of grammar include: the declension of nouns; gender; the passive participle; pronouns; conjugation of verbs; numbers; declensions of adjectives; compounds; verb moods and tense. Reading exercises will be taken from the Hitopadesa, Pancatantra, The Story of Sakuntala, The Story of Sagara and his Sons, and The Bhagavadgita.
RGTR(READ) 01981. Text previewing 2. Test-taking strategies 3. Time management 4. Vocabulary development 5. Passage redundancy 6. Activating prior knowledge 7. Patterns of discourse 8. The four forms of discourse 9. The test-writers' perspective
RLST 28001. Program Planning Group Work 2. Introduction to Lab & Leadership Styles 3. Philosophy & Mission 4. Needs Assessment 5. Communication & Group Management 6. Risk Management & Leadership Techniques 7. Programming for All People 8. Program Planning 9. Goals & Objectives 10. Staffing 11. Policies & Procedures 12. Budgets & Pricing 13. Program Promotion 14. Program Evaluation 15. Program Implementation 16. Writing Comprehensive Program Plan 17. Presentation Instruction 18. Interpreting Evaluation Data
RLST 40401. Introductions 2. Becoming a Therapeutic Recreation Professional: Helping others, communication, behavior management, child/elder abuse 3. Assessments: Interviews & Observations 4. Assessments: Commercial assessments 5. Assessments: Other assessment strategies 6. Facility visit 7. Assessment: Group presentations 8. Planning and documentation: Writing behavioral statements 9. Planning and documentation: Developing treatment plans 10. Medical abbreviations 11. Planning and documentation: Progress notes 12. Implementation: Developing specific programs 13. Implementation: Activity analysis & adaptation 14. Documentation: Group presentations 15. Implementation: Content development 16. Implementation: Process development 17. Evaluation: Program evaluation 18. Evaluation: Clinical outcomes 19. Evaluation: Community re-entry 20. Evaluation: Discharge planning 21. Health care trends: Computer applications, reimbursement issues, standards of practice and protocols, continuing education The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor may be necessary.
RLST 89901. Developing Teaching Strategies 2. Writing Professional Papers 3. Critiquing Research 4. Pursuing External Funding 5. Integrating Research, Service, and Teaching 6. Pursuing Positions after Graduation
RMIN 4000HIntroduction to risk - 1 Risk Identification and evaluation - 2 Property liability loss exposures - 3 Life, health, and loss of income loss exposures - 4 Risk management techniques; no insurance methods - 5 Insurance as a risk management technique: principles - 6 Insurance as a risk management technique: policy provisions - 7 Selecting and implementing risk management techniques - 8 Risk management for auto owners - 13 Risk management for homeowners -15 Loss of life - 16 Loss of health - 17 Retirement planning and annuities - 18 Employee benefits - (19&20) The last week of the class students must give a 10-minute oral presentation on the subject of their 15-page term paper. The class is divided into teams of 2 or 3 students and each team much write a term paper and give an oral presentation with an emphasis on delivery, and visual aids. The paper is supposed to have the content. The presentation is a formal one like one given to a board of directors by an employee. The subject of the term paper must be pre-approved by the professor (me) and be a topic not covered in any detail in class.
RMIN 5510Topic Title 1 Introduction to Personal Financial Planning 2 Time Value of Money 3 Introduction to Life Insurance 4 Net Premiums Life Insurance and Annuities 5 Life Insurance Products 6 Annuities and Optional Benefits 7 Life Insurance Contracts 8 Life Insurance and Annuity Taxation 9 Estate Planning 10 Retirement Planning 11 Investment Planning and Analysis 12 Determining Life Insurance Needs 13 Life Insurance Underwriting 14 Life Insurance Cost Analysis 15 Business Planning
RMIN 5570Topic Title 1 Overview of Insurance Company Operations 2 Marketing and Distribution Systems 3 Underwriting 4 Claims Adjusting 5 Ratemaking 6 Financial Analysis 7 Reinsurance 8 Surplus Lines 9 Lloyd's of London 10 Regulation of Insurers 11 Insurer Accounting
RMIN 9300Dissertation writing.
ROML(LING) 7700-The Proficiency movement and the Role of Context -History of Second Language Teaching -Methods and Strategies -Technology and Language Teaching (audio and video; cinema) -Listening and Reading Comprehension -Oral competency -Teaching Writing; Writing as Process -Evaluation procedures -Teaching Culture -Teaching Literature
ROML(LING) 8000 The topical outline will vary from topic to topic. In keeping with University policies, however, all students will be required to take a final examination. Students will also be expected to write a term paper and/or several shorter papers.
RUSS 1001The following is a representative topical outline for RUSS 1001. Note: Grammar and vocabulary are introduced progressively in connection with specific communicative goals. The same topics may occur more than once within the two-course sequence for Elementary Russian: this allows students to master structures and vocabulary in manageable segments. Each reoccurrence of a topic introduces new details, while also reinforcing material previously covered. 1. Alphabet and pronunciation Greetings and introductions Asking and answering yes-no questions Gender of nouns and possessive modifiers Plurals of masc. and fem. nouns 2. Grammar: Plurals of neuter nouns Common irregular plurals Gender and number for adjectives Question words Word order Intonation and pronunciation (cont.) Thematic areas for the development of speaking skills: Asking where someone lives Finding out someone's identity Making strong contrasts Making introductions/getting acquainted 3. Grammar: Verbs: present tense forms, 1st conjugation Prepositional case of nouns Accusative case of nouns Formation of adverbs Verbs of motion and expressing destinations Subordinate clauses Thematic areas for the development of speaking skills: Asking what someone is doing Asking about someone's occupation Describing a new apartment Discussing a homework assignment Giving and soliciting opinions Asking for directions 4. Grammar: "To have": u + GEN constructions Genitive case of nouns and pronouns Verbs: present tense forms, 2nd conjugation Verbs: Past tense Permission and prohibition Thematic areas for the development of speaking skills: Describing an apartment, discussing problems Making an inquiry over the phone Making plans Discussing knowledge of foreign languages Discussing musical abilities 5. Grammar Prepositional case of modifiers More on irregular plurals Accusative case of modifiers and pronouns Genitive case of modifiers Verbs of motion (cont.) Demonstrative pronouns Relative clauses Thematic areas for the development of speaking skills: Asking where someone studies Clarifying directions Discussing writers Asking where to buy something Ordering food Discussing travel
RUSS 3200Kievan Rus' (9th-12th c.) The creation of the first state The acceptance of Christianity The development of writing in the Russian lands Struggles with foreign powers/invaders The architecture of Kiev and Novgorod The Tatar yoke (13-15th c.) Russian icons The history of Russia's liberation from the Golden Horde The appearance of a new state: Muscovy (15-17th c.) Comparison with Kievan Rus' The architecture of the Moscow Kremlin and other fortifications of this period The end of the Riurikovich dynasty The time of troubles The beginning of the Romanov dynasty The creation and expansion of the Russian empire (18-19th c.) Military victories and the expansion of borders The reforms of Peter the Great The founding of Saint Petersburg The architecture of the new capital, comparison with Moscow The golden age of the Russian nobility; Catherine the Great Establishment of museums, palaces, parks Russian art of the 18th c. Russian art, music and theater in the 19th c.
RUSS 4001(The following is a representative outline. Appropriate texts and other materials illustrating the various topics will be chosen at the discretion of the instructor.) Varieties of language and register Colloquial style Neutral style High style Regional variation Proverbs and sayings Fillers, particles and interjections Conjunctions Verbal etiquette Letter writing Lexical difficulties Paronyms, homonyms False cognates Verbal government Fixed expressions and collocations Syntax of complex sentences, word order
RUSS 4070I. Emigration and migration. Reasons for emigration. Exile as a poetic mode in world literature (Ovid, Dante, Rushdie, Kundera, etc.) II. Occasional emigration from Russia before the 20th century. Forced and voluntary exile. France and Italy as second homelands. Andrei Kurbsky's correspondence with Ivan the Terrible Alexander Herzen Petr Boborykin Nikolai Gogol Ivan Turgenev III. The 1917 Revolution and the First Wave of Emigration from Russia Ivan Bunin and the poetics of nostalgia Vladimir Nabokov as a Russian/American writer Boris Zaytsev Russian literary Paris between the two world wars IV. Unfortunate homecoming: The Soviet government's invitation to Russian emigres to return to the Soviet Union and subsequent repressions. The case of Marina Tsvetaeva. V. World War II and the Second Wave of Emigration. France gives way to America and Israel as the primary destination of emigrants from the Soviet Union. VI. "Refuseniks" and internal emigration. Underground literature and samizdat. Joseph Brodsky VII. The Third Wave of Emigration. Shift from political to economic emigration. Return to Russia. Alexander Solzhenitsyn Vasily Aksyonov Sergei Dovlatov Ruf Zernova Solzhenitsyn's return to Russia and his role as a symbol of Slavophilism. Andrei Makine: a Russian writer's French identity
RUSS 4270(Following is a representative topical outline. Different works or authors may be included at the discretion of the instructor.) Introduction: Historical background; Russian culture before the 20th c., with particular attention to the literature of the 19th c. The Silver Age and the Avant Garde movement of the 1910s and 20s. The totalitarian regime and literature in the Soviet period. Emigre literature. Literature from the Thaw to the period of glasnost' and perestroika and the fall of the Soviet Union. Individual authors and works to be discussed: I. A. Bunin: Biography, works written in Russia and as an emigre. "Light Breathing" A. A. Blok: selected poetry I. E. Babel: "Awakening", "My First Goose" Yu. K. Olesha: "Envy", "Love" A. A. Akhmatova: literary output from the Silver Age to the Thaw; selected poetry, including portions of "Requiem" A. P. Platonov: A genius destroyed by the Soviet regime. "Return" B. L. Pasternak: poetry from the novel "Doctor Zhivago" A. I. Solzhenitsyn: The victory of the writer in the fight against totalitarianism. "Right Hand"
SAMS 54151. Review your exotic pet medicine notes. Review the exotic pet medicine (SAMS 5215) and zoo & wildlife medicine (SAMS 5116) notes, available in the reading room prior to the first day of your rotation. 2. You will be professional in appearance with clean, clinically appropriate smocks, slacks or skirts (no jeans), and shoes. You will strive to keep the hospital professional in appearance by cleaning up after yourself and your patients in the ward, examination rooms, conference room and exercise areas. Your patients will be well cared for and will go home clean. 3. To attend the exotics orientation on the first day of each block change. At this meeting the previous and current block faculty will discuss and allocate cases. 4. You will assume a responsibility role in the management of the patients you see, some of which will be critically ill. After taking a history and performing a physical examination, you will be expected to formulate your own R/O lists, and diagnostic and therapeutic plans in writing prior to approaching the clinician (unless the case is critical) and to carry the plans out once approved by the supervising clinician on the case. You will be sure to search for the results of your plan each day (e.g. laboratory reports, radiographs, ultrasound, surgery, etc) so that you can include these in your SOAP and your plan for the following day. You will strive to manage your cases as effic- iently as possible (for example, you will remember not to feed animals that are scheduled for sedation or radiographic studies, or blood tests that require fasting). You will be well prepared for patient discharges with the instructions and medications ready at the time the client is expected. You will not schedule patient discharges during your receiving time unless directed by faculty. 5. Review schedule of appointments for the following day and be prepared to discuss potential rule-outs and diagnostic proce- dures. 6. You will aarive early enough in the mornings to examine and care for all your patients prior to rounds at 8:00am on weekdays. You should allow 30 minutes per ICU case and 15 minutes per ward case. Your ICU orders will be completed prior to 8:00am each day. You must complete treatments by 9:00am on weekends, at which time clinicians and students will review each case and distribute new emergency cases. You will be on time for receiv- ing your cases and will be willing to take emergency cases. 7. Physical examination of all birds and reptiles should be per- formed with a doctor. Do not examine any venomous or dangerous animal. At least one restrainer per 5' of snake. Beware of being bitten or scratched by any exotic animal. Do not examine any animal that you feel uncomfortable restraining. Use appro- priate handling and restraint techniques for all birds, reptiles, and mammals. 8. You will be sure the cages are appropriately labeled with a completely filled out cage card and treatment sheet. You will write up your admitted patients on the large dry-erase board of impatients. 9. Please ensure that all laboratory tests are properly submitted (ask the techs for assistance if necessary) and in the case of blood please request that any excess blood, serum or plasma is SAVED in case further tests are required. 10. Following case discussion and agreement with the doctor, call the owners of all inpatients to give a progress report before going home. 11. You will SOAP each inpatient's record each day. Daily weights and SOAPs are due by 8:00am on weekdays and 9:00am on weekends. Each active problem with be SOAPed. Problems that are clearly related can be combined (for example, decreased Ca and increased Phosphorus do not have to be SOAPed separately, but can be combined as a specified metabolic bone disease). In most cases, you will begin with a large number of problems and grad- ually see which ones can be combined so that you will work down to one or two major problems. Remember that problems can be historical, physical, or laboratory in origin. Stay focused on your patient as you SOAP. Read textbooks for assistance in assessments, but do not copy information (such as long rule out lists) from textbooks. The content of your record should appli- cable to your specific case. Be sure to include a diagnostic and therapeutic plan for each problem for each day. Tests and treatments you are doing should be boxed and checked off when done. Tests you may want to do should be listed but not boxed. When administering drugs, be sure to include the dose, route, and frequency of administration. Be sure to summarize any client communication that you perform. 12. You will prepare for sit-down rounds as time allows, but usually at 8:15-9:00 every morning and be willing to participate in the discussions. When your case is being discussed, you will bring the record, radiographs and any other pertient information. 13. You will be prepared to present your patients during case rounds. On the first day of presentation, give the signalment, chief complaint of the owner, summery of the history, pertinent physical examination findings and any pertinent diagnostic test results. Summarize the major problems, your major R/O, and your plans for that day. On subsequent days, give the signalment, major problems, and current status of the diagnostic and thera- peutic plans. Please try to be well organized. 14. You will ensure that Kate Grant or another tech prices up all cases, and that the doctor has signed the record and any discharge instructions before taking the client to the cashier. 15. At discharge, you will ensure that your patient's medical records are up to date and that any radiographs, ultrasonograms, and endoscopy video are prepared in advance to show the owner. 16. Copy blood and lab reports to provide to the owner at dis- charge. 17. You are responsible for cleaning your patient's cage during its stay and after discharge. 18. Each blood donor ferret must be physically examined and soaped at least once on every rotation. 19. Evaluation of 10 radiographs from the educational packet housed in radiology. Prepare for cases prior to presenting them to the clinician. Preparation is on your own time. You will present radiographic problem(s), rule-outs and diagnostic/thera- peutic plans. 20. The reading room has all the exotic books available in the reserve section. There are also a number of books in the cup- board to the left of the exam rooms. 21. You will be a "team player" by working well with the care- takers, technicians, and your classmates. You will help your classmates as needed, knowing that many procedures require more than one person. You will keep the number of cases assigned to you up to date on the wipe board in the exotics ward so that the case distribution will be as equitable as possible. If you know you have the fewest cases, you will volunteer to take the next emergency case. 22. You will learn to utilize technical staff effectively and with due consideration. The exotics ward techs can perform and submit most diagnostic tests with you if you discuss the need for these tests with them. They can also perform daytime treatments as long as these are listed on the treatment sheets. The part- time techs are also available to assist you. Learn to make these technicians part of your animal care team. Technicians have the ability to make veterinarians' days much more pleasant! 23. Speak to a staff member if you have any problems, queries or complaints. Unlike most of our patients, we do not bite! 24. Evaluation will be performed based upon your patient records, practical abilities and verbally as appropriate. Evaluation is based on: subject knowledge, the utilization, organization, and content of the problem oriented medical record, ability to iden- tify and solve problems, willingness to participate in sit down rounds, organization and clarity of case rounds, technical abilities, ability to efficiently carry out plans, patient care, ability to relate well to people even in stressful situations, professional appearnace, initiative, enthusiasm, and communi- cation skills. 25. A verbal evaluation will be provided if necessary after the first 2 weeks. A final written evaluation will be completed on the last day of the block and submitted to the Dean's Office. Overall block evaluation is "satisfactory" or "unsatisfactory". In order to receive a "satisfactory" evaluation, the student must perform passing work in each of three major areas: know- ledge and records, technical skills, and professional deportment. 26. Students cannot expect to miss any weekdays without making the days up to receive a grade for the course. On weekends, students should maintain the care of their own patients. 27. Medical records are a legal document and must never be falsified in any manner. All information recorded must be accurate. Once written, no page of a record may be destroyed or discarded. All pages in the record must be dated and clearly and completely identified as belonging to a specific patient.
SAMS 5435Inpatient Responsibilities Instructor assigns any inpatients to individual student. Students are expected to have completed examination of, treatment of, and written SOAPs and orders for their inpatient cases by 8:00am. Students are responsible for treatments and should be able to discuss any patient condition changes, results of diagnostic tests, and changes in treatment plan throughout the day. Students communicate with the owners of all inpatients daily. Students are responsible for writing discharge instructions for their inpatients. Outpatient Responsibilities Receives referred and local patients with skin diseases as scheduled appointments. Students take history, examine the patient, devise a differential diagnoses list, and develop an appropriate work-up and treatment plan for the instructor to review. The instructor and student then examine the patient together. Students are responsible for care of outpatient cases including diagnostic testing, discharge instructions, and client communications, ie. at the time of discharge and subsequent telephone communications. Teaching Rounds Held from 8-9am 2-3 times per week on days determined by the instructor on the service. Rounds are both lecture- and case-based and include cases for the day. Student participaton is expected. Consultations On a daily basis, the dermatology service performs consultations for other services in the small and large animal hospitals. Consultations are initially performed by the students on the dermatology service and then reviewed by the dermatology instructor. Weekend Responsibilities If there are any dermatology inpatients on the weekend, students are responsible for them. Responsibilities include examination, treatments, owner communication, and discharges.
SAMS 54401. Inpatient Responsibilities: On first day of rotation, clinicians present inpatients. For the rest of the rotation, students are expected to have completed examination, tratment, and written SOAPs and orders for inpatients by 8am. Students present updates on inpatients to the service at 8am rounds. Inpatients are the primary rsponsibility of students on the service. Students are exposed to new patients and patients already undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. They should be SOAPed daily and checked throughout the day. Students are responsible for treatments and should be able to discuss any patient condition changes, results of diagnostic tests, and changes in treatment plan throughout the day. Students communicate with the owners of all inpatients daily. 2. Discharge Instructions: Students are expected to write discharge instructions for their inpatients and outpatients. 3. Rounds - Participation in daily case rounds is expected. 8-8:30am Board Rounds - Each morning the service meets to discuss all inpatients and outpatients and create a plan for the day. Teaching rounds - These are held on days/times determined by the instructor on the service. Topics of rounds revolve around cases for the day and student participation is expected. Evening rounds - Each evening the service meets to discuss inpatients and remaining issues concerning outpatients. Students update the rest of the service on the condition of their inpatients and present results of diagnostic testing (bring any test results or imaging to rounds for discussion). Journal Club - On Thursdays at 8:30am, the intern/resident on the service leads a journal club. Presentations - On Friday afternoons, students present 15-20 minute discussions of oncology topics of interest. 4. Outpatient Responsibilities The oncology service receives newly diagnosed cancer patients and patients receiving ongoing therapy: New patients - come as scheduled appointments. Students take history, examine patient, assess patient, and form a preliminary plan. Clinicians review the case and student and a clinician will return to exam room for further review of patient and discussion with owner. Students are responsible for care of new patients including diagnostic testing, treatments, and owner communication, visits, and discharges. Students may also be asked to communicate with referring veterinarians. Ongoing patients are dropped off between 8-9am. They are received by the oncology nurses and admitted to the medicine ward. Following daily board rounds, students examine ongoing patients, evaluate any diagnostic testing, and discuss plan for patient with clinician. Chemotherapy doses should be calculated by students and reviewed by the oncologist on clinics. Radiation patients are treated Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. They may be inpatients or may be dropped off between 8-9am. All radiation therapy patients must have a physical examination prior to anesthesia for treatment. 5. The oncology service receiving schedule is as follows: Monday: 9:30am-11:30am - New Appointments 12:30-1:00pm - Radiation rechecks Tuesday: Chemotherapy Rechecks - Drop off between 8 and 9am Wednesday: 9:30am-11:30am - New appointments 12:30-1:00pm - Radiation rechecks Thursday: Chemotherapy Rechecks - Drop off between 8 and 9am Friday: No Appointments - teaching, work-up, catch up day 6. Chemotherapy & Radiation Therapy Training specific time will be assigned for each student to assist oncology nurses in administration of chemotherapy agents and radiation therapy. In addition, teaching rounds discussing chemotherapy, administration/handling of chemotherapy, and radiation therapy are part of each block. 7. Consultations On a daily basis, clinicians on the oncology service perform a large number of consultations for other services in the hospital and for referring veterinarians. When time permits, consultations may be done as a group for teaching purposes. Students are expected to participate. 8. Weekend Responsibilities It is unusual for the oncology service to have inpatients on the weekend, but if we do, students are responsible for their patients. Responsibilities include examination, treatments, owner communication, visits, and discharges. Students may share weekend duties with others on the service. Clinicians supervise and assist with inpatient care. 9. Grading Students will be evaluated as S/U based on their patient care, participation, and performance during the rotation.
SAMS 54601. Receiving Schedule Appointment schedule will be posted every morning. Newly referred small animal patients will be seen on two days per week (Monday, Wednesday) from 9am-11:30am. Every half hour a new appointment and a recheck appointment will be received concurrently. On the receiving days, large animal appointments are scheduled hourly in the afternoon (1:30,2:30,3:30), and will first be received and clinically examined by the assigned large animal student. The students on the ophthalmology rotation are expected to be present during the large animal appointments. Tuesday and Thursday are surgery days, where no regular appointments will be scheduled. Students need to bring their scrubs and are expected to either assist during surgery or be present in the surgery suite. Fridays, only recheck examinations and CERF (Canine Eye Registration Foundation; screening purebred dogs for inherited eye diseases) examinations are scheduled on a regular basis. The students are expected to have scrubs available for use everyday of the rotation as emergency surgeries are performed as needed on the ophthalmology service. 2. Orientation: Day of the block change an orientation session will be held by the resident or faculty at 9am to demonstrate and discuss the basic ophthalmic diagnostic techniques and to go over the paperwork that has to be filled out by the student. The students are expected to review the material presented in the sophomore ophthalmology lecture course SAMS 5200. 3. Outpatient responsibilities Students introduce themselves to the client, take a short history (case related) and perform basic ophthalmic examination procedures on the patient. The student examination form has to be filled out and a preliminary diagnosis and treatment plan has to be established and discussed with the clinician. The clinician and student will return to the exam room for further review and discussion with the owner. The student might be assigned to write discharge instructions, fill out pharmacy request forms and escort the client to the cashier window. Students are responsible for care of new patients that will stay in the hospital for further diagnostic testing or that will be dropped off for surgery. 4. Inpatient responsibilities Care of inpatients is an important responsibility of students on the service. They are responsible for surgery and anesthesia request forms, treatment sheets, and regular treatments of their patients. Patients should be SOAPed daily and checked throughout the day. Students should be able to discuss any patient condition changes, results of diagnostic tests, and changes in treatment plan throughout the day. Students communicate with the owners of all inpatients daily and they are also responsible for visits and discharges. 5. Weekend and Holiday Responsibilities Occasionally the ophthalmology service has inpatients on the weekend and over holidays, students are responsibile for their patients during this time. Responsibilities include examination, treatments, owner communication, visits, and discharges. Clinicians supervise and assist with inpatient care. The technicians on duty do night treatments; however, the student is responsible for treatment on in house patients not in ICU up until 10:00pm. 6. In house consultations: On a daily basis, clinicians on the ophthalmology service perform a number of consultations for other services in the hospital. When time permits, the consultations are done in the morning or afternoon and students are expected to participate. 7. Large Animal Patients: Students on the ophthalmology rotation have no primary case responsibility for large animal patients. Receiving, treatment and client communication is the responsibility of the large animal student assigned to the case. However, during the examination process and surgery, the small animal students are expected to participate. 8. Rounds Ophthalmology teaching rounds will be held. Topics of the rounds will be determined by the faculty in charge, but is usually a case-based discussion (slides) on ophthalmic cases. During the rotation the students may have to present a case selected by the faculty or will be required to present one or more of the cases they have seen on the rotation. The students may be required to document their cases with the use of digital cameras and present them during rounds. Morning rounds - each morning the service will meet to discuss and examine all inpatients, change treatment plans and creat a plan for the day. Afternoon rounds - depends upon the faculty in charge of the rotation, afternoon rounds will be held to discuss the in-house cases and cases presented to the service during the day. The students will be expected to attend afternoon rounds before going home for the day. 9. Emergency responsibilities Students will be assigned evening and weekend emergency duty. The assigned student will be required to see ophthalmic emergencies (surgical and non-surgical) in both the small animal and large animal hospital. All students on the rotation should come prepared to stay after hours each day until dismissed by the senior faculty or residents on the service. 10. Tests - Students should be prepared for a final examination at the end of each rotation.
SAMS 54651. Inpatient Responsibilities On first day of rotation, clinicians present inpatients. For the rest of the rotation, students are expected to have completed examination of, treatment of, and written SOAPs and orders for inpatients by 8am. Students present updates on inpatients to the service at 8am rounds. Inpatients are the primary responsibility of students on the service. They should be SOAPed daily and checked throughout the day. Students are responsible for treatments and should be able to discuss any patient condition changes, results of diagnostic tests, and changes in treatment plan throughout the day. Students communicate with the owners of all inpatients daily. Night treatments for neurology inpatients are performed by students in conjunction with those on the Internal Medicine rotation. Neurology students are incorporated in the Internal Medicine rotating evening treatment schedule. 2. Discharge Instructions Students are expected to write discharge instructions for their inpatients and outpatients. 3. Rounds 8-8:30am rounds: Each morning the service meets to discuss all inpatients and outpatients and creat a plan for the day. Teaching rounds: These are held on days/times determined by the instructor on the service. Topics of rounds revolve around cases as well as specific topics chosen by the instructors and students. Evening rounds: Each evening the service meets to discuss inpatients and remaining issues concerning outpatients. Students update the rest of the service on the condition of their inpatients and present results of diagnostic testing (bring any test results or imaging to rounds for discussion). 4. Outpatient Responsibilities New patients come as scheduled appointments. Many of the patients evaluated by the neurology service are hospitalized for evaluations however some are outpatients. Students take history, examine patient, assess patient, and form a preliminary plan. Clinicians review the case and student and a clinician will return to exam room for further review of patient and discussion with owner. Students are responsible for care of new patients including diagnostic testing, treatments, and owner communication, visits, and discharges. Students may also be asked to communicate with referring veterinarians. Emergency patients are presented at anytime during the day. If available, students may be asked to evaluate these patients. Students may be asked to participate in after hours surgical emergency cases . 5. The neurology service receiving schedule New appointments and recheck appointments are seen in the AM on Monday-Wednesday No appointments scheduled for Thursday Recheck appointments in the AM on Friday 6. Consultations On occasions, neurology clinicians are asked to evaluate patients on other services. Participation with these consultations is optional. 7. Weekend Responsibilities Responsibilities include examination, treatments, owner communication, visits, and discharges. Students may share weekend duties with others on the service with the permission of the clinicians on duty. Clinicians supervise and assist with inpatient care. 8. Grading Students will be evaluated as S/U based on their patient care, participation, and performance during the rotation.
SAMS 54851. Assume a responsible role in the management of the patients you see, some of which will be critically ill. 2. After taking a history and performing a physical examination, you will be expected to formulate your own R/O lists, and diagnostic and therapeutic plans in writing prior to approaching the clinician (unless the case is critical) and to carry the plans out once approved by the supervising clinician on the case. You will be sure to search for the results of your plan each day (e.g., laboratory reports, radiographs, ultrasound, surgery, etc.) so that you can include these in your SOAP and your plan for the following day. 3. You will strive to manage your cases as efficiently as possible (for example, you will remember not to feed animals that are scheduled for sedation or radiographic studies, or blood tests that require fasting). 4. You will be present for patient discharges and will be well-prepared with instructions and medications ready at the time the client is expected. 5. You will not schedule patient discharges during your receiving or rounds times. 6. You will arrive early enough in the mornings to examine and care for all your patients prior to 8:00am on weekdays and 9:00am on weekends. 7. You should plan 30 minutes per ICU case and 15 minutes per ward case. Your ICU orders will be completed prior to 8:00am every day. Your treatments will be completed by 9:00am on weekends, at which time clinicians will review each case and distribute new emergency cases. Weekend emergency receiving will be scheduled and you will pick up new emergency cases if you are assigned to a specific weekend. 8. You will be a "team player" by working well with the nurses, caretakers, and your classmates. You will help your classmates as needed, knowing that many procedures require more than one person. You will keep the number of cases assigned to you up to date on the dry-erase board in the medicine ward so that the case distribution will be as equitable as possible. If you know you have the fewest cases, you will volunteer to take the next emergency case. 9. You will be professional in appearance with clean, clinically appropriate smocks, slacks or skirts (no jeans) and shoes. You will strive to keep the hospital professional in appearance by cleaning up after yourself and your patients in the ward, examination rooms, conference room and exercise areas. Your patients will be well cared for and will go home clean and groomed. 10. You will be on time for receiving your cases and will be willing to take emergency cases any time on this block. 11. You will be sure your patients have identification collars and that their cages are appropriately labeled with a completely filled out cage card. 12. You will SOAP each inpatient's record each day. SOAPs and TPRs are due by 8:00am on weekdays and 9:00am on weekends. Each active problem will be SOAPed. You will begin with a large number of problems and gradually see which ones can be combined so that you will work down to one or two major problems. Remember that problems can be historical, physical, or laboratory in origin. Read textbooks for assistance in assessments, but do not copy information from textbooks. The content of your record should be applicable to your specific case. Be sure to include a diagnostic and therapeutic plan for each problem for each day. Tests and treatments you are doing should be boxed and checked off when done. Tests you may want to do should be listed but not boxed. When administering drugs, be sure to include the dose (mg/kg and total dosage), route, and frequency of administration. 13. You will contact in-patient clients once daily or as instructed by your supervising clinician. You will be prepared to convey general updating information, such as which diagnostic or therapeutic procedures were completed that day or how the patient is doing. You maintain good communication with your supervising clinician regarding information conveyed to clients. You will record a summary of all client communications in the patient's medical record. 14. You will be prepared to present your patients during case rounds in an organized and time-efficient manner. When you have a case, you will bring the record, radiographs and any other pertinent information. On the first day of presentation, give the signalment, chief complaint of the owner, summary of the history, pertinent physical examination findings and any pertinent diagnostic test results. Summarize the major problem, your major rule-outs, and your diagnostic and therapeutic plans for that day. On subsequent days, give the signalment, major problems, and current status of the diagnostic and therapeutic plans. 15. You will utilize nursing staff effectively. The medicine ward nurses can perform most diagnostic tests for you if you communicate the need for these tests with them. They will perform daytime treatments as long as these are listed on the treatment sheets hanging on each cage door. Learn to make nurses part of your animal health care team. Our nurses are a valuable resource. 16. Evaluation will be done as written comments in your patient records and verbally as appropriate. Evaluation is based on subject knowledge, patient care, the utilization, organization, and content of the problem-oriented medical record, ability to identify and solve problems, participation in rounds, organization and clarity of case presentations in rounds, efficiency in carrying out diagnostic and therapeutic plans, ability to relate well to people even in stressful situations, professional appearance, initiative, enthusiasm, communication skills, and technical abilities. A verbal and written evaluation will be provided after the first 1.5 weeksw. A final written evaluation will be completed on the last day of the block and submitted to the Dean's Office. 17. Students canot expect to miss any weekdays without making the days up to receive a grade for the course. 18. Regarding weekends, all students having cases are expected to come to the hospital and take care of their patients prior to 9am. The current status of the patient and plans for the next 24 hours will be reviewed with the clinician in charge of the case at approximately 9am on Saturday and Sunday. In addition, students assigned to pick up emergency cases must come into the hospital at 9am on Saturday and Sunday to assume care of these emergency transfers. All other students must be available by phone or pager in case the number of emergency transfers requires additional students. If a student needs to be away for a weekend day, that student must seek permission for such from the supervising faculty member well in advance of the weekend day in question. Students should assume that they will have responsibilities to this rotation 7 days a week. 19. Medical records must never be falsified in any manner. All information recorded must be accurate. Once written, no page of a record may be destroyed or discarded. All pages in the record must be dated and clearly and completely identified as belonging to a specific patient. all changes must be initialed and dated. Information deleted should be marked through with a single line. Records always have to be completed. Names of the primary clinician and supervising faculty member responsible for the case should be listed on the case summary.
SOCI 3590I. Choosing and Designing a Fieldwork Project Fitting methods to questions Designing qualitative studies Assessing the validity of qualitative research Assessing ethical risks in participant Observation II. Evidence-collection in qualitative research Participant observation Grounded theory approaches and their critiques Interviewing-structured and unstructured Focus-group interviewing Content analysis Analysis of media, discourse, text and historical materials Analysis of cultural documents Combining qualitative and quantitative analysis III. Data analysis and presentation in qualitative research Grounded theory approaches and their critiques Interpretive approaches Issues of validity, reliability and persuasibility Oral presentations of qualitative research Written presentations of qualitative research Nonwritten presentations of qualitative research IV. Interviewing Structured versus unstructured approaches Group and focus group interviewing Oral history and narrative approaches V. Analysis of text, documents, media and content VI. Analysis of Qualitative Data VII. Writing and Presenting Qualitative Accounts. VIII. The relation of theory to evidence in qualitative research
SOCI 6750I. The Choice and the Logic of a Fieldwork Design Fitting methods to questions Design issues in qualitative research Behavioral versus interpretive approaches Theoretical approaches to fieldwork II. The Development of Fieldwork roles III. Ethical Issues in Fieldwork Cost/benefit analyses Roles of IRB's IV. Participant Observation Selecting a setting Fieldwork roles Grounded theory approaches and their critiques V. Interviewing Structured versus unstructured approaches Group and focus group interviewing Oral history and narrative approaches VI. Analysis of text, documents, media and content VII. Analysis of Qualitative Data VIII. Writing and Presenting Qualitative Accounts.
SOWK 7377Program Development in Human Services A. Steps in Grant Writing -summary -background statement -problem statement -methodology -evaluation -budget -future funding B. Political and Technical Aspects C. "Important Things to Remember" in Proposal Writing 2. Assessing Need in Human Services A. Methods of Need Assessment B. Political and Economic Implications 3. "Request for Proposals" (federal, state, local government, and private funding sources) 4. Budgeting in Human Services A. Analysis of budgeting systems for federal, state, local, and private funding sources; an examination of budget requirements for: Athens/Clarke County Government, H.U.D. Community Development Block Grant Program, Governor's Children's Trust Fund, Patricia Roberts Harris Fellowship Program, and the U.S. Department of Education B. Budget Preparation and Justification 5. Major Revenue Sources for Human Services Organizations A. Fundraising Alternatives B. Identifying Noncash revenue
SPAN 2002 Language issues: Writing as process; Reading for meaning; Contrastive cultural topics: The Global village and the environment; Censorship and Freedom; Indigenous Civilizations; Discovery or Encounter; Toward a Definition of "Culture".
SPAN 4081This class will have a mandatory weekly screening of each film (2 hours per week) and a lecture period (3 hours per week). Students will write weekly reflective papers analyzing the film watched that week supporting their arguments with theoretical readings. A research paper will be required at the end of the semester.
SPAN 4082This class will have a mandatory weekly screening of each film (2 hours per week) and a lecture period (3 hours per week). Students will write reflective papers analyzing the film watched that week supporting their arguments with theoretical readings. A research paper will be required at the end of the semester.
SPAN 6100Important literary texts from the eleventh through the sixteenth century will be examined against their social, cultural and historical backdrops. Of crucial importance will be the tracing of prose writings, lyric poetry, and theatrical works in relation to the profound changes that Castilian and other peninsular societies underwent, first during the Reconquest period and ultimately during the age of imperial expansion.
SPAN 6200Spanish-language writers used many literary modes to reflect upon the changing cultural and political dynamics after 1492. This course will examine a host of writings, including poetry, prose, chronicles and plays, for the purpose of studying the ways that the Spanish world picture changed in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Discussions will take into account recent theoretical insights from various fields, including Golden-Age studies, post-Colonial theory, and Women's studies.
SPAN 6500Writings of Columbus, Fernández de Oviedo, Las Casas, and the Inca Garcilaso, represent just a few of the many important texts that reflect on the encounters between Europeans and Americans during the early-modern era. Of particular interest in this course will be the analysis of how writers used letters, "relaciones", and chronicles to reflect on questions of alterity. Literary theory drawn from New Historicism, post-Colonial studies, and Colonial Spanish American studies will be taken into account in order to contextualize and theorize the many kinds of contact that took place over two centuries after 1492.
SPAN 8500The ever-expanding definition of nationality will be studied through literary texts that focus on women's experiences, the varied ethnic experiences such as Afro-Latin American, Indian and Gypsy, the questions of multiple identities from a Jewish perspective, the creation of gay cultural spaces, and the reclaiming and re-writing of heritage among Latina/o writers in the United States.
SPAN(LING) 4650 Week I. Introduction to basic concepts in the linguistic study of Spanish. Sounds and writing systems. Week II. Phonetic and orthographic alphabets. Languages and dialects. Week III-IV: Phonems, allophones, phonemic phrases, syllabic structure. Week V-VIII: Description and distribution of consonantal sounds. Dialectal variation. Phonetic transcription. Week IX-X: Description of vocalic sounds. Week XI: English and Spanish stress patterns. Week XII: Major Spanish dialects. Week XIII-XV: Sociolinguistics dimension of Spanish variation.
SPCM 7500Survey the most important theories, research findings, and principles of the academic discipline of Training and Development. Examine the major ways in which training is conducted, including the strengths and weaknesses of various training techniques. Study design and presentation of communication training sessions of various lengths ranging from one half hour up to one week. Writing professional-quality proposal to conduct training in a for-profit or non-profit organization or corporation. Study the content, themes, and behavioral objectives of major communication training topics most likely to be useful in organizations. Assessment of the needs of an organization, and the employees within it, can be measured, and be able to conduct a "needs assessment" using appropriate methodology. Review state-of-the-art computer technology to increase training effectiveness. Assess the short and longer term effectiveness of a communication training session using appropriate methodology. The marketing of Communication Trainer, including a strategy for gaining initial experience, effective pricing, and so on. 1. Learn and be able to articulate, using the appropriate specialized terminology, the most important theories, research findings, and principles of the academic discipline of Training and Development. 2. Be able to articulate the major ways in which training is conducted, including the strengths and weaknesses of various training techniques. 3. Be able to design and conduct communication training sessions of various lengths ranging from one half hour up to one week. 4. Be able to write a professional-quality proposal to conduct training in a for-profit or non-profit organization or corporation. 5. Learn and be able to articulate the content, themes, and behavioral objectives of major communication training topics most likely to be useful in organizations. 6. Learn and be able to articulate the major ways in which the needs of an organization, and the employees within it, can be measured, and be able to conduct a "needs assessment" using appropriate methodology. 7. Learn and be able to use state-of-the-art computer technology to increase training effectiveness. 8. Learn how (and be able) to assess the short and longer term effectiveness of a communication training session using appropriate methodology. 9. Be able to articulate a strategy for marketing yourself as a Communication Trainer, including a strategy for gaining initial experience, effective pricing, and so on. 10. Be able to articulate accepted ethical principles that are appropriate for the professional Communication Trainer. Grading: Paper 1 (20%): A short (about 5 page) paper which reviews the literature bearing on an issue within the training and development discipline. Some of the journals (magazines) which should be especially valuable will include Training, Training and Development (Used to be Training and Development Journal), Human Resource Management, Public Personnel Manager, Human Resource magazine, Personnel and Human Resources Management, and Communication Education will be especially useful for this assignment. These papers will be due on Thursday, October 9. Introductory Presentation (15%): A one half hour training session in which you teach the class important communication principles. (Note: All presentations will be videotaped for additional analysis and evaluation.) Paper 2 (25%): A proposal to conduct a substantial (half day or longer) training session. This proposal should include a rationale, a description of objectives, a proposal for a needs assessment, including a description of how the assessment will be conducted, a description of the training techniques to be used, and a methodology for assessing the sessions effectiveness. Major Presentation (40%): OK, you received the job you were after in your proposal (Paper 2). Now present it. You'll have an entire class meeting. Depending on the length of your proposed presentation you may need to present a condensed version of your actual proposal. Attendance and meeting hours: We will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays only, but, in lieu of Fridays, will need to find some additional meeting time so that everyone will have the opportunity to present their "Major" training session. I recognize the difficulty this may present for everyone, and we'll just have to work together to arrange these additional meetings, perhaps meeting daily, or in the evening, for the last week of class, or so. Miscellaneous: Papers are to be typed (word-processed). Reading assignments will generally be given in class to be completed at a subsequent meeting. Regular attendance is expected.
SPCM(JRMC) 76111) Critical-structural analysis of US Health Care System Dissemination of information and services 2) Intercultural issues in health enhancement and information seeking 3) Perspectives on organizing for community advocacy Coalition building 4) Shaping health legislation Public opinion formation Lobbying Case Studies 5) Assessment of community health communication needs 6) Grant development and writing
SPED 30501. Class Participation (10%) The instructor will subjectively award up to 10% of the available points for class participation. The student behaviors considered in awarding these points include attending class regularly and on time, turning in assignments when due, completing work accurately and neatly, coming to class prepared, and actively participating in class discussions. Participation points will be assigned at the end of the semester. Regular attendance is required for all scheduled group activities in that the student is responsible for obtaining all materials, instruction, etc. presented during class. Attendance at all class meetings is stressed because information provided in class will be tested on the midterm and final exams. Not all material covered will be found in the required readings. You are required to inform the instructor in advance of your absence. Failure to do so will result in your not being allowed to make-up any missed class work (quiz, activity). As is the instructor, students are expected to come to class meetings thoroughly prepared. ¡°Thoroughly prepared¡± is defined as having read the readings enough times to verbally and in writing state the definitions of terms from the readings; discuss ideas, notions, concepts, issues, and procedures from the readings; relate the ideas, notions, concepts, issues, and procedures to previous information presented to class or in previous readings; and apply the information from the readings to problems. It also implies the student has reviewed information from previous class meetings. The student should prepare questions when information from the readings is unclear and request instructor clarification in class. 2. Quizzes (25%) At each class meeting, students should be prepared to be tested over all materials assigned and discussed to date. Quizzes are designed to assess students¡¯ mastery of course content and to encourage them to be prepared for class meetings. Questions will be based upon the readings assigned for that class, but also may include review questions over previous readings and lectures. 3. Examinations (Midterm, 30%; Final 35%): A midterm and final examination are scheduled to assess a student's comprehension and application of information covered in SPED 3050. Both exams will consist of two parts: Informational (multiple choice and short answer) section and behavioral program application section. 4. All grading will be done as objectively as possible. In the case of qualitative assessment, evaluation will be based on instructor judgement. Grades are assigned based on the assumption that the grade of B represents satisfactory performance (80%). The grade of A represents outstanding performance. Both grades are indicative of competence in the principles and practices in designing individualized learning programs and in the management of the behaviors of exceptional students. It should be kept in mind that most students will perform satisfactorily. Accordingly, not everyone will receive an ¡°A¡± grade. A=90% of total possible points B=80% of total possible points C=70% of total possible points D=65% of total possible points F=below 65% possible points 5. he assignment of an incomplete ("I") grade is discouraged and will be assigned only in cases of extreme emergencies and in cases where a passing grade (C) may be earned. It is the student's responsibility to notify the instructor when such circumstances exist. Upon notification, a contract between the student and instructor will be developed before the last week of the semester for completion of the course.
SPED 5400Course Requirements: Class attendance and participation - Students are expected to attend and participate fully in a professional manner in all scheduled class meetings and discussions. Effective collaborative skills are learned through collaborative interactions and reflection. Assigned readings should be read in preparation for the session for which they are scheduled. At least five classes will begin with a quick write in which you will respond to a question or issue based on that day's assigned reading. (15 points) Team observations - Each student will observe two team meetings. These may include SST, IEP, IFSP,ITP, or parent teacher conferences. Using direct observation, and interview, team functioning will be analyzed and described. Reports should include: 1. A general description of the team (roles, layout, time constraints etc.) 2. Functional description (type of team structure, developmental stage, etc.) 3. Critique of communication styles observed. 4. Summary of your perception of team functioning based on data collected. Team observations first must be negotiated by the student with their supervising teacher then cleared by Dr. Vail. No specific identifying information should be disclosed regarding the school, professionals involved or students. Reports should be 3-5 pages, typed, double spaced. (20 points; 10 points per report) Peer coaching - Students placed at the same school for their SPED 4100L will be paired to coach each other on 2 occasions during their practicum experience. Peer coaching outlines will be distributed in class. (15 points) Family visit & Log - Students will be paired with families of a child with a disability, two students per family. The goal of this assignment is to understand the everyday experiences associated with parenting a child with a disability. About 6 hours over the course of 3 visits that are convenient to the family should be scheduled. You are to participate in whatever the family is doing at the time (shopping, home routine, recreational activity, etc.) You are to participate in activities to the extent that you and the family feel comfortable. You should not be left alone with the person with disabilities. Your goal is to observe family interactions and informally learn from the family through dialogue. After each visit reflect and write in your log about what you did with the family and what you learned from the family that may help you to become a more responsive teacher. Be sure to incorporate course content from readings and discussion into your reflection. (15 points) Collaborative Group Project - Students will work in teams of 4 or 5 members to develop and present a notebook of information related to collaboration that extends and complements course content. Topical areas may include: information and strategies in working with specific cultural groups; effective strategies and activities in working with general education teachers; effective ways to involve families in the school process; effective methods for supervising paraprofessionals, etc...) Students should reflect and journal (to be described next) about the collaborative team process and individual progress. Groups will be given time in class (Friday sessions) to meet. Each member should be active participants in developing of the product and in the class presentation. Information should be carefully documented and useful to others. (15 points) Reflective Journal - Reflective journals are a critical component of the course and should have entries on a weekly basis (minimum). These journals should focus on collaborations that are observed or experienced in field placements as well as during in class group meetings. Students should track personal goals in the area of collaboration with progress made over the semester. Journal entries should synthesize your field based experiences with class discussion & readings. Your last entry should focus on your assumptions or principles about working with families (5 assumptions) and others collaboratively (5 assumptions). These must incorporate your beliefs along with course discussion and readings. (20 points) ****All assignments must be typed double spaced. Journals should be available for collection each Monday. Assignments will be graded according to completeness, synthesis of readings and course content along with personal reflection, organization, grammar and spelling.
SPED 7010Class 1 8-23 Introduction and overview of the course. Module 1 8-30 and 9-6 Decision making, SST, eligibility, referral process, basic assessment considerations and measures for determining intelligence. Module 2 9-13 Mild Intellectual Disabilities: Definitions, eligibility in the state of Georgia, assessment considerations, assessment tools commonly used to determine mild intellectual disabilities, common strategies and objectives for students with mild intellectual disabilities. Module 3 9-20 and 9-27 Learning Disabilities: Definitions, eligibility in the state of Georgia, assessment considerations, assessment tools commonly used to determine learning disabilities, and common strategies and objectives for students with learning disabilities. Module 4 10-4 and 10-11 Emotional/Behavioral Disorders, Severe Emotional Disturbance and Social Maladjustment: Definitions, eligibility in the state of Georgia, assessment considerations, assessment tools commonly used to determine emotional/behavioral disorders and severe emotional disturbances, and common strategies and objectives for students with emotional/behavioral disorders. Module 5 10-18 Autism, Other Health Impaired, Orthopedic Impairments and Traumatic Brain Injury: Definitions, eligibility in the state of Georgia, assessment considerations, and assessment tools commonly used to determine eligibility. Fall break October 26 and 27 Module 6 11-1 Functional Behavioral Assessments and Behavioral Intervention Plans What are they? Why are they important? How do you do them? What do you do with the results? Module 7 11-8 Communicating results with parents, students, teachers and administrators. Module 8 11-15 Developing comprehensive, longitudinal individualized programs based on assessment results. Module 9 11-22 Assessing young children (3-5 year olds); Assessing students for the purpose of developing transition plans (14 years old through 21 years old). Module 10 11-29 Pulling it all together! Presentation of final projects: 11-29 and 12-6 FINAL PROJECT: You will complete a battery of assessments for a student who is being referred for consideration of special education needs or is already identified as a student with a disability that needs re-evaluation. Be prepared to present your final project to the class during the last two weeks of the semester (November 29th and December 6th). You will write a report that follows the format that we will discuss in class. In general it will include: Identifying information: Name (do not use child's full or real name) DOB Grade level Age Sex Date(s) of testing Date of report Reason for referral: Explain reasons for assessment List specific questions to be addressed Summarize behaviors that led to referral for assessment Background information: Summarize the individual's developmental and academic history Family: current family constellation, pertinent information about parent education, etc. Educational: individual's current educational situation Developmental: report milestones as reported by family Medical: provide any known relevant medical history Behavior observations: Summarize the individual's behaviors during the assessment session (i.e., development of rapport, establishing eye contact, response to types of tasks/ different times of day, persistence, attentiveness, etc.) Include a statement concerning validity of results Tests and procedures used: List full name of all instruments Describe any informal assessment procedure(s) Assessment results: Style of reporting results may vary depending on the types of assessments you have used and the purpose of the overall evaluation Summary and conclusions: Integrate assessment results by making note of overall level of performance on areas assessed Recommendations: Suggest instructional strategies and modifications that are appropriate for regular classroom use as well as any other environments that a placement committee may determine is appropriate for the student you evaluated Suggest goals and objectives that are appropriate for this student based on your evaluation results
SPED 7100Read ALL assigned readings and case readings. READINGS SHOULD BE COMPLETED BY THE DATE LISTED ON THE CLASS SCHEDULE. Case story readings will be given out one week before the story is to be discussed in class. Come to class prepared to discuss assigned reading materials Complete 3 mini-assignments related to the case stories. I will provide the format for each mini-assignment at least one week before they are due. ASSIGNMENTS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED AFTER THE END OF CLASS PERIOD FOR WHICH THEY ARE LISTED WITHOUT PRIOR APPROVAL OF THE INSTRUCTOR Participate in planning and conducting a comprehensive community screening effort to identify preschoolers who may have special needs. Screening will take place in Madison County, GA on a Saturday. Any student that is unable to attend this Saturday screening will meet with the instructor for prior approval of an alternative project. At the same time as another class participant, observe an infant/toddler (0-2 years) and a preschooler (3-5 years) engaging in play activities for a minimum of 30 minutes for each child. Maintain a detailed continuous written record of child behaviors throughout the observation period. Individually interpret and summarize your observations (5 pts) Then, with your partner, compare observation, reconcile differences, and write a collaborative summary of observations (5 pts, 2-4 pages) Participate in planning and conducting a transdisciplinary play- based assessment Use and critically evaluate commercially available assessment tools (1 standardized, 1 curriculum based) for infants and /or preschoolers. Prepare 3-5 page summary including description, critical evaluation, report of results, and interpretation of results. Address the utility of instrument for program planning. You present your information in class. Make sure at least one tool is used with a 0-2 year old and one is used with a 3-5 year old. You may choose to work with a partner in this assignment. Synthesize TPBA results in a written report. Include objective for program planning.
SPED 7120I. Completion of 10 Modules Each module will take approximately 12 hours to complete. The modules include some of the following activities, and these activities should be done in the following order during each module. Assigned Readings--nongraded; One or more reading chapters, web-based readings, and/or additional hard-copy readings is assigned in each module. Also, each student is required to read all materials which are posted to the class bulletin board during each module. These postings should be considered assigned readings and completed prior to chatroom discussion participation. Students should anticipate a minimum of 4 hours of readings and study assignments per module. Video Review: Video segments on selected topics are available on videotape for several of the modules. These must be viewed during the module where they are assigned during the course. These activities will be discussed during the chatrooms. This is a nongraded assignment. When video review is required in a module, students should allocate between 30 minutes and 120 minutes of viewing time. Module Activities: Specific activities are described in each module. These may be involve worksheets, article reviews, reflective thought questions, position papers, reports on web- sites, structured interviews, book reports, assessments, checklists, etc. One or two activities may be required during any particular module, and each will be graded on a scale of 100 total possible points. Each of these will comprise 10% of the final grade. Students should anticipate spending between 3 and 7 hours on module assignments in each module. Short Answer Quizzes. Short Answer and/or multiple choice quizzes are required throughout the course. These are not directly included in a student's course grade, but the instructor will review performance by each student on each assessment, and consider each student's performance in assigning a grade for class participation. Chatroom Discussions. When a chatroom discussion is required during a particular module, a minimum of two scheduled times will be available. Each student must participate in one of those discussions. Students are required to complete all reading assignments and review any material which is posted to the class bulletin board, prior to participation in a chatroom discussion. These discussions will generally be discussions on the assigned readings or the material on the bulletin board. Participation in the chatroom discussions will be considered as one part of the student's participation grade (see grading section below). Chatrooms are scheduled for 2 hours each. II. Completion of A Course Project Each student must complete a project for this course. Students may choose from the project options below. This selection will be made by the third module of the course. During modules 4 through 9, students should anticipate spending a minimum of 3 hours in each module on the course project. For students completing one of the group projects, every member of the group will be assigned the same grade. During the third course module, each student, or each group of students who are jointly developing a group project, will develop a one page (typed and double spaced) prospectus of the project, which is to include as much detail about the proposed project as possible. The Instructor will review these and inform the students if the proposed project is acceptable. The final project will count 30% of the course grade, whereas the initial prospectus itself is an ungraded assignment. The final projects are due on August 10, 2000. A Videotape Development Project Option. Since many teachers have video development options within their school, the development of a videotape demonstration of a specific instructional approach or tactic for students with learning disabilities is one project option. This may be either an individual or a group project. These videotapes must be "finished product" videotape segments from 4 to 15 minutes in length, consisting of a description of a teaching strategy or assessment strategy useful for students with learning disabilities, a demonstration of the tactic with one or more children with learning disabilities in a school setting, and a debrief of the tactic by the teacher. Written instructions (i.e. one to two pages) on how other teachers may implement the tactic must also be developed. Emphasis should be placed on expanding the situations for which a tactic may be used. You must also provide to the instructor permissions from all persons in the video for subsequent educational use. Software Development Option. Development of software to facilitate the use of a specific instructional procedure may serve as one project option. These may be either a group or an individual project, and a great deal of latitude will be given for this project, in view of the rather broad parameters which software development may entail. Other Project Options: The instructor will review other project options which may be based on projects which are on- going within the student's school district. These may include review of a particular curriculum in view of the learning characteristics associated with a learning disability, extensive reviews of newly developed assessment procedures, or other projects from the local district. The Term Paper Option. Development of a term paper is a final option for students who cannot develop other project options. This must be an individual effort. A student will select a specific defensible thesis in a particular topic area, and prepare a review of the literature in that area. The finished paper must conform to APA writing standards, and include 20 pages of text. At least 20 separate research sources for each review will be required. Participation and Grading Each student will be graded on participation, which will include work in the chatroom discussions, overall success on the quizzes, the routine e-mail with the instructor, and all instructional interactions. This will count 10% of the final course grade. Grades for every graded assignment will be awarded on a 100 point basis and then converted to the weighted score for the course grade. The final course grade will be calculated as follows. Module Assignments 60% of the course grade. Chatroom Participation 10% of the course grade. The Course Project 30% of the course grade. 93 and above = A; 85 to 92 = B; 75 to 79 = C; 70 to 74 = D; Below 70 = F
SPED 7200Percent of final grade Assignment 25% 1. Research Paper Research and write scholarly paper on topic of your choice related to course. Paper should incorporate at least 10 references and should be written using APA style. Paper length may range from 12-20 pages. You will present information related to your paper in class. Papers due 5/25. 10% 2. Program Visit Each class participant is required to visit one preschool program; if possible, one that serves young children with and without disabilities. The visit should last about one hour in length. Information and impressions gained through this visit should be documented on program observation forms (see attached). Information about the various program visits will be presented orally. A 1-2 page typewritten description of the program and completed observation forms must be turned in by __. 10% 3. Planning and Facilitating Play/Activity-Based Instruction In conjunction with the McPhaul Center, you will be assigned to a class that includes young children with disabilities. You will collaborate with the classroom teacher in planning for and facilitating ABI (using routines, child directed play and teacher directed activities) including evaluation and monitoring of individual child benchmarks. 50% 4. Mid-term and Final Exams 5% 5. Class Participation Come to class prepared to actively participate in group activities and discussions. Note: Assignments are due at the beginning of the specified class period or before. Five points will be subtracted for each day that an assignment is late.
SPED 72101. Quizzes (20% of Grade) Students should be prepared to complete a quiz at each class meeting. The quiz will cover material from the readings for that date, but will also include all information covered since the beginning of the course. Information and application questions will be provided. One quiz will be dropped at the end of the quarter. 2. Professional Participation (10% of Grade) Students, as noted earlier, must come to each class session thoroughly prepared. "Thoroughly prepared" is defined as (a) stating the concepts, principles, and procedures described in the readings, (b) relating concepts, principles, and procedures from current readings to previous readings/discussions, and (c) applying the concepts, principles, and procedures to old and new problems. Students will be evaluated at each session, and instructor's professional judgement will be used to determine this portion of students' grade. At the end of each class meeting, the instructor will assign one of the following ratings: "Exceptional," "Professional," or "Marginal." Behaviors which receive each rating are described below. Exceptional - Questions and comments that are relevant to the topic, greatly clarify issues/topics being discussed, and stimulate a line of relevant discussion. Questions which cite data or other authors are important here. Listening is also required. This rating is rarely given. Professional - Topic relevant questions and comments, but ones that do not necessarily clarify issues/topics being discussed, and do not necessarily stimulate a line of relevant discussion. Listening is also required. Marginal - Repetitious comments, experience- oriented comments, over generalizations, wandering from the topic, evidence of lack of preparation, monopolizing the discussion, and/or lack of participation in the discussion. Students will also be evaluated on their preparedness at student-instructor conferences. 3. Informational Examination (35% of Grade) Students will have two opportunities to demonstrate informational competence on the material covered in the course: Final Examination #1: April 3 Required Final Examination #2: May 4 Optional All students are required to take the final examination the first time it is offered. Students who are not satisfied with their performance may retake the final exam (different form) during final week. The score earned on the last exam taken will be recorded and used to calculate the student's course grade. The final exam is divided into two parts. Part I will be a series of short answer questions that assess the learner's acquisition of principles and procedures related to the design, implementation, evaluation and modification of instructional programs. Content tested will come directly from required readings and seminar discussions. Part II of the examination will assess the learner's ability to generalize these instructional design principles and procedures to a specific case by designing an instructional program. This part of the exam will require the learner to conceptualize and outline major sections of an instructional program based on the presenting problem. The learners will have a choice of cases from which to select. 4. Instructional Program (35% Course Grade) All students are required to design an instructional program based on errorless learning discrimination principles and procedures. This program will address a skill appropriate to the target student's level of functioning and IEP goals and objectives. At minimum, the program must formatively evaluate the target learner's acquisition of a conditional discrimination within the context of a multiple baseline or multiple probe single subject research design. The purpose of this component of the course is for the student to demonstrate competence in: 1. Writing an errorless learning program designed to teach a child with disabilities a functional skill. (i.e., conditional discrimination). 2. Implementing the instructional program. 3. Objectively evaluating the effectiveness of the instructional program. 4. Writing the results of the instructional program in accordance with APA (1994) publication guidelines. 5. Presenting and defending the project to the seminar. Beginning the week of students will be required to meet with the instructor. During this initial conference you will be required to submit an outline of your project which should include a description of students setting, materials, procedures for selecting target behavior(s), and baseline and instructional procedures. It is recommended that you refer to Appendix B, Instructional Program Design Variables, as you write your program outline and final write-up. Sufficient information should be presented in both the outline and write-up to permit replication. At the initial conference you should bring a type written copy of the program outline for the instructor. In subsequent conferences, you should bring your program outline, graphic display(s) of the data, and a "log" of any observations during the implementation of the instructional program. Your preparedness will be evaluated and considered in the "Professional Participation" component of the course.
SPED 7240I. One abstract and presentation of article related to the chosen project. The abstract is not to exceed 4 typewritten, double-spaced pages (12 point font). A. Abstracts on experimental articles should include a description of the following elements: 1. Purpose of the study. A one or two sentence description of the goal of the intervention. 2. Participants. The number, gender, ages, accompanying labels, and any relevant test scores. 3. Target behavior(s). Operational definitions of the behavior(s) measured. 4. Data collection procedures. Schedules, observers, and types. 5. Intervention procedures. Contingencies, instructions, description of procedures, participants' roles, etc. 6. Experimental design. Group, single-subject type, or case-study. 7. Results. Quantitative and/or qualitative findings. 8. Conclusions. Those made by author(s) and yourself. Limitations and future research should also be addressed. B. Abstracts on non-experimental articles, such as project reports or models, should address: 1. The purpose of the project/model 2. The participants (if any) 3. The activities/components of the projects/models 4. The outcomes (if any) 5. The conclusions of the author(s) and yourself. 6. Limitations and future directions for research should be included. II. An in-class presentation and student-lead discussion of the above abstracted article. III. One take-home midterm examination. IV. One major project, the topic of which will be selected by the student from numerous options (presented in class). An APA style write-up of the project is required. V. An in-class presentation of the major project. VI. Participation in all class meetings is important. Related readings are to be completed prior to each class meeting. Discussion questions are to be prepared for each assigned reading.
SPED 7250COURSE REQUIREMENTS Each student must develop and hand in a portfolio of all work assigned and graded. Attached to the end of this course syllabus is a progress chart to help all students to keep track of their work assignments. This chart must be stapled to the inside of each student’s portfolio. The following assignments will make up a student’s total grade. MASTER STUDENTS 1. Review of phonological and orthographic measures: 100 points Each student will review two phonological and two orthographic measures provided. A critique of the assessment measure must follow A critique handed out in class. 2. Quizzes: Four quizzes will be administered throughout the quarter. Each quiz will be administered the first part of the class it is assigned. 3. Standardized Test Administration: Each student will administer the OWLS (written expression) test, the WJ- III (Word Attack, Letter Identification, Passage Comprehension, Spelling Patterns, and Story Recall). Guide-lines will be handed out in class for the administration and scoring procedures. 4. Informal Indices: Each student will choose an age/ability level to develop informal indices to evaluate the reading and writing abilities of students at that level. The areas of decoding, reading comprehension, spelling, syntax, text structure and sense of audience must be included. Guide- lines will be handed out in class for the construction of all indices. 5. Final Examination: An in-class exam will be given the assigned day of finals. Each student Will have a choice of one casestudy from a selection of three to analyze And provide the following information: __ assessment of sample (using indices created in #4) __ identification of case writer’s strengths/weaknesses __ identification of appropriate instructional strategies __ identification of accommodations (low technology) __ identification of assistive technology Student may bring any resources to class to help during the examination.
SPED 7460Internship Activities and Evaluation Policies and Procedures Notebook Activities: This notebook is to be compiled by the intern within the first two weeks of the first day of the internship, and shall include sections for the written policies and procedures (with accompanying forms) in the categories of prereferral, parental and student notifications, referral, assessment, IEP, placement, evaluation, and discipline. Evaluation: The presence of written policies, procedures and accompanying forms for each area above. Student Profiles and Assessment Activities: The intern will read the files of all students served in the classroom, and conduct assessments on at least three students. Standardized, informal, criterion-referenced, curriculum-based and functional assessments will be administered to help determine present levels of functioning. Decisions about specific assessment tools to be administered will be made by the student intern and supervisor(s). This information is to be compiled into a student profile (using a pseudonym) for each student assessed. The profiles must be typed and organized to include the following elements: Demographic information including a pseudonym, grade level, chronological age, parental information ¨ Relevant medical information ¨ Services received through special education, general education, and related services ¨ Levels of functioning in math, language arts, speech, all other academics, vocational skills ¨ Social skills, excessive behaviors ¨ Motivational factors, reinforcement survey ¨ Familial issues Evaluation: The presence of complete information on each of the above elements. IEP Development Activities: Student interns will develop Individualized Education Plans for two students with learning disabilities during the semester. Each IEP should include: Present level of performance, annual goals and short-term objectives, the special education and related services that will be provided and the extent to which the child will participate in general education programs, plans for starting the services and the anticipated duration of the services, plans for evaluating whether the goals and objectives are being achieved, and, if appropriate, a transition plan. Informal and/or formal assessments should be administered to complete each IEP and, if possible, feedback from the parents or guardians of the studen the semester. Lesson plans are to be developed for each observation, including the criteria below. Evaluation of Lesson Plans: Lesson plans will be evaluated within the following format. Leadership Project: Activities: Students will develop a leadership project in either advocacy or inclusion. For either area, the intern is to prepare an outline of the proposed activities, including (a) rationale, (b) the goal(s) of the project, (c) a detailed description of the planned activities to meet the goal(s), (d) the method for evaluating the outcomes with respect to the goal(s), and (e) implications for future. The intern should design this project with the assistance of the supervisor and cooperating teacher. Examples of projects include: Developing and implementing an in-service for teachers to enhance their understanding of behavioral disorders; initiating a co-teaching approach that involves general education teachers and students and students with behavioral disorders in a joint project (e.g., service learning, mentoring); and developing an inservice for general education teachers in the area of strategies to improve academic success. Evaluation: The project outline will be evaluated by the supervisor and supervising teacher. The final write up of the project shall be 10-15 pages, including references and APA style. The written project shall be evaluated with respect to a- e above.
SPED 9300I. Research Questions A. Problem Statement & Relevency B. Research Questions vs. Non-Research Questions C. Hypothesis Formulation II. Review of Literature A. Professional B. Creation of Evidence Based Arguments C. Delineating Parameters of the Review III. Writing the Methods Section A. Formulating/Selection of Research Design B. Scientific Requirements (Reliability/Validity) C. Presentation/Justification of Research Design IV. Results and Discussion Section A. Stating Results Without Overstating Results B. Discussion Section Relating Current Research to Literature
STAT 7700Students learn how to elicit information from other members of a project team, formulate a statistical analysis of the problem, implement statistical software packages, write a report, and make oral presentations. The need for this course stems from the department's concern that our graduate students have opportunities to gain an appreciation of real world applications of statistics. For international students with visa restrictions, an internship position can provide such an educational experience . This course should be repeatable since a second internship with the same company has value as well as a second internship with a new company. Also the credit hours for the course should be flexible so that a student if need be can be full time by enrolling in this course only.
TELE 3110Writing and writing formats for radio, television, cable television, motion pictures, short films, corporate videos, and the worldwide web; generating, developing, and writing original ideas; analyzing and critiquing writing for the electronic media; careers in writing for the electronic media.
TELE 3110HWriting and writing formats for radio, television, cable television, motion pictures, short films, corporate videos, and the worldwide web; generating, developing, and writing original ideas; analyzing and critiquing writing for the electronic media; careers in writing for the electronic media.
TELE 4110/61101. Creative ideas for screenplays 2. Narrative strategies 3. Pitching story ideas 4. Film theories 5. Writing treatments that sell 6. Story structures 7. Character construction and development 8. Theories of subjectivity 9. Writing dialogue 10. Theories of dialogic interaction 11. The business of writing for the screen – agents, producers, and directors 12. Peer reviews and critiquing practices 13. Rewriting and polishing 14. Analyzing the completed screenplay
TELE 5550Subjects to be covered include finding, diagraming and pitching stories, broadcast news writing basics, news conference coverage, interviewing basics, basic broadcast news ethics, telling stories through people, the use of graphics, police and court reporting and visual story telling.
TELE 5570-5570LThis course will deal with both the processes and values associated with broadcast news writing and producing. Specifically, it will deal with broadcast style, ethics, values, conventions and deadlines. It will also look at TV news show producing as far as organizational structure, forms, conventions, temporal restraints, network news feed systems, news acquisition and processing and presentation. All of these things are couched in the framework of broadcast news organizational methods.
TELE 5580/7580-5580L/7580LBroadcast news practicum: producing the television news program; use of digital cameras; writing for broadcast; videography and video editing (both linear and nonlinear); creation and effective use of broadcast graphics; responding to deadlines; ethical issues and professional standards for broadcast news; career development.
TELE 5590/7590-5590L/7590LBroadcast news practicum: producing the television news program; use of digital cameras; writing for broadcast; videography and video editing (both linear and nonlinear); creation and effective use of broadcast graphics; responding to deadlines; ethical issues and professional standards for broadcast news; career development.
TXMI 4540/6540Introduction Writing Assignment Due (WAD); Historical Perspective Map Quiz; Historical Perspective WAD; Development of International Trade Map Quiz; Twentieth Century Saga WAD; General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade Map Quiz: GATT WAD; Post WWII changes Map Quiz; Textile Trade in the last half of the 20th century WAD; Overview of the US textile complex Map Quiz; The Multifiber Arrangement (MFA) WAD; GATT Rounds - Kennedy, Tokyo, Uruguay Map Quiz; The Legislative Battles; NAFTA, Carribean Basin, Subharan Africa WAD; Structures for Managing Trade First Course Quiz The World Trade Organization; Problems of the WTO Map Quiz; The Textile Complex WAD; A look at Japan, South Korea and Taiwan Map Quiz; A look at Philippines, Indonesia, Thailand Map Quiz; Vietnam, Sri Lanka, others in SE Asia, Europe and Central America Map Quiz; India and Pakistan WAD; China Map Quiz; China WAD; 2005 and the future Second Course Quiz
TXMI 59011. Resume Writing 2. Job Interview 3. Professional Dress 4. Company Research 5. Past Interns' Presentations
UNIV 1105-Parts of speech -Elements of a sentence -Verbals and phrases -Clauses -Using subordination for better style -Fused sentences, comma splices, fragments -Punctuation: Commas, semi-colon, dash -Quotations -Pronouns: agreement, case, reference -Subject-Verb agreement -Mechanics: apostrophes, capitalization -Dangling and misplaced modifiers -Parallelism -Levels of language-use of slang -Capabilities of the grammar checker Students write and edit a short academic paper.
UNIV 1106-Business letter format, audience analysis -Business style, grammar and mechanics -Letter of introduction/application -Letter of complaint or response to complaint -Memo format -Outlines and headings -Technical description or process paper (instructions) with visuals (diagrams, illustrations) -Computer Visuals: Create Excel charts -Writing effective e-mail; sending attachments; listservs -The problem-solving/recommendation report -The research report: Using the Internet for information Summarizing and critiquing articles and web sites Proposals Documentation Oral presentations, PowerPoint.
UNIV 1115-Prewriting strategies -Quoting and paraphrasing -Grammar, with a focus on the editorial failure errors of ENGL 1101 -Effective organization of an essay -Effective content (providing evidence, selecting evidence from reading) Students write six to eight essays applying the principles taught in the course.
UNIV 1116· Analyzing your professor's academic tasks · Reading and thinking like your professor · Using strategies to maximize your concentration and comprehension · Using techniques to improve the quality of your class notes · Using techniques and strategies to help you monitor and self-test · Predicting questions and solving problems · Finding a test preparation strategy that works for you · Building a logical study plan · Learning how to evaluate your academic performance and to modify techniques when necessary · Understanding the writing process
UNIV 1117-Grammar topics: · Verbs: tenses, modals, use of passive · Nouns: singular and plural, count and noncount, possessives · Articles · Pronouns · English sentence structure, sentence order, and sentence boundaries · Connectors, conjunctions, and transitions · Noun clauses and adjective clauses · Gerunds and infinitives · Parallel structures · Conditional sentences -Composing American-style academic paragraphs -Composing American-style academic papers (students will write several short papers during the semester or will work on one or two longer papers for a course in their major) -Vocabulary development (approximately ten vocabulary assignments)
UNIV 2201-Exploring student interests for research projects -Analyzing examples of academic research papers-format, academic conventions, writer's voice, and prose style -Analyzing and differentiating popular and scholarly resources-matching resource to purpose and audience -Orientation to the UGA Main Library's services and hard-copy resources -Using GIL, GALILEO, and specialized online databases -Evaluating information on the Internet and World Wide Web -Gathering resource materials and compiling a working bibliography -Avoiding plagiarism & using appropriate documentation and citation styles for the student's academic discipline -Workshops on drafting and revising; individual conferences -Final draft of research paper due NOTE: Order of topics and number of assigned papers vary depending on instructor.
UNIV 2202-Grammar topics: · Verbs: tenses, modals, use of passive · Nouns: singular and plural, count and noncount, possessives · Articles · Pronouns · English sentence structure, sentence order, and sentence boundaries · Connectors, conjunctions, and transitions · Noun clauses and adjective clauses · Gerunds and infinitives · Parallel structures · Conditional sentences -Vocabulary development (approximately ten vocabulary assignments) -Writing in one's discipline (students will write one paper or report addressed to general readers and one paper or report addressed to specialized readers in their field) -Editing papers in one's major (students will have four or five conferences with the instructor for guidance with editing papers they are working on in their major field or their thesis or dissertation)
UNIV 2203- Analyzing and understanding assignments for papers in various courses - Exploring and focusing a paper topic, generating content, doing research, and planning the paper - Considering the rhetorical situation of a writing assignment - Drafting, receiving feedback, and revising - Mastering one's error patterns, learning grammar rules, and learning effective editing strategies - Students will write six to eight papers, revising them extensively.
VARB 54501. The student will learn interviewing skills by observation and actual practice. 2. The student will learn how to conduct a behavioral exam. 3. The student will practice using presenting history and behavioral exam to come to a diagnosis of the cause of the behavior problem. 4. The student will gain experience in writing treatment plans and discharge instructions. 5. The student will practice communicating with and educating clients regarding management and treatment of their pet. 6. The student will learn how to locate information on animal behavior through library and internet search systems.
VARB 7720Increased activity in taking the behavioral history, including teaching senior veterinary students how to take the history. Expanded experience with direct assessment of various species of behavior patients, including dogs, cats, parrots, horses, rabbits, rats and other species as presented. Continue to study the interpretation of visual and auditory communication in dogs, cats, parrots, horses, rabbits, rats and other species as presented. Continue to study the treatment of behavior problems, including the use of psychoactive medications, operant conditioning techniques, environmental management, desensitization and counter-conditioning techniques. Continue to study ethical and legal issues in the treatment of companion animals with behavior problems, especially aggressive pets. Increased responsibility for case management, under faculty supervision. Instruction of senior veterinary students both in the hospital and in rounds. Independent study of normal behavior of domestic animals and the diagnosis and treatment of behavior problems in companion animals, in preparation for sitting the ACVB board examination. Select cases to be written as formal case reports for the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists. Write one formal case report for submission to a journal. Decide on a research topic for a clinical research project, and carry out the project. Attend continuing education courses in behavior and related fields offered to graduate veterinarians through the College of Veterinary Medicine. Attend lectures and seminars in clinical behavior offered by University of Georgia faculty and visiting faculty. Make a presentation in resident rounds. Present lectures in VARB 5240 (Veterinary Animal Behavior, 5200 (Equine Behavior), 5210 (Small Animal Behavior) and 5220 (Studies in Applied and Domestic Animal Behavior).
VIET 1002Week 1: Dialogue 15 Verb forms Week 2: Dialogue 16 New vocabulary Quoc ngu Topical structure Week 3: Dialogue 17 New vocabulary Structure Week 4: Dialogue 18 New vocabulary Grammar: Past Week 5: Dialogue 19 New vocabulary Grammar: Future tense Week 6: Dialogue 20 New vocabulary The Passive Voice Week 7: Dialogue 21 New vocabulary Idioms Week 8: Dialogue 22 New vocabulary Reading Exercises Week 9: Dialogue 23 New vocabulary Tone exercises Week 10: Dialogue 24 New vocabulary Time Week 11: Dialogue 25 New vocabulary Vocabulary expansion Week 12: Dialogue 26 New vocabulary Sentence building Week 13 Dialogue 27 New vocabulary Tone plays Week 14: Dialogue 28 New vocabulary Nom writing Week 15: Review
VPHY 7300 Students will be expected to write original ideas, problems addressed, and answers found to specific questions through research conducted with guidance of the instructor, and assistance of a graduate committee. Students are expected to properly organize and present thoughts including proper references to germane literature, methods, data obtained, appropriate statistical analyses, and conclusions. All or part of the thesis may be completed within the quarter. Writing may consist of manuscripts of publication or drafts of material to be incorporated in the thesis. Frequent communication with the major professor, drafts, manuscripts, and/or the complete thesis will provide the basis for evaluating student performance by the major professor.
VPHY 9300 Students will be expected to write original ideas, problems addressed, and answers found to specific questions through research conducted with guidance of the instructor and assistance of a graduate committee. Students are expected to properly organize and present thoughts including proper references to germane literature, methods, data obtained, appropriate statistical analyses, and conclusions. All or part of the dissertation may be completed within the quarter. Writings may consist of manuscripts for publication or drafts of material to be incorporated in the dissertation. Frequent communication with the major professor, drafts, manuscripts, and/or the complete dissertation will provide the basis for evaluating student performance by the major professor.
WIPP 7001I. Review of the Writing in the Disciplines/Writing across the Curriculum movement: its goals and founding principles. II. The critical thinking/student engagement/writing link. III. How to analyze and teach the writing conventions of your discipline. IV. The writing process and how to intervene to help students. V. How to create syllabi and assignments that support WIP principles. VI. How to teach students to revise work with an attention to global issues such as content, focus, development, and arrangement. VII. How to develop responding/grading criteria VIII. How to respond to student writing effectively. IX. How to conference with students. X. How to teach peer review and use it effectively in your class. XI. How to work productively with WIP faculty; how to provide professional and exceptional support. XII. Writing productivity and your own writing processes. XIII. How to teach students to revise for clarity, conciseness, and correctness.
YORB 3990The topical focus of the course will be developed along the academic (and other) interests of the students but attention will be paid to: - The Yoruba World view incorporating knowledge of the language, culture, and society - Yoruba oral traditions - Yoruba (literary) writings: traditional and modern - Application of readings to Yoruba and Nigerian societies
YORB(AFAM) 2010Class activities will be organized around a core of grammatical and functional topics that will include but will not be limited to: - Feelings and emotions - Direct and indirect questions - Conditionals - Simple serial verb formations - Repetition and reduplication - Adverbs and adverbial expressions - Yoruba music and songs - Tense variations - Comparatives and superlatives - Personal names and titles - Means and their preparations - Simple proverbs and poems - Weekly Course Outline will be provided as well as the assignments and exercises for the week and their due dates. - The readings will be distributed throughout the course, and taken mainly from Nigerian/Yoruba textbooks, newspapers and creative writings.
ZULU 3990Class activities will be organized around a core of grammatical and functional topics that will include but not be limited to: - IsiZulu music and Songs - Tense variations - Proverbs and poems The readings will be distributed throughout the course, and taken mainly from IsiZulu textbooks, newspapers and creative writings.
ZULU(AFAM) 2001Students will enhance communications skills in Zulu through oral exercises, reading and writing assignments, language laboratory exercises, tests and examinations. Among the topics address will be: Social communication skills in Zulu; Zulu grammar and agreement systems; Zulu concepts of time marking; Nouns and related agreement systems; Adjectival and adverbial agreement systems; Storytelling techniques.
ZULU(AFAM) 2002Students will enhance communications skills in Zulu through oral exercises, reading and writing assignments, language laboratory exercises, tests and examinations. Students will continue to work in areas addressed in ZULU(AFAM) 2001, including: Social communication skills in Zulu; Zulu grammar and agreement systems; Zulu concepts of time marking; Nouns and related agreement systems; Adjectival and adverbial agreement systems; Storytelling techniques.
ZULU(AFAM) 3001The focus of the course is on the development of advanced skills in the use of colloquial and formal Zulu. Among the topics addressed are: Complex grammatical structures; Complex lexical formations; Semantic clusters and corresponding cultural designations; Pragmatics; Text Analysis; Survey of literary works; Dominant literary forms in Zulu writing; Zulu poetics.
ZULU(AFAM) 3002The focus of the course is on the development of advanced skills in the use of colloquial and formal Zulu. Among the topics addressed are: Complex grammatical structures; Complex lexical formations; Semantic clusters and corresponding cultural designations; Pragmatics; Text Analysis; Survey of literary works; Dominant literary forms in Zulu writing; Zulu poetics.